pdf viewer in asp.net c# : Add image pdf SDK software API .net winforms html sharepoint aleshka1-part69

11 
decision of a citizen. The whole state apparatus is formed by human beings, who 
have their own private interests. Thus, the emergence of corruption seriously 
depends on a person who is employed in the public sphere and seeks certain 
personal benefits from his position
9
.  
In the theory  of  corruption  there are two  ways of perception of  this 
phenomenon 
one is formed by moralists and another one 
by revisionists. 
According to the moralists, corruption is perceived as a disease which prevents 
the well-
being of society. In its turn, the revisionists’ point of view describes 
corruption as  an inevitable phenomenon  which is a  necessary feature of  the 
adjustment process of development of society
10
.  In this text, I will not present the 
opinions about the positive economic and political effects of corruption as well as 
its positive social functions (some of researchers argue about positive impact of 
some types of corruption, such as facilitation payment, redistribution of income 
and quicker decision-making). I would like to focus on traditionally accepted 
negative impacts of corruption on development of the state. Joseph Nye argues 
that in case of existence of corrupt political institutions in a country, it will have a 
significant negative impact on the economy of this state. He proves it with an 
example of the growing costs of doing business and imbalanced supply of public 
goods and. Corruption on political level brings inequality of political participation 
as well as  redistribution of social  benefits,  which results  in  high  social and 
political costs
11
Before  I  start  to describe  the  reasons  of  prevalence  of  corruption  in 
Georgia, it is worth to notice that there were a large number of reasons for such a 
broad expansion of corruption practices in this country. Also, these reasons have 
been changing over time. Some authors argue that the instability in the state 
systems in the countries of the Black Sea region “
is more a rule than an exception 
that citizens do not trust their governments and state authorities, political actors 
do not trust their opponents will obey the formal rules of the game in politics and 
states view their neighbors with heavy dose of suspicion’ and that this prevailing 
9
M.J.Farrales, What is Corruption?, A history of Corruption Studies and the Great Definitions 
Debate, University of California, San Diego, 2005, p. 7-10 
10
M.J.Farrales, What is Corruption?, A history of Corruption Studies and the Great Definitions 
Debate,  University of California, San Diego, 2005, p. 7 
11
J.Nye, Corruption and Political Development: A Cost-Benefit Analysis, p. 9-10. 
Add image pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
how to add image to pdf; add an image to a pdf acrobat
Add image pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
attach image to pdf form; add a jpg to a pdf
12 
distrust partly explains the instability in the region
12
”. This opinion, howe
ver, 
does not help us to understand, whether such poor-functioning state apparatus in 
the Region has been an always existing feature or an acquired one? According to 
the  Corruption  Perception  Index,  annually  published  by  the  Transparency 
International, in the year of 2003, Georgia was ranked among the most corrupted 
countries in the world, together with such states as Tajikistan, Myanmar, Haiti, 
Nigeria and Bangladesh (data from 2003)
13
. In the following chapters, I would 
like to describe the reasons of such wide-spread corruption in Georgia. 
1.1.The cause of corruption: Georgia during the Soviet times and the post-
Soviet era. 
Since  the  Soviet  times,  Georgia  has  been  known  as  a  country  of 
corruption, organized crime, and nepotism. Some authors argue that Georgia was 
one of the most or even the most corrupted republic of the USSR (Kupadze). 
There is a misleading opinion that corruption in the post-Soviet countries emerged 
during the transition period after the collapse of Soviet Union. This point of view 
is not correct - from the old Soviet times, Georgia was notorious by its corruption 
and  wide-spread bribes.  Such system of wide-spread corruption  had been a 
dramatic legacy of the foreign influence of the Russian Empire and later 
of the 
USSR. During the last century, Georgia has become a modern state which united 
various  national  and  regional  minorities.  However,  the  feeling  of  the strong 
kinship ties between various national groups and extended families continued to 
exist. This peculiarity led to emergence of nepotism
14
. Officially, there was no 
private property in the Soviet Union and that fact fostered the development of 
corruption. The reason for that was the absence of legitimate law protecting the 
state property and rather week control of Moscow over the regional authorities in 
the Caucasian and Central Asian republics. Eventually, the officials could dispose 
the  state  property  in  their  private  interest.  Public  officials  in  Georgia  built 
extensive apartments for themselves despite the Soviet housing norms and their 
12
M.Muskhelishvili, Institutional change and social stability in Georgia, Southeast European and 
Black Sea Studies. 
13
Transparency International, surveys and indices 2003, archive  
14
L.Shelley, Organized Crime and Corruption in Georgia, p.16 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on. Able to edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF document image.
how to add a jpeg to a pdf; acrobat insert image in pdf
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
DLLs for PDF Image Extraction in VB.NET. In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be necessary. Add necessary references:
adding an image to a pdf in acrobat; add photo to pdf file
13 
living standards had been incomparable to the rest of the population.  Another 
reason of emergence of corruption in the Soviet Georgia, besides the absence of 
private property, was the shadow economy. One of the centers of the underground 
entrepreneurship in the Soviet Union was the capital of Georgia - Tbilisi. Georgia 
had  the  biggest  shadow  economy  in  the  whole  USSR  (Kim).  The  shadow 
economy was based on the frauds with the raw materials, which were supplied to 
factories, but not registering in the official documents. In this way, the public 
officials and managers of the state factories could sell the unreported goods at the 
black market. Another major segment of the black market, besides the selling of 
unreported goods produced at the state factories,  had been  illegal  fruits and 
vegetables trade. There was a serious difference in prices for fruits and vegetables 
within the Soviet Union as well as very deep shortage of such products 
Southern 
fruits were considered to be luxurious goods). In such situation, the Georgian 
farmers could sell their products at the black market, what resulted in fact that 
their income was ten times higher than the average salary in the Soviet Union.
15
This fact is worth mentioning as after the collapse of the USSR, the Georgian 
farmers  found  themselves  in  conditions  of  complete  poverty.  However,  one 
should remember that the wealth of Georgian villages during the Soviet time was 
not created by positive aspects of the Soviet economy. 
In order to reject the hypothesis that transition period had caused the 
emergence of corruption in the former Soviet republics, I would like to present the 
argument of continuance of the interest in corruption. Eventually, this interest 
appeared not so long ago, approximately in the end of the 1980
th
. At that time, 
scholars had started to  pay  more attention to  this phenomenon because they  
understood that it was very harmful for development of the state. Corruption 
disrupts  democracy,  economy  as  well  as  civil  society.  It  also  increases 
expenditures for governments and creates a cynical perception of politics in the 
society (Elliott, Rose Acherman)
16
. Because of ideological reasons there were no 
studies of corruption during the Soviet time. It was practically impossible to 
collect data on corruption in the USSR. After the collapse of the Soviet Union, the 
15
A. Kupatadze, European Security, Explaining Georgia’s anti
-corruption drive, 2012,  p.5 
16
M.J.Farrales, What is Corruption, A history of Corruption Studies and the Great Definitions 
Debate, University of California, San Diego, 2005, p.1 
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add a picture to a pdf file; add picture pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to add a picture to a pdf file; adding a png to a pdf
14 
emerged  freedom  of  information  opened  an  opportunity  to  study  this 
phenomenon. That is why in the very beginning of the 90
th
, we had observed the 
overlapping of two processes 
first, the transition process, and the second 
dramatic growth of corruption. Of course, these two processes are interdependent, 
but it does not mean that transformation had brought corruption to live 
it has 
already  existed  for  a  very  long  period  of  time,  hidden  by  completely  non-
transparent Soviet system. 
After the collapse of the USSR, as all other members of the Soviet Union, 
Georgia  tried  to  build  the  democratic  regime  in  the  country.  Immediately, 
democracy started to face a lot of barriers and challenges, first of all, the civil war 
and violent ethnic conflicts. These military conflicts drove Georgia to complete 
economic chaos
17
. The situation in Georgia after the collapse of the USSR did not 
improve the situation with bribery and corruption. Georgia was not a communist 
state  anymore,  but  the  Soviet  system  stayed  alive.  All  the  state  apparatus 
continued to be formed from the same people, who ruled the country in the Soviet 
times. The new Georgian president, Eduard Shevardnadze, brought back to power 
the Soviet nomenclature, just after Georgia declared its independence. Until the 
Rose Revolution of 2003, the communist features of the Soviet system dominated 
political system of Georgia. It led to decline in level of life of the Georgian 
citizens as well as deterioration of 
state’s economy
18
.  At the same time, Georgia 
much broader  political  freedom  in  comparison with  other  post-Soviet  states. 
Thereby,  the  Georgian  political  regime  of  the  90
th
could  be  identified  as 
“transitional  hybrid system”. It  still shared a  lot of featur
es  of  authoritarian 
regimes such as concentration of power at the top, lack of rule of law, weak 
institutions, problems with human rights protection and corruption. Even though 
the system was not so harsh, the distance between the state and society was 
perceptible. In that case, the Georgian society at the same time had a high level of 
civil rights and freedoms, but it did not have significant influence on the executive 
power. The executive power of the country had complete monopoly over political 
rule in the country and did not have necessity to implement fundamental reforms 
17
L.Esadze,  
“Georgia’s Rose Revolution: People’s anti
-
corruption revolution?”,
Organized 
Crime and Corruption in Georgia, p. 111-112 
18
L.Shelley, Organized Crime and Corruption in Georgia, p.16 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
List<Bitmap> images = new List<Bitmap>(); images.Add(new Bitmap(Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.gif")); / Build a PDF document with GIF image.
adding images to pdf files; add image to pdf acrobat reader
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Sticky Note to PDF Page in C#.NET. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in Visual Studio .NET framework.
add picture to pdf form; add signature image to pdf acrobat
15 
in Georgia in the 90
th
. Since there was complete absence of institutions connecting 
the society and the government, there was a strong need to create such channels of 
influence and cooperation. Unfortunately, corruption substituted all other channels 
of interaction: precisely, corruption spilled in the gap separating the state and the 
society
19
.  
The stagnation in the state apparatus was created by the fact that Eduar 
Shevardnadze was choosing and hiring people for governmental work not because 
of a common idea of the state building, but because of common hunger for power 
and willingness to be part of a mutually corrupted system
20
. Thought the 1990
th
there was a very strong connection between political power, state institutions, 
police, and the organized crime
21
.  Immediately after the collapse of the Soviet 
Union, there was a process of wide-spread social activity of the citizens, but due 
to various reasons, such self-organization of Georgian society had completely 
finished in the beginning of the 90
th
. During all this period, the relations between 
the state and the society in Georgia had been very weak. The reason for this is the 
low level of institutional trust, low level of formal memberships, and at the same 
time, high level of intensive informal relations. Such societies as Georgian are 
characterized by strong informal networks of trust between relatives and friends. 
In  Georgian  tradition,  the  importance of  friendship  is  salient.  The  Georgian 
traditions of friendship, strong family ties and developed regional identity create a 
powerful network of informal relations in the country. Informal loyalty and trust 
among  families  and  friends  have  created  foundation for  the  emergence  and 
development of such negative factors as nepotism and clientalism in political and 
economic areas
22
.   
Interesting  link  between  political  success  of  both  Shevardnadze  and 
Saakashvilli lies in the sphere of fight against corruption. For example in the 
newspaper “
The times
” in 1985, there was an article saying that the promotion of 
Shevardnadze  to  the highest positions  in the  Soviet Union  gave  to Mikhail 
19
M.Muskhelishvili, Institutional change and social stability in Georgia, Southeast European and 
Black Sea Studies. P.322-323 
20
Burakova L., «Why Georgia has succeeded», «Uniter Press», 2011 
21
N. Shahnazarian, Police Reform and Corruption in Georgia, Armenia and Nagorno-Karabakh, 
PONARS Eurasia Policy Memo No. 232, 2012, p.2 
22
M.Muskhelishvili, Institutional change and social stability in Georgia, Southeast European and 
Black Sea Studies. P. 320 
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; Remove Image from PDF Page Using C#. Add necessary references:
add photo to pdf form; how to add photo to pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; VB.NET: Remove Image from PDF Page. Add necessary references:
adding images to pdf; how to add picture to pdf
16 
Gorbachev a strong ally in Politburo in his fight against corruption
23
.  Even 
though the Saakashvilli’s anti
-corruption reforms get to be similar with the early 
steps of Eduard Shevardnadze, the main principles of rule of these two Georgian 
presidents turned in the different directions. Eduard Shevardnadze, being the 
Minister of the Interior in the Social Socialistic Republic of Georgia, showed up 
the corruption pyramids created by the first secretary of the Communist party of 
Georgia - Mzhavanadze.  Shevardnadze used the anti-corruption policies for his 
campaign against the old party apparatus in the face of Mzhavanadze and his 
family. Although, Eduard Shevardnadze declared the intention to implement anti-
corruption policies in Georgia  in the 90
th
, he  failed to realize this desire  in 
practice
24
.  During  Shevardnadze’s  times,  there  was  a  complete  tolerance  of 
corruption. The amount of bribes paid to officials in 2001, was calculated between 
75  and 105  millions  USD. The  system was  doomed  to  be highly  corrupted 
because all the state officials had extremely low salaries. Very often, the salaries 
had not being paid during months. That was the perfect basis for the bribes
25
. The 
same situation happened to the retired people who had being receiving their 
pensions with a big delay of even half year: ”…
my grandmother was waiting for 
her pension for months. The government did not give her it until she did not 
appoint a responsible person to get it through. That person took 20% of her 
pension. It was awful
26
” The situation looks more dramatic when one knows 
that the pensions were approximately 20-30 lari (10-13 USD)
27
In  the  1990
th
,  there  were  no  anti-corruption  reforms  implemented  in 
Georgia 
the government did not have a unified strategy in that issue. In majority 
of cases, individual ministers dealt with corruption in isolation, implementing 
their own policies on the institutional level. The absence of analyses about the 
actual roots of wide-spread corruption made these policies unproductive. The 
governmental  officials  could  study  and  analyse  the  Georgian  corruption  for 
months and years, while it had been destroying the whole system from inside. 
During  the  whole  rule  of  president  Shevardnadze,  there  was  no  attempt  to 
23
A. Kupatadze, European Security, Explaining Georgia’s anti
-corruption drive, 2012,  p.7 
24
Burakova L., «Why Georgia has succeeded», «United Press», 2011 
25
A. Kupatadze, European Security, Explaining Georgia’s anti
-corruption drive, 2012,  p.8 
26
Personal interview 1. 
27
Personal interview 2. 
17 
implement efficient anti-corruption policies. That is why all the government of 
Shevardnadze did not have any success in its fight against corruption 
they have 
never declared such a fight, being the primary beneficiary of the corruption in 
Georgia
28
. There were several planned anti-corruption initiatives, first of all aimed 
at the black market in the 1990
th
. However, these initiatives had never been 
executed.  The  reason  for  that  were  the  completely  corrupted  bureaucrats, 
businessmen and politicians. Between the years of 1997 and 2000,  president 
Shevardnadze called “the years of crusade against corruption”. Despite such load 
slogans, till the very end of the rule of his rule nothing had being changed
29
During the 1990
th
, Georgia had a chance for improvement of its system 
because of  foreign aid aimed at fight of corruption. This assistance had been 
offered by such international organizations as IMF, World Bank, the European 
Bank of Reconstruction and the OSCE. The Western donors invested rather high 
amounts of financial resources in order to help Georgia to solve its corruption 
problem. However, the citizens of Georgia did not see any results of that aid. In 
the 1990
th
, Georgia had been the most corrupted state among the former Soviet 
republics
30
. In addition, foreign financial aid became the source of illegal income 
for Georgian officials
31
.  
If  we  compare  the  government  of  Eduard  Scheverdnadze  with  the 
government, which came to power after the Revolution of Roses, one can notice 
that the biggest difference between them is the fact that Mikheil Saakashvili came 
to power with  total support of  the society.  He did not  have any obligations 
towards powerful groups of influence  in  the  country as  well  as he  was not 
influenced by corrupted representatives of the Georgian state apparatus. At the 
very beginning of his rule, Mikheil Saakashvili did not stop and turned back as 
did Eduard Shevardnadze in the very beginning of the 90
th
.  
The old Georgian state system of the 90
th
was characterized by the weak or 
rather non-existent institutions. So it has complicated the implementation of new 
28
Tamuna Karosanidze
, “
National anti-corruption strategy and action plan: elaboration and 
implementation
”, 
TI-Georgia, Anti-Corruption Resource Centre, www.U4.no 
29
A. Kupatadze, European Security, Explaining Georgia’s anti
-corruption drive, 2012,  p.8 
30
L.Esadze,  
“Georgia’s Rose Revolution: People’s anti
-
corruption revolution?”,
Organized 
Crime and Corruption in Georgia, p. 112 
31
A. Kupatadze, European Security, Explaining Georgia’s anti
-corruption drive, 2012,  p.8 
18 
projects planed by the new government as well as multiplied problems in almost 
every  sector  of  the  state  system
32
.  Being  the  Minister  of  Justice,  Mikheil 
Saakashvili was perceived to be the only progressive civil servant. On one of the 
meetings with the president Eduard Shevardnadze, he showed the photographs of 
mansions of some of the corrupt state officials with the inquiry of their dismissal. 
Saakashvilli stated: “
it is impossible to remain in this government and witness 
how the leadership is sinking in the morass of corruption and how the state 
apparatus is merging with international criminal bodies and how the country is 
turning into criminal enclave
33
.  
1.2. Regional conflicts in Georgia,  Criminal groups, Thieves in Law 
After the collapse of the USSR in the yearly 1990
th
, large-scale separatist 
movements emerged in Georgia what led to the civil war in this country. The 
reason for such dramatic development of situation was the lack of quick and 
substantial reforms at the very beginning of Georgian independence. There were 
attempts from the Western countries to help to implement the rule of law and the 
justice system in Georgia, but they were not supported by the ruling elite and the 
people working in the state apparatus. The post-Soviet leaders of Georgia did not 
want to listen to the Western experts who were advising them about state building 
as well as promotion of market reforms and privatization
34
.  
Lack of any strong control of the top-leadership of the country over the 
state apparatus created appropriate conditions for the growth of informal clans 
that had existed thought the whole Georgian history. Organized crime in Georgia 
had  always  had  family  and  clan  features.  One  of  major  reasons  for  such 
phenomenon was the lack of self-governance in the country as there had been a lot 
of foreign invasions to Georgia for many centuries. In the Middle Ages, the 
Georgian kings did not have much influence over his vassals because of difficult 
access  to  many  territories  of  his  country  (all  the  Georgian  state  is  very 
mountainous). That is why the Georgian people had been living for a very long 
32
Tamuna Karosanidze
, “
National anti-corruption strategy and action plan: elaboration and 
implementation
”, 
TI-Georgia, Anti-Corruption Resource Centre, www.U4.no 
33
A. Kupatadze, 
European Security, Explaining Georgia’s anti
-corruption drive, 2012,  p.6 
34
L.Shelley, Organized Crime and Corruption in Georgia, p.18 
19 
time without higher authority over them. In addition, there was no well-developed 
civil society there, but traditional communities. All these factors led to protests 
against the central authority in the beginning of the XIX, when the country started 
its centralization. The loyalty of citizens belonged rather to extended families than 
to any state authority. Such family and clan importance in Georgia has survived 
till the present day. All this factors explain the tendency of Georgian people to 
unite in informal groups, based on family and regional ties. If one compares the 
criminal organizations in Russia and Georgia he would see that in Russia there are 
no kinship ties among the members of these organizations. It distinguishes the 
organized crime in Georgia and Sicily on the one hand, and Russia on the other. 
The tradition of organized crime in Georgia has its roots going even before the 
Bolshevik revolution in 1917. At that time, Georgia was a trading and transport 
centre of the Caucasus. The Bolshevik revolutionaries also used the underworld 
crime in their activities. Stalin was using the help of regional criminal groups of 
Georgia in the beginning of his revolutionary career. Afterwards, when he was 
accepted  to  the  Bolshevik  party,  the  Georgian criminal groups  continued  to 
communicate with Stalin, what created a relationship between the organized crime 
and new Communist state
35
The emergence of modern criminal clans in Georgia took place in 
1970
th
. They were composed of professional criminals, high level corrupt public 
officials and the underground entrepreneurs, who were functioning in the shadow 
economy. All these three types of actors had been contributing to development of 
the underground economy of Georgia. Those criminal clans had been focusing on 
exploitation of state resources and misuse of public office in their private interest. 
The Georgian organized crime spilled  over to other territories of the USSR, 
receiving profits from the shadow economy in that places
36
. Again, one can see 
that the roots of the Georgian corruption are much deeper than the transition times 
of the 1990
th
 
The  Georgian  underground  criminal  groups  gave  birth  to  such 
phenomenon as the Thieves in law 
the so called mafia leaders, who lived their 
criminal  life  according  to  a  certain  well-developed  Code  of  Thieves.  The 
35
L.Shelley, Organized Crime and Corruption in Georgia, p.69 
36
Ibidium. 
20 
existence of thieves in law had its own meaning for the corrupted system of 
Georgia. In many cases,  the  shadow power  of  the  thieves  in  law had  been 
replacing the governmental power in Georgia. For example, all the conflicts in 
business in Georgia before the Rose Revolution had been solved using that power 
of the thieves in law
37
. During the 1990
th
, there was time when it very difficult to 
distinguish police officers and civil servant from regular criminals. At the very 
beginning  of  the  90
th
,  a  part  of  the  criminal  world  had  joined  the  police. 
Simultaneously, the  police  officers made  a  fusion  with  criminal  groups  and 
corrupted public officials and politics. Thereby, the gap between the police and 
regular  citizens  had  grown  even  more.  Obviously,  there  was  no  option  to 
complain to corrupted officials about the bad-functioning state. That was the main 
reason why citizens preferred to use the “help” of the thieves in law than the 
assistance of corrupted police
38
. The thieves in law made efforts to be perceived 
as legal businessmen in Georgia. However behind their “business” stood overall 
corruption and imposed power on the markets. The crime groups were helping 
financially and with their human resources to political campaigns of practically all 
Georgian politicians of the 90
th39
.  
The  dominance  of  criminal  clans  and  the  complete  lack  of  authority 
recognition  led  to  regional  separatism  in  Georgia.  For  instance,  in  the 
Autonomous Republic Adjara there had been a complete absence of the rule of 
law. In Adjara, the power was dominated by the Abashidze family clan. Before 
the revolution of 2003, this clan had literary feudal power in the region. It seemed 
that it had nothing to do with the central government of Georgia
40
. It had its own 
boarders, armed forces, e
conomy, and the “government”. There was very serious 
misuse of power by the permanent head of the Republic, Aslan Abashidze: in the 
centre of Batumi, his house had been constantly protected by the snipers on the 
rooftop. This building and surrounding territory was the only permanent lit place 
in  whole  city.  There  were  cases  when  the  central  streets  of  the  city  were 
completely blocked, because a son of Abashidze was racing in his sport car
41
37
Personal interview, 1. 
38
L. Burakova, «Why Georgia has  succeeded», United Press, (in Russian), 2011 
39
L.Shelley, Organized Crime and Corruption in Georgia, p.73 
40
Personal interview. 
41
Burakova L., «Why Georgia has  succeeded», United Press, (in Russian), 2011 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested