pdf viewer in asp net c# : Acrobat add image to pdf Library application component asp.net html winforms mvc b7cf1a5379ba7dc098844798bb6c8b712edfc4f30-part306

African Journal of International Affairs, Vol. 7, Nos. 1&2, 2004, pp. 167–180
© Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa, 2006
(ISSN 0850-7902)
Reforms and Industrial Development
and Trade in East Africa:
The Case of Tanzania
Stephen M. Kapunda*
Abstract
The objective of this discussion is to critically examine the performance of the
industrial and trade sectors in the context of the East African Community (EAC).
It has been shown that the industrial performance has some direct impact on trade
and that Tanzania’s trade shares to EAC are still low. Furthermore, despite the
recent impressive performance of the industrial sector, there are traditional and
competitive challenges to the sector. The paper therefore concludes by providing
policy recommendations.
Résumé
L’objectif de cette discussion est d’examiner sous un oeil critique les performances
des secteurs de l’industrie et du commerce, dans le contexte de la Communauté
Est-Africaine (CEA). Il a été démontré que la performance industrielle a un impact
direct sur le commerce et que la part commerciale de la Tanzanie au sein de la CEA
reste faible. En outre, malgré la récente bonne performance du secteur industriel, il
subsiste d’anciens défis concurrents au niveau de ce secteur. Cet article conclut en
fournissant des recommandations de politique publique.
Introduction
The pre-reform period in Tanzania was in the main guided by policies
based on African Socialism (Ujamaa) in terms of the 1967 Arusha Dec-
laration. Such strong ideological emphases were absent in the other
East African Community Countries. The differences in ideology was
* Department of Economics, University of Dar-es-Salaam. Currently at Department of Eco-
nomics, University of Botswana, Private Bag 0022, Gaborone, Botswana.
9. Kapunda2.PMD
23/05/2006, 11:57
167
Acrobat add image to pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
how to add an image to a pdf file in acrobat; how to add image to pdf document
Acrobat add image to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add image to pdf file; how to add a photo to a pdf document
168
AJIA 7: 1&2, 2004
probably one of the factors which contributed to the disintegration of
the East African Community in 1977.
The economic crisis of the early 1980s shook the region’s economic
performance, including  industrial development and trade. In Tanza-
nia, the impact was exacerbated by the aftermath of the war with Uganda
– a short-term domestic phenomenon. This resulted in the decline in
GDP, an acute shortage of goods and inputs, and an unsatisfactory
performance of industrial and other productive sectors as discussed in
the subsequent section. The first effort to manage the crises was the
1981 National Economic Survival Programme (NESP) followed by the
1982 Structural Adjustment Programme (SAP). Effective reforms, how-
ever, started in 1986 with a series of economic recovery measures guided
by IMF/World Bank. These led to effective market reforms and privati-
sation.
The performance of the economy and the industrial sector in par-
ticular fluctuated with changing policies and crises. Industrial commodity
trade also tended to follow the fluctuations.The objective of this article
is to examine critically the industrial and trade sectors’ performance in
the context of EAC. The emphasis is on the period after the introduc-
tion of reform.
Market Reforms and Industrial Development
in Tanzania
Background Information
The Tanzanian economy in the first 15 years of independence (1961-
1976) was impressive in terms of economic growth. During the first six
years the economy was largely guided by inherited policies. As noted in
the introduction, between 1967 and 1985 the Tanzanian economy was
essentially guided by the state. The first ten years of the period (1967-
1976) saw a fairly satisfactory economy in terms of growth and provi-
sion of basic goods. During that period the economy grew by about 5.4
percent while the industrial sector grew by 6.5 percent. The policy em-
phasis on the provision of basic goods and services certainly paid off
(Bagachwa 1992: 23).  However, the period just prior to the effective
reforms (1980-85) saw the economy grow by 1.2 percent while the in-
dustrial growth was almost negative throughout the years averaging -4.9
9. Kapunda2.PMD
23/05/2006, 11:57
168
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Convert image files to PDF. File & Page Process. Annotate & Comment. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF
acrobat add image to pdf; add picture to pdf document
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. you can easily perform file conversion from PDF document to image or document
add image to pdf form; add jpg to pdf document
169
Kapunda: Reforms and Industrial Development and Trade in East Africa
percent. This was essentially due to the early 1980s general crisis referred
to in the Introduction.
Reforms and Industrial Performance
During the first Economic Recovery Programme (ERP I: 1986-1989)
the real growth of the economy was 3.7 percent while that of narrowly
defined industrial sector (manufacturing) was 2.7 percent. The average
growth rate was about 3 percent during the 1986-1991 period while
the industrial contribution to GDP averaged 9 percent.  For details see
Table 1.
Table 1: Industrial Sector’s GDP and Employment Rates
and Contribution to GDP (%).(1992 Prices)
Year Overall GDP Industrial Contribution Employment
Growth
Sector to
GDP
Growth
Growth
1986
3.3
0.1
9.1
1.8
1987
3.9
4.1
9.2
-9.9
1988
4.2
3.1
9.1
0.4
1989
3.3
5.2
9.3
7.4
1990
3.6
4.1
9.2
2.5
1991
3.3
1.9
9.1
-1.3
1992
3.0
-4
8.6
3.5
1993
4.1
-0.6
8.6
0.1
1994
3.9
-0.2
8.4
3.3
1995
4.0
1.6
8.2
1
1996
4.2
4.8
8.3
-0.1
1997
3.3
5.7
8.1
2
1998
4.0
8.0
8.4
3.9
1999
4.5
3.6
8.3
5.5
2000
4.9
4.8
8.3
6.5
2001
5.7
5.0
8.3
6
2002
6.2*
8.0*
8.4*
10.3*
Source: United Republic of Tanzania (henceforth URT) Economic Surveys
(various issues).
Note: * Provisional.
9. Kapunda2.PMD
23/05/2006, 11:57
169
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Image and Document Conversion Supported by Windows Viewer. Convert to PDF.
how to add image to pdf acrobat; add an image to a pdf
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. file conversion from PowerPoint document to image or document PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
add image field to pdf form; how to add photo to pdf in preview
170
AJIA 7: 1&2, 2004
Capacity utilisation also increased in some industries from lower levels
in 1985 to higher levels in 1991. Examples are textiles, cement, ciga-
rettes, soft drinks, cooking oil, tyres and match boxes.  (See Appendix,
Table A). This was attributable mainly to the eased availability of raw
materials and spare parts as a result of foreign exchange being more
accessible during the recovery period. Another related factor was the
rehabilitation of many industries, which became visible in 1989.
However, the growth rate became negative between 1992 and 1994.
The contribution of the industrial sector to GDP declined from 9.1
percent (1991) to 8.6 percent (1992).
The official reasons for this trend include:
- unfair competition between domestically produced industrial prod-
ucts and imported products especially the case of textiles after intro-
ducing trade liberalisation. This was compounded by unfair competi-
tion resulting from cheap and untaxed (illegally) imported industrial
products;
government efforts to reduce government deficit and money supply
(as reflected in recommendations based on structural adjustment);
- the migration of skilled/technical manpower from the public sector to
newly established private enterprises where higher salaries and fringe
benefits prevailed;
- declining effective demand for industrial goods due to the decrease in
consumers’ purchasing power;
- an increase in costs of production, especially the component relevant
to public utilities (electricity, gas and water) and transport and com-
munication; and
- frequent power interruptions, inadequate water supply, and unsatis-
factory transport and communication services.
Some comments on these points are in order: The first three reasons
can easily be related to the early impact of structural adjustment, or
market reforms. The rest of the reasons were mainly internal. We may
add the following reasons: misuse of funds and other properties; man-
agement problems; liquidity problems; delays in formalising proper for-
eign exchange applications due to bureaucratic procedures; inappropri-
ate technology; and the low quality of industrial products (Kapunda
2000:6).
After 1994 industrial growth was positive. In fact, the average real
growth was 5 percent despite the relatively low percentage contribution
to GDP. In recent years both the economy’s growth and industrial growth
9. Kapunda2.PMD
23/05/2006, 11:57
170
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. perform file conversion from Word document to image or document Word to PDF Conversion.
add picture to pdf online; add picture to pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
this VB.NET Imaging PDF Watermark Add-on, you watermark that consists of text or image (such as users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat.
adding an image to a pdf; add picture to pdf
171
Kapunda: Reforms and Industrial Development and Trade in East Africa
seem to be very impressive. The increase in production has been mainly
a result of the rehabilitation of divested/privatised enterprises, the es-
tablishment of new industries, and an improvement in the supply of
electricity and water (URT 2002:143, URT 2003:179). Industrial em-
ployment has been higher than before, largely as a result of an increase
in private and informal enterprises and also in small scale and medium
industrial firms. (URT 2003:179).
But it should be noted that a few industrial products have improved
their market competitiveness. Products with remarkable sales perform-
ances include beer, cigarettes, soft drinks, bottled water, tyres and tex-
tiles. The increase in sales is mainly due to an increase in quality, a
more efficient distribution system, and vigorous promotion and adver-
tisement. Joint ventures and privatisation have also contributed posi-
tively in some cases, as with beer.
With regard to production costs and prices it is observed that they
are still relatively high. Most of the industrial commodities are sold at
higher prices than imports. This tends to discourage domestic production.
Some of the reasons for high domestic prices include an increase in
production costs including expensive imported inputs, high transaction
costs, and a partially reformed tax structure regarding commodities.
Most industries produce consumer goods. The contribution of con-
sumer goods industries to total industrial earnings was 57 percent in
1990, and it rose to 63 percent in 1998. In the same years the contribu-
tion of intermediate goods fell from 29 percent to 24 percent and that
of capital goods declined from 14 percent to 13 percent. It is often
argued that to realise economic independence, capital goods and inter-
mediate goods industries play an increasing role in the economy. In the
long run the two types of industries should overtake the consumer goods
sector in terms of contributions to the economy. However, the case of
Tanzania seems not to follow the trend. Part of the reason is that most
(foreign) investors concentrate on consumer goods industries where they
can make quick profits and where they can compete in the domestic
markets too (in which the majority of consumers have low purchasing
power). However, the old debate on a basic industry strategy should be
revised. The government should encourage foreign investors to invest
jointly with the public sector in intermediate and capital good indus-
tries and inputs like the Mchuchuma coal and Liganga iron ore, espe-
cially in the long run by providing effective incentives. This line of
9. Kapunda2.PMD
23/05/2006, 11:57
171
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
free hand, rubber stamp, callout, embedded image, and ellipse no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe Users need to add following implementations to your
add image to pdf acrobat; add an image to a pdf acrobat
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
Also designed to be used add-on for .NET Image SDK, RasterEdge Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader & print
add photo to pdf online; add png to pdf acrobat
172
AJIA 7: 1&2, 2004
argument has recently been supported by the Ministry of Industry and
Trade  (URT 2002:16).
Reform Impact and Implications for Small Scale Industries
and Informal Industrial Activities
Between the crisis of the early 1980s and the early 1990s, small
scale industries and the informal sector have been growing at a com-
mendable rate. This has also provided a growing share of jobs, output
and income. Currently, nearly 60 percent of the urban labour force in
mainland Tanzania is absorbed in the informal sector. A World Bank
Survey revealed that output in most larger firms contracted, while out-
put in smaller and medium sized firms expanded. More specifically, 60
percent of the smaller firms increased production while only 48 percent
of the larger firms managed to do so (World Bank 1991).The impact of
the reforms on the small industrial enterprises seems to have been mixed.
Positive impact aspects include the following:
- import liberalisation has improved the supply of intermediate inputs
and spare parts;
- domestic trade liberalisation has also made raw materials more freely
available for small scale grain mills, oil, coffee and cashew nut process-
ing and saw mills.
However, the following negative impact aspects need to be noted:
- the inflationary impact of devaluation increased prices of imported in-
puts;
- the volume of sales has decreased in some plants due to increases in
prices of imported inputs and spare parts; and
- the closure of small plants, especially those which are very import-inten-
sive or less competitive or both, as cheap imported products of high
quality enter the domestic market.
It should be underlined that although most of the small-scale industries
currently cannot face global market competition, they are still impor-
tant in the domestic market since the internal demand is high. Further-
more, they generate employment even in rural and semi-rural areas.
The record of a 10.3 percent rise in the employment rate in 2002 (see
Table 1) is partly a result of increase in small and medium enterprises.
9. Kapunda2.PMD
23/05/2006, 11:57
172
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
how to add image to pdf; how to add image to pdf in preview
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
out transformation between different kinds of image files and Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft
add jpeg to pdf; acrobat insert image into pdf
173
Kapunda: Reforms and Industrial Development and Trade in East Africa
Industry and Trade
Impact of Industrial Performance on Trade
As noted in the Introduction, the trade in industrial goods tends to
follow the fluctuation of the performance of the industrial sector and
the economy in general. When the industrial and general economic
performance was fairly satisfactory between 1961 and 1976 there was
a reasonable provision of basic industrial goods for both the domestic
and international markets. However, during the crisis in the 1980s there
was a very acute shortage of locally produced industrial goods to trade
with. Parallel markets dominated the economy (Kapunda et al 1988,
1990).
The negative industrial growth of 1992-1994, and the subsequent
rise of the growth rates in later years influenced negatively the pattern
of industrial contribution to total exports, as noted in Table 2. The
industrial contribution to total exports rose from 16.0 percent in 1995
to 19.0 percent in 1998 despite the declining tendency of recent trends
– with some improvement between 2001 and 2002.
Regional Trade
Tanzania is a member of both the East African community (EAC) and
the Southern African Development Community (SADC). It also par-
ticipates in global trade organisations like the World Trade Organisa-
tion (WTO), and has qualified in terms of the African Growth and
Opportunity Act (AGOA).
Tanzania exports more goods and services to Kenya than previously,
but it imports even more from that country resulting in a negative bal-
ance of trade. In fact the overall balance of trade is negative for the
EAC, SADC and the rest of the world. However, Tanzania is mostly a
net exporter to Uganda  (Table 3). The volume of trade between Tanza-
nia and the European Union (EU) is the greatest (Appendix Tables B
and C).
The volume of trade between Tanzania and the EAC seems to be
small given the great emphasis on EAC trade. In 2002, for example,
Tanzania exported only 4.5 percent and imported about 5.9 percent of
total volumes of trade from the EAC. Similar percentages for the SADC
were respectively 5.6 and 12.8 in the same year. While Tanzania trades
mostly with Kenya in the case of the EAC, its major trading partner in
the SADC is South Africa.
9. Kapunda2.PMD
23/05/2006, 11:57
173
174
AJIA 7: 1&2, 2004
Table 2: Industrial Growth and Contribution
to Total Exports (Percentage)
Year
Sectoral Contribution
Contribution
Change in
Growth
to total
to Non-
Industrial
Export
traditional Exports   exports
1986
0.1
10.7
45.5
19.2
1987
4.1
17.8
43.1
16.1
1988
3.1
18.9
48.8
14.4
1989
5.2
21.2
51.4
18.9
1990
4.1
23.8
48.9
13.3
1991
1.9
19.4
43.7
-27.7
1992
-4.0
16.0
36.4
-8.7
1993
-0.6
11.8
28.4
-19
1994
-0.2
14.8
42.2
48.1
1995
1.6
16.0
36.5
41.9
1996
4.8
14.5
37.5
1.6
1997
5.7
17.0
35.1
-9.3
1998
8.0
19.0
15.4
-67.9
1999
3.6
12.0
12.4
-15.7
2000
4.8
6.5
11.6
43.2
2001
5.0
7.2
10.3
30.3
2002
8.0*
7.3*
9.5*
17.3*
Source: URT, Economic Survey (Various years)
Note: * Provisional.
Qualification in terms of the provisions of AGOA provides not only
free access to US markets but also promotes opportunities for increased
USA investment in a participating country. Already some textile indus-
tries like A-Z and Sunflag have taken advantage of the Act. In the year
2000, products worth US $1,642 million were sold in the US (URT
2003:42).
9. Kapunda2.PMD
23/05/2006, 11:57
174
175
Kapunda: Reforms and Industrial Development and Trade in East Africa
Table 3: Trade Between Tanzania, EAC and the Rest
of the World (million US$)
Region/
1997
1998
1999
2000 2001
2002*
Country
Kenya Exports
12.8
26.0
21.0
32.2
38.1
35.3
Imports
95.7
105.8
95.1
93.4
96.1
95.2
B/Trade
-82.9
-79.8
-74.1
-61.2
-58.0
-59.9
Uganda Exports
11.6
6.5
4.7
8.5
5.5
5.5
Imports
1.9
2.3
6.0
5.6
11.4
2.7
B/Trade
9.7
4.2
-1.3
2.9
-5.9
2.8
EAC
Exports
24.4
32.5
25.7
40.7
43.6
40.8
Imports
97.6
108
101.1
99.0
107.5
97.9
B/Trade
-73.2
-75.5
-75.4
-58.3
-63.9
-57.1
SADC
Exports
22.3
15.1
13.8
18.4
21
51.3
Imports
139.9
179.8
196.3
194.4   221.6
211.1
B/Trade
-117.6
-164.7 -182.5
-176 -200.6
-159.8
Global Exports
752.5
588.5
543.2
663.2 776.4
902.5
Imports 1320.3 1588.7 1572.8 1533.9  1714.4
1658.4
B/Trade    -567.8 -1000.2 -1029.6   -870.7   -938.0
-755.9
Source:  Calculated  from  URT  (2003)  Economic  Survey  data.
Note: * Provisional. B/Trade - Balance of Trade.
Industrial Challenges and Prospects
The main challenges to the industrial sector include a set of traditional
and competitive - oriented constraints. Examples of the former include
limited capital, high electricity costs, high interest rates and high trans-
port/transaction costs, especially in the regions (provinces) (URT
2002:7). Competitive-oriented constraints include stiff competition and
unfair trade and dumping practices.
The expected trade reforms by the EAC, SADC, WTO and others
require the industrial sector to produce products of high quality and at
low cost in order to face the stiff competition from highly industrialised
countries in SADC, WTO and other areas. Effort in improving the quality
of industrial products and lowering production costs can be made. Some
industries like beer, soft drinks, and cigarettes have already shown some
progress in that direction. With regard to AGOA, Tanzania should con-
9. Kapunda2.PMD
23/05/2006, 11:57
175
176
AJIA 7: 1&2, 2004
tinue to take advantage of opportunities provided by the Act in devel-
oping textiles and other industries.
At this stage a cautionary word is in order. While regional co-opera-
tion and integration and international organisations like WTO have
some positive impact on trade, the special interests of individual coun-
tries need to be taken into consideration. These may include the need
to assist weak competitor firms like small and medium enterprises in a
country like Tanzania; the importance of inter-industrial linkages; the
use of local inputs to ensure economic stability; and the need for some
mechanism to control unfair competition and dumping practices
(Kapunda 2003:13).
Conclusions and Recommendations
This chapter has indicated that there has been a significant improve-
ment in the industrial sector performance in Tanzania during the re-
form period, especially in recent years. However, the sector is faced
with traditional and competitive challenges. To improve the situation
the following recommendations are advanced:
First, Tanzania should raise its trade share with the EAC because of its
proximity and similar competitive indices. This can be done by increas-
ing industrial and other exports and thereby improving the balance of
trade. In general, the country should participate more in the EAC De-
velopment Strategy.
Second, despite the current regional and global emphasis on market re-
forms and private investment, the particular interests of individual coun-
tries should be respected as far as possible.  This may involve a mixture
of the visible hand of the state and the invisible hand of the markets in
guiding the industrialisation process and trade. Specifically the Tanza-
nia Government should attempt to:
(i)
guide the industrial sector through an effective trade and competi-
tion policy centred on fair competition. The Policy should put
special emphasis on industries of particular interest in the country
like small and medium industries and strategic industries. Bot-
swana, for instance, is taking such a programme seriously;
(ii)
play a leading role in developing strategic intermediate and capi-
tal goods industries which have positive sectoral linkage benefits
in the long run. This is essentially because private investors are
normally interested in projects with a short pay back period. The
recent position of the Ministry of Industry and Trade on joint
9. Kapunda2.PMD
23/05/2006, 11:57
176
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested