pdf viewer in asp net c# : Add jpg to pdf preview application control cloud windows azure .net class postgresql-9.4-A49-part3016

Chapter 3. Advanced Features
Awindow function call always contains an
OVER
clause directly following the window function’s
name andargument(s). This is what syntacticallydistinguishes it from a regular function or aggregate
function. The
OVER
clause determines exactlyhow the rows of thequery are split up for processing by
the window function. The
PARTITION BY
listwithin
OVER
specifies dividingthe rows into groups, or
partitions, that share the same values of the
PARTITION BY
expression(s). For each row, the window
function is computed across the rows that fall into the same partition as the current row.
You can also control the order in which rows are processed by window functions using
ORDER BY
within
OVER
.(The window
ORDER BY
does not even have to match the order in which the rows are
output.) Here is an example:
SELECT depname, empno, salary,
rank() OVER (PARTITION BY depname ORDER BY salary DESC)
FROM empsalary;
depname
| empno | salary | rank
-----------+-------+--------+------
develop
|
8 |
6000 |
1
develop
|
10 |
5200 |
2
develop
|
11 |
5200 |
2
develop
|
9 |
4500 |
4
develop
|
7 |
4200 |
5
personnel |
2 |
3900 |
1
personnel |
5 |
3500 |
2
sales
|
1 |
5000 |
1
sales
|
4 |
4800 |
2
sales
|
3 |
4800 |
2
(10 rows)
As shown here, the
rank
function produces a numerical rank within the current row’s partition for
each distinct
ORDER BY
value, in the order defined by the
ORDER BY
clause.
rank
needs no explicit
parameter, because its behavior is entirelydetermined by the
OVER
clause.
The rows considered by a window function are those of the “virtual table” produced by the query’s
FROM
clause as filtered by its
WHERE
,
GROUP BY
,and
HAVING
clauses if any. For example, a row
removed because it does not meet the
WHERE
condition is not seen by any window function. A query
can contain multiple window functions that slice up the data in different ways by means of different
OVER
clauses, but they all act onthe same collection of rows defined by this virtual table.
We already saw that
ORDER BY
can be omitted if the ordering of rows is not important. It is also
possible to omit
PARTITION BY
,in which case there is just one partition containing all the rows.
There is another important concept associated with window functions: for each row, there is a set of
rows within its partition called its window frame. Many (but not all) window functions act only on
the rows of the windowframe, rather than of the whole partition. By default, if
ORDER BY
is supplied
then the frame consists of all rows from the start of the partition up through the current row, plus any
following rows that are equal tothe current row according to the
ORDER BY
clause. When
ORDER BY
is omittedthe default frame consists of all rows in the partition.
1
Here is an example using
sum
:
SELECT salary, sum(salary) OVER () FROM empsalary;
salary |
sum
--------+-------
5200 | 47100
5000 | 47100
1. There are options to define the window frame in other ways, but this tutorial does not cover them. See Section 4.2.8 for
details.
18
Add jpg to pdf preview - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add photo to pdf form; how to add jpg to pdf file
Add jpg to pdf preview - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add jpg to pdf form; add picture to pdf preview
Chapter 3. Advanced Features
3500 | 47100
4800 | 47100
3900 | 47100
4200 | 47100
4500 | 47100
4800 | 47100
6000 | 47100
5200 | 47100
(10 rows)
Above, since there is no
ORDER BY
in the
OVER
clause, thewindow frame is the same as the partition,
which for lack of
PARTITION BY
is the whole table;in other words each sum is taken over the whole
table and so we get the same result for each output row. But if we add an
ORDER BY
clause, we get
very different results:
SELECT salary, sum(salary) OVER (ORDER BY salary) FROM empsalary;
salary |
sum
--------+-------
3500 |
3500
3900 |
7400
4200 | 11600
4500 | 16100
4800 | 25700
4800 | 25700
5000 | 30700
5200 | 41100
5200 | 41100
6000 | 47100
(10 rows)
Here the sum is taken from the first (lowest) salary up through the current one, including any dupli-
cates of the current one (notice the results for the duplicated salaries).
Window functions are permitted only in the
SELECT
list and the
ORDER BY
clause of the query. They
are forbidden elsewhere, such as in
GROUP BY
,
HAVING
and
WHERE
clauses. This is because they
logically execute after the processing of those clauses. Also, window functions execute after regular
aggregate functions. This means it is valid to include an aggregate function call in the arguments of a
window function, but not vice versa.
If there is a need to filter or group rows after the window calculations are performed, you can use a
sub-select. For example:
SELECT depname, empno, salary, enroll_date
FROM
(SELECT depname, empno, salary, enroll_date,
rank() OVER (PARTITION BY depname ORDER BY salary DESC, empno) AS pos
FROM empsalary
) AS ss
WHERE pos < 3;
The above query only shows the rows from the inner query having
rank
less than 3.
When a query involves multiple window functions, it is possible towrite out eachone with a separate
OVER
clause, but this is duplicative and error-prone if the same windowing behavior is wanted for
several functions. Instead, each windowing behavior can be named in a
WINDOW
clause and then
referenced in
OVER
.For example:
19
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to JPEG in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB PowerPoint to JPEG converter library will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg. Add references:
how to add an image to a pdf in preview; how to add picture to pdf
C# Word - Convert Word to JPEG in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET Word to JPEG converter library will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg. Add references:
add image to pdf form; how to add a picture to a pdf document
Chapter 3. Advanced Features
SELECT sum(salary) OVER w, avg(salary) OVER w
FROM empsalary
WINDOW w AS (PARTITION BY depname ORDER BY salary DESC);
More details about window functions can be found in Section 4.2.8, Section 9.21, Section 7.2.4, and
the SELECT reference page.
3.6. Inheritance
Inheritance is a concept from object-oriented databases. It opens up interesting new possibilities of
database design.
Let’s create two tables: A table
cities
and a table
capitals
.Naturally, capitals are also cities, so
you want some way to show the capitals implicitly when you list all cities. If you’re really clever you
might invent some scheme like this:
CREATE TABLE capitals (
name
text,
population real,
altitude
int,
-- (in ft)
state
char(2)
);
CREATE TABLE non_capitals (
name
text,
population real,
altitude
int
-- (in ft)
);
CREATE VIEW cities AS
SELECT name, population, altitude FROM capitals
UNION
SELECT name, population, altitude FROM non_capitals;
This works OKas far as queryinggoes, but it gets ugly when you need toupdate several rows, for one
thing.
Abetter solution is this:
CREATE TABLE cities (
name
text,
population real,
altitude
int
-- (in ft)
);
CREATE TABLE capitals (
state
char(2)
) INHERITS (cities);
In this case, a row of
capitals
inherits all columns (
name
,
population
,and
altitude
)from its
parent,
cities
.The type of the column
name
is
text
,a native PostgreSQL type for variable length
20
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
from multiple image formats such as tiff, jpg, png, gif a PDF document in C#.NET using this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
adding images to pdf files; how to add a jpeg to a pdf file
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Support various formats image deletion, such as Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other bitmap Remove Image from PDF Page Using C#. Add necessary references:
add image field to pdf form; adding image to pdf form
Chapter 3. Advanced Features
character strings. State capitals have an extra column,
state
,that shows their state. In PostgreSQL,
atable can inherit from zero or more other tables.
For example, the following queryfinds the names of allcities, including state capitals, that are located
at an altitude over 500 feet:
SELECT name, altitude
FROM cities
WHERE altitude > 500;
which returns:
name
| altitude
-----------+----------
Las Vegas |
2174
Mariposa
|
1953
Madison
|
845
(3 rows)
On the other hand, the following query finds all the cities that are not state capitals and are situated at
an altitude over 500 feet:
SELECT name, altitude
FROM ONLY cities
WHERE altitude > 500;
name
| altitude
-----------+----------
Las Vegas |
2174
Mariposa
|
1953
(2 rows)
Here the
ONLY
before
cities
indicates that the queryshould be run over only the
cities
table, and
not tables below
cities
in the inheritance hierarchy. Many of the commands that we have already
discussed —
SELECT
,
UPDATE
,and
DELETE
—support this
ONLY
notation.
Note: Although inheritance is frequently useful, it has not been integrated withuniqueconstraints
or foreign keys, which limits its usefulness. See Section 5.8 for more detail.
3.7. Conclusion
PostgreSQL has manyfeatures not touched upon in this tutorialintroduction, which has been oriented
toward newer users of SQL. These features are discussed inmore detailin the remainder of this book.
If you feel you need more introductory material, please visit the PostgreSQL web site
2
for links to
more resources.
2. http://www.postgresql.org
21
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Support various formats image deletion in Visual Studio, such as Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff VB.NET: Remove Image from PDF Page. Add necessary references:
add picture to pdf file; add image pdf
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
Supported image formats, including Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other bitmap VB.NET DLLs: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in PDF Page. Add necessary references:
adding image to pdf; add an image to a pdf with acrobat
II. The SQL Language
This part describes the use of the SQL language in PostgreSQL. We start with describing the general
syntax of SQL, then explain how to create the structures to hold data, how to populate the database,
and how to query it. The middle part lists the available data types and functions for use in SQL
commands. The rest treats several aspects that are important for tuning a database for optimalperfor-
mance.
The information in this part is arranged so that a novice user can follow it start to end to gain a full
understandingof thetopics withouthavingtorefer forward too many times. Thechapters areintended
to be self-contained, so that advanced users can read the chapters individually as they choose. The
information in this part is presented in a narrative fashion in topical units. Readers looking for a
complete description of a particular command should see Part VI.
Readers of this partshouldknowhow to connect toa PostgreSQLdatabase andissueSQL commands.
Readers that are unfamiliar with these issues are encouraged to read Part I first. SQL commands are
typically entered using the PostgreSQL interactive terminal psql, but other programs that have similar
functionality can be used as well.
C# Word - Insert Image to Word Page in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Excel, VB.NET Add references: page = docx.GetPage(0); REImage image = new REImage(@"C:\logo2.jpg"); page.AddImage
acrobat add image to pdf; how to add image to pdf document
C# PowerPoint - Insert Image to PowerPoint File Page in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB.NET Add image to PowerPoint file page using C# GetPage(0); REImage image = new REImage(@"C:\logo2.jpg"); page.AddImage
how to add photo to pdf in preview; add signature image to pdf acrobat
Chapter 4. SQL Syntax
This chapter describes the syntax of SQL. It forms the foundation for understanding the following
chapters which will go into detail about how SQL commands are applied to define and modify data.
We also advise users who are already familiar with SQL to read this chapter carefully because it
contains several rules and concepts that are implemented inconsistently among SQL databases or that
are specific toPostgreSQL.
4.1. Lexical Structure
SQL input consists of a sequence of commands. A command is composed of a sequence of tokens,
terminated by a semicolon (“;”). The end of the input stream also terminates a command. Which
tokens are valid depends on the syntax of the particular command.
Atoken can be a key word, an identifier, a quoted identifier, a literal (or constant), or a special
character symbol. Tokens are normally separated by whitespace (space, tab, newline), but need not
be if there is no ambiguity (which is generally only the case if a special character is adjacent to some
other token type).
For example, the following is (syntactically) valid SQL input:
SELECT
*
FROM MY_TABLE;
UPDATE MY_TABLE SET A = 5;
INSERT INTO MY_TABLE VALUES (3, ’hi there’);
This is a sequence of three commands, one per line (although this is not required; more than one
command can be on a line, and commands can usefully be split across lines).
Additionally, comments can occur in SQL input. They are not tokens, they are effectively equivalent
to whitespace.
The SQL syntax is not very consistent regarding what tokens identify commands and which are
operands or parameters. The first few tokens are generally the command name, so in the above ex-
ample we would usually speak of a “SELECT”, an “UPDATE”, and an “INSERT” command. But for
instance the
UPDATE
command always requires a
SET
token to appear in a certain position, and this
particular variation of
INSERT
also requires a
VALUES
in order to be complete. The precise syntax
rules for each command are describedin Part VI.
4.1.1. Identifiers and Key Words
Tokens such as
SELECT
,
UPDATE
,or
VALUES
in the example above are examples of key words, that
is, words that have a fixed meaning in the SQL language. The tokens
MY_TABLE
and
A
are exam-
ples of identifiers. They identify names of tables, columns, or other database objects, depending on
the command they are used in. Therefore they are sometimes simply called “names”. Key words and
identifiers have the same lexical structure, meaning that one cannot know whether a token is an iden-
tifier or a key word without knowing the language. A complete list of key words can be found in
Appendix C.
SQL identifiers and key words must begin with a letter (
a
-
z
,but also letters with diacritical marks
and non-Latinletters) or an underscore (
_
). Subsequent characters in an identifier or keyword can be
letters, underscores, digits(
0
-
9
), or dollar signs (
$
). Notethatdollar signsarenot allowedinidentifiers
according to the letter of the SQL standard, so their use might render applications less portable. The
24
Chapter 4. SQL Syntax
SQL standard will not define a key word that contains digits or starts or ends with an underscore, so
identifiers of this form are safe against possible conflict with future extensions of the standard.
The system uses no more than
NAMEDATALEN
-1 bytes of an identifier; longer names can be written
in commands, but they will be truncated. By default,
NAMEDATALEN
is 64 so the maximum identifier
lengthis 63bytes. If this limitis problematic, it canbe raisedbychanging the
NAMEDATALEN
constant
in
src/include/pg_config_manual.h
.
Key words andunquoted identifiers are case insensitive. Therefore:
UPDATE MY_TABLE SET A = 5;
can equivalentlybe written as:
uPDaTE my_TabLE SeT a = 5;
Aconvention often used is to write key words in upper case and names in lower case, e.g.:
UPDATE my_table SET a = 5;
There is a second kind of identifier: the delimited identifier or quoted identifier. It is formed by en-
closing an arbitrary sequence of characters in double-quotes (
"
). A delimited identifier is always an
identifier, never a key word. So
"select"
couldbe used torefer to a columnor table named “select”,
whereas an unquoted
select
would be taken as a key word and would therefore provoke a parse
error when used where a table or column name is expected. The example can be written with quoted
identifiers like this:
UPDATE "my_table" SET "a" = 5;
Quotedidentifiers cancontainanycharacter, except the character with codezero. (Toincludea double
quote, write two doublequotes.) This allows constructingtable or columnnames that wouldotherwise
not be possible, such as ones containing spaces or ampersands. The length limitation still applies.
Avariant of quoted identifiers allows including escaped Unicode characters identified by their code
points. This variant starts with
U&
(upper or lower case Ufollowed byampersand) immediatelybefore
the opening double quote, without any spaces in between, for example
U&"foo"
.(Note that this
creates anambiguity withthe operator
&
.Use spacesaroundthe operator to avoidthis problem.) Inside
the quotes, Unicode characters can be specified in escaped form by writing a backslash followed by
the four-digit hexadecimal code point number or alternatively a backslash followed by a plus sign
followed by a six-digit hexadecimal code point number. For example, the identifier
"data"
could be
written as
U&"d\0061t\+000061"
The following less trivial example writes the Russian word “slon” (elephant) in Cyrillic letters:
U&"\0441\043B\043E\043D"
If a different escape character than backslash is desired, it can be specified using the
UESCAPE
clause
after the string, for example:
U&"d!0061t!+000061" UESCAPE ’!’
25
Chapter 4. SQL Syntax
The escape character can beanysingle character other thana hexadecimal digit, theplus sign, asingle
quote, a double quote, or a whitespace character. Note that the escape character is written in single
quotes, not double quotes.
To include the escape character in the identifier literally, write it twice.
The Unicode escape syntax works only when the server encoding is
UTF8
.When other server encod-
ings are used, only code points in the ASCII range (up to
\007F
)can be specified. Both the 4-digit
and the 6-digit form can be used to specify UTF-16 surrogate pairs to compose characters with code
points larger than U+FFFF, although the availability of the 6-digit form technically makes this un-
necessary. (Surrogate pairs are not stored directly, but combined into a single code point that is then
encoded in UTF-8.)
Quoting anidentifier also makesit case-sensitive, whereas unquotednames are always foldedtolower
case. For example, the identifiers
FOO
,
foo
,and
"foo"
are considered the same by PostgreSQL, but
"Foo"
and
"FOO"
are different from these three and each other. (The folding of unquoted names to
lower case in PostgreSQL is incompatible with the SQL standard, which says that unquoted names
should be folded to upper case. Thus,
foo
should be equivalent to
"FOO"
not
"foo"
according to the
standard. If you wantto write portable applications you are advised to always quote a particular name
or never quote it.)
4.1.2. Constants
There are three kinds of implicitly-typed constants in PostgreSQL: strings, bit strings, and numbers.
Constantscan also be specified withexplicittypes, which can enablemore accurate representationand
more efficient handling by the system. These alternatives are discussed in the following subsections.
4.1.2.1. String Constants
Astring constant in SQL is an arbitrary sequence of characters bounded by single quotes (
), for
example
’This is a string’
.To include a single-quote character within a string constant, write
twoadjacent singlequotes, e.g.,
’Dianne”s horse’
.Notethat this is not the same asa double-quote
character (
"
).
Two string constants that are only separated by whitespace withat least one newline are concatenated
and effectively treated as if the string had beenwritten as one constant. For example:
SELECT ’foo’
’bar’;
is equivalent to:
SELECT ’foobar’;
but:
SELECT ’foo’
’bar’;
is not valid syntax. (This slightly bizarre behavior is specified by SQL; PostgreSQL is following the
standard.)
26
Chapter 4. SQL Syntax
4.1.2.2. String Constants with C-style Escapes
PostgreSQL also accepts “escape” string constants, which are an extension to the SQL standard.
An escape string constant is specified by writing the letter
E
(upper or lower case) just before the
opening single quote, e.g.,
E’foo’
.(When continuing an escape string constant across lines, write
E
only before the first opening quote.) Within an escape string, a backslash character (
\
)begins a
C-like backslash escape sequence, in which the combination of backslash and following character(s)
represent a special byte value, as shown in Table 4-1.
Table 4-1. Backslash Escape Sequences
Backslash Escape Sequence
Interpretation
\b
backspace
\f
form feed
\n
newline
\r
carriage return
\t
tab
\
o
,
\
oo
,
\
ooo
(
o
=0 - 7)
octal byte value
\x
h
,
\x
hh
(
h
=0 - 9, A - F)
hexadecimal byte value
\u
xxxx
,
\U
xxxxxxxx
(
x
=0 - 9, A - F)
16 or 32-bit hexadecimal Unicode character
value
Any other character following a backslash is taken literally. Thus, to include a backslash character,
write two backslashes (
\\
). Also, a single quote can be included in anescape string by writing
\’
,in
addition to the normal way of
.
It is your responsibility that the byte sequences you create, especially when using the octal or hex-
adecimal escapes, compose valid characters in the server character set encoding. When the server
encoding is UTF-8, then the Unicode escapes or the alternative Unicode escape syntax, explained in
Section4.1.2.3, should be used instead. (The alternative would be doing the UTF-8 encoding byhand
and writing out the bytes, which would be very cumbersome.)
The Unicode escape syntax works fully only when the server encoding is
UTF8
.When other server
encodings are used, only code points in the ASCII range (up to
\u007F
)can be specified. Both the
4-digit and the 8-digit form can be used to specify UTF-16 surrogate pairs to compose characters
with code points larger than U+FFFF, although the availability of the 8-digit form technically makes
this unnecessary. (When surrogate pairs are used when the server encoding is
UTF8
,they are first
combined into a single code point that is then encoded in UTF-8.)
Caution
If the configuration parameter standard_conforming_strings is
off
,then Post-
greSQL recognizes backslash escapes in both regular and escape string con-
stants. However, as of PostgreSQL 9.1, the default is
on
,meaning that back-
slash escapes are recognized only in escape string constants. This behavior
is more standards-compliant, but might break applications which rely on the
historical behavior, where backslash escapes were always recognized. As a
workaround, you can set this parameter to
off
,but it is better to migrate away
from using backslash escapes. If you need to use a backslash escape to rep-
resent a special character, write the string constant with an
E
.
In addition to
standard_conforming_strings
,the configuration parameters
escape_string_warning and backslash_quote govern treatment of backslashes
in string constants.
27
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested