pdf viewer in asp.net c# : Add a picture to a pdf Library software component asp.net winforms .net mvc AGF_Final_Report6-part57

60
·  Total OECD emissions in 2020: 10.9 Gt (from  World Energy Outlook 
2009); 
·  Tax  on  carbon  that  could  be  used  for  international  climate  change 
financing: US$1/ton.  This assumption is equivalent, for example, to a 
carbon price of US$25/ton with 4 per cent earmarking for international 
climate action. 
Calculation steps 
Revenues from this source are calculated as follows:  
·  Multiply the carbon price by the total relevant emissions to determine 
revenues (US$1/ton x 10.9 Gt ~ US$10 billion) 
G. 
Removal of fossil fuel subsidies 
Description of source 
The revenues from this source are assumed to be generated by the gradual 
removal of fossil fuel production subsidies in developed countries. The total estimates 
that were proposed for phase-out in nine countries in a recent Group of Twenty (G-20) 
report were  approximately US$8  billion  in 2009  in  Annex  2  countries.
29
Other 
estimates of the scale of subsidies are on the range of US$60 billion per year.
30 
Estimating  the  scale  of  potential  fossil  fuel  subsidies  in  2020  among  Annex  2 
countries is not possible given numerous uncertainties, particularly concerning the 
policy choices of future Governments regarding financial, tax and other incentives for 
fossil fuel production and consumption.  Therefore, existing estimates of the scale of 
the proposed phase-out of current subsidies are used as the basis for the 2020 estimate. 
One hundred per cent of the removed subsidies are assumed to be rechanneled to 
international climate action.  
H. 
Redirection of fossil fuel royalties 
Description of source 
The revenues from this source are assumed to be generated by the redirection 
of a portion of the receipts from fossil fuel production in developed countries.  The 
scenario considered is diverting existing receipts, not increasing the level of existing 
receipts.  
The qualitative range reflects a survey of recent self-reported receipts from 
five key oil-producing developed countries.  The recent federal annual receipts for 
each of these countries range from a few billion United States dollars (Australia and 
29
Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Spain, the United Kingdom and the United States, according 
to the June 2010 Group of Twenty (G-20) report entitled "Report to leaders on the G-20 commitment to 
rationalize and phase out inefficient fossil fuel subsidies".  This report is available from 
www.g20.org/exp_04.aspx.  (Note: some of these countries did not propose any fossil fuel production subsidies 
for phase-out.)   
30
See United Nations Development Programme, United Nations Department of Economic Affairs and World 
Energy Council, “World energy assessment overview: 2004 update”. 
Add a picture to a pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
add image in pdf using java; add picture pdf
Add a picture to a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
add photo to pdf online; add an image to a pdf form
61
Canada) to tens of billions of United States dollars (Norway, the United Kingdom and 
the United States). 
No point estimates were produced, reflecting the complexity of forecasting 
federal  receipts,  questions  regarding  the  appropriate  scope  of  jurisdictions  (e.g., 
federal only versus also provincial) and revenue instruments to be considered, and 
questions about  how  to  treat different  types of existing revenue  commitments in 
determining  the  share  of  revenue  that  would  be  available  for  climate  finance.  
Therefore,  existing  estimates  of  the  receipts  are  used  as  the  basis  for  the  2020 
estimate.  
I. 
Development bank-type loans 
Description of source 
Multilateral development banks are treated as a secondary source/channel for 
generating additional flows, rather than as a separate source in their own right. The 
methodology  of  the  Advisory  Group  looks  at  what  leverage  could  be  achieved 
through  the  multilateral  development  banks  channeling  a  portion  of  finance  as 
mobilized by the other sources examined.   
There are a series of assumptions and calculations made to determine the 
revenues available when treating the multilateral development banks as a channel: 
·  The  appropriate  percentage  split  in  different  carbon  price  scenarios 
between  lending  windows  (concessional/non-concessional)  was 
estimated at 50/50 (low case), 40/60 (medium case) and 25/75 (high 
case); 
·  The leverage that could be achieved in terms of multilateral development 
bank  lending  is  estimated  at  1:1.2  (concessional)  and  1:5  (non-
concessional),  based  on  a  review  of  the  existing  balance  sheets  of 
multilateral development banks and regional development banks.  Based 
on  the  split  between  lending  types,  this  corresponds  to  an  overall 
leverage factor of 3 to 4; 
·  The grant equivalence of that lending is calculated with the OECD/DAC 
methodology for concessional lending (i.e., IDA-type) to determine the 
grant element of the lending, as described in this annex.  Some Advisory 
Group  members  proposed  applying  the  same  methodology  to  non-
concessional lending.  
These  assumptions  can  be  summarized  as  follows:  If  US$10  billion  of 
additional finance were to be channeled through the multilateral development banks, 
and allocated at a 40/60 split of concessional/non concessional lending (medium case), 
then total flows could be in the range of US$30 billion to US$40 billion over the 
funding period.   This would be equivalent to US$11 billion in net flows. 
C# TIFF: How to Insert & Burn Picture/Image into TIFF Document
Support adding image or picture to an existing or new new REImage(@"c:\ logo.png"); // add the image powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add jpg to pdf online; add picture to pdf
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
VB.NET image cropper control SDK; VB.NET image cropping method to crop picture / photo; you can adjust the size of created cropped image file, add antique effect
how to add image to pdf reader; add image to pdf acrobat
62
J. 
Financial transaction tax 
Description of source 
The revenues from this source would be generated by a small tax levied on 
financial transactions. Two options were taken into consideration by the Advisory 
Group: a tax on foreign exchange transactions through CLS (settlement system) and a 
tax  on transactions of all  financial  instruments, settled  by  a securities  settlement 
system. The revenue estimates used by the Advisory Group are based on the former. 
Revenue estimates for this source are not linked to the carbon price. 
Revenue estimates by 2020 
(in billions of United States dollars)  
US$2 billion to US$27 billion. 
Assumptions and references 
The key input variables for the calculation are as follows: 
·  Volume of transactions: US$3,000 billion per day (based on estimates by 
CLS); 
·  Tax rate: 0.001 per cent to 0.01 per cent; 
·  Elasticity of volume of transactions to transaction costs: -0.5 to -1; 
·  Percentage of revenues earmarked for climate financing: between 25 and 
50 per cent; 
·  Share  of  incidence  in  developing  countries:  8.5  per  cent  (based  on 
estimates by CLS of the fraction of transactions by value that involve 
developing country currencies). 
Calculation steps 
Revenues from this source are calculated as follows:  
·  Value of yearly transactions are calculated based on the daily volume 
(US$3,000 billion per day x 255 days = US$765 trillion); 
·  Volume of transactions after tax are calculated on the basis of elasticity 
to tax and potential transaction cost
31
.  This results in a reduction in 
volume of between 3 and 6 per cent for a 0.001 per cent tax and  a 
reduction of between 21 and 37 per cent for a 0.01 per cent tax, and a 
total volume of between 604 billion and 719 billion; 
·  Revenues  are  calculated  by  applying  the  range  of  tax  rates  to  the 
resulting  volume  estimates  (ranging  from  0.001  per  cent  of  US$719 
billion to 0.01 per cent of US$604 billion = US$7 billion to US$60 
billion); 
31
R. Schmidt (2007), “The Currentcy Transaction Tax: Rate and Revenue Estimates” 
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
drawing As RaterEdgeDrawing = New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add multiple jpg to pdf; add photo to pdf in preview
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Codes to Add Antique Effect to Image with .
mature technology to replace a picture's original colors add the glow and noise, and add a little powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add jpg to pdf file; add jpg to pdf
63
·  8.5 per cent is deducted to exclude revenues that come from developing 
countries:  (US$7 billion to US$60 billion) x (1-0.085) = US$6 to US$55 
billion; 
·  Share  of  revenue  that  would  flow  to  international  climate  action  is 
calculated as between 25 and 50 per cent of US$6 billion to US$55 
billion = US$2 billion to US$27 billion. 
K. 
Direct budget contributions 
Description of source 
Direct  budget  contributions  involve  revenues  provided  through  national 
budgetary  decisions.  Over  the  period  2010-2012,  developed  countries  have 
committed  to provide  resources approaching US$30 billion, most  of  which will 
probably be direct budget contributions. Some members of the Advisory Group made 
reference to a proposal in the UNFCCC negotiations to dedicate between 0.5 per cent 
and 1 per cent of the gross domestic product (GDP) of developed countries to long-
term  climate  financing,  which  would  correspond  to  between  US$200  billion and 
US$400 billion.
32
L. 
Private capital 
Description of source 
The revenues from this source refer to international private finance flowing as 
a result of specific interventions by  developed countries.   This includes  actions 
financed by public flows and multilateral development banks, such as risk-mitigation 
instruments that compensate for potential lower rates of return required by the private 
investor (also referred to as “crowding in”), and by capacity-building to create and 
implement climate policies in developing countries, as well as carbon market offsets.   
The total  potential  for  private investment was  estimated using  a  marginal 
abatement cost (MAC) curve.  For opportunities with a positive marginal cost, a 
leverage factor is estimated by considering the amount of private flows generated for 
each dollar input into the average project, based on the McKinsey & Company MAC 
curve, as well as Clean Technology Fund and World Bank projects, as detailed by 
work stream 7.  The resulting leverage factor for such projects was estimated to be in 
the range of 2x to 4x, or an average of 3x.  
To apply this average leverage factor, an estimate of the amount of public 
flows,  including  multilateral  development  bank  loans,  and  carbon  market  offsets 
available to leverage private investment is required, recognizing that  not all  such 
flows will leverage private finance.  Carbon offset flows are estimated at between 
US$30 billion and US$50 billion in the medium carbon price scenario, as described in 
subsection M below.  These are assumed to be fully available to leverage private 
investment.   
32
UNFCCC, ”Investment and Financial Flows to Address Climate Change: an Update”, page 13. 
VB.NET Image: Image Scaling SDK to Scale Picture / Photo
Framework application; VB.NET sample code for how to scale image / picture; Frequently asked questions about RasterEdge VB.NET image scaling control SDK add-on.
add image field to pdf form; add image pdf acrobat
VB.NET Image: Create Code 11 Barcode on Picture & Document Using
file, apart from above mentioned .NET core imaging SDK and .NET barcode creator add-on, you also need to buy .NET PDF document editor add-on, namely, RasterEdge
how to add an image to a pdf file; add picture to pdf in preview
64
In addition, it is assumed that a combination of multilateral development bank 
or other public finance provides between US$35 billion and US$60 billion that is 
fully available to leverage private climate-related investment.  Importantly, this is not 
the total amount of multilateral development bank or other public finance for climate 
change, which would necessarily be larger.  In fact, it is reasonable to assume that a 
significant fraction of total public flows will be used in ways that do not  leverage 
private finance.  Most multilateral development bank finance, however, is likely to 
leverage private finance.  The between US$35 billion and US$60 billion of public 
resources to leverage private climate-related investment might therefore derive from 
either  the  total  pool  of  public  sources  or  from  the  smaller  volume  of  additional 
multilateral development bank resources, as described in subsection I above, or from 
some combination of the two.  
After applying the leverage factor to the volume of resources to be leveraged, 
this approach of estimating total private flows would include those from domestic 
sources and flows that originated in other developing countries.  It was assumed that 
domestic investment could constitute up to 50 per cent of total private flows.  These 
flows were excluded in the consideration of flows from developed countries.  
Calculation steps 
Estimated revenues from this source are then calculated as follows:  
·  Between US$30 billion and US$50 billion in financial flows through 
carbon  market  offsets  (of  which  100  per  cent  crowds  in  private 
investment); 
·  An  additional  US$35  billion  to  US$60  billion  in  multilateral 
development  bank  or other public finance,  fully  available to leverage 
private investment; 
·  Total leveraging funds available = between US$65 billion and US$110 
billion; 
·  Using  the  average  3x  leverage  factor,  this  multiplies  into  between 
US$195 billion and US$330 billion; 
·  At the top end of the range, it would also be possible to include up to 
US$70  billion  of  private  financing,  potentially  available  to  support 
negative-cost  actions  if  driven  by  capacity-building  supported  by 
developed countries; 
·  From this total estimate of roughly US$200 billion to US$400 billion in 
leveraged  private investment, up to 50 percent arising from  domestic 
private  sources  within  developing  countries  is  excluded,  leading  to 
between US$100 billion and US$200 billion from developed countries. 
There is no analytical or empirically agreed basis on which to do calculations 
of net private flows.  Some members of the Advisory Group suggested a potential 
methodology  based  on  the  idea  that  private  flows  leveraged  by  public 
investment/instruments  and  carbon  markets  may  have  lowered  their  return 
expectations. An illustrative example can be based on a mid-case scenario that might 
C# Word - Paragraph Processing in C#.NET
Add references: C# users can set paragraph properties and create content such as run, footnote, endnote and picture in a paragraph.
adding images to pdf forms; add picture to pdf reader
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we this VB.NET image resizer control add-on, can provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to add an image to a pdf in acrobat; add jpg to pdf form
65
generate  a gross total  of US$200  billion  of international  private capital flows to 
developing countries by 2020.  If investors of this capital modestly lowered their 
return  expectations,  for  example  by  2  per  cent,  because  of  the  involvement  of 
multilateral development banks or bilateral institutions in the investment, this would 
generate a benefit of 2 per cent of US$200 billion, or US$4 billion, each year over the 
lifetime of the projects. If one assumes a lifetime of 10 years and a cost of capital of 
between 10 and 15 per cent, the net present value of the US$4 billion cash flow 
would be between US$20 billion and US$24 billion. This would be a real reduction in 
the cost of delivering mitigation action in developing countries, and could be treated 
as a net private flow of between US$20 billion and US$24 billion per annum.  The 
estimated net benefit could be particularly valuable for those developing countries 
with more limited access to international private capital. 
M. 
Carbon market offsets 
Description of source 
The  revenues  for  this  source  are  related  to  the  purchases  of  offsets  in 
developing countries.  The potential scale of resources is dependent on the emissions 
reduction commitments of developed countries and on carbon-market design.  The 
calculation described here represents the gross, or total, flows. Additional details on 
the net concept for carbon-market offsets are given in the main report. 
Revenue estimates by 2020 
(in billions of United States dollars) 
Low carbon price 
Medium carbon price  High carbon price 
8-12 
38-50 
150 
Assumptions and references 
The key input variables for the calculation are as follows: 
·  Carbon prices: US$15, US$25 and US$50, which correspond to the low, 
medium  and  high  price  scenarios  from  Advisory  Group  general 
assumptions; 
·  Total offsets: 0.5-0.8 Gt, 1.5-2 Gt and 3 Gt, which correspond to the low, 
medium  and  high  price  scenarios  from  Advisory  Group  general 
assumptions. 
Calculation steps 
Revenues from this source under each carbon price scenario are calculated as 
follows (numbers for medium carbon price scenario are given as an example): 
·  Multiply the carbon price by the total offsets to determine revenues: 
US$25/ton x 1.5 Gt to 2 Gt = US$38 billion to US$50 billion. 
66
Annex III 
Examples of spending wisely 
Guyana’s low carbon growth strategy: aligning global and national priorities 
Guyana’s  low-carbon  development  strategy  aims  to  “make  national 
development  and  combating  climate  change  complementary,  not  competing, 
objectives”. It does this by creating a national-scale, replicable model that addresses 
the 17 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions that result from deforestation and 
forest degradation, while at the same time reorienting the Guyanese economy onto a 
“long-term,  low  deforestation,  low-carbon climate resilient  trajectory”.   Guyana’s 
approach provides a useful model for how market-based climate finance could reduce 
emissions from deforestation and degradation in other developing countries.  
I. 
Background 
Recognizing  the  potential  incompatibility  between  protecting  Guyana’s 
forests and pursuing economically rational development opportunities, in late 2007 
the President of Guyana laid out three challenges to create low carbon prosperity in 
forest countries: 
(a) 
How to make forests worth more alive than dead:  Guyana has 
about 16 million hectares of forest, covering over 80 per cent of its territory. An 
“economically  rational”  development trajectory could see deforestation in  Guyana 
causing 1.5 Gt in cumulative emissions by 2020; 
(b) 
How to decarbonize predicted future growth: As well as increasing 
deforestation pressures, a “business-as-usual” development trajectory would lead to 
carbon-intensive economic development in the non-forestry sectors of the economy; 
(c) 
How to protect against climate change:  Guyana’s coastal region and 
capital lie below sea level, and about 40 per cent of Guyana’s population lives in 
regions  exposed  to  significant  flooding  risk.  In  2005,  floods  caused  damage 
equivalent  to  60 per  cent  of  gross  domestic product  (GDP), and the annual loss 
resulting from flooding is projected to be 10 per cent of current GDP by 2030.  
II. 
Implementation 
Guyana’s low-carbon development strategy seeks to address these challenges 
by interlinking national development, mitigation and adaptation: 
Making forests worth more alive than dead:  At the heart of the strategy is 
a  climate  finance  mechanism,  the  Guyana  REDD+  Investment  Fund,  which  is 
structured as payment for forest climate services. Guyana sells “avoided deforestation 
credits” at US$5 per ton of CO
2
 Payments are then used as public finance in, or to 
catalyse private finance for, low-carbon investments.  Although payments are results-
based, it is estimated that Guyana will provide US$350 million of climate services 
during the period 2010-2015. The Government of Norway has stated its intention to 
pay for US$250 million worth of these services, based on an independent assessment 
67
of results achieved. Once the final US$100 million is committed, the Government of 
Guyana will be able to create the world’s first national-scale forest climate services 
scheme. 
The Guyana-Norway  partnership  is  designed  to  jointly  identify  and  solve 
challenging  issues  that  are  internationally  relevant,  e.g.  balancing  national 
sovereignty  with  international  safeguards.   Funds from the  the  Guyana  REDD+ 
Investment Fund  are channelled into nationally determined low-carbon investments, 
in accordance with the financial, social and environmental safeguards of reputable 
international organizations. Annual assessment and verification is carried out by a 
third party. The system is designed  to eventually transition towards funding from 
international carbon markets, reducing Guyana’s dependence on international public 
financing. It also incorporates a shrinking baseline for deforestation credits, thereby 
reducing carbon market supply over time.  The methodology used is compatible with 
the  recommendations  of  the  informal  working  group  on  interim  financing  for 
Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+), implying 
that  its  replication  internationally  could support  global  additionality and  achieve 
reductions in global deforestation rates of 25 per cent by 2015 (estimated as 7 Gt in 
cumulative emissions abatement). 
Decarbonizing future growth:  During 2010-2015, payments for forest 
climate services are being channelled through the Guyana REDD+ Investment Fund 
to the first wave of public and private investments to support the transition towards 
a low-carbon  economy.  Investments in  2010  and  2011  will  support  low-carbon 
development for small businesses; expand Guyana’s digital infrastructure, including 
a  fibre-optic  link  with  Brazil;  effect  public  interventions  to  catalyse  private 
investments to access US$1 billion in identified export opportunities in six low 
carbon economic sectors; strengthen forest governance and capabilities to monitor, 
report  and  verify  forest  carbon  abatement;  and  support  social  and  economic 
development for indigenous peoples, forest-dependent communities and vulnerable 
groups. 
The biggest investment of the Guyana REDD+ Investment Fund in 2010 and 
2011 will see between US$40 million and US$60 million of payments being used as 
Government  equity  in  a  roughly  US$750  million,  private  sector-led hydropower 
project. Government support will enable satisfactory returns for private investors, 
while ensuring a competitively priced electricity supply in Guyana. This will enable 
Guyana to switch from nearly 100 per cent dependence on fossil fuel-based electricity 
generation to nearly 100 per cent clean, renewable energy supplies. Sithe Global (an 
80 per cent subsidiary of The Blackstone Group of the United States) and the China 
Development Bank are partnering with each other to provide private equity and debt 
financing.  
Protecting against climate change:  While Guyana’s total adaptation costs 
are projected to exceed US$1 billion, a portfolio of urgent, near-term investments 
has  been  identified.    Priority  projects  will  require  about  US$288  million  of 
investment,  including  reinforcement  of  ocean sea  walls,  expansion  of the early 
warning and emergency response system and improvement of sanitation and water 
resilience. Some Investment Fund money will be allocated to adaptation priorities, 
with other financing being secured through domestic and international channels. 
68
III.  Lessons from “spending wisely” 
International support should be flexible enough to meet the national 
circumstances  of  a  country,  especially  its  desired  path  to  low-carbon 
development.  When the low-carbon development strategy was first promoted to 
Guyana’s development partners, few were able to provide substantial support on the 
basis that it did not “fit” with existing donor-funded programmes.  Philanthropy was 
needed to make initial progress.  
Predictable,  results-based  incentives  for  forest  climate  services  are 
essential  for  forest  countries. Action on avoiding deforestation and forest 
degradation  competes  with  other  urgent  national  development  priorities.  It  also 
requires  leaders  to  deploy  significant  political  capital.  If  this  action  is  to  be 
prioritized  by  developing  countries  (with  the  consequent  leadership  and  public 
sector reform demands), predictable, accessible and positive incentives are essential.  
Robust monitoring, reporting and verification systems are require d to 
make  the  forest  payment  system  work. Although monitoring, reporting and 
verification  is  an  issue  that  continues  to  be  discussed  within  the  REDD+ 
negotiations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change 
(UNFCCC), Guyana and Norway have identified a road map to progressively put in 
place monitoring, reporting and verification systems that are compliant with the 
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). In the early stages, payments 
for forest climate services are based on proxies for the eventual capabilities needed 
for  IPCC-compliant  monitoring,  reporting  and  verification.  In  effect,  these 
“discount” the payments that Guyana receives until a full monitoring, reporting and 
verification system is in place.  
Transparency and adherence to internationally determined safeguards 
are essential for international partnership to work. A key challenge in designing 
the  Guyana REDD+  Investment Fund, as with  REDD+ internationally, has been 
ensuring that respect for national sovereignty over development decisions is balanced 
with adherence to international financial, social and environmental safeguards, for 
example to protect the rights of indigenous peoples. Absent UNFCCC guidance, the 
countries have designed the Investment Fund so that the safeguards of any of a jointly 
approved list of institutions are deemed acceptable. 
Existing official development assistance (ODA) financial intermediation 
mechanisms  will need  reform  if  they  are  to  be used  for  climate  financing. 
Considerable time was spent by Guyana and Norway exploring whether particular 
ODA mechanisms could be used for the Investment Fund. Several (e.g., multi-donor 
trust  funds)  were  not  fit  for  purpose  for  a  payment-for-services  concept.  The 
Investment  Fund  has  been  designed  utilizing  ODA  components,  but  greater 
efficiencies will be achieved when modernized modalities are available. 
Action on forestry can lead to development, adaptation and mitigation 
multipliers. Guyana’s low-carbon growth plan envisages using all of the payments 
for  reduced  deforestation  to  support  additional  development,  mitigation  and 
adaptation projects, effectively leveraging the international financing provided for 
69
avoided deforestation to broaden  potential impact.  Preliminary analysis  suggests 
that this could reduce the cost per ton of CO
2
abated by at least one third.  
Forestry payments enable private sector leverage. Guyana is using some of 
the REDD+ payments to invest in early-stage critical infrastructure projects, with the 
aim of reducing the risks that would normally deter private investment (e.g., policy 
risk) before selling the projects to private investors.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested