pdf viewer in asp net c# : How to add image to pdf acrobat application software utility azure winforms asp.net visual studio PowerGREP26-part3046

256 
By separating different sub-regexes with vertical bars, you can tell the regex engine to attempt them 
from left to right, and return success as soon as one of them can be matched. 
Optional Items 
Putting a question mark after an item tells the regex engine to match the item if possible, but continue 
anyway (rather than admit defeat) if it cannot be matched. 
Repetition Using Various Quantifiers 
Three styles of operators, the star, the plus, and curly braces, allow you to repeat an item zero or more 
times, once or more, or an arbitrary number of times. It is important to understand that these 
quantifiers are ´greedyµ by default, unless you explicitly make them ´lazyµ. 
Grouping and Backreferences 
By placing round brackets around part of the regex, you tell the engine to treat that part as a single 
item  when  applying  operators  such  as  quantifiers.  With  round  brackets,  you  can  also  create 
backreferences that allow you to reuse the text matched by part of the regex inside the regular 
expression, or later in the replacement text of a search and replace operation. Backreferences are also 
very useful for extracting parts from a string in a programming language. 
Unicode Characters and Properties 
If your regular expression flavor supports Unicode, then you can use special Unicode regex tokens to 
match specific Unicode characters, or to match any character that has a certain Unicode property or is 
part of a particular Unicode script or block. 
Mode Modifiers 
Change matching modes such as ´case insensitiveµ for specific parts of the regular expression. 
Atomic Grouping and Possessive Quantifiers 
Nested quantifiers can cause an exponentially increasing amount of backtracking that brings the regex 
engine to a grinding halt. Atomic grouping and possessive quantifiers provide a solution. 
Lookaround with Zero-Width Assertions, part 1 and part 2 
Lookahead and lookbehind (collectively lookaround) are zero-width. With positive lookaround, you 
can specify multiple requirements (sub-regexes) to be applied to the same part of the string. With 
negative lookaround, you can invert the result of a regex match (i.e. match something that does not 
match something else). 
Continuing from The Previous Match Attempt 
Forcing a regex match to start at the end of a previous match provides an efficient way to parse text 
data. 
How to add image to pdf acrobat - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add a picture to a pdf document; how to add a picture to a pdf file
How to add image to pdf acrobat - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add image to pdf file acrobat; how to add photo to pdf in preview
257 
Combining Positive and Negative Lookaround with Conditionals 
A conditional is a special construct that will first evaluate a lookaround, and then execute one sub-
regex if the lookaround succeeds, and another sub-regex if the lookaround fails. 
XML Character Classes 
XML Schema regular expressions support four shorthand character classes to match XML names. 
They also introduce a handy feature called ´character class subtractionµ, which is now also available in 
the JGsoft and .NET regex engines. 
POSIX Bracket Expressions 
If  you  are  using  a  POSIX-compliant  regular  expression  engine,  you  can  use  POSIX  bracket 
expressions to match locale-dependent characters. 
Adding Comments 
Some regex flavors allow you to add comments to make complex regular expressions easier to 
understand. 
Free-Spacing Mode 
Splitting a regular expression into multiple lines, adding comments and whitespace, makes it even 
more readable. 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Convert image files to PDF. File & Page Process. Annotate & Comment. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF
add image to pdf in preview; how to add image to pdf document
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. you can easily perform file conversion from PDF document to image or document
how to add a jpeg to a pdf file; add photo to pdf form
258 
3. Literal Characters 
The most basic regular expression consists of a single literal character, e.g.: «
a
». It will match the first 
occurrence of that character in the string. If the string is ´
Jack is a boy
µ, it will match the „
a
µ after the 
´
J
µ. The fact that this ´
a
µ is in the middle of the word does not matter to the regex engine. If it matters to 
you, you will need to tell that to the regex engine by using word boundaries. We will get to that later. 
This regex can match the second „
a
µ too. It will only do so when you tell the regex engine to start searching 
through the string after the first match. In a text editor, you can do so by using its ´Find Nextµ or ´Search 
Forwardµ function. In a programming language, there is usually a separate function that you can call to 
continue searching through the string after the previous match. 
Similarly, the regex «
cat
» will match „
cat
µ in ´
About cats and dogs
µ. This regular expression consists 
of a series of three literal characters. This is like saying to the regex engine: find a «
c
», immediately followed 
by an «
a
», immediately followed by a «
t
». 
Note that regex engines are case sensitive by default. «
cat
» does not match ´
Cat
µ, unless you tell the regex 
engine to ignore differences in case. 
Special Characters 
Because we want to do more than simply search for literal pieces of text, we need to reserve certain characters 
for special use. In the regex flavors discussed in this tutorial, there are 11 characters with special meanings: 
the opening square bracket «
[
», the backslash «
\
», the caret «
^
», the dollar sign «
$
», the period or dot «
.
», the 
vertical bar or pipe symbol «
|
», the question mark «
?
», the asterisk or star «
*
», the plus sign «
+
», the opening 
round  bracket  «
(
»  and  the  closing  round  bracket  «
)
».  These  special  characters  are  often  called 
´metacharactersµ. 
If you want to use any of these characters as a literal in a regex, you need to escape them with a backslash. If 
you want to match „
1+1=2
µ, the correct regex is «
1\+1=2
». Otherwise, the plus sign will have a special 
meaning. 
Note that «
1+1=2
», with the backslash omitted, is a valid regex. So you will not get an error message. But it 
will not match ´
1+1=2
µ. It would match „
111=2
µ in ´
123+111=234
µ, due to the special meaning of the plus 
character. 
If you forget to escape a special character where its use is not allowed, such as in «
+1
», then you will get an 
error message. 
Most regular expression flavors treat the brace «
{
» as a literal character, unless it is part of a repetition 
operator like «
{1,3}
». So you generally do not need to escape it with a backslash, though you can do so if 
you want. An exception to this rule is the java.util.regex package: it requires all literal braces to be escaped. 
All other characters should not be escaped with a backslash. That is because the backslash is also a special 
character. The backslash in combination with a literal character can create a regex token with a special 
meaning. E.g. «
\d
» will match a single digit from 0 to 9. 
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Image and Document Conversion Supported by Windows Viewer. Convert to PDF.
add image to pdf reader; adding an image to a pdf in acrobat
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. SDK to convert PowerPoint document to PDF document code for PowerPoint to TIFF image conversion
how to add an image to a pdf file in acrobat; adding jpg to pdf
259 
Escaping a single metacharacter with a backslash works in all regular expression flavors. Many flavors also 
support the 
\Q...\E
escape sequence. All the characters between the 
\Q
and the 
\E
are interpreted as literal 
characters. E.g. «
\Q*\d+*\E
» matches the literal text „
*\d+*
µ. The 
\E
may be omitted at the end of the 
regex, so «
\Q*\d+*
» is the same as «
\Q*\d+*\E
». This syntax is supported by the JGsoft engine, Perl, PCRE 
and Java, both inside and outside character classes. However, in Java, this feature does not work correctly in 
JDK 1.4 and 1.5 when used in a character class or followed by a quantifier. 
Special Characters and Programming Languages 
If you are a programmer, you may be surprised that characters like the single quote and double quote are not 
special characters. That is correct. When using a regular expression or grep tool like PowerGREP or the 
search function of a text editor like EditPad Pro, you should not escape or repeat the quote characters like 
you do in a programming language. 
In your source code, you have to keep in mind which characters get special treatment inside strings by your 
programming language. That is because those characters will be processed by the compiler, before the regex 
library sees the string. So the regex «
1\+1=2
» must be written as 
"1\\+1=2"
in C++ code. The C++ 
compiler will turn the escaped backslash in the source code into a single backslash in the string that is passed 
on to the regex library. To match „
c:\temp
µ, you need to use the regex «
c:\\temp
». As a string in C++ 
source code, this regex becomes 
"c:\\\\temp"
. Four backslashes to match a single one indeed. 
See the tools and languages section in this book for more information on how to use regular expressions in 
various programming languages. 
Non-Printable Characters 
You can use special character sequences to put non-printable characters in your regular expression. Use «
\t
» 
to match a tab character (ASCII 0x09), «
\r
» for carriage return (0x0D) and «
\n
» for line feed (0x0A). More 
exotic non-printables are «
\a
» (bell, 0x07), «
\e
» (escape, 0x1B), «
\f
» (form feed, 0x0C) and «
\v
» (vertical tab, 
0x0B). Remember that Windows text files use ´
\r\n
µ to terminate lines, while UNIX text files use ´
\n
µ. 
You can include any character in your regular expression if you know its hexadecimal ASCII or ANSI code 
for the character set that you are working with. In the Latin-1 character set, the copyright symbol is character 
0xA9. So to search for the copyright symbol, you can use «
\xA9
». Another way to search for a tab is to use 
«
\x09
». Note that the leading zero is required. 
Most regex flavors also support the tokens «
\cA
» through «
\cZ
» to insert ASCII control characters. The 
letter after the backslash is always a lowercase c. The second letter is an uppercase letter A through Z, to 
indicate Control+A through Control+Z. These are equivalent to «
\x01
» through «
\x1A
» (26 decimal). E.g. 
«
\cM
» matches a carriage return, just like «
\r
» and «
\x0D
». In XML Schema regular expressions, «
\c
» is a 
shorthand character class that matches any character allowed in an XML name. 
If your regular expression engine supports Unicode, use «
\uFFFF
» rather than «
\xFF
» to insert a Unicode 
character. The euro currency sign occupies code point 0x20AC. If you cannot type it on your keyboard, you 
can insert it into a regular expression with «
\u20AC
». 
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word SDK to convert Word document to PDF document. demo code for Word to TIFF image conversion
add a picture to a pdf; acrobat insert image in pdf
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Using this VB.NET Imaging PDF Watermark Add-on, you can a watermark that consists of text or image (such as And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no
add picture to pdf form; add a jpg to a pdf
260 
4. First Look at How a Regex Engine Works Internally 
Knowing how the regex engineworks will enable you to craft better regexes more easily. It will help you 
understand quickly why a particular regex does not do what you initially expected. This will save you lots of 
guesswork and head scratching when you need to write more complex regexes. 
There are two kinds of regular expression engines: text-directed engines, and regex-directed engines. Jeffrey 
Friedl calls them DFA and NFA engines, respectively. All the regex flavors treated in this tutorial are based 
on  regex-directed  engines.  This  is  because  certain  very  useful  features,  such  as  lazy  quantifiers  and 
backreferences, can only be implemented in regex-directed engines. No surprise that this kind of engine is 
more popular. 
Notable tools that use text-directed engines are awk, egrep, flex, lex, MySQL and Procmail. For awk and 
egrep, there are a few versions of these tools that use a regex-directed engine. 
You can easily find out whether the regex flavor you intend to use has a text-directed or regex-directed 
engine. If backreferences and/or lazy quantifiers are available, you can be certain the engine is regex-directed. 
You can do the test by applying the regex «
regex|regex not
» to the string ´
regex not
µ. If the resulting 
match is only „
regex
µ, the engine is regex-directed. If the result is „
regex not
µ, then it is text-directed. The 
reason behind this is that the regex-directed engine is ´eagerµ. 
In this tutorial, after introducing a new regex token, I will explain step by step how the regex engine actually 
processes that token. This inside look may seem a bit long-winded at certain times. But understanding how 
the regex engine works will enable you to use its full power and help you avoid common mistakes. 
The Regex-Directed Engine Always Returns the Leftmost Match 
This is a very important point to understand: a regex-directed engine will always return the leftmost match, 
even if a ´betterµ match could be found later. When applying a regex to a string, the engine will start at the 
first character of the string. It will try all possible permutations of the regular expression at the first character. 
Only if all possibilities have been tried and found to fail, will the engine continue with the second character in 
the text. Again, it will try all possible permutations of the regex, in exactly the same order. The result is that 
the regex-directed engine will return the leftmost match. 
When applying «
cat
» to ´
He captured a catfish for his cat.
µ, the engine will try to match the first 
token in the regex «
c
» to the first character in the match ´
H
µ. This fails. There are no other possible 
permutations of this regex, because it merely consists of a sequence of literal characters. So the regex engine 
tries to match the «
c
» with the ´
e
µ. This fails too, as does matching the «
c
» with the space. Arriving at the 4th 
character in the match, «
c
» matches „
c
µ. The engine will then try to match the second token «
a
» to the 5th 
character, „
a
µ. This succeeds too. But then, «
t
» fails to match ´
p
µ. At that point, the engine knows the regex 
cannot be matched starting at the 4th character in the match. So it will continue with the 5th: ´
a
µ. Again, «
c
» 
fails to match here and the engine carries on. At the 15th character in the match, «
c
» again matches „
c
µ. The 
engine then proceeds to attempt to match the remainder of the regex at character 15 and finds that «
a
» 
matches „
a
µ and «
t
» matches „
t
µ. 
The entire regular expression could be matched starting at character 15. The engine is "eager" to report a 
match. It will therefore report the first three letters of catfish as a valid match. The engine never proceeds 
beyond this point to see if there are any ´betterµ matches. The first match is considered good enough. 
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
as a kind of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS VB.NET PPT: VB Code to Add Embedded Image Object to
how to add a jpeg to a pdf file; add picture to pdf
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
Also designed to be used add-on for .NET Image SDK, RasterEdge Bitmap to PDF Converter can Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for
add an image to a pdf form; adding an image to a pdf form
261 
In this first example of the engine’s internals, our regex engine simply appears to work like a regular text 
search routine. A text-directed engine would have returned the same result too. However, it is important that 
you can follow the steps the engine takes in your mind. In following examples, the way the engine works will 
have a profound impact on the matches it will find. Some of the results may be surprising. But they are always 
logical and predetermined, once you know how the engine works. 
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
pdf insert image; add an image to a pdf acrobat
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
out transformation between different kinds of image files and Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft
add multiple jpg to pdf; how to add an image to a pdf in acrobat
262 
5. Character Classes or Character Sets 
With a "character class", also called ´character setµ, you can tell the regex engine to match only one out of 
several characters. Simply place the characters you want to match between square brackets. If you want to 
match an a or an e, use «
[ae]
». You could use this in «
gr[ae]y
» to match either „
gray
µ or „
grey
µ. Very 
useful if you do not know whether the document you are searching through is written in American or British 
English. 
A character class matches only a single character. «
gr[ae]y
» will not match ´
graay
µ, ´
graey
µ or any such 
thing. The order of the characters inside a character class does not matter. The results are identical. 
You can use a hyphen inside a character class to specify a range of characters. «
[0-9]
» matches a single digit 
between 0 and 9. You can use more than one range. «
[0-9a-fA-F]
» matches a single hexadecimal digit, case 
insensitively. You can combine ranges and single characters. «
[0-9a-fxA-FX]
» matches a hexadecimal digit 
or the letter X. Again, the order of the characters and the ranges does not matter. 
Useful Applications 
Find a word, even if it is misspelled, such as «
sep[ae]r[ae]te
» or «
li[cs]en[cs]e
». 
Find an identifier in a programming language with «
[A-Za-z_][A-Za-z_0-9]*
». 
Find a C-style hexadecimal number with «
0[xX][A-Fa-f0-9]+
». 
Negated Character Classes 
Typing a caret after the opening square bracket will negate the character class. The result is that the character 
class will match any character that is not in the character class. Unlike the dot, negated character classes also 
match (invisible) line break characters. 
It is important to remember that a negated character class still must match a character. «
q[^u]
» does not 
mean: ´a q not followed by a uµ. It means: ´a q followed by a character that is not a uµ. It will not match the 
q in the string ´
Iraq
µ. It will match the q and the space after the q in ´
Iraq is a country
µ. Indeed: the 
space will be part of the overall match, because it is the ´character that is not a uµ that is matched by the 
negated character class in the above regexp. If you want the regex to match the q, and only the q, in both 
strings, you need to use negative lookahead: «
q(?!u)
». But we will get to that later. 
Metacharacters Inside Character Classes 
Note that the only special characters or metacharacters inside a character class are the closing bracket (]), the 
backslash (\), the caret (^) and the hyphen (-). The usual metacharacters are normal characters inside a 
character class, and do not need to be escaped by a backslash. To search for a star or plus, use «
[+*]
». Your 
regex will work fine if you escape the regular metacharacters inside a character class, but doing so significantly 
reduces readability. 
263 
To include a backslash as a character without any special meaning inside a character class, you have to escape 
it with another backslash. «
[\\x]
» matches a backslash or an x. The closing bracket (]), the caret (^) and the 
hyphen (-) can be included by escaping them with a backslash, or by placing them in a position where they do 
not take on their special meaning. I recommend the latter method, since it improves readability. To include a 
caret, place it anywhere except right after the opening bracket. «
[x^]
» matches an x or a caret. You can put 
the closing bracket right after the opening bracket, or the negating caret. «
[]x]
» matches a closing bracket or 
an x. «
[^]x]
» matches any character that is not a closing bracket or an x. The hyphen can be included right 
after the opening bracket, or right before the closing bracket, or right after the negating caret. Both «
[-x]
» 
and «
[x-]
» match an x or a hyphen. 
You can use all non-printable characters in character classes just like you can use them outside of character 
classes. E.g. «
[$\u20AC]
» matches a dollar or euro sign, assuming your regex flavor supports Unicode. 
The JGsoft engine, Perl and PCRE also support the \Q...\E sequence inside character classes to escape a 
string of characters. E.g. «
[\Q[-]\E]
» matches „
[
µ, „
-
µ or „
]
µ. 
POSIX regular expressions treat the backslash as a literal character inside character classes. This means you 
can’t use backslashes to escape the closing bracket (]), the caret (^) and the hyphen (-). To use these 
characters, position  them as explained  above in  this  section.  This  also means  that  special  tokens like 
shorthands  are  not  available  in  POSIX  regular  expressions. See the  tutorial  topic on POSIX bracket 
expressions for more information. 
Shorthand Character Classes 
Since certain character classes are used often, a series of shorthand character classes are available. «
\d
» is 
short for «
[0-9]
». 
«
\w
» stands for ´word characterµ, usually «
[A-Za-z0-9_]
». Notice the inclusion of the underscore and 
digits. 
«
\s
» stands for ´whitespace characterµ. Again, which characters this actually includes, depends on the regex 
flavor. In all flavors discussed in this tutorial, it includes «
[ \t\r\n]
». That is: «
\s
» will match a space, a tab 
or a line break. Some flavors include additional, rarely used non-printable characters such as vertical tab and 
form feed. 
The flavor comparison shows ´ascii onlyµ for flavors that match only the ASCII characters listed in the 
previous paragraphs. With flavors marked as ´YESµ, letters, digits and space characters from other languages 
or Unicode are also included in the shorthand classes. In the screen shot, you can see the characters matched 
by «
\w
» in RegexBuddy using various scripts. Notice that JavaScript uses ASCII for «
\d
» and «
\w
», but 
Unicode for «
\s
». XML does it the other way around. Python offers flags to control what the shorthands 
should match. 
264 
Shorthand character classes can be used both inside and outside the square brackets. «
\s\d
» matches a 
whitespace character followed by a digit. «
[\s\d]
» matches a single character that is either whitespace or a 
digit. When applied to ´
1 + 2 = 3
µ, the former regex will match „
2
µ (space two), while the latter matches 
1
µ (one). «
[\da-fA-F]
» matches a hexadecimal digit, and is equivalent to «
[0-9a-fA-F]
». 
Negated Shorthand Character Classes 
The above three shorthands also have negated versions. «
\D
» is the same as «
[^\d]
», «
\W
» is short for 
«
[^\w]
» and «
\S
» is the equivalent of «
[^\s]
». 
Be careful when using the negated shorthands inside square brackets. «
[\D\S]
» is not the same as «
[^\d\s]
». 
The latter will match any character that is not a digit or whitespace. So it will match „
x
µ, but not ´
8
µ. The 
former, however, will match any character that is either not a digit, or is not whitespace. Because a digit is not 
whitespace, and whitespace is not a digit, «
[\D\S]
» will match any character, digit, whitespace or otherwise. 
265 
Repeating Character Classes 
If you repeat a character class by using the «
?
», «
*
» or «
+
» operators, you will repeat the entire character class, 
and not just the character that it matched. The regex «
[0-9]+
» can match „
837
µ as well as „
222
µ. 
If you want to repeat the matched character, rather than the class, you will need to use backreferences. «
([0-
9])\1+
» will match „
222
µ but not ´
837
µ. When applied to the string ´
833337
µ, it will match „
3333
µ in the 
middle of this string. If you do not want that, you need to use lookahead and lookbehind. 
But I digress. I did not yet explain how character classes work inside the regex engine. Let us take a look at 
that first. 
Looking Inside The Regex Engine 
As I already said: the order of the characters inside a character class does not matter. «
gr[ae]y
» will match 
grey
µ in ´
Is his hair grey or gray?
µ, because that is the leftmost match. We already saw how the 
engine applies a regex consisting only of literal characters. Below, I will explain how it applies a regex that has 
more than one permutation. That is: «
gr[ae]y
» can match both „
gray
µ and „
grey
µ. 
Nothing noteworthy happens for the first twelve characters in the string. The engine will fail to match «
g
» at 
every step, and continue with the next character in the string. When the engine arrives at the 13th character, 
g
µ is matched. The engine will then try to match the remainder of the regex with the text. The next token in 
the regex is the literal «
r
», which matches the next character in the text. So the third token, «
[ae]
» is 
attempted at the next character in the text (´
e
µ). The character class gives the engine two options: match «
a
» 
or match «
e
». It will first attempt to match «
a
», and fail. 
But because we are using a regex-directed engine, it must continue trying to match all the other permutations 
of the regex pattern before deciding that the regex cannot be matched with the text starting at character 13. 
So it will continue with the other option, and find that «
e
» matches „
e
µ. The last regex token is «
y
», which 
can be matched with the following character as well. The engine has found a complete match with the text 
starting at character 13. It will return „
grey
µ as the match result, and look no further. Again, the leftmost match 
was returned, even though we put the «
a
» first in the character class, and „
gray
µ could have been matched in 
the string. But the engine simply did not get that far, because another equally valid match was found to the 
left of it. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested