pdf viewer in asp.net c# : How to add image to pdf acrobat SDK software API .net windows winforms sharepoint AGF_Final_Report1-part52

10
13.  Net metrics of concessional public flows would adjust the gross values to 
take account of servicing obligations and alternative financing opportunities. 
The Advisory Group reports the grant equivalent transfers consistent with the 
methodologies used by the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) of the 
Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). 
14.  In  the case  of  private  and  public  non-concessional  financial  flows,  while 
conceptually the net benefit of these flows to a country could be calculated, 
in practice it is significantly more difficult to do than for concessional public 
flows, as there is no internationally agreed or empirical basis on which to do 
such calculation. There were varying views within the Advisory Group about 
how robust any estimate would be  with regard to any net private  or public 
non-concessional flows, given the practical difficulties.  The report explains 
methodologies proposed by some members and gives examples of how one 
might calculate net private and public non-concessional flows.  
15.  One perspective within the Advisory Group was that carbon offsets should 
not count towards the US$100 billion goal, since these are mechanisms that 
are designed to reduce the cost of mitigation in developed countries. Another 
perspective was that financial flows from offsets should count towards the 
US$100 billion goal because these payments are a clear example of policy-
driven financial transfers to developing countries, and because existing offset 
systems have demonstrated success in predictably and efficiently leveraging 
additional investment in developing countries. A third perspective was that 
only the net value of carbon offset flows should count towards the  US$100 
billion goal, paralleling the proposed net approach to private capital flows.  
16.  Spending  resources  wisely  is  critical  to  building  the  mutual  confidence 
needed  to  mobilize  climate  finance.  The  report  therefore  includes  some 
illustrative examples of climate change financing, without prejudice to the 
UNFCCC negotiations. The full texts of the examples are found in annex III. 
17.  The Advisory Group worked in close collaboration; all members participated 
in  drafting  technical  background  papers  from which the  present report is 
derived, as well as in distilling and condensing those papers into the final 
report. The Advisory Group met several times, at the principal and deputy 
levels, with working sessions held in several countries. 
18.  Outreach  was  an  important  element  of  the work of the Advisory Group, 
which consulted widely among numerous stakeholders. Consultations were 
held with representatives of United Nations Member States, civil society and 
the private sector. Briefings were held for the parties at UNFCCC sessions. In 
addition, individual members of the Advisory Group had interactions with a 
wide array of stakeholders, including civil society and the private sector. 
19.  When announcing the launch of the Advisory Group, the  Secretary-General 
expressed his expectation that the work of the Advisory Group would help to 
inform negotiations on climate change financing as an essential part of a 
comprehensive climate change agreement.  The Advisory  Group hopes that 
this expectation will be met through the process that has led to the present 
How to add image to pdf acrobat - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add jpg to pdf file; adding images to pdf forms
How to add image to pdf acrobat - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
pdf insert image; how to add photo to pdf in preview
11
report, and that the report itself will contribute to the discussions on financing 
within the ongoing UNFCCC negotiations.  
20.  Section II of the present report presents the conclusions from the analysis of 
the Advisory Group. Section III describes the concepts and methods used in 
carrying out the analysis at the base of the present report, focusing on the 
sources  and  assessment  criteria  considered  (supplemented  by  annex  II). 
Section IV describes the assessment of the sources against the criteria, and 
draws  the  broad  conclusions from  this analysis.  Section V examines the 
issues involved in combining the different individual sources. 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Convert image files to PDF. File & Page Process. Annotate & Comment. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF
acrobat insert image into pdf; add image to pdf acrobat
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. you can easily perform file conversion from PDF document to image or document
add image to pdf online; add image to pdf
12
II.   Conclusions from the analysis  
A. The overall challenge 
21.  The current range and potential of instruments available to meet the goal of 
US$100 billion per year by 2020 point to the conclusion that it is challenging 
but feasible to achieve this goal.  
22.  Reaching  the  goal  will  likely  require  taking a systemic approach to the 
financing  of  climate  action.  This  involves  carbon  pricing  as  well  as 
implementing  a  wide variety of sources, public and private, bilateral and 
multilateral, including alternative sources of finance; a scaling  up of existing 
public sources; and increased private flows. There were different perspectives 
within the Advisory Group on the appropriate composition of  sources for 
reaching the goal. 
23.  A  combination  of  sources  will  also  be  required  to  effectively  address 
different types of climate actions. Given the purpose of the resources, which 
is to support both adaptation and mitigation in developing countries, both 
public and private sources, and both grants and loans, would be necessary. 
Grants and highly concessional loans are crucial for adaptation in the most 
vulnerable developing countries, such as the least developed countries, small 
island developing States and Africa.  
B.  Sources and instruments 
24.  New public sources examined by the Advisory Group have the potential to 
generate  flows  of  tens  of  billions  of  dollars annually, a significant step 
towards raising the US$100 billion per year.  
25.  Strong commitments to domestic mitigation and the introduction of carbon-
based  instruments  in  developed  countries  are  key  for  mobilizing climate 
financing, both public and private. New public instruments based on carbon 
pricing  in  particular  are  attractive  because  they  both  raise  revenue  and 
provide incentives for mitigation actions.  
26.  Higher carbon prices feed through into multiple public sector instruments 
(such as revenues from the auctioning of emissions allowances, domestic 
carbon taxes, international levies and emissions trading schemes), into carbon 
offset  markets  and  into  the  effective  prices  for  carbon  abatement  that 
influence investment patterns in developing countries. The higher or lower 
the carbon price, the larger or smaller the revenue and the stronger or weaker 
the price signal to reduce emissions. While the Advisory Group emphasized 
the importance of pricing carbon, it did not take a firm view on the choice of 
instruments to achieve carbon pricing, for example, on whether this should be 
achieved via taxes or carbon markets.  
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Image and Document Conversion Supported by Windows Viewer. Convert to PDF.
adding a jpeg to a pdf; add jpg to pdf preview
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. SDK to convert PowerPoint document to PDF document code for PowerPoint to TIFF image conversion
add png to pdf preview; adding image to pdf
13
27.  Direct budget contributions, based on existing  public finance sources,  could 
continue to play an important role. Direct revenues draw from a domestic 
revenue base, including domestic taxes. To address potential difficulties in 
the timely implementation of new instruments, Governments may prefer to 
increase budget contributions.  The political acceptability of this source over 
the longer term will depend on national circumstances and on the size of the 
contribution. The global fiscal environment has placed public  finances in 
many developed countries under extreme pressure. The Advisory Group also 
recognized that some Governments would be constrained from increasing the 
existing tax bases,  whether through existing or new sources, owing to the 
operation  of domestic  budgetary  rules.  Nevertheless, the Advisory Group 
expects that direct budget contributions will play a key role in the long term. 
28.  International private investment flows are essential for the transition to a low-
carbon, climate-resilient future. These investments can be stimulated through 
the  targeted  application  of  concessional  and  non-concessional  public 
financing. Careful and wise use of public funds in combination with private 
funds  can  generate  truly  transformational  investments.  Further  work  is 
recommended on finding the most effective use of grant funding for climate 
actions. 
29.  Carbon  markets  offer  important  opportunities  for  supporting  new 
technologies and leveraging private investment in developing countries. The 
Advisory Group therefore recommends that the carbon markets  be further 
strengthened and developed, while ensuring environmental integrity. 
30.  Domestically  based  instruments  have  advantages  in  terms  of  political 
acceptability in developed countries, allowing flexibility and tailoring to the 
particular circumstances of these countries.  
31.  Carbon-related  instruments  coordinated  internationally,  for  example  on 
international  transportation,  could  potentially  mobilize  significant  public 
resources for climate action in developing countries. These instruments may 
present difficulties, however, in terms of political acceptability and incidence 
on developing countries.  Some  members  were  of  the  view  that  political 
acceptability and incidence on developing countries should be addressed by 
the parties to the UNFCCC and the Kyoto Protocol. These members believed 
that further discussion on the design and implementation should depend on 
the decision by those parties. Other members were of the view that universal 
application of instruments on international transportation was necessary, inter 
alia,  in  order to avoid  significant competitiveness issues. These members 
were of the view that incidence issues, particularly on developing countries, 
could  be  addressed  by  mechanisms  other  than  selective  application,  for 
example through the appropriate collection and  distribution of revenue. Any 
mechanism should not blunt abatement incentives or distort competitiveness. 
Further  work  on  such  instruments  should  be  taken  forward  in  the 
International  Maritime  Organization  and  the  International  Civil  Aviation 
Organization.   
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word SDK to convert Word document to PDF document. demo code for Word to TIFF image conversion
add picture to pdf file; add an image to a pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Using this VB.NET Imaging PDF Watermark Add-on, you can a watermark that consists of text or image (such as And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no
add image pdf acrobat; how to add a jpeg to a pdf
14
32.  The  multilateral  development  banks (regional  development banks and the 
World Bank) and the United Nations system are likely to play a key role both 
in  fostering  low-carbon  growth  and  in  meeting  the  adaptation  needs  of 
developing countries. The United Nations system can play a complementary 
role both in preparing the demand of developing countries for new significant 
climate finance and in the implementation phase of specific mitigation and 
adaptation  programmes.  The  multilateral  development  banks,  in  close 
collaboration with the  United  Nations  system,  can  play  a  multiplier role, 
leveraging significant additional green investment in a way that integrates 
climate action into overall development programmes. Their capacity to do so 
should be strengthened through additional resources in the course of the next 
decade.  
33.  A global financial transaction tax, as currently debated, would be a new and 
additional source. The share of the revenues to be allocated to climate action 
would  be  a  policy  issue.  Strong  international  coordination,  allowing  for 
international implementation, would increase the efficiency of such a source, 
limiting  its  distorting  effects.  The  lack  of  political  acceptability  and 
unresolved issues of  incidence on developing countries make it difficult to 
implement universally, however. In this context, one perspective within the 
Advisory  Group  was  that  further  work  would  be  needed  to  overcome 
cooperative issues. A different perspective was that a financial transaction tax 
is only feasible among interested countries at the national or regional level. 
34.  Some of the potential instruments examined by the Advisory Group, such as 
a  carbon  export  optimization  tax  or  a  climate  fund  based  on  globally 
coordinated  special  drawing  rights  appear  to  be  unlikely  instruments  for 
meeting  the  2020  goal  of  US$100  billion;  the  issues  of  incidence  on 
developing countries and of political acceptability are particularly difficult. 
C. Combining instruments 
35.  In  line  with  the  systemic  approach  taken  in  the  analysis  of  sources,  the 
Advisory  Group  examined  issues  involved  in  combining  instruments, 
including overlaps and interactions. Public sources, for example, should be 
combined  in  ways  that  avoid  double  counting  of  likely  revenue  and 
inefficient  double  taxation.  Sound  design  of  public  instruments,  such  as 
development bank instruments, can increase private flows as well as leverage 
paid-in  capital.  Equally,  the  United  Nations  system  has  considerable 
experience  in  helping  developing countries  to  apply for and establish an 
enabling  policy  environment  to  receive  new  climate  finance.  Revenue 
potentials cannot  necessarily  be  added  together,  for  instance,  because  of 
spillover effects and potentially diminishing political appetite for mobilizing 
multiple sources. Combining different sources, both public and private, and 
examining  their  appropriate  role  and  scale  should  be  subject  to  further 
international and national analysis and discussions. National circumstances 
will be taken into account in evaluating the menu of options.  
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
as a kind of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS VB.NET PPT: VB Code to Add Embedded Image Object to
adding image to pdf; add jpg to pdf online
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
Also designed to be used add-on for .NET Image SDK, RasterEdge Bitmap to PDF Converter can Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for
adding images to pdf forms; add image to pdf reader
15
36.  The Advisory Group recognized that some key elements of the flows would 
be mutually reinforcing. In particular, carbon prices, flows from multilateral 
development banks and private sector flows support each other in terms of 
both revenues and incentives. 
37.  How sources might be combined in overall revenue mobilization depends on 
some key variables. These include carbon prices, the percentage of fiscal 
revenues  that  is  allocated  for  international  climate  action,  the  use  of 
international coordinated sources, the willingness to channel funds through 
multilateral development banks and the size of carbon market finance.  The 
Advisory Group addressed only potential  incidence on developing countries 
and did not address incidence on developed countries. 
38.  The Advisory Group emphasized the importance of new carbon-based public 
instruments and a carbon price in the range of US$20-US$25 dollars per ton 
of CO
2
equivalent in 2020 as key elements  in reaching the goal of US$100 
billion per year. 
39.  Revenue  estimates  have  been  adjusted  to  reflect  that  some  of  these 
instruments  encompass  incidence  on  developing  countries,  and  that  a 
substantial share of the revenue is likely to remain in developed countries to 
support domestic priorities. 
40.  Of the new public instruments examined, the greatest revenue contribution 
potential is likely to come from  auctions of emission allowances and  new 
carbon taxes in developed countries. Given a carbon price of US$20-US$25 
per ton of CO
and assuming allocation of up to  10 per cent of total revenues 
raised going to international climate action, such sources have the potential to 
generate around US$30  billion annually. These sources have strong carbon 
efficiency attributes, and will not have any direct incidence on developing 
countries.   
41.  The Advisory Group also pointed to the revenue potential of up to US$10 
billion from other instruments, such as redeployment of fossil fuel subsidies 
in developed countries or some form of financial transaction tax that reflects 
the various perspectives of the Advisory Group. 
42.  Without  underestimating  the  difficulties  that  will  have  to  be  solved, 
particularly in terms of national sovereignty and incidence on developing 
countries, the  Advisory  Group  pointed  to  carbon  pricing  of  international 
transport  as  an  important  potential  source  for  climate  financing  (and 
mitigation) that could contribute substantially towards  mobilizing US$100 
billion. Given a carbon price in the range of US$20-US$25 per ton of CO
2
, a 
25 to 50 per cent earmarking of such revenues to international climate action 
and  no  net  incidence  on  developing  countries,  these  sources  have  the 
potential  of  mobilizing  approximately  US$10  billion  or  more  of  public 
finance annually.  
43.  From the perspective of some members that most of the revenue towards the 
goal should be public, there is a need to scale up existing public instruments 
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
acrobat insert image into pdf; adding an image to a pdf in preview
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
out transformation between different kinds of image files and Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft
pdf insert image; add an image to a pdf
16
channelled through direct budget contributions for climate action  in order to 
complement the revenue from new public sources.  
44.  The Advisory Group estimates that, for every US$10 billion in paid-in capital, 
multilateral development banks could deliver US$30 billion to US$40 billion 
in gross flows. There is no analytical or empirically agreed basis on which to 
calculate  net  multilateral  development  bank  flows;  however,  based  on 
methodologies suggested by some members and explained in the report, the 
net multilateral development bank flows would be US$11 billion.   
45.  Enhanced private flows will be essential to economic transformation towards 
low-carbon growth.  Ultimately, these will need to be mobilized at a scale of 
hundreds of billions of dollars.  Multilateral development banks, the United 
Nations system and bilateral agencies, other international institutions, public-
private risk-sharing instruments and more developed carbon markets can all 
play key roles in multiplying potential private flows for climate investment. 
46.  The analysis indicates that a carbon price of US$20 to US$25 could generate 
around US$100 billion to US$200 billion of gross private capital flows for 
climate action in developing countries. There is no analytically or empirically 
agreed basis on which to do net private calculations; however, based on some 
methodologies suggested by some members and explained in the report, such 
gross flows could lead to private net flows in the range of US$10 billion to 
US$20 billion.  
47.  A  carbon  price  in  the  range  of  US$20-US$25  could  generate  increased 
carbon market flows of between US$30 billion and US$50 billion annually. 
One perspective within the Advisory Group was that such flows should count 
towards the US$100  billion goal, while another perspective was that such 
flows should not count towards that goal. From yet another perspective, only 
net  carbon  market  flows  should  count.  Carbon  market  flows  of  this 
magnitude could  deliver  up  to US$10  billion  of  net  transfers,  based  on 
methodologies explained in the report. There is, however, no analytically or 
empirically agreed basis on  how to do  such calculations of carbon market 
finance flows.   
D. Time horizons 
48.  Several of the sources examined by the Advisory Group could be operational 
relatively  quickly.  In  particular,  public  sources  implemented  domestically 
could be implemented more quickly. On the private finance side, flows of 
investments  will  depend  on  a  mix  of  Government  policies  and  on  the 
availability of risk-sharing instruments. In some cases, confidence in policies 
and instruments could be built fairly quickly, but others may require more 
time to implement. 
17
E.  Spending wisely 
49.  The Advisory Group examined cases covering key areas related to enhanced 
action on mitigation, including substantial finance to reduce emissions from 
deforestation and forest degradation, adaptation, technology development and 
transfer,  and  capacity-building.  There  should  be  a  balanced  allocation 
between  adaptation  and  mitigation  during  the  period  2010-2012.  The 
Advisory  Group  presumes  that  the  same  will  apply  in  the  future.  In 
accordance with political commitments made  at the United Nations Climate 
Change Conference in Copenhagen in 2009, funding for adaptation will be 
prioritized for the most vulnerable developing countries, such as the least 
developed  countries,  small  island  developing  States  and  Africa.  The 
illustrative cases are the  African Water Facility, the  South Africa  Wind 
Energy Programme,  Guyana’s  low-carbon growth strategy, the  Caribbean 
Catastrophe  Risk  Insurance  Facility  and  Indonesia’s  Geothermal  Power 
Development Programme. The regional development banks, the World Bank, 
the United Nations system, other multilateral institutions and  the Reducing 
Emissions  from  Deforestation  and  Forest  Degradation  plus  (REDD+) 
partnership will be crucial in scaling up national appropriate climate actions, 
for  example  via  regional  and  thematic  windows  in  the  context  of  the 
Copenhagen Green Climate Fund, such as a possible Africa Green Fund. 
18
III.  Concepts and methods
1
50.  The Advisory Group focused on sources and instruments,
2
examining their 
individual characteristics against a set of agreed criteria and exploring how 
they could potentially be combined.  The Advisory Group also tried to assess 
the different sources and instruments with analytical rigour, finding common 
ground  when  possible  and  acknowledging  differences  when  not.    The 
Advisory  Group  did  not  examine  formulae  for allocating revenue targets 
across developed countries.  
A. Sources 
51.  The  work  of  the  Advisory  Group  on  potential  sources  was  based  on 
suggestions  that  have  been  made  in  the  relevant  literature, 3  public 
discussions and ideas within the Advisory Group itself. Following the terms 
of reference of the Advisory Group, the focus was on the potential sources of 
revenues for the scaling up of new and additional resources from developed 
countries. Having identified and discussed potential sources of finance,  the 
Advisory  Group grouped them into four categories (see chart below): (a) 
public sources; (b) development bank instruments; (c) carbon market finance; 
and (d) private capital.   
52.  Each of these four types of finance  could potentially  play a different but 
complementary role in meeting the potential set of mitigation and adaptation 
end  uses.  In many cases, such as that illustrated in Guyana’s low-carbon 
1
For more details on the methodology, see annex II on concepts and methods. 
2
Such sources and instruments are often used interchangeably, but, when a distinction is made, the former term 
is more generic, referring to an area or broad base, and the latter more specific, for a particular type of measure. 
3
A survey was conducted early in the work of the Advisory Group and is available on its website at 
www.un.org/climatechange/agf. 
Public 
sources  
Public carbon-market 
rket 
revenues 
Direct budget  
contributions 
International 
transport 
Carbon-related 
revenues 
Financial transaction 
taxes 
Development 
bank  
instruments  
Private 
capital 
Carbon 
markets 
Multilateral 
development bank 
contributions 
incl. SDRs 
Public/private 
leverage 
Carbon-market  
offsets 
19
growth strategy, these different sources need to be combined into an overall 
package of funding. 
Case study  
Guyana’s low-carbon growth strategy: aligning global and national  low-carbon 
priorities through innovative financing
Background 
The programme is based on payments for climate services that come  through the Guyana 
REDD+ Investment Fund.  Funds are then channeled into nationally determined low-carbon 
investments. The programme has defined financial, social and environmental safeguards, with 
annual assessment and verification carried out by third parties. 
This  national  programme  is  designed  to  eventually  transition  towards  funding  from 
international carbon markets, reducing Guyana’s dependence on international public financing. 
It is estimated that Guyana will provide US$350 million of climate services during the period 
2010-2015. 
Key messages 
The case shows how various sources of financing could be combined into an overall package 
of funding to support a transition from public sources to carbon markets. In the case of 
Guyana’s low-carbon growth strategy, the source/use matching includes :  
· 
Reduction of current emissions, addressed with bilateral and multilateral transfers from 
public sources; 
· 
Decarbonizing future growth, achieved through a mix of different measures, including 
targeted development lending and carbon market finance leveraging further private 
investment; 
· 
Funding adaptation projects and programmes, which is best achieved through multiple 
foreign and domestic sources. 
53.  The  Advisory Group  formed eight workstreams  on  different sources (six 
public and two private). Each workstream carried out detailed analysis of the 
different sources, assessing them against the criteria laid out in the terms of 
reference. Each of the sources was considered and analysed carefully: 
(a) 
Public  sources:  these  could  be  grants
4
or  loans  (via  multilateral 
development banks or elsewhere) but are, in principle, available to be 
used directly for grants: 
(i)  Revenues from the international auctioning of emission 
allowances (such as assigned amount units (AAU) under the 
Kyoto Protocol): this would involve retaining some allowances 
from developed countries and then auctioning them to raise 
revenues; 
(ii)  Revenues from the auctioning of emission allowances in 
domestic emissions trading schemes: this would involve the 
auctioning of domestic credits (as in the European Union 
Emission Trading Scheme phase III) and allocating some part of 
associated revenues; 
4
Grants relate to sources that require no servicing and therefore constitute “pure” transfers from developed 
countries to developing countries.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested