pdf viewer in asp.net c# : Acrobat insert image into pdf software SDK cloud windows winforms html class ec0200603-part811

29
Spain. On the other hand, for larger households the relationship between mean expenditures and
household size is smoother in Spain (as a matter of fact, mean expenditure for six-person
households in the U.S. is lower than for five-person households). It is also observed that the
difference in favor of the U.S. tends to decline as household size increases (for six-person
households, those differences are not statistically significant). As the scale factor grows toward
one, these differences manifest themselves in a different U pattern for the ratio “between-group
inequality/overall  inequality”  (see  the  upper  panel  in   Table  4).  The  re-orderings  among
households of different sizes which take place as the scale factor increases are more dramatic in
the U.S, where between-group inequality reaches a minimum before and increases afterwards
more rapidly than in Spain. Consequently, for larger values of  the scale adjustment  factor
Θ  between-group inequality is larger in the U.S.
Since the  difference  in contaminated  inequality tends  to dominate the difference in
uncontaminated  inequality,  the  results  on  overall  inequality  depend  on  the  assumptions
concerning economies of scale. Thus, when economies of scale are assumed to be large (for
values of Θ Θ  below 0.5), expenditures are marginally more unequally distributed among Spanish
households than in the U.S., although the difference is not statistically significant.  On the
contrary, when economies of scale are assumed to be low (for values of Θ Θ  above 0.5), overall
expenditure inequality is significantly greater in the U.S.
The decomposition of the original Theil inequality index, I
1, 
follows the same pattern as
that of the mean logarithmic deviation I
(results not shown but available from the authors). On
one hand, differences in within-group inequality are not statistically significant. On the other
hand, for low values of Θ between-group inequality is lower in the U.S. while the opposite
happens for higher values of Θ . In any case, overall differences are not statistically significant
Acrobat insert image into pdf - insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sample C# code to add image, picture, logo or digital photo into PDF document page using PDF page editor control
how to add image to pdf acrobat; how to add image to pdf
Acrobat insert image into pdf - VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Guide VB.NET Programmers How to Add Images in PDF Document
how to add an image to a pdf in acrobat; adding images to a pdf document
32
and
B(Θ ) = 
µ
(z(Θ ))I
1
(
µ
1
(Θ ),...,
µ
M
(Θ )),∈ Θ [0,1].   
(22)
As the scale adjustment factor Θ  increases, the role of household size in the denominator
of equation (21) increases also, causing within-group welfare to decline. Naturally, this effect is
more pronounced for larger households. Consequently, as Table 6 shows, the decrease in the
within-group term is larger in Spain than in the U.S.
Table 6 around here
On the other hand, between-group expenditure inequality according to I
1
is greater in
Spain than in the U.S. for Θ,  the scale adjustment factor, equal to 0.0 and 0.3, and the opposite is
the case for larger values of Θ Θ . Thus, the penalty imposed on social welfare through this term is
correspondingly larger (smaller) for Spain when the scale factor is low (high). This effect works
in the opposite direction to the previous one (the variation in within-group welfare with the
adjustment factor Θ Θ ) but it is of a much lower order of magnitude. Therefore, the conclusion is
that although social welfare in the U.S. is significantly greater than in Spain, the difference grows
continuously  from  12 to 40  percent  as  the  scale  factor  increases  and  economies  of  scale
diminish.
25,26
D.  Accounting for Differences in Prices
As pointed out before, when expenditure distributions are expressed at constant prices,
expenditure inequality and welfare comparisons reflect both differences in the quantities of
goods and services purchased, and also differences in the price structures prevailing in each
25
This is also the case for SEFs that correct mean expenditures by between-group inequality using members of the
GE family different from I
1
. Results are available upon request.
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Image and Document Conversion Supported by Windows Viewer. Convert to PDF.
adding an image to a pdf; add picture to pdf preview
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
PDF Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat. to PDF. Besides text, users also can insert a target image, like company
add photo to pdf online; adding a jpg to a pdf
33
country. Lacking a spatial price index to compare prices across countries, this section examines
the robustness of  the  results  to  the  choice of  the time period  for  reference  prices. If the
distributional impact of price changes between periods t and t’ in country 1 is very different from
the one in country 2, then expenditure inequality and welfare comparisons at prices of period t
will typically differ from comparisons at prices of period t’.
Let ∆ I
t
(Θ ) denote the difference in expenditure inequality between two countries 1 and
2 at prices of period ti.e.,
∆ I
t
(Θ ) = I
0
(z
2t
(Θ )) - I
0
(z
1t
(Θ )). 
(23)
Similarly, at prices of period t’ < t we have
∆ I
t’
(Θ ) = I
0
(z
2t’
(Θ )) - I
0
(z
1t’
(Θ )). 
(24)
For each country i = 1, 2, let ∆ P
i
(Θ ) denote the distributive effect of price changes from period
t’ to period t, that is,
∆ P
i
(Θ ) = I
0
(z
it
(Θ )) - I
0
(z
it’
(Θ )).                                            
(25)
Suppose, for instance, that the rate of inflation in country i during this period has been greater for
the rich than for the poor, in which case the change in prices from t’ to t is said to be anti-rich.
This means that the Paasche indices required to deflate money magnitudes in period t to express
them at period t’ prices are greater for the rich than for the poor.  Thus, the expenditure necessary
to acquire the period t bundle of goods at t’ prices is reduced for everyone, but is reduced by
more for the rich.  Hence, inequality at t’ prices is smaller than inequality at t prices, that is to
say, ∆ P
i
(Θ ) = I
0
(z
it
(Θ )) - I
0
(z
it’
(Θ )) > 0.
It is easy to see that
26
See the Appendix for differences in the definition of total expenditures that could affect the welfare results.
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. of C# demo code for Excel to TIFF image conversion may directly copy and paste it into your C#
add image to pdf reader; how to add an image to a pdf in reader
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
with no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe VB.NET PPT: VB Code to Add Embedded Image Object to VB.NET PPT: Insert and Customize Text Annotation on PPT
add jpeg signature to pdf; how to add an image to a pdf in preview
35
Table 7 around here
V.  SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
This paper has highlighted the role of demographics and the choice of the reference time
period on expenditure inequality and welfare comparisons for Spain and the U.S. In order to
assess the statistical significance of all results, bootstrap estimates of the sampling variance of all
magnitudes have been computed throughout.
Using a model in which equivalence scales are assumed to depend only on household size
and a parameter reflecting different views about the importance of economies of scale, the results
show that differences in demographic factors can be very important in international comparisons.
Inequality and welfare comparisons of similarly defined 1990-91 expenditure distributions for
both countries are drastically different for smaller and larger households.  In particular, smaller
households in the U.S. are more prevalent, younger, more affluent (based on expenditures) and
exhibit less inequality than their Spanish counterparts; while larger households are relatively less
prevalent, not  as  affluent  and  have  greater  inequality.  Given  this  diversity,  decomposable
measurement instruments help to explain how results at the household size level are translated at
the population level.
When the 1990-91 expenditure distributions in both countries are expressed at winter of
1991 and winter of 1981 prices, inflation over the time period in both countries is essentially
neutral from a distributional point of view. Because the distributional impact of price changes is
of a comparable order of magnitude, expenditure inequality and welfare comparisons are robust
to the choice of the reference price vector.  Those comparisons are also robust to the choice of
36
the inequality or social welfare index, and to potential problems associated with the data in the
tails of the expenditure distributions.
There are good reasons to  identify people’s economic  well-being with consumption
[expenditures] rather than income, but there are few country-wide and international studies that
take this view although the number is growing. Previous studies (Gottschalk and Smeeding
1997) show that around the year 1990, household income inequality was clearly greater in the
U.S. than in Spain. However, when expenditures are substituted for income as the measure of
economic well-being, the ranking of the two countries cannot be maintained unequivocally. The
ranking can be maintained only for the expenditure distributions when economies of scale are
assumed to be small or non-existent. Otherwise, expenditure inequality is smaller in the U.S.
although the differences are not statistically significant. On the other hand, social welfare is
significantly greater in the U.S than in Spain for all values of the equivalence scale parameter,
and the difference increases as economies of scale diminish.
If it is desirable to reduce expenditure inequality, then Spain would have to strive to
lower expenditure inequality within small households while the U.S. would have to pay special
attention to larger households. However, to be able to draw useful policy conclusions much more
work would have to be done. Decomposition analysis could be applied to learn about the main
factors, together with household size,  which  account for expenditure inequality  differences
between the two countries. But, ultimately, policy conclusions will need to wait until the explicit
modeling of such differences has been empirically tested.
37
APPENDIX
A. The Household Definition
In the EPF, a household is defined as one person or more than one person who shares
living quarters, or part of them, and consumes food and other products financed from a common
budget. In the CE, a household (or consumer unit) comprises either: all members of a particular
household who are related by blood, marriage, adoption, or other legal arrangement; a person
living alone or sharing a household with others or living as a roomer in a private home or lodging
house or in permanent living quarters in a hotel or motel, but who is financially independent; or
two or more people living together who use their incomes to make joint expenditure decisions.
Financial independence is determined by the three major expense categories: housing, food, and
other living expenses.  To be considered financially independent, a least two of the three major
expense categories have to be provided entirely, or in part, by the respondent. For further details
on the Spanish and the U.S surveys used for this study, see INE (1992) and Bureau of Labor
Statistics (1993).
B.  The Merge of the Diary and the Interview in the CE
As indicated in Section III, data from both the Diary and Interview are used to define total
expenditures following a method developed by Rob Cage at the BLS (Cage et al. 2002).  The
BLS (1993) estimates that about 80 to 95 percent of total household expenditures are accounted
for in the Interview.  Not accounted for in the Interview are roughly 40 specific goods and
services, e.g., soaps, laundry and cleaning products, tolls, over-the-counter drugs, pet food, and
personal care products.  Data from the Diary are used to impute additional expenditures for these
omitted items to the Interview households.  This is accomplished by calculating the expenditure
for the Diary unique item, as a percent of total food expense, and taking the product of this factor
and the total food expense reported in the Interview.  The budget shares for these items are
produced by index-area and consumer unit size in the Diary sample.  These shares are then
mapped to the CE Interview sample by index area and consumer unit size, and are used to impute
expenditures for these additional items in the Interview.
Household size and age of head are based on the average of the quarterly values for the
values reported (rounded values of average household size were used for our analysis). The
population weights used are also the result of averaging the quarterly weights over the number of
quarters for which the consumer unit participates in the survey.
C. Definition of household expenditures
In this paper, household economic well-being is identified with household consumption.
It would have been desirable to include the value of all the items that households consume in this
measure, but the exercise was restricted by the available data. Given this, the focus remained on
current consumption expenditures.
The starting point is the expenditure bundle used by the statistical agencies for the
production of their official Consumer Price Indexes (CPIs). Included in the U.S. CPI bundle but
not the Spanish CPI bundle are items like funeral articles, gambling expenditures, fines, hunting,
38
fishing and other fees,  rent  and food  in-kind from work,  and expenditures for automobile
insurance.  All of these are considered current consumption for our study and were added to the
Spanish bundle as well.
Expenditures for the acquisition of vehicles for private transportation, house maintenance
and repairs, and life insurance are considered to be more of a form of savings than current
consumption.  Thus, they are excluded for the analysis.  Expenditures for housing (rent for
renters and some type of rental equivalence for owners, as well as utilities), and health and
vehicle insurance are included. In addition, for the U.S., adjustments are made to account for the
flow of services from selected household durables  (see Cage et al. 2002).
However, some differences in the Spanish and U.S. definition of household consumption
expenditures remain. For example, it is known that in both countries health care and education
are consumed by the population; however, households may or may not pay for these consumption
services and related goods, or they may pay relatively little. This is of particular importance when
making international comparisons when one country has national health insurance, for example,
and the other does not, as is the case with Spain and the U.S. To include the household’s
expenditures for the U.S., and not the comparable expenditures made by Spanish households and
the government on the part of Spanish households means that an item like health care (and its
value) in Spain will be underestimated. About 2.28 percent of total expenditures for Spain are for
out-of-pocket health expenditures. This is in contrast to the share for the U.S. that is about 7
percent. Included in the Spanish measure, however, but not the U.S. one are (i) cash
contributions to non-profit institutions and cash transfers to members of the household who are
not living at the residence
27
(for example, college students), as well as (ii) the value of home
production
28
. As noted in the main part of the paper, cash transfers are not collected each quarter
in the CE data so they could not be included in the U.S. total.  No information is collected in the
CE on home production. However, when these last two sets of expenditures are excluded, the
overall results with respect to inequality and social welfare in Spain as compared to the U.S.
change very little
29
.
27
Cash contributions to non-profit institutions and to persons not living in the household data are only collected in
the fifth quarter of the CE Interview.  Our sample includes households who may not have a fifth interview; based on
this, expenditures were defined so that they would be the same across all quarters covered.  Thus, these contributions
are not included in the U.S. definition of current consumption expenditures.
28
Home production includes self-consumption and self-supply.  Self-consumption is defined to be goods (mainly
food) produced on one’s own farm, in one’s own factory or workshop, or by one or some member of the household.
These goods are consumed by household members or given as gifts to others not of this household during the
reference period.  These goods are valued at local retain market prices.
29
When the overall inequality (I
0
) results were produced for each 
Θ
with cash transfers and home production not
included, the sign of the U.S.- Spanish differences did not change.  However, expenditure inequality in Spain
increased marginally with the exclusion of these expenditures.  When  
Θ
= 0.0, the overall inequality index value
was 0.171 (versus 0.166), when 
Θ
= 0.3, the index was 0.149 (versus 0.145), when 
Θ
= 0.5, the index was 0.143
(versus 0.139), when 
Θ
= 0.7, the index was 0.143 (versus 0.140), and when 
Θ
= 1.0, the index was 0.158 (versus
0.155).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested