pdf viewer in asp net c# : Add picture to pdf document SDK software API .net winforms asp.net sharepoint PowerGREP32-part3053

316 
E.g. «
[\p{Ll}\p{Lu}-[\p{IsBasicLatin}]]
»  matches  all  uppercase  and  lowercase Unicode  letters, 
except any ASCII letters. The 
\p{IsBasicLatin}
is subtracted from the combination of 
\p{Ll}\p{Lu}
rather than from 
\p{Lu}
alone. This regex will not match ´
abc
µ. 
While you can use nested character class subtraction, you cannot subtract  two classes sequentially. To 
subtract ASCII letters and Greek letters from a class with all Unicode letters, combine the ASCII and Greek 
letters into one class, and subtract that, as in «
[\p{L}-[\p{IsBasicLatin}\p{IsGreek}]]
». 
Notational Compatibility with Other Regex Flavors 
Note that a regex like «
[a-z-[aeiuo]]
» will not cause any errors in regex flavors that do not support 
character class subtraction. But it won’t match what you intended either. E.g. in Perl, this regex consists of a 
character class followed by a literal «
]
». The character class matches a character that is either in the range a-z, 
or a hyphen, or an opening bracket, or a vowel. Since the a-z range and the vowels are redundant, you could 
write this character class as «
[a-z-[]
» or «
[-[a-z]
». A hyphen after a range is treated as a literal character, 
just like a hyphen immediately after the opening bracket. This is true in all regex flavors, including XML. E.g. 
«
[a-z-_]
» matches a lowercase letter, a hyphen or an underscore in both Perl and XML Schema. 
While the last paragraph strictly speaking means that the XML Schema character class syntax is incompatible 
with Perl and the majority of other regex flavors, in practice there’s no difference. Using non-alphanumeric 
characters in character class ranges is very bad practice, as it relies on the order of characters in the ASCII 
character table, which makes the regular expression hard to understand for the programmer who inherits your 
work. E.g. while «
[A-[]
» would match any upper case letter or an opening square bracket in Perl, this regex 
is much clearer when written as «
[A-Z[]
». The former regex would cause an error in XML Schema, because 
it interprets 
-[]
as an empty subtracted class, leaving an unbalanced 
[
Add picture to pdf document - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
how to add image to pdf in acrobat; add picture to pdf form
Add picture to pdf document - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
how to add image to pdf file; how to add jpg to pdf file
317 
23. POSIX Bracket Expressions 
POSIX bracket expressions are a special kind of character classes. POSIX bracket expressions match one 
character out of a set of characters, just like regular character classes. They use the same syntax with square 
brackets. A hyphen creates a range, and a caret at the start negates the bracket expression. 
One key syntactic difference is that the backslash is NOT a metacharacter in a POSIX bracket expression. So 
in POSIX, the regular expression «
[\d]
» matches a „
\
µ or a „
d
µ. To match a „
]
µ, put it as the first character 
after the opening 
[
or the negating 
^
. To match a „
-
µ, put it right before the closing 
]
. To match a „
^
µ, put it 
before the final literal 
-
or the closing 
]
. Put together, «
[]\d^-]
» matches „
]
µ, „
\
µ, „
d
µ, „
^
µ or „
-
µ. 
The main purpose of the bracket expressions is that they adapt to the user’s or application’s locale. A locale is 
a collection of rules and settings that describe language and cultural conventions, like sort order, date format, 
etc. The POSIX standard also defines these locales. 
Generally, only POSIX-compliant regular  expression engines have  proper  and full  support for  POSIX 
bracket expressions. Some non-POSIX regex engines support POSIX character classes, but usually don’t 
support collating sequences and character equivalents. Regular expression engines that support Unicode use 
Unicode properties and scripts to provide functionality similar to POSIX bracket expressions. In Unicode 
regex  engines,  shorthand  character  classes  like  «
\w
»  normally  match  all  relevant  Unicode  characters, 
alleviating the need to use locales. 
Character Classes 
Don’t confuse the POSIX term ´character classµ with what is normally called a regular expression character 
class. «
[x-z0-9]
» is an example of what we call a ´character classµ and POSIX calls a ´bracket expressionµ. 
[:digit:]
is a POSIX character class, used inside a bracket expression like «
[x-z[:digit:]]
». These two 
regular expressions match exactly the same: a single character that is either „
x
µ, „
y
µ, „
z
µ or a digit. The class 
names must be written all lowercase. 
POSIX bracket expressions can be negated. «
[^x-z[:digit:]]
» matches a single character that is not x, y, 
z or a digit. A major difference between POSIX bracket expressions and the character classes in other regex 
flavors is that POSIX bracket expressions treat the backslash as a literal character. This means you can’t use 
backslashes to escape the closing bracket (]), the caret (^) and the hyphen (-). To include a caret, place it 
anywhere except right after the opening bracket. «
[x^]
» matches an x or a caret. You can put the closing 
bracket right after the opening bracket, or the negating caret. «
[]x]
» matches a closing bracket or an x. 
«
[^]x]
» matches any character that is not a closing bracket or an x. The hyphen can be included right after 
the opening bracket, or right before the closing bracket, or right after the negating caret. Both «
[-x]
» and 
«
[x-]
» match an x or a hyphen. 
Exactly which POSIX character classes are available depends on the POSIX locale. The following are usually 
supported, often  also by regex engines  that don’t support POSIX itself. I’ve  also indicated equivalent 
character classes that you can use in ASCII and Unicode regular expressions if the POSIX classes are 
unavailable. Some classes also have Perl-style shorthand equivalents. 
Java does not support POSIX bracket expressions, but does support POSIX character classes using the 
\p
operator. Though the 
\p
syntax is borrowed from the syntax for Unicode properties, the POSIX classes in 
Java only match ASCII characters as indicated below. The class names are case sensitive. Unlike the POSIX 
C# TIFF: How to Insert & Burn Picture/Image into TIFF Document
Support adding image or picture to an existing new REImage(@"c:\ logo.png"); // add the image powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
add photo to pdf reader; add picture to pdf
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
Dim drawing As RaterEdgeDrawing = New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
add photo to pdf for; add jpeg signature to pdf
318 
syntax which can only be used inside a bracket expression, Java’s 
\p
can be used inside and outside bracket 
expressions. 
POSIX: 
«
[:alnum:]
» 
Description: 
Alphanumeric characters 
ASCII: 
«
[a-zA-Z0-9]
» 
Unicode: 
«
[\p{L&}\p{Nd}]
» 
Shorthand: 
Java: 
«
\p{Alnum}
» 
POSIX: 
«
[:alpha:]
» 
Description: 
Alphabetic characters 
ASCII: 
«
[a-zA-Z]
» 
Unicode: 
«
\p{L&}
» 
Shorthand: 
Java: 
«
\p{Alpha}
» 
POSIX: 
«
[:ascii:]
» 
Description: 
ASCII characters 
ASCII: 
«
[\x00-\x7F]
» 
Unicode: 
«
\p{InBasicLatin}
» 
Shorthand: 
Java: 
«
\p{ASCII}
» 
POSIX: 
«
[:blank:]
» 
Description: 
Space and tab 
ASCII: 
«
[ \t]
» 
Unicode: 
«
[\p{Zs}\t]
» 
Shorthand: 
Java: 
«
\p{Blank}
» 
POSIX: 
«
[:cntrl:]
» 
Description: 
Control characters 
ASCII: 
«
[\x00-\x1F\x7F]
» 
Unicode: 
«
\p{Cc}
» 
Shorthand: 
Java: 
«
\p{Cntrl}
» 
POSIX: 
«
[:digit:]
» 
Description: 
Digits 
ASCII: 
«
[0-9]
» 
Unicode: 
«
\p{Nd}
» 
Shorthand: 
«
\d
» 
Java: 
«
\p{Digit}
» 
POSIX: 
«
[:graph:]
» 
Description: 
Visible characters (i.e. anything except spaces, control characters, etc.) 
ASCII: 
«
[\x21-\x7E]
» 
Unicode: 
«
[^\p{Z}\p{C}]
» 
Shorthand: 
Java: 
«
\p{Graph}
» 
C# Word - Paragraph Processing in C#.NET
Add references: CreateParagraph(); //Create a picture for para IPicture picture = para.CreatePicture(imageSrcPath); //Save the document doc0.Save
add photo to pdf preview; adding image to pdf
VB.NET Image: Create Code 11 Barcode on Picture & Document Using
file, apart from above mentioned .NET core imaging SDK and .NET barcode creator add-on, you also need to buy .NET PDF document editor add-on, namely, RasterEdge
add image to pdf; how to add an image to a pdf in preview
319 
POSIX: 
«
[:lower:]
» 
Description: 
Lowercase letters 
ASCII: 
«
[a-z]
» 
Unicode: 
«
\p{Ll}
» 
Shorthand: 
Java: 
«
\p{Lower}
» 
POSIX: 
«
[:print:]
» 
Description: 
Visible characters and spaces (i.e. anything except control characters, etc.) 
ASCII: 
«
[\x20-\x7E]
» 
Unicode: 
«
\P{C}
» 
Shorthand: 
Java: 
«
\p{Print}
» 
POSIX: 
«
[:punct:]
» 
Description: 
Punctuation and symbols. 
ASCII: 
«
[!"#$%&'()*+,\-./:;<=>?@[\\\]^_`{|}~]
» 
Unicode: 
«
[\p{P}\p{S}]
» 
Shorthand: 
Java: 
«
\p{Punct}
» 
POSIX: 
«
[:space:]
» 
Description: 
All whitespace characters, including line breaks 
ASCII: 
«
[ \t\r\n\v\f]
» 
Unicode: 
«
[\p{Z}\t\r\n\v\f]
» 
Shorthand: 
«
\s
» 
Java: 
«
\p{Space}
» 
POSIX: 
«
[:upper:]
» 
Description: 
Uppercase letters 
ASCII: 
«
[A-Z]
» 
Unicode: 
«
\p{Lu}
» 
Shorthand: 
Java: 
«
\p{Upper}
» 
POSIX: 
«
[:word:]
» 
Description: 
Word characters (letters, numbers and underscores) 
ASCII: 
«
[A-Za-z0-9_]
» 
Unicode: 
«
[\p{L}\p{N}\p{Pc}]
» 
Shorthand: 
«
\w
» 
Java: 
POSIX: 
«
[:xdigit:]
» 
Description: 
Hexadecimal digits 
ASCII: 
«
[A-Fa-f0-9]
» 
Unicode: 
«
[A-Fa-f0-9]
» 
Shorthand: 
Java: 
«
\p{XDigit}
» 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
clip art or screenshot, the picture will be AddPage", "InsertPage" and "DeletePage" to add, insert or & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
add image pdf; add jpg signature to pdf
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Planet Barcode Generator for Image, Picture &
on Overview. VB.NET Planet Barcode Creator Add-on within Generate Planet Barcode on Picture & Image in VB.NET. In for adding Planet barcode image to PDF, TIFF or
how to add an image to a pdf in acrobat; adding an image to a pdf in preview
320 
Collating Sequences 
A POSIX locale can have collating sequences to describe how certain characters or groups of characters 
should be ordered. E.g. in Spanish, ´
ll
µ like in ´
tortilla
µ is treated as one character, and is ordered 
between ´
l
µ and ´
m
µ in the alphabet. You can use the collating sequence element 
[.span-ll.]
inside a 
bracket expression to match „
ll
µ. E.g. the regex «
torti[[.span-ll.]]a
» matches „
tortilla
µ. Notice 
the double square brackets. One pair for the bracket expression, and one pair for the collating sequence. 
I do  not know of any regular expression engine that support collating sequences, other than POSIX-
compliant engines part of a POSIX-compliant system. 
Note that a fully POSIX-compliant regex engine will treat ´
ll
µ as a single character when the locale is set to 
Spanish. This means that «
torti[^x]a
» also matches „
tortilla
µ. «
[^x]
» matches a single character that is 
not an ´
x
µ, which includes „
ll
µ in the Spanish POSIX locale. 
In any other regular expression engine, or in a POSIX engine not using the Spanish locale, «
torti[^x]a
» 
will match the misspelled word „
tortila
µ but will not match „
tortilla
µ, as «
[^x]
» cannot match the two 
characters ´
ll
µ. 
Finally, note that not all regex engines claiming to implement POSIX regular expressions actually have full 
support for collating sequences. Sometimes, these engines use the regular expression syntax defined by 
POSIX, but don’t have full locale support. You may want to try the above matches to see if the engine you’re 
using does. E.g. Tcl’s regexp command supports collating sequences, but Tcl only supports the Unicode 
locale, which does not define any collating sequences. The result is that in Tcl, a collating sequence specifying 
a single character will match just that character, and all other collating sequences will result in an error. 
Character Equivalents 
A POSIX locale can define character equivalents that indicate that certain characters should be considered as 
identical for sorting. E.g. in French, accents are ignored when ordering words. ´
élève
µ comes before 
´
être
µ which comes before ´
événement
µ. ´
é
µ and ´
ê
µ are all the same as ´
e
µ, but ´
l
µ comes before ´
t
µ 
which comes before ´
v
µ. With the locale set to French, a POSIX-compliant regular expression engine will 
match  „
e
µ, „
é
µ,  „
è
µ and  „
ê
µ  when  you  use the  collating sequence 
[=e=]
in  the bracket  expression 
«
[[=e=]]
». 
If a character does not have any equivalents, the character equivalence token simply reverts to the character 
itself. E.g. «
[[=x=][=z=]]
» is the same as «
[xz]
» in the French locale. 
Like collating sequences, POSIX character equivalents are not available in any regex engine that I know of, 
other than those following the POSIX standard. And those that do may not have the necessary POSIX locale 
support. Here too Tcl’s regexp command supports character equivalents, but Unicode locale, the only one 
Tcl supports, does not define any character equivalents. This effectively means that «
[[=x=]]
» and «
[x]
» are 
exactly the same in Tcl, and will only match „
x
µ, for any character you may try instead of ´xµ. 
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
SDK; VB.NET image cropping method to crop picture / photo; VB.NET image cropping control add-on needs a PC com is professional provider of document, content and
add jpg to pdf preview; add image pdf acrobat
VB.NET Image: Image Scaling SDK to Scale Picture / Photo
this VB.NET image scaling control add-on, we API, developer can only scale one image / picture / photo at com is professional provider of document, content and
add picture pdf; add signature image to pdf
321 
24. Adding Comments to Regular Expressions 
If you have worked through the entire tutorial, I guess you will agree that regular expressions can quickly 
become rather cryptic. Therefore, many modern regex flavors allow you to insert comments into regexes. The 
syntax is «
(?#comment)
» where ´commentµ can be whatever you want, as long as it does not contain a 
closing round bracket. The regex engine ignores everything after the «
(?#
» until the first closing round 
bracket. 
E.g.  I  could  clarify  the  regex  to  match  a  valid  date  by  writing  it  as  «
(?#year)(19|20)\d\d[- 
/.](?#month)(0[1-9]|1[012])[- /.](?#day)(0[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])
» . Now it is instantly 
obvious that this regex matches a date in yyyy-mm-dd format. Some software, such as RegexBuddy, EditPad 
Pro and PowerGREP can apply syntax coloring to regular expressions while you write them. That makes the 
comments really stand out,  enabling the  right  comment in  the right spot to make a  complex  regular 
expression much easier to understand. 
Regex comments are supported by the JGsoft engine, .NET, Perl, PCRE, Python and Ruby. 
To make your regular expression even more readable, you can turn on free-spacing mode. All flavors that 
support comments also support free-spacing mode. In addition, Java supports free-spacing mode, even 
though it doesn’t support 
(?#)
-style comments. 
322 
25. Free-Spacing Regular Expressions 
The JGsoft engine, .NET, Java, Perl, PCRE, Python, Ruby and XPath support a variant of the regular 
expression syntax called free-spacing mode. You can turn on this mode with the «
(?x)
» mode modifier, or 
by turning on the corresponding option in the application or passing it to the regex constructor in your 
programming language. 
In free-spacing mode, whitespace between regular expression tokens is ignored. Whitespace includes spaces, 
tabs and line breaks. Note that only whitespace between tokens is ignored. E.g. «
a b c
» is the same as «
abc
» in 
free-spacing mode, but «
\ d
» and «
\d
» are not the same. The former matches „
d
µ, while the latter matches 
a digit. «
\d
» is a single regex token composed of a backslash and a ´dµ. Breaking up the token with a space 
gives you an escaped space (which matches a space), and a literal ´dµ. 
Likewise, grouping modifiers cannot be broken up. «
(?>atomic)
» is the same as «
(?> ato mic )
» and as 
«
( ?>ato mic)
». They all match the same atomic group. They’re not the same as 
(? >atomic)
. In fact, the 
latter will cause a syntax error. The 
?>
grouping modifier is a single element in the regex syntax, and must stay 
together. This is true for all such constructs, including lookaround, named groups, etc. 
A character class is also treated as a single token. «
[abc]
» is not the same as «
[ a b c ]
». The former 
matches one of three letters, while the latter matches those three letters or a space. In other words: free-
spacing mode has no effect inside character classes. Spaces and line breaks inside character classes will be 
included in the character class. 
This means that in free-spacing mode, you can use «
» or «
[ ]
» to match a single space. Use whichever you 
find more readable. 
Java, however, does not treat a character class as a single token in free-spacing mode. Java does ignore 
whitespace and comments inside character classes. So in Java’s free-spacing mode, «
[abc]
» is identical to 
«
[ a b c ]
» and «
» is the only way to match a space. However. even in free-spacing mode, the negating 
caret must appear immediately after the opening bracket. «
[ ^ a b c ]
» matches any of the four characters 
^
µ, „
a
µ, „
b
µ or „
c
µ just like «
[abc^]
» would. With the negating caret in the proper place, «
[^ a b c ]
» 
matches any character that is not ´
a
µ, ´
b
µ or ´
c
µ. 
Comments in Free-Spacing Mode 
Another feature of free-spacing mode is that the # character starts a comment. The comment runs until the 
end of the line. Everything from the # until the next line break character is ignored. 
The XPath flavor does not support comments within the regular expression. The # is always treated as a 
literal character. 
Putting it all together, I could clarify the regex to match a valid date by writing it across multiple lines as: 
# Match a 20th or 21st century date in yyyy-mm-dd format 
(19|20)\d\d                # year (group 1) 
[- /.]                     # separator 
(0[1-9]|1[012])            # month (group 2) 
[- /.]                     # separator 
(0[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])   # day (group 3)
Part 5 
Regular Expression Examples 
325 
1. Sample Regular Expressions 
Below, you will find many example patterns that you can use for and adapt to your own purposes. Key 
techniques used in crafting each regex are explained, with links to the corresponding pages in the tutorial 
where these concepts and techniques are explained in great detail. 
If you are new to regular expressions, you can take a look at these examples to see what is possible. Regular 
expressions are very powerful. They do take some time to learn. But you will earn back that time quickly 
when using regular expressions to automate searching or editing tasks in EditPad Pro or PowerGREP, or 
when writing scripts or applications in a variety of languages. 
RegexBuddy offers the fastest way to get up to speed with regular expressions. RegexBuddy will analyze any 
regular expression and present it to you in a clearly to understand, detailed outline. The outline links to 
RegexBuddy’s regex tutorial (the same one you find on this website), where you can always get in-depth 
information with a single click. 
Oh, and you definitely do not need to be a programmer to take advantage of regular expressions! 
Grabbing HTML Tags 
«
<TAG\b[^>]*>(.*?)</TAG>
» matches the opening and closing pair of a specific HTML tag. Anything 
between the tags is captured into the first backreference. The question mark in the regex makes the star lazy, 
to make sure it stops before the first closing tag rather than before the last, like a greedy star would do. This 
regex 
will 
not 
properly 
match 
tags 
nested 
inside 
themselves, 
like 
in 
´
<TAG>one<TAG>two</TAG>one</TAG>
µ. 
«
<([A-Z][A-Z0-9]*)\b[^>]*>(.*?)</\1>
» will match the opening and closing pair of any HTML tag. 
Be sure to turn off case sensitivity. The key in this solution is the use of the backreference «
\1
» in the regex. 
Anything between the tags is captured into the second backreference. This solution will also not match tags 
nested in themselves. 
Trimming Whitespace 
You can easily trim unnecessary whitespace from the start and the end of a string or the lines in a text file by 
doing  a  regex  search-and-replace.  Search  for  «
^[  \t]+
»  and  replace  with  nothing  to  delete  leading 
whitespace (spaces and tabs). Search for «
[ \t]+$
» to trim trailing whitespace. Do both by combining the 
regular expressions into «
^[ \t]+|[ \t]+$
» . Instead of 
[ \t]
which matches a space or a tab, you can 
expand the character class into «
[ \t\r\n]
» if you also want to strip line breaks. Or you can use the 
shorthand «
\s
» instead. 
IP Addresses 
Matching an IP address is another good example of a trade-off between regex complexity and exactness. 
«
\b\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\.\d{1,3}\b
» will match any IP address just fine, but will also match 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested