pdf viewer in asp net c# : Add image to pdf file Library control class asp.net azure winforms ajax PowerGREP7-part3063

66 
When PowerGREP executes this action, the following happens for each file: 
1.
The 
sectioning 
regex 
matches 
section 
in 
the 
.ini 
file, 
e.g. 
[Header1]\r\nName1=Value1\r\nName2=Value2
µ. The section’s header „
Header1
µ is stored 
in the named group ´headerµ.  
2.
The  main  action  now  searches  through  this  section,  and  matches  a  name=value  pair,  e.g. 
Name1=Value1
µ  
3.
The main action substitutes backreferences in the text to be collected for this search match, e.g. 
´
Header1/Name1
µ. The result is added to the results.  
4.
The main action repeats steps 2 and 3 until all name=value pairs in the current section have been 
found.  
5.
PowerGREP repeats steps 1 through 4 for all sections in the .ini file.  
You can easily adapt the techniques shown in this example for your own purposes. 
1.
Create a regular expression that matches all sections in the file you’re interested in.  
2.
Add named capturing groups to the regex for each part of the section (headers, footers, etc.) you 
want to collect for all items.  
3.
Create a second regular expression that matches each item in those sections. This regular expression 
will only ´seeµ one section at a time. You don’t need to worry about this regex matching any part of 
the file outside the sections matched by the first regex.  
4.
Add named or numbered capturing groups to the second regex for each part of the item you want to 
collect.  
5.
Compose the text to be collected using backreferences to the groups you added in steps 2 and 4.  
Add image to pdf file - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
how to add image to pdf; how to add a picture to a pdf document
Add image to pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
how to add a jpeg to a pdf file; how to add an image to a pdf file in acrobat
67 
33. Collect Paragraphs (Split along Blank Lines) 
This example illustrates how you can use file sectioning to process files paragraph by paragraph, where a 
paragraph is a block of lines delimited from other paragraphs by one or more blank lines. 
You can find this action in the PowerGREP.pgl library as "Collect paragraphs (split along blank lines)". 
1.
Select the files you want to search through in the File Selector.  
2.
Start with a fresh action.  
3.
Select ´split along delimitersµ from the ´file sectioningµ list. Leave the section search type as ´regular 
expressionµ.  
4.
In the Section Search box, enter the regular expression «
(?:\r\n){2,}+
». This regular expression 
matches two or more consecutive line breaks, or one or more consecutive blank lines. If lines 
containing  only  whitespace  should  be  considered  blank,  use  the  regular  expression 
«
\r\n(?:[ \t]*+\r\n)++
».  
5.
Turn on the ´collect whole sectionsµ checkbox.  
6.
Set the action type to ´searchµ. Since we turned on the ´collect whole sectionsµ checkbox, there’s no 
need to enter a text to be collected, so we can use the ´searchµ action type instead of ´collect dataµ.  
7.
Enter the search term you want to find in the paragraphs.  
8.
Click the Preview button to see the results.  
If you want to treat lines that consist of nothing but spaces and tabs as blank lines, use the regular expression 
«
\r\n(?:[ \t]*+\r\n)++
» to find your sections. This regex also matches two or more line breaks. The 
difference is that it allows whitespace between each pair of line breaks. This makes it match one or more 
consecutive lines that do not contain anything except whitespace. You can find this action as "Collect 
paragraphs (split along whitespace-only lines)" in the library. 
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
add photo to pdf in preview; how to add an image to a pdf in preview
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
add a jpeg to a pdf; adding images to pdf
68 
34. Apply an Extra Search-And-Replace to Target Files 
This example shows how you can use the Sequence panel in PowerGREP to run an extra search-and-replace 
on each target file produced by a PowerGREP action. This is different from the ´extra processingµ part of a 
PowerGREP action. This is different from  the ´extra  processingµ  feature on  the  Action  panel,  which 
performs an extra search-and-replace on each replacement text or each text to be collected, handling each bit 
of text separately. The Sequence panel allows you to run a whole new action on the target files, reprocessing 
each file as a whole. 
Suppose you want to condense consecutive spaces into single spaces in your target files when running a 
´collect dataµ action. If you used the ´extra processingµ feature to search for «
{2,}
» and replace with a 
single space, you’d condense consecutive spaces within each search match that is collected into the file. But if 
one search match ends with a single space and the next match starts with a single space, the target file will still 
end up with two consecutive spaces. The reason is that the ´extra processingµ processes each search match 
separately. It sees a single space at the end of the first match, and a single space at the start of the second 
match, neither of which are replaced because the regex doesn’t match them. To condense all consecutive 
spaces, even those that were part of different matches, we need to search for «
{2,}
» through the target file 
as a whole. 
1.
Prepare  the  ´collect dataµ  action  on the  File  Selector and  Action panels.  Don’t  worry  about 
consecutive spaces just yet.  
2.
Start with a fresh sequence.  
3.
Click the New Step button on the Sequence panel to add the contents of the Action panel as the first 
step in the sequence.  
4.
Start with a fresh action.  
5.
Set the action type to ´search-and-replaceµ.  
6.
In the Search box, enter the regular expression «
{2,}
». This regular expression matches two or 
more consecutive line spaces.  
7.
In the Replacement box, enter a single space.  
8.
Click the New Step button on the Sequence panel to add the contents of the Action panels as the 
second step in the sequence.  
9.
With the second step still selected on the Sequence panel, select ´target files from other stepµ in the 
´file selectionµ drop down list.  
10.
Select step 1 in the ´stepµ drop-down list. The second step is now configured to process the target 
files created by the first step.  
11.
Click the Quick button on the Sequence panel to execute both steps. The first step collects the 
search matches. When that’s done, the second step condenses consecutive spaces.  
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF;
add picture to pdf file; attach image to pdf form
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively.
adding a jpg to a pdf; add image to pdf
69 
35. Inspect Web Logs 
While there is a lot of specialized software available for gathering useful information from web server logs, 
sometimes you want to get some information that standard web log analyzers do not offer. 
PowerGREP is most useful for analyzing logs for which no specialized software is available. The basic 
concepts illustrated in this example are applicable to analyzing any kind of server or system log. 
In this example, we will use Apache’s extended log format. Most other web servers also use this format, or 
offer it as a choice. In this log format, each event gets one line in the log file: 
bdsl.66.14.88.130.gte.net - - [31/Jan/2005:00:06:55 -0500] "GET / HTTP/1.1" 200 
8669  "http://www.google.com/search?q=regex+tutorial"  "Mozilla/4.0  (compatible; 
MSIE 6.0; Windows NT 5.1; SV1)"
(In the actual log file, all this is on a single line.) 
Each line consists of eight elements. If we assume that we will only apply our regular expression to valid log 
files, and therefore our regex need not exclude invalid log file lines, we can easily write the regular expression 
for each item: 
1.
Domain name or IP address of the client making the request: «
\S+
»  
2.
Basic authentication (two dashes in the above example, indicating no authentication): «
\S+\s+\S+
»  
3.
Date, time and time zone stamp: «
\[[^]]+\]
»  
4.
HTTP  request,  consisting  of  request  method  (GET),  file  (/)  and  protocol  (HTTP/1.1): 
«
"(?:GET|POST|HEAD) [^ "]+ HTTP/[0-9.]+"
»  
5.
Status code returned by the server (200): «
[0-9]+
»  
6.
Number of bytes served (8669): «
[-0-9]+
»  
7.
Referring URL, between double quotes: «
"[^"]*"
»  
8.
User agent, between double quotes: «
"[^"]*"
»  
We can easily put all of this together. Items are separated by whitespace, which we match with «
\s+
». The 
result is: 
«
^\S+\s+\S+\s+\S+\s+\[[^]]+\]\s+"(?:GET|POST|HEAD)  [^  "]+  HTTP/[0-9.]+"\s+[0-
9]+\s+[-0-9]+\s+"[^"]*"\s+"[^"]*"$
» 
While this regular expression properly matches a server log line, it is not useful for collecting information. To 
make it useful, we have to add capturing groups, so we can collect only the information we want. To make 
things easy, we’ll use named capturing groups. If we capture everything, and split the file in the HTTP request 
into file name and parameters, we get: 
«
^(?<client>\S+)\s+(?<auth>\S+\s+\S+)\s+\[(?<datetime>[^]]+)\]\s+"(?:GET|POST|HEAD
(?<file>[^ 
?"]+)\??(?<parameters>[^ 
?"]+)? 
HTTP/[0-9.]+"\s+(?<status>[0-
9]+)\s+(?<size>[-0-9]+)\s+"(?<referrer>[^"]*)"\s+"(?<useragent>[^"]*)"$
» 
Collecting Referring URLs 
1.
Select the log files you want to search through in the File Selector.  
2.
Start with a fresh action.  
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
RasterEdge .NET Image SDK has included a variety of image and document Add necessary references In addition, VB.NET users can append a PDF file to the end of a
how to add an image to a pdf file; add jpg signature to pdf
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Convert smooth lines to curves. Detect and merge image fragments. Flatten visible layers. C#.NET DLLs: Compress PDF Document. Add necessary references:
how to add image to pdf in preview; how to add photo to pdf in preview
70 
3.
Set the action type to ´collect dataµ.  
4.
Turn on ´group identical matchesµ and ´group results for all filesµ.  
5.
Set ´sort collected matchesµ to ´by decreasing totalsµ so we can see which URLs are most important.  
6.
Set ´minimum number of occurrencesµ to 10 or higher, to avoid collecting too many URLs that are 
of no importance.  
7.
Search for the regular expression «
"GET [^ ?"]+?\.html?[^ "]* HTTP/[0-9.]+"\s+[0-
9]+\s+[-0-9]\s+"([^"]*)"
» which captures the referring URL in backreference one.  
8.
Enter ´
\1
µ in the Collect box, to collect referring URLs.  
9.
Click the Preview button to run the action.  
The regex for matching complete log file entries was clipped at the start and the end to produce this example. 
By removing the parts we aren’t interested in, we speed up the action. Capturing groups we don’t care fore 
were also removed. We’re capturing the HTTP request with «
GET [^ ?"]+?\.html?[^ "]* HTTP/[0-
9.]+
» to restrict matches to page hits only. This makes sure the statistics aren’t skewed, since most browsers 
send the same referrer information when loading images as when loading the page containing those images. 
This action is available in the PowerGREP.pgl library as ´Inspect Apache web logs - Referring URLsµ. 
If we want to collect referring sites (domain names) rather than complete URLs, we have to refine the regular 
expression, to separate the domain name from the rest of the URL. Instead of using «
[^"]*
», we will use 
«
(?:-|http://([-.a-z0-9]+)[^"]*)
». We are using two pairs of parenthesis now: the outer pair to 
group the pipe symbol, and the inner pair to create a backreference with the domain name part of the URL. 
The complete regular expression thus becomes: 
«
"GET [^ ?"]+?\.html?[^ "]* HTTP/[0-9.]+"\s+[0-9]+\s+[-0-9]+\s+"(?:-|http://([-.a-
z0-9]+)[^"]*)"
» 
If the web browser did not pass referrer info, then the referrer item in the logs will show up as ´-µ, including 
the quotes. This is why we are using the pipe symbol to match this option, in addition to the domain name. If 
the dash was matched, the part of the regular expression in the capturing group will not have matched 
anything. In that case, the backreference will be empty. Since we only put \1 in the collect box, an empty 
string will be collected in that case. 
This action is available in the PowerGREP.pgl library as ´Inspect Apache web logs - Referring domainsµ. 
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
PDF document splitting, PDF page reordering and PDF page image and text Add necessary references: In addition, C# users can append a PDF file to the end of a
adding jpg to pdf; add jpg to pdf file
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
1). ' Create output PDF file path list Dim outputFilePaths As New List(Of String) Dim i As Integer For i = 0 To splitIndex.Length outputFilePaths.Add(Program
how to add an image to a pdf; acrobat insert image into pdf
71 
36. Extract Google Search Terms from Web Logs 
In the preceding example I showed you how to extract information and statistics from web logs. I will now 
build upon that example to accomplish a specific task: get a list of search terms that people used to find your 
web site in Google. 
The regular expression for matching web log entries needs three adaptations. The first one is optional. I like 
to restrict the search to hits to web pages, so I’ve changed the part of the regular expression that matches the 
file in the HTTP request to «
/([-_a-z0-9]+\.html)?
» 
The second change is what makes this example work. Instead of using «
"[^"]*"
» to match any referring 
URL, 
we’ll 
use 
«
(?:http://www\.google\.(?:com?\.)?[a-
z]{2,3}/search\?.*?q=\+*+([^&"\r\n]++)[^"\r\n]*)
» to match only Google search pages, and 
extract the search terms. The «
http://www\.google\.(?:com?\.)?[a-z]{2,3}/search
» part matches 
URLs such as http://www.google.com/search on any country-specific top-level domain. The other part 
«
q=\+*+([^&"\r\n]++)[^"\r\n]*
» matches the q parameter in the search page URL. This parameter lists 
the URL-encoded search terms. The regex captures these into a backreference. 
The third change speeds up the action. Since we only care about the HTTP request and the referrer, we can 
remove the parts of the regex before the HTTP request and after the referrer. The part of the regex matching 
the HTTP request cannot match anywhere else in the log entries, so our regular expression is still properly 
anchored. 
Since the search terms are part of the referring URL, they are URL-encoded. Spaces have been substituted 
with pluses, and various other special characters are substituted with hexadecimal values. E.g. the plus itself 
was substituted with %2B, and the quote character with %22. When PowerGREP’s ´extra processingµ 
feature, the search terms can easily be made readable again. 
1.
Select the log files you want to search through in the File Selector.  
2.
Open the PowerGREP.pgl library file included with PowerGREP. You can find it in the folder 
where PowerGREP is installed, c:\Program Files\JGsoft\PowerGREP4 by default.  
3.
Select ´Inspect Apache web logs - Google search termsµ in the library, and click the Use Action 
button. This sets up the regular expression and extra processing as I explained above.  
4.
Click the Preview button to run the action.  
When the action finishes running, the Results panel will show a list of search terms, sorted from most to least 
occurrences. 
If you select the action ´Inspect Apache web logs - Google search terms with landing pagesµ in the library, 
you will get a list of search terms paired with the page the visitor clicked on in Google’s search results. Search 
terms without a page brought the visitor to the home page. The only difference in the action that shows 
landing pages is the text to be collected, which uses two backreferences instead of one. 
The regular expression has two capturing groups. The first one matches the file name in the HTTP request, 
which is the landing page. The second group matches the Google search terms. The text to be collected uses 
´
\l2
µ (backslash ell two) to collect the search terms converted to lowercase, and «
\1
» to collect the landing 
page. 
72 
37. Split Web Logs by Date 
Software that generates log files often dumps everything into a single log file. As the log file grows in size it 
becomes difficult to work with. Using PowerGREP you can easily split the log into multiple files, such as one 
file per day. 
For this example we’ll split an Apache web log which stores one log entry per line, with each entry storing the 
date formatted like 25/Apr/2010. The Merge Web Logs by Date example does the opposite. 
1.
Select the log files you want to split in the File Selector.  
2.
Start with a fresh action.  
3.
Set the action type to ´split filesµ.  
4.
In the ´file sectioningµ list, select "line by line, including line breaks". Each line in the file is one log 
entry.  
5.
Turn on the option "collect/replace whole sections". This makes sure lines will be extracted as a 
whole into the target files.  
6.
In 
the 
Search 
box, 
enter 
the 
regular 
expression 
«
(?'day'\d\d?)/(?'month'Jan|Feb|Mar|Apr|May|Jun|Jul|Aug|Sep|Oct|Nov|Dec)/(?'
year'\d{4})
». Only lines that match this regex are written to a target file.  
7.
In  the  Target  File  box,  enter  something  along  the  lines  of  ´
c:\logs\web  logs  ${day} 
${month} ${year}.txt.bz2
µ to build a path using replacement text syntax that includes the date 
from the regex match. Lines with the same target file (after substituting backreferences) are written to 
the same file. Lines with different target files are written to different files. We’ve added a 
.bz2
extension to the target file name to make PowerGREP automatically compress the file.  
8.
Set ´between collected textµ set to ´nothingµ. Since we’re collecting whole lines including line breaks, 
there’s no need to add more delimiters.  
9.
Set the backup file options as you like them.  
10.
Click the Quick Split button to split the file. Use this button instead of Split Files. Otherwise 
PowerGREP will waste a lot of time and memory to display your entire log files on the Results panel.  
Splitting files does not delete the original files. It may overwrite original files if the Target File for one or 
more search matches is a file that is searched through. When splitting files PowerGREP does not write the 
final target files until the action has completed. Overwriting source files won’t alter the search matches. 
This action is available in the PowerGREP.pgl library as ´Split Apache web logsµ. 
Recombining Log Files 
The above example can also be used to recombine log files. Suppose your application writes log files to a 
certain size. It might write up to 100,000 entries in a single log file, and then start with a new file. Doing so 
keeps log file sizes manageable, but you’ll end up with entries from multiple days in the same file, and entries 
from the same day in multiple files. 
To recombine the logs so you’ll have one file for the log entries of one day, simply mark all the files with your 
logs in the File Selector. Then execute the action described above. If log entries from different files result in 
the same target file, they’ll be merged into that target file, even though you’re executing a ´split filesµ action. 
The key difference between ´split filesµ and ´merge filesµ actions is that ´split filesµ calculates the target file 
for each search match, while ´merge filesµ calculates the target file for each file searched through. 
73 
The ´order of collected matchesµ drop-down list determines the order in which matches (log entries in this 
case) from different files are written when a ´split filesµ action calculates the same target file path from 
matches from multiple files. This is important if you want your log entries in the combined file to have the 
same order as in the original files. If your original log files put the log entries in order if you sort the files 
alphabetically by name, then choose "sort files Alphabetically A..Z". If the time stamp on the log files puts 
the files in the correct order (e.g. the time stamp on each log file is the time the last entry was written) then 
you can choose ´oldest file to newest fileµ. 
74 
38. Merge Web Logs by Date 
Software that generates log files is often configured to start with a new log file every now and then, such as 
one log file per day. This is great for keeping file sizes small, but results in a large number of log files. If the 
log files are small it may be more convenient if you combine them into a smaller set of files. 
For this example we’ll merge an Apache web log which stores one log entry per line, with each entry storing 
the date formatted like 25/Apr/2010. The example assumes each file has the logs for one day. It combines 
these logs into one file per month. The Split Web Logs by Date example does the opposite. 
1.
Select the log files you want to merge in the File Selector.  
2.
Start with a fresh action.  
3.
Set the action type to ´merge filesµ.  
4.
Leave the ´file sectioningµ set to ´do not section filesµ. The ´merge filesµ action always combines 
entire files. We don’t need to use file sectioning to process log entries separately. The first date we 
find in the file determines the target file.  
5.
In 
the 
Search 
box, 
enter 
the 
regular 
expression 
«
(?'day'\d\d?)/(?'month'Jan|Feb|Mar|Apr|May|Jun|Jul|Aug|Sep|Oct|Nov|Dec)/(?'
year'\d{4})
». Only files in which this regex can find a match are combined. PowerGREP only 
finds the first regex match in each file. As soon as one match is found, the file is merged.  
6.
In the ´target file creationµ drop-down list near the bottom of the Action panel, select ´merge based 
on search matchesµ. This makes the Target File box visible.  
7.
In the  Target File  box, enter  something  along the lines  of ´
c:\logs\web logs ${month} 
${year}.txt.bz2
µ to build a path using replacement text syntax that includes the date from the 
regex match. Since only the first regex match is used, the first date found in the file determines the 
target  file  it is  merged into.  We’ve  added  a 
.bz2
extension to  the target  file  name  to  make 
PowerGREP automatically compress the target file.  
8.
Set ´between collected textµ set to ´nothingµ. Apache log files already have a line break at the end.  
9.
The ´order of collected matchesµ drop-down list determines the order in which our log files are 
combined. This is important if you want your log entries in the combined file to have the proper 
order. If your original log files put the log entries in order if you sort the files alphabetically by name, 
then choose "sort files Alphabetically A..Z". If the time stamp on the log files puts the files in the 
correct order (e.g. the time stamp on each log file is the time the last entry was written) then you can 
choose ´oldest file to newest fileµ. 
10.
Set the backup file options as you like them.  
11.
Click the Merge Files button to merge the files. A ´merge filesµ action never lists anything but file 
names on the Results panel, so there’s no difference between Merge Files and Quick Merge.  
Merging files does not delete the original files. It may overwrite original files if the Target File for one or 
more search matches is a file that is searched through. When merging files PowerGREP does not write the 
final target files until the action has completed. Overwriting source files won’t alter the search matches. 
A ´merge filesµ action always merges files as a whole. If you want to merge multiple files but put different 
parts of each file into different target files, essentially splitting and merging files at the same time, use a ´split 
filesµ action. The Split Web Logs by Date example can do this. 
This action is available in the PowerGREP.pgl library as ´Merge Apache web logsµ. 
75 
39. Split Logs into Files with a Certain Number of Entries 
Dealing with large log files is often cumbersome. With PowerGREP you can easily split logs into separate 
files with a specific number of entries per log. E.g. splitlog0.txt would have the entries 0 to 999, splitlog1.txt 
has entries 1,000 to 1,999, and so on. You can put all the entries from the original log or logs into the target 
files, or you can extract only those entries that you’re interested in. 
1.
Select the log files you want to split in the File Selector.  
2.
Start with a fresh action.  
3.
Set the action type to ´split filesµ.  
4.
In the ´file sectioningµ list, select "line by line, including line breaks". This works for logs that use 
one line for each entry.  
5.
Turn on the option "collect/replace whole sections". This makes sure lines will be extracted as a 
whole into the target files.  
6.
If you want all log entries to be in the split files, enter the regular expression «
.
» into the search box, 
and make sure ´dot matches newlinesµ is off. This puts any line that is not blank into the target files. 
If you want only certain lines, enter a search term or regex that (partially) matches the log entries you 
want to extract. E.g. search for «
^Error
» to extract only those entries starting with the word 
´Errorµ.  
7.
In 
the 
Target 
File 
box, 
enter 
something 
along 
the 
lines 
of 
´
c:\logs\splitlog%MATCHNZ:/1000%.txt
µ  to  specify  the  target  path.  The  match 
placeholder 
%MATCHNZ:/1000%
takes the number of the match counting from zero, and divides it by 
1000. This results in 
0
for the first 1,000 matches, 
1
for the second 1,000 matches, and so on. If you 
want the first log file to be number one, use 
%MATCHNZ:/1000+1%
. Match placeholders use integer 
arithmetic that is calculated strictly from left to right. If you expect to have more than 10 but less 
than, say, 100 log files, you can pad the number in the target file name to have two digits by 
using 
%MATCHNZ:/1000:2Z%
or 
%MATCHNZ:/1000+1:2Z%
as the placeholder. 
2Z
means to pad 
with zeros to make the placeholder have at least two digits.  
8.
Set ´between collected textµ set to ´nothingµ. Since we’re collecting whole lines including line breaks, 
there’s no need to add more delimiters.  
9.
Set the backup file options as you like them.  
10.
Click the Quick Split button to split the file. Use this button instead of Split Files. Otherwise 
PowerGREP will waste a lot of time and memory to display your entire log files on the Results panel.  
Splitting files does not delete the original files. It may overwrite original files if the Target File for one or 
more search matches is a file that is searched through. When splitting files PowerGREP does not write the 
final target files until the action has completed. Overwriting source files won’t alter the search matches. 
This action is available in the PowerGREP.pgl library as ´Split Logs into Files with a Certain Number of 
Entriesµ. 
Recombining Log Files 
The above example can also be used to recombine log files. Say you previously split your logs into files with 
1,000 entries and deleted the original logs. Now want the logs to be split into files with 2,500 entries each. 
Follow the exact same steps as above. In the first step, select all the previously split log files. In step 7, 
use 
%MATCHNZ:/2500%
as the placeholder. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested