pdf viewer in asp.net c# : How to add an image to a pdf in preview application SDK cloud html wpf .net class AGF_Final_Report4-part55

40
C. Leveraging gross flows 
108. While different  perspectives can  be  taken  on  how  to  count  gross  flows 
towards the  US$100  billion target, and in particular  on the role of private 
finance and offset flows, there is broad agreement that fostering gross flows 
is a key enabler of green growth. There are three main multipliers in fostering 
gross  flows:  the  multilateral  development  banks,  bilateral  risk-mitigating 
instruments and carbon offsets.  
109. First, the multilateral development banks play a significant multiplier role.  
As described above, they have the capacity to translate one dollar of public 
capital into up to four dollars of gross lending.  In addition, each dollar of 
lending is estimated to generate three dollars of private capital co-investment, 
of which approximately 50 per cent is mobilized from international sources. 
Finally, the  participation of multilateral  development banks in the carbon 
markets  means  that  they  are  potentially  able  to  help  pilot  and  scale  up 
innovative offset schemes. 
110. Second, the use of public instruments to help mitigate policy-related risks 
associated  with  the  transition to  low-carbon economies acts  as a further 
multiplier of gross  resource flows. Each public dollar invested in such risk-
mitigation  instruments  is  estimated  to  generate  three  dollars  of  gross 
international resource flows. 
111. Third, carbon market offsets also generate significant gross flows.  In the 
Advisory Group mid-case scenario of a US$25 carbon price, offset volumes 
are  estimated  to  be  approximately  2  billion  tons, provided that  caps are 
consistent with the Copenhagen Accord commitments.  This generates up to 
US$50 billion in gross flows, crowding in up to US$75 billion in additional 
international private capital investment.  If prices were lower or offsets were 
restricted, it is possible that offsets of this volume would lead to lower private 
sector flows (i.e., closer to US$10 per ton), resulting in only US$5 billion to 
US$8  billion of gross  flows,  crowding  in an  additional US$8  billion  to 
US$12 billion of private capital.  
112. While each multiplier works independently, they are all, to a greater or lesser 
degree, affected by carbon prices.  Lower carbon prices potentially reduce the 
net  public  resources  that  could be  used  to  support sector  transformation 
programmes  in  developing  countries.  They  potentially  constrain  the 
expansion  of  multilateral  development  banks  (and  bilateral)  risk-sharing 
capacity.  In addition, for a given offset capacity in the carbon markets, lower 
carbon  prices  reduce  the  implicit  carbon  price  in  developing  countries, 
potentially reducing the low-carbon investment flow.   
113. If available public funds, multilateral development bank lending and carbon 
market offsets are used effectively to crowd in investment, private capital has 
the potential to deliver substantial gross flows. 
How to add an image to a pdf in preview - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
acrobat add image to pdf; adding a jpg to a pdf
How to add an image to a pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
adding images to pdf files; how to add an image to a pdf in preview
41
Case study 
The African Water Facility: long-term solutions for improved water resources 
management and use delivers multiple benefits 
Background 
The project is a portfolio of 65 projects  targeting water resources management.  It includes 
activities covering the following topics: national and transboundary water resources management; 
water resources information management; water supply and sanitation; and water for agriculture.  
The overall portfolio is valued at US$110 million, with approximately US$370 million leveraged in 
investment funds. 
Key messages 
The project is an example of how the right investments and policies in the agriculture sector can 
deliver multiple benefits simultaneously. In this case, the benefits include: 
· 
Agricultural and income benefits through more efficient water use and better planning; 
· 
Climate change mitigation and adaptation benefits through more climate-resilient water 
supply and sanitation.
D. Creating coherent combinations 
114. How different sources might be combined  depends  on some key variables 
which impact  the revenues  available.   The Advisory Group identified the 
following such  key  variables:  (a)  carbon  prices (values considered were 
US$15, US$25 and US$50 per ton); (b) the percentage of fiscal revenues that 
are allocated for international climate action; (c) the use of sources that are 
more  international  in  nature,  such  as  coordination  on  international 
transportation  levies;  (d)  the  willingness  to  channel  funds  through  the 
multilateral development banks; (e) the expansion and degree of openness of 
carbon markets;
and (d) the political appetite to mobilize multiple sources. 
***** 
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Convert PDF to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff). • Convert PDF to HTML (.htm, .html). PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document in preview.
how to add a photo to a pdf document; add photo pdf
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
PDF to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff). • Convert PDF to HTML (.htm, .html). PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document. • Highlight PDF text in preview.
pdf insert image; adding image to pdf in preview
42
Annex I 
Terms of reference of the High-level Advisory 
Group on Climate Change Financing 
Financing for Climate Change 
1. Based on the need identified in the Copenhagen Accord to study the potential sources of 
revenue for  financing mitigation and adaptation activities in developing countries, and to 
make  progress  on this key  issue  in  the course  of  2010,  the  UN  Secretary-General has 
established a High-level Advisory Group on Climate Change Financing. 
2. The Group will conduct a study on potential sources of revenue for the scaling up of new 
and  additional  resources  from  developed  countries  for  financing  actions  in  developing 
countries, in the spirit of the political commitments contained in the Copenhagen Accord, 
with a view to contributing to an appropriate decision of the UNFCCC Conference of the 
Parties at its 16
th
session in Mexico.  
3. Initial outputs from the Group by the May/June meetings of the UNFCCC will provide 
timely information to Parties for their feedback. This will help to increase the transparency of 
the work of the Advisory Group, allow for comments and suggestions by governments as 
well as guidance for further work that the Group may need to undertake. The final report will 
be submitted to the UN Secretary-General and to the current (Denmark) and next (Mexico) 
president of the UNFCCC Conference of the Parties by November 2010. 
Scope of the work of the Advisory Group 
4. As part of its work, the Group will develop practical proposals on how to significantly 
scale-up long-term financing for mitigation and adaptation strategies in developing countries 
from  various  public  as  well  as  private  sources,  and  how  best  to  deliver  it.    Besides 
considering how existing mechanisms can be scaled up, the Group will also examine the need 
for new and innovative long-term sources of finance, in order to fill the gap in international 
climate financing. 
5. The Group will provide views and suggestions, based on the best possible analysis, that are 
in support of development. The criteria for assessing combinations of sources will include: 
revenue; efficiency; incidence; equity; practicality; acceptability; additionality; and reliability. 
Funding would help fund adaptation, mitigation, technological development and transfer, and 
capacity building for action on climate change in developing countries. The Group will in 
particular address the needs for funding for adaptation of the most vulnerable. 
6. The Group will be expected to consult widely. 
High-Level Group Members 
7. The High-level Advisory Group will be co-chaired by H.E. Mr. Meles Zenawi, Prime 
Minister of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, and H.E. Mr. Gordon Brown, Prime 
Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. 
8. The other members of the Advisory Group, serving in their expert capacities, include other 
Heads of State and Government, as well as ministers of finance, high office holders and 
experts on public finance, development and related issues of the highest quality and standing. 
The composition of the Group ensures for equal representation of developed and developing 
countries. 
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
C# DLLs for Word File Preview. Add references: Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net.
add image to pdf in preview; add image pdf
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
Add necessary XDoc.PowerPoint DLL libraries into your created C# application as You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net.
add photo to pdf for; add photo to pdf reader
43
9. The members of the High-level Advisory Group were designated by the Secretary-General, 
and are formally accountable to and report to the Secretary-General. The Secretary-General 
will ensure that the results of work of the Group are communicated to the UNFCCC process, 
and that feedback and any guidance is received and channeled back. The Secretary-General, 
the Co-Chairs and the Members of the Advisory Group will be actively engaged in outreach 
activities to UN member states and the media to enhance transparency of the deliberations 
and findings of the Group. 
Secretariat of the Group 
10. The Secretary-General has set up a secretariat in New York for a period of 12 months, 
which is linked to the  existing Secretary-General’s Climate Change  Support Team.  The 
secretariat will be responsible for facilitating substantive inputs to the Group, preparing the 
documentation, and for organizing its meetings. 
**** 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP.NET to reduce or minimize original PDF document size Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or
add photo to pdf form; how to add image to pdf acrobat
How to C#: Set Image Thumbnail in C#.NET
VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word following steps below, you can create an image viewer WinForm Open or create a new WinForms application, add necessary dll
add jpg to pdf document; add jpeg signature to pdf
44
Annex II 
Detailed methodology 
The present annex describes the basic concepts and methods developed for the report 
of the Secretary-General’s High-level Advisory Group on Climate Change Financing. 
The annex is organized into seven sections, described below:  
I. 
Carbon price scenarios: describes the three carbon price scenarios 
used and how they relate to other published results.  Also explains the key drivers 
of carbon prices; 
II. 
Criteria of the Advisory Group and evaluation of sources against 
criteria:  describes  the process for evaluating sources and the outcome of  the 
evaluation.    Additional  details  on  revenue  calculations  are  given  in  papers 
produced in eight work streams and published on the web; 
III.  Calculating  net  public  flows:  describes  the  concept  of  grant 
equivalence for concessional public sector loans, as the basis of the calculation of 
net concessional public flows, and the methodology used to quantify the flows.  
This section also discusses views on net measures of non-concessional (e.g., non-
Official  Development  Assistance  (ODA))  public  sector  loans,  as  well  as 
methodologies suggested by some members; 
IV.  Methodology  for  the  multilateral  development  bank  multiplier; 
explains  the  methodology  for  calculating  the  contributions  from  multilateral 
development  banks.  In  particular,  this  section  describes  how  multilateral 
development banks translate an amount of flows into a larger amount of lending 
owing to their ability to leverage funds through the capital markets; 
V. 
Private  flows:  describes  the  methodology  for  calculating  the 
potential amount of private flows leveraged by public contributions and carbon 
market flows. It also describes the share of international versus domestic flows, 
where only the share of international flows is being counted; 
VI.  Allocation of revenues for international climate action: describes 
the methodology used to determine what portion of revenues raised by a given 
source is allocated for climate change financing versus other uses; 
VII.   Summary  of  the  revenue  calculations  by  source:  explains the 
estimates presented in the report. 
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Excel file in C#.net.
how to add image to pdf document; adding an image to a pdf in preview
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Generally speaking, using well-designed APIs, C# developers can do following things. Remove Image from PDF Page Using C#. Add necessary references:
how to add image to pdf in preview; adding images to a pdf document
45
I. 
Carbon price scenarios  
To ensure the consistency of the revenue estimates for the different carbon-
related  sources,  the  Advisory  Group defined simple  scenarios based  on different 
carbon  prices.  The  objective  was  to  ensure  through  these  simple  scenarios  that 
estimates calculated by the different work streams would be comparable and built on 
a consistent methodology, rather than to develop fully fledged scenarios.  
The Advisory Group defined three potential scenarios for the carbon markets 
– low (US$10-US$15 per ton of CO2e), medium (US$$20-US$25 per ton of CO
2
equivalent) and an additional illustrative high-price scenario (US$50 per ton of CO
2
equivalent)
13
The low and medium scenarios are broadly consistent with the 
Copenhagen Accord pledges that followed the fifteenth Conference of the Parties to 
the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. This was supported 
by  a  broad  literature  review that  included  a  wide  set  of  models  using  different 
assumptions and varying interpretations of Copenhagen Accord pledges, and with 
different business-as-usual emission baselines. Given the uncertainties inherent in a 
10-year price forecast, the Advisory Group further checked the numbers by running 
models made available by some members. The high-price scenario uses a US$50 
price per ton of CO
2
equivalent. It is meant to be an illustrative scenario to test the 
revenue flows of different sources in a high carbon price context. This price level 
could be seen as consistent with stronger emission reductions, in line with a trajectory 
consistent  with  the outcome of  a 2-degree rise in global temperatures. Of course, 
there are many assumptions required to link a carbon price with a climate outcome, 
given that carbon markets are only one of many variables that matter. Therefore, the 
focus of the high price scenarios was primarily on illustrating the impact of a higher 
price on revenue sources rather than on developing a fully fledged scenario linked to 
a specific climate outcome or suggesting the appropriateness of this scenario.   
The following prices and volumes were assumed for the three scenarios: 
Offset prices and volumes under different scenarios  
Scenario 
Offset volume (in metric tons 
of CO
equivalent) 
Offset price (per ton of CO
2
equivalent in US$) 
Low 
500-800  
10-15 
Medium 
1,500-2,000 
20-25 
High 
3,000 
50 
For simplicity, it was assumed that prices in the markets for assigned amount units 
(AAUs) under the Kyoto Protocol were the same as offset prices. 
The  models  used  as  a  basis  to  develop  these  scenarios  utilized  updated 
baseline data taking into account the impact of the economic recession on global 
emissions, for example:  
·  The  Framework  to  Assess  International  Regimes  for  differentiation  of 
commitments (FAIR) model of the Netherlands Environmental Assessment 
Agency suggests a carbon price of US$12/tCO
equivalent in a world in which 
13
To simplify the calculations, in the main report, only the top end of the ranges is used to calculate the revenue 
potential of different sources. 
46
the low end of the Copenhagen Accord pledges is reached, and a range of 
US$17-US$24/tCO
equivalent if the high end of pledges is reached.  This 
model includes the impact of the recession in its business as usual modelling; 
·  The  European  Commission  used  the  Prospective  Outlook  on  Long-term 
Energy Systems (POLES) model and was based on an updated baseline that 
takes into account the impact of the recession. It suggests an offset price of 
US$18/tCO
equivalent, assuming the low end of Copenhagen Accord pledges 
is reached and US$32/tCO
equivalent if the high end is reached; 
·  The results were further sense-checked by internal modelling exercises by a 
couple of members of the Advisory Group, using similar  updated baseline 
data and targets (low and high end of Copenhagen Accord pledges) as the 
published models. 
Additional sources that did not include an update to the baseline data were 
also reviewed:  
·  The Environment Protection Agency (EPA) of the United States of America 
suggests  US$16/tCO
equivalent  based  on  the  implementation  of  the 
Waxman-Markey  bill  in  the  United  States  and  the  Group  of  Eight  (G-8) 
agreement to lower emissions by 50 per cent in other Annex-I countries by 
2050, with non-Annex-I countries not taking action before 2025; 
·  Using assumptions similar to those used by the US EPA the United States 
Energy  Information  Administration’s  National  Energy  Modelling  System 
(NEMS) suggests a carbon price of US$32; 
·  The regionally integrated model of climate and the economy based on World 
Energy  Outlook  2009 data assumes a US$8 carbon price based on 
Copenhagen Accord pledges but with no developing country action before 
2020; 
· World Energy Outlook 2009 suggests a price range of US$26-US$37/ tCO
2
equivalent under the assumption of a long-term stabilization at 450 ppm and a 
cap-and-trade scheme in the  Organization for  Economic Cooperation and 
Development  (OECD)  and  European  Union  countries  in  the  power  and 
industry sectors, with a reduction target of 4 per cent below 1990 and offset 
limits of 0.5 Gt to 1.7 Gt per year. 
47
Overview of models of scenarios 
(in United States dollars) 
Low price 
Medium price 
FAIR 
12 
17-24 
POLES 
18 
32 
Additional estimates 
United States EPA 
16
a
NEMS 
12-25 
RICE 
WEO 2009 
26-37 
Based on the assessment of American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 
(“Waxman-Markey bill”) and specific international assumptions that are not based on 
Copenhagen Accord pledges. 
There are a range of uncertainties that could substantially impact any of the 
carbon market forecasts; some of these uncertainties also explain differences between 
the different models: 
·  AAU overhang: There is a large overhang of AAUs from the first compliance 
period, estimated  at  up  to  8 Gt,  which  if  brought  into  future compliance 
periods  could  flood  the  AAU  markets  and  eliminate  any  demand  from 
Government buyers and therefore reduce AAU auction revenues to close to 
zero.  The  overhang  could  potentially  also  affect  demand  from  emissions 
trading scheme (ETS) markets if Governments were to adjust ETS targets as 
Government  targets  are  easily  met.  The  figures  shown  assume  that  this 
overhang would not be used to meet the caps; 
·  The  scope  of  domestic  ETSs:  At  this  point  in  time,  several  developed 
countries are considering ETSs, but the outcome is still unclear. This means 
that the precise scope (share of total emissions of developed countries) of 
ETSs and the related demand for offsets is still unknown; 
·  Design of ETSs: Offset demand and related prices will be driven mostly  by 
the scale and design of domestic ETS markets. There are many features in the 
design of ETSs that will have an effect on prices and offset volumes.  Among 
the more important ones are: 
–  The amount and type of international offsets allowed into the market: 
The more offsets are allowed, the larger the international flows but also 
the higher the financing need in developing countries. This is a result of 
the larger share of the global abatement needed in developing countries. 
Additionally, there are different views on what types of offsets should be 
allowed, in particular whether Reducing Emissions from Deforestation 
and Forest Degradation (REDD) credits and hydrofluorocarbon credits 
should be allowed, or continue to be allowed, in the markets. Expanding 
the scope for offsets would increase the supply and hence reduce prices 
for offsets; 
48
–  Floor or ceiling prices: Domestic ETSs may have a price floor or price 
ceiling, which would affect overall carbon prices; 
–  Banking  and  borrowing:  These  mechanisms  can  be  used  to manage 
supply and demand imbalances over time and hence can affect prices in a 
given year, but have limited impact on the average price and volumes 
over time.  However, banking will tend to encourage reductions below 
near-term  targets,  and  correspondingly  higher  prices,  when  long-term 
targets are ambitious. 
·  Carbon market structure and reform of the Clean Development Mechanism 
(CDM):   Currently, CDM  is the primary  source for  offsets to developed 
countries. A number of reforms, including sectoral crediting or crediting for 
nationally appropriate mitigation actions, are under discussion. These could 
significantly increase the potential supply of credits and hence reduce prices. 
One perspective within the Advisory Group was that the current CDM process 
constrains the supply of offset credits with average processing times for CDM 
of up  to  two  years and significant uncertainty  regarding  the  approval  of 
projects. This led to different views on whether the CDM reform is necessary 
and what direction it should take.    
II. 
Criteria of the Advisory Group and evaluation of sources against 
criteria 
The Advisory Group completed a detailed analysis on each source assessing it 
against the criteria as defined by the terms of reference. These included the following: 
revenue, efficiency and equity, incidence, practicality, reliability, additionality and 
acceptability. The criteria are described in detail in the main text of the report.  The 
assessments of the different sources against these criteria were carried out by eight 
work streams and are summarized in the executive summaries of the eight working 
papers. The working paper summaries were based on both the outcome of the analysis 
of the individual work streams and on the discussions held at the different meetings of 
the  Advisory  Group.  Regarding  the  first  criterion,  revenue,  a  more  detailed 
quantitative assessment was carried out, and is described in more details in the main 
report and in section VII of this annex. 
The assessment against the criteria constituted the core of the material used to 
generate the broader, qualitative assessment of sources described in the main report. It 
is important to stress that, where possible, the assessment was based on a quantitative 
analysis (for instance in the case of revenues), but for several criteria the assessment 
was qualitative, owing to the nature of the criteria. Also, different perspectives on 
sources led to different assessments against the criteria.  
III.  Calculating net public flows 
The calculation of the grant element of the concessional public finance loans 
is based  on  the  of  the  OECD  Development Assistance  Committee  grant  element 
calculator  (http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/34/6/15344611.xls).  Conceptually,  in  the 
narrow definition of concessional public sector loans, only the grant equivalent of the 
concessional element of the loan is included.  This accounts for the fact that a portion 
of the loan must be repaid. 
49
The  OECD  Development  Assistance  Committee  does  not  apply  its  grant-
element calculations to non-concessional loans.
14
Views differed among members of 
the Advisory Group about whether and how to do such a calculation.  Some members 
suggested adapting the OECD Development Assistance Committee procedure in the 
following way:  
In the context of a loan, the concessionality of the interest rate charged (R1) is 
calculated by comparing it with a discount rate (R2).  The discount rate used 
depends on which perspective is taken on the loan.  To the receiver, R2 is the 
interest that would have been due had a sovereign loan of the same size been 
taken out in the international money markets.  From the donor’s perspective, 
the grant equivalence is the opportunity cost of the return that the lender could 
have expected from the next most profitable means of investing the capital at 
similar  risk;  hence,  R2  is  defined  as  the  return  of  such  an  investment.  
Following the OECD methodology, a standard discount rate of 10 per cent for 
R2 was adopted. 
The grant equivalence  is the  value  of  this difference in the  interest rates, 
which is approximately equal to the principal multiplied by the difference 
between R2 and R1 [principal x (R2-R1)].  Since the benefits of reduced 
interest rates from public sector lending will almost always occur over time, 
grant equivalence should be discounted in order to  generate its net present 
value.  In addition, the terms of repayment (such as grace periods and long 
maturities) increase the grant element.   
Based  on  this  methodology  suggested  by  some  members,  both  the 
concessional  loans  (International  Development  Assistance  (IDA)-like)  and  non-
concessional loans (International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD)-
like) that a multilateral development bank (MDB) or bilateral institution
15
can issue
16
were considered in calculating a net multilateral development bank flow.  While IDA-
type lending  has a grant element between 80 and 82 per cent
17
,  non-concessional 
lending,  made  up  of  both  IBRD-type  (with  low  degree  of  concessionality)  and 
commercial,  International  Finance  Corporation  (IFC)-type  loans,  has  a  weighted 
average grant equivalence of ~20 per cent
18
. The net element of non-concessional 
multilateral development bank lending was therefore calculated only on IBRD-type 
14
See definition of “grant element” at http://www.oecd.org/glossary/
:  “The grant element concept is not applied 
to the market-based lending operations of the multilateral development banks.” 
15
Capital could be paid-in also to increase the capital base of a bilateral institution (e.g., KfW in Germany or 
CDC in England) which can act like the multilateral development bank in issuing bonds to raise additional 
capital for loans.  For simplicity only the multilateral development banks are referenced in the text.  
16
In the context of multilateral development banks, non-concessional loans are IBRD-type loans with limited 
concessionality, while concessional loans are IDA-type loans with higher concessionality.   
17
Methodology of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.  Includes both grants and loans 
at the regular credit/grants/blends split for International Development Association fiscal years 2003 to 2011 
(IDA13-IDA15).  See “A review of IDA’s long-term financial capacity and financial instruments”, available 
from http://siteresources.worldbank.org/IDA/Resources/Seminar%20PDFs/73449-1271341193277/IDA16-
Long_Term_Financing.pdf. 
18
Methodology of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.  For the International Bank for 
Reconstruction and Development (IBRD), assumes an average concessional rate for IBRD of historic London 
Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) plus 40 to 60 basis points, maturity of between 10 and 20 years and a three-
year grace period, corresponding to between 27 and 40 per cent.  For the International Finance Corporation 
(IFC), assumes 0 per cent grant equivalent (commercial terms).  A split between IBRD/IFC lending of 67 per 
cent/33 per cent based on World Bank Group split is assumed. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested