pdf viewer in asp.net c# : Add a picture to a pdf document SDK control service wpf azure web page dnn AGF_Final_Report5-part56

50
loans  and  not  on  commercial loans  (IFC-type).   This grant equivalence range is 
applied  to  loans  described  as  development  bank-type  loans  in  the  main  report.  
Further details on the calculation are described in section IV below. 
IV.  Methodology for the multilateral development bank multiplier 
Multilateral  development  banks  and  bilateral  institutions  are treated  as  an 
instrument to channel primary sources in order to generate additional flows
19
.
As a 
secondary source, a portion of the public funds raised (or additional direct budget 
contributions) can be allocated to multilateral development banks directly.  It may 
also be possible to use existing multilateral development bank headroom. The ability 
of these institutions to issue bonds on the back of paid-in and callable capital allows 
them to generate additional flows above the value of the public funds paid in.  
For non-concessional lending, the multiplier is calculated by considering the 
total loans multilateral development banks can make on the back of one additional 
dollar in paid-in capital.  As described above, the multilateral development banks 
issue bonds on the back of the paid-in and callable capital.  The money raised with 
these bonds can be used to issue loans.  The value of bonds that can be issued can be 
approximated by the current average value of the equity/loan ratio across multilateral 
development banks, which is approximately 5.
20
For each US$1 of paid-in capital 
and related callable capital, the institution can issue in that year US$5 of loans.   
For concessional lending, the multiplier is calculated by considering the total 
loans multilateral development banks can make on the back of one additional dollar 
in replenishment.  For IDA-type concessional lending, this is approximately US$1.20 
for each US$1 of replenishment.  The small amount of leverage generated for IDA-
type loans results from the fact that a portion of the money for IDA loans comes from 
flows from borrower repayments and a portion from net income from concessional 
lending.    Unlike  in  the  case  of  concessional  lending,  however,  multilateral 
development banks do not borrow to fund IDA; rather, the largest contribution comes 
from direct donor grants. 
These  multipliers  are  applied  to  the  sources  channelled  through  the 
multilateral development banks to calculate the total gross lending from multilateral 
development banks.  To determine the overall flows that multilateral development 
banks could generate for climate finance on the back of a given amount of paid-in 
capital, it was necessary to make an assumption about the proportion of concessional 
and non-concessional lending  issued by the multilateral development banks.  It is 
assumed that the proportion depends on the carbon price. This is the outcome of the 
19
Some might also consider the resources that could be generated via multilateral development banks using 
current balance sheet headroom to raise additional money in the capital markets.  These revenues were not 
included in the estimates for the sources at this stage. For this source to be considered, there would need to be 
political will to access the headroom, and flows generated through this source would require careful 
quantification. In addition, there would need to be careful determination of what could count towards the 
US$100 billion, given that callable capital has already been allocated to the multilateral development banks 
and therefore could not be classified as a “new and additional” source. The impact on the contingent liability 
of shareholders may be considered “new and additional”, depending on the additional risk multilateral 
development banks would take on their balance sheets.   
20
This multiplier of 5 was based on the current average value of the equity/loan ratio across multilateral 
development banks. Actual values of this multiplier will vary for different multilateral development banks.  
Excludes cost of callable capital in national budgets, which is assumed to be small. 
Add a picture to a pdf document - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
adding a jpeg to a pdf; add a picture to a pdf
Add a picture to a pdf document - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
how to add a jpg to a pdf; add png to pdf acrobat
51
analysis carried out by workstream 4, and is based on the observation that the higher 
the carbon price, the less need for concessionality. It is assumed that the split for 
paid-in capital varies from 50/50 for non-concessional/concessional in the low carbon 
price scenario to 60/40 in the medium carbon price scenario and 75/25 in the high 
carbon price scenario.  Because of the larger multiplier for non-concessional lending, 
this translates into a percentage split for lending, i.e., the amount of finance provided 
to developing countries, to a non-concessional/concessional split of 81/19 in the low 
carbon price scenario, 86/14 in the medium carbon price scenario and 93/7 in the high 
carbon price scenario.    
In the medium carbon price scenario, this split and the multipliers for the two 
types of lending lead to an overall multiplier of 3.5, i.e., each US$1 in flows to a 
multilateral development bank is translated into US$3.50 in concessional and non-
concessional loans.  This calculation is detailed in the box below: 
Calculation of non-concessional/concessional lending split and multiplier 
(Medium carbon price scenario)  
Assumption is that for each US$1 flowing into the multilateral development banks, 
US$0.60 is used to increase the paid-in capital for non-concessional lending and 
US$0.40 is used as replenishment for concessional lending 
Resulting lending is calculated by applying the multiplier described above: 
·  Concessional lending = US$0.40 paid in x 1.2 multiplier = US$0.48 in total 
loans 
·  Non-concessional lending = US$0.60 paid in x 5 multiplier = US$3 in total 
loans 
·  Total lending = US$0.48 + US$3 = US$3.48 
·  Overall multiplier = US$3.48 loans/US$1 paid in = ~3.5 
·  Concessional lending = US$0.48/$3.48 = 14 per cent of the total 
·  Non-concessional lending = US$3/$3.48 = 86 per cent of the total 
Using the approach suggested by some members, an additional step can be 
performed to calculate the narrow public flows, as the multiplier generates gross 
public flows from the multilateral development bank.  As described in section III, the 
non-concessional  loans  are  assumed  to  be  a  mix  of  IBRD-  and  IFC-type  non-
concessional loans, and the concessional loans are assumed to be IDA-type loans. In 
the medium carbon price scenario, using the narrow public methodology explained 
above, one finds the grant equivalence of the gross flows to be US$1.10 in narrow 
public flows (see figure below for  an outline of the calculation steps).  That means 
that, for each  US$1 flowing  to  a  multilateral development  bank,  the multilateral 
development bank can issue loans with a total grant equivalence of US$1.10.  This 
corresponds to an additional US$0.10 generated by the multilateral development bank 
alongside the US$1 of initial  public flows purely on the  back of  their ability to 
leverage their strong balance sheet.   
Intuitively, this figure may seem low, but it is important to note the different 
roles and meanings of gross and narrow flows here.  Multilateral development banks 
are valuable for their ability to leverage flows to create large gross flows: US$1 in 
C# TIFF: How to Insert & Burn Picture/Image into TIFF Document
Support adding image or picture to an existing new REImage(@"c:\ logo.png"); // add the image powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
add image to pdf java; how to add a jpeg to a pdf
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
Dim drawing As RaterEdgeDrawing = New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
add an image to a pdf acrobat; how to add an image to a pdf
52
revenue  allocated  to  a  multilateral  development  bank  leads to  the  equivalent  of 
US$3.50 in loans, i.e. US$3.50 in investment in developing countries, and this does 
not take into account the private capital that is likely to co-invest with the multilateral 
development  banks.    The  grant  equivalent  flows  are  generated  by  interest  rate 
differentials  between borrowing and lending, which are financed by the additional 
risk taken on by the shareholders of multilateral development banks. 
V. 
Private flows 
As outlined in the report, private flows, i.e., investment capital for mitigation 
and adaptation projects provided by private investors, are key to support climate 
action in developing countries. The magnitude of total private flows depends on a 
number of assumptions, including overall estimates of private sector potential based 
on negative and positive cost opportunities, the total amount of public flows available 
and the portion used in  instruments to leverage private investment, the amount of 
carbon market finance available and the leverage factors for both public instruments 
and carbon market finance. 
In the estimates given in the report, the private flows are calculated with the 
following methodology: 
Calculating MDB Multiplier, including net multiplier as proposed by 
some AGF members 
$0.6 paid 
into 
IBRD
IFC
$1 in 
paid in
public 
funds
Total loans 
of $3.5
$3 loans
$0.4 paid 
into IDA
$1.1 net 
public
$1 in 
public 
funds
Total $1.1 in net 
public flows (of 
which $0.1  is 
additional)
x3.5
x1.1
x5
$0.5 
grants/ 
loans
x1.2
$0.7 net 
public
$0.4 net 
public
1 Values for  medium carbon price
60%
1
40%
1
Lending split 86% 
non concessional / 
14% concessional
Grant 
equiv
-
alence
Grant 
equiv
-
alence
C# Word - Paragraph Processing in C#.NET
Add references: CreateParagraph(); //Create a picture for para IPicture picture = para.CreatePicture(imageSrcPath); //Save the document doc0.Save
add image to pdf; how to add jpg to pdf file
VB.NET Image: Create Code 11 Barcode on Picture & Document Using
file, apart from above mentioned .NET core imaging SDK and .NET barcode creator add-on, you also need to buy .NET PDF document editor add-on, namely, RasterEdge
how to add a picture to a pdf file; add image to pdf preview
53
International private capital going towards positive cost activities is calculated 
by applying a leverage factor to both public sources and carbon market offset flows.  
One can consider three different types of flows that are leveraged: 
(a) 
Public flows:  These are the public flows raised from sources such as the 
international transport levy and carbon-related sources.  These include flows that 
will be  used for  mitigation  as  well as adaptation.   Some flows will  leverage 
private capital while others will be used in ways that do not leverage private 
capital (see work stream 7); 
(b) 
Public flows from multilateral development banks:  These are the public 
flows that come from additional multilateral development bank resources. As is 
described in work stream 4, most of these flows will leverage private capital;   
(c) 
Carbon market offset flows:  As is described in work stream 8, virtually all 
of these flows will leverage private capital; 
In  all  three cases, the  total private  capital  is  determined  by applying an 
average leverage factor of 3 x (as defined in work stream 7).  A further adjustment is 
needed to account for the portion of this private capital that will come from domestic 
investors in developing countries.  This portion was assumed to be up to 50 per cent, 
so  50  per cent  of  total private  capital  is  excluded from  the  leveraged  flows  to 
determine the international private capital.   
VI.  Allocation of revenues for international climate action 
It is likely that part of the revenues collected by Governments through the 
measures examined by the Advisory Group will be retained for domestic use, and that 
only a portion of them will be dedicated to international climate action.  To be able to 
estimate the revenues available for international climate action, the Advisory Group 
discussed and agreed on a set of simple assumptions for each source, as follows: 
·  In terms of the money raised through auctions related to carbon markets (ETSs 
and AAUs
21
), the assumption was made that between 2 and 10 per cent of such 
revenues would be dedicated to international climate action;  
·  It  was  assumed  that  a  larger  percentage  of  revenues  linked  to  taxing 
international transport would be dedicated to international climate action owing 
to the international nature of the tax. It was assumed that between 25 and 50 per 
cent would be channelled to developing countries; 
·  For  carbon-related revenues  (e.g.,  carbon  taxes,  wire taxes  and  removal  of 
subsidies) the assumption used was that only between 2 and 10 per cent 
22
of 
the revenues would be dedicated to international action owing to the domestic 
nature of the measures. This was implemented implicitly in the estimations by 
using a lower carbon price rather than by applying the scenario-related carbon 
prices.  
·  For the financial transaction tax, the assumption was made that between 25 and 
50 per cent of revenues would be used for international climate action.  
21
These are only relevant for Kyoto parties. 
22
Where percentage earmarked varies with the carbon price. 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Add Image to PowerPoint Document Slide/Page
clip art or screenshot, the picture will be AddPage", "InsertPage" and "DeletePage" to add, insert or & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
how to add an image to a pdf in reader; acrobat insert image into pdf
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Planet Barcode Generator for Image, Picture &
on Overview. VB.NET Planet Barcode Creator Add-on within Generate Planet Barcode on Picture & Image in VB.NET. In for adding Planet barcode image to PDF, TIFF or
add jpeg to pdf; add image to pdf form
54
·  For multilateral development bank lending and direct budget contributions, the 
assumption was made that these funds would be dedicated entirely to climate 
action.   
VII.  Summary of revenue calculations by source 
A. 
International auctioning of emissions allowances and auction 
of allowances in domestic emissions trading schemes  
Description of source 
The revenues would come from countries contributing a share of the revenues 
from auctioning AAU or ETS credits.
23
It is assumed that they would not use both 
sources for international climate finance at the same time.
24
The calculation is therefore based on an analysis of the available credits, the 
carbon price and the share of revenues earmarked for international climate finance.  
Revenue estimates by 2020 
(in billions of United States dollars) 
Low carbon price 
Medium carbon price  High carbon price 
2-8 
8-38 
14-70 
Assumptions and references 
The key input variables for the calculation are as follows: 
·  Carbon prices: US$15, US$25 and US$50, which correspond to the low, 
medium  and  high  price  scenarios  from  the  Advisory  Group  general 
assumptions; 
·  Available carbon credits: 5.4 Gt, 15.2 Gt and 14 Gt based on developed 
country emissions under the low to high range of commitments made 
under the Copenhagen Accord.  In the low carbon price scenario, the 
total number of carbon credits is lower, as it is assumed that there is only 
partial coverage, i.e., no AAU and only some countries implement an 
ETS.   In the  medium and high  carbon  price  scenarios, there is  full 
coverage via AAU/ETS; total emissions are lower in the high scenario 
owing to additional abatement; 
·  Share  of  carbon  credit  revenues  set  aside  for  international  climate 
finance: between 2 and 10 per cent of the total emission credits available. 
For AAUs, this would in fact be between 2 and 10 per cent of available 
credits.    In  the  case  of  an  ETS,  only  a  share  of  the  total  country 
emissions might be covered by the ETS, e.g., between 40 and 50 per cent, 
as is the case for the European Union. In that case, it can be assumed that 
23
Auctions of assigned amount units are relevant only for Parties to the Kyoto Protocol. 
24
They might use auction revenues from emissions trading schemes to pay for auction revenues from assigned 
amount units. 
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
SDK; VB.NET image cropping method to crop picture / photo; VB.NET image cropping control add-on needs a PC com is professional provider of document, content and
adding image to pdf; how to add image to pdf file
VB.NET Image: Image Scaling SDK to Scale Picture / Photo
this VB.NET image scaling control add-on, we API, developer can only scale one image / picture / photo at com is professional provider of document, content and
add image to pdf acrobat reader; adding an image to a pdf form
55
the share of credits set aside would be proportionally higher than the 
range of 2-10 per cent assumed for AAU auctions.
25
There is a simplifying assumption made that the two sources would substitute 
at the same magnitude, so only the total covered emissions need to be considered, and 
the split between AAUs and ETSs does not impact the revenue estimates. 
Calculation steps 
Revenues for each carbon price scenario are calculated as follows (numbers in 
parentheses are for a medium carbon price scenario): 
·  Multiply the carbon price by the emissions allowances to determine total 
market size (US$25/ton x 15.2 Gt = US$380 billion); 
·  Multiply  market  size  by  the  percentage  of allowances  auctioned  and 
earmarked for international climate finance to determine total revenues 
from source (between 2 and 10 per cent of US$380 billion = between 
US$8 billion and US$38 billion). 
B. 
Offset levies 
Description of source 
The revenues would come from withholding a share of offset revenues as a 
global source, as currently done in the CDM. 
The  calculation is  therefore  based on an  analysis of the  total  offsets, the 
carbon  price  and  an  assumption  regarding  the  share  of  revenues  earmarked  for 
international climate finance. 
Revenue estimates by 2020 
(in billions of United States dollars) 
Low carbon price 
Medium carbon price 
High carbon price 
0-1 
1-5 
3-15 
Assumptions and references 
The key input variables for the calculation are as follows: 
·  Carbon prices: US$15, US$25 and US$50, which correspond to the low, 
medium  and  high  price  scenarios  from  the  Advisory  Group  general 
assumptions; 
·  Offsets: 500-800 Mt, 1,500-2,000 Mt and 3,000 Mt in the low, medium 
and  high  carbon  price  scenarios  from  the  Advisory  Group  general 
assumptions; 
25
In addition, there may be a share of credits that is given directly to emitters as opposed to auctioned, so the 
earmarking would refer to the percentage of total credits, not the percentage of auction revenues (which would 
be smaller). 
56
·  Size of the offset levy: between 2 and 10 per cent of the total offset value, 
compared with 2 per cent currently. 
Calculation steps 
Revenues under each carbon price scenario are calculated as follows (numbers 
in parentheses are for a medium carbon price scenario): 
·  Multiply  the  carbon  price  by  the  total  offsets  to  determine  offset 
revenues  (US$25/ton  x  1,500-2,000  Mt  =  US$38  billion  to  US$50 
billion); 
·  Multiply  market size  by  the  percentage  of  allowances  auctioned  and 
earmarked for international climate finance to determine total revenues 
from source (between 2 and 10 per cent of between US$38 billion and 
US$50 billion = US$1 billion to US$5 billion). 
C. 
Revenues generated from taxes on international aviation 
Description of source 
The revenues for this source would be generated by a tax on international 
aviation.  It could be in the form of a levy on aviation jet fuels for international 
voyages,  a  separate  Emission  Trading Schemes  for  these  activities  or  a  levy  on 
passenger tickets of international flights. The revenue estimates used in the report of 
the Advisory Group refer to a fuel levy.
26
Revenue estimates by 2020 
(in billions of United States dollars) 
Low carbon price 
Medium carbon price  High carbon price 
1-2 
2-3 
3-6 
Assumptions and references 
The key input variables for the calculation are as follows: 
·  Carbon prices: US$15, US$25 and US$50, which correspond to the low, 
medium  and  high  price  scenarios  from  the  Advisory  Group  general 
assumptions; 
·  Total emissions from aviation activities in 2020 of 800 Mt per year, 
including  emissions  resulting  from  carrying  both  passengers  and 
freight.
27
The total comes from applying a growth factor for traffic and 
an  increase  in  efficiency  to  the  actual  emissions  in  2009.    The 
26
An emissions trading scheme would generate similar revenues if 100 per cent of the emissions credits are 
auctioned. A ticket tax as currently calculated would generate slightly lower revenues because it does not tax 
freight (it would change the ranges for revenue estimates to US$1 billion to US$3 billion for the medium 
carbon price scenario and US$2 billion to US$6 billion for the high carbon price scenario). Detailed estimates 
of a ticket tax are available in this annex.   
27
Excludes charter flights. 
57
assumptions come from the International Air Transport Association; the 
Official Airline Guide; the Department for Environment, Food and Rural 
Affairs of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; 
Airports Council International; and Boeing; 
·  Emissions excluded because of their incidence on developing countries 
or  because  they  relate  to  domestic  flights:  550  Mt/year.  All  flights 
between developing countries and one half of flights between developed 
and  developing  countries are not  taken into consideration in order  to 
ensure no incidence of the tax on developing countries.  In addition, all 
domestic and intra-European Union flights are excluded;  
·  Share of revenues raised used for international climate finance: between 
25 and 50 per cent of total revenues.   
It is assumed that a fuel levy would cover the cost of emissions at the carbon 
price, so the total revenues raised would be the same as in the case of an ETS with 
auctioning of 100 per cent of available credits.  A ticket tax could be implemented in 
different ways (e.g., a flat fee, a flat fee linked to average carbon content or different 
fees for categories of flights linked to average carbon content).  The assumption is 
made that the ticket tax should cover the cost of the emissions from passenger traffic, 
and that three different types of ticket taxes will be charged for short-, medium- and 
long-haul flights.
28
Calculation steps 
Revenues  from  a  fuel levy or ETS under  each  carbon  price scenario are 
calculated  as  follows  (numbers  in  parentheses  are  for  a  medium  carbon  price 
scenario): 
·  Subtract the excluded domestic and developing country incidence from 
total emissions (800 Mt – 550 Mt = 250 Mt in scope); 
·  Multiply the carbon price by the total relevant emissions to determine 
revenues (US$25/ton x 250 Mt = US$6 billion); 
·  Multiply  market  size  by  the  percentage  of  revenues  earmarked  for 
international  climate finance to determine total revenues  from source 
(between 25 and 50 per cent of US$6 billion = US$2 billion to US$3 
billion). 
D. 
Revenues  generated  from  taxes  on  international  maritime 
emissions 
Description of source 
The  revenues  for  this  source  are  generated  by  a  tax  on  emissions  from 
international maritime activities.  It could be in the form of either a levy on maritime 
28
Flights are defined as short-haul if they are less than 500 km, medium-haul if they are between 500 and 
1,600 km and long-haul if they are more than 1,600 km. 
58
fuels for international voyages or a separate Emission Trading Schemes for these 
activities. 
Revenue estimates by 2020 
(in billions of United States dollars) 
Low carbon price 
Medium carbon price 
High carbon price 
2-6 
4-9 
8-19 
Assumptions and references 
The key input variables for the calculation are as follows: 
·  Carbon prices: US$15, US$25 and US$50, which correspond to the low, 
medium  and  high  price  scenarios  from  the  Advisory  Group  general 
assumptions; 
·  Total emissions from international maritime activities: between 925 Mt 
and 1,058 Mt in 2020 (from the International Maritime Organization, 
based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report 
on Emissions Scenarios); 
·  Share of revenues excluded due to incidence on developing countries: 30 
per cent of total based on value share of worldwide imports; 
·  Share of revenues raised used for international climate finance: between 
25 and 50 per cent of total revenues.   
Calculation steps 
Revenues from this source under each carbon price scenario are calculated as 
follows (numbers in parentheses are for a medium carbon price scenario): 
·  Subtract the excluded developing country incidence from total emissions 
(925 Mt to 1,058 Mt – 30 per cent = 648 Mt to 741 Mt in scope); 
·  Multiply the carbon price by the total relevant emissions to determine 
revenues  (US$25/ton  x  648  Mt-741  Mt  =  US$16  billion  to  US$19 
billion); 
·  Multiply  market  size  by  the  percentage  of  revenues  earmarked  for 
international climate  finance  to  determine  total  revenues  from source 
(between 25 and 50 per cent of US$16 billion to US$19 billion = US$4 
billion to US$9 billion). 
E. 
Wires charge 
Description of source 
The revenues from this source would be generated by introducing a small 
charge on electricity generation, either per kWh produced (independent of carbon 
59
emissions) or on a kWh proportional to the generator’s carbon emissions.  Unlike the 
other sources, revenue estimates are expressed as a function of the size of the charge. 
Revenue estimates by 2020 
(in billions of United States dollars) 
For  every  US$0.0004  per  kWh  (equivalent  to  US$1  per  ton  of  CO2  in 
developed countries on average), US$5 billion in estimated revenue. 
Assumptions and references 
The key input variables for the calculation are as follows: 
·  Total  OECD  power  emissions  in  2020:  4.7  Gt  (from World Energy 
Outlook 2009); 
·  Total power generated in OECD countries in 2020: 11,994 TWh (from 
World Energy Outlook 2009); 
·  Tax  on  carbon  that  could  be  used  for  international  climate  change 
financing:  US$1/ton,  with  all  revenues  assumed  to  be  destined  for 
international climate action (100 per cent earmarking).  This assumption 
is equivalent, for example, to a carbon price of US$25/ton with 4 per 
cent earmarking.  
Calculation steps 
Revenues for this source are calculated as follows:   
·  Multiply the carbon price by the total relevant emissions to determine 
revenues (US$1/ton x 4.7 Gt = US$5 billion); 
·  Divide  the  total  revenues  by  the  power  generated  to  determine  the 
corresponding  per  kWh  charge  (US$5  billion  ÷  11,994  TWh  = 
US$0.0004/kWh). 
F. 
Carbon tax 
Description of source 
The  revenues from  this source would  be generated  by a small  charge  on 
carbon emissions in developed countries.  Unlike the other sources, revenue estimates 
are expressed as a function of the size of the charge. 
Revenue estimates by 2020 
(in billions of United States dollars)  
For every US$1 per ton of CO
2
charge, US$10 billion in estimated revenue. 
Assumptions and references 
The key input variables for the calculation are as follows: 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested