I
n
t
r
o
d
u
c
t
i
o
n
1.3 Teaching Specialised Classes
Activities 
Introduction
We know language learners have to practise, 
so effective activities are central to their success. 
We do want to help you avoid relying on a 
handful of the same ones, so this section contains 
hundreds of activities, warmers and techniques to 
bring your lessons to life, and make preparation 
easy!
1. Twenty-Four Warmers You Must Know
A selection of fun, interactive speaking activities 
you can use for any class and any level. Almost 
all require no preparation.
2. Twelve Activities You Must Know
These are classic activities and techniques, 
organised by skill, which you can use in any lesson.
3. Activities A-Z
Here we’ve listed hundreds of our favourite 
activities alphabetically.
4. Activities A-Z: Photocopiable Materials
These are the photocopiable activities referred to 
and cross-referenced in Activities A-Z that you can 
photocopy and use in your classes!
H
o
w
t
o
T
e
a
c
h
A
c
t
i
v
i
t
i
e
s
L
e
s
s
o
n
P
l
a
n
s
G
r
a
m
m
a
r
A
p
p
e
n
d
i
x
Copy a picture from pdf to word - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf; how to copy and paste an image from a pdf
Copy a picture from pdf to word - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
copy image from pdf preview; copy image from pdf to
H
o
w
t
o
T
e
a
c
h
A
c
t
i
v
i
t
i
e
s
L
e
s
s
o
n
P
l
a
n
s
G
r
a
m
m
a
r
A
p
p
e
n
d
i
x
I
n
t
r
o
d
u
c
t
i
o
n
2.3 Activities A-Z
45
 Read out your words in random order. Students 
have to fill in every square in the table, and 
remove the three words that don’t fit (of  
course students may fill out the table in a 
different order).
Variation:
•  Students could do this in groups, with one 
student in each group reading out the words.
5. New combinations
Before class: Note down ten adjective + noun 
combinations students have recently learnt (e.g. 
tall man, modern building).
1. Write the adjective + noun combinations on 
the board (ask the students to guess what 
noun you’re going to write next, in order to 
keep them engaged).
2. Divide students into groups. They need to write 
as many different combinations as they can in 
three minutes.
3. Discuss what combinations are and are not 
possible.
Extension:
•  Students write a story using some of their new 
combinations.
6. Collocation snap
Before class: Photocopy & cut up sets of 10+ 
adjective + noun collocations (e.g. heavy + rain). 
Each word should be on a separate card. Create 
one set for each group of around 4-5 students.
1. Divide students into groups. Give one set of 
cards to each group. 
2. Students match the adjectives and nouns face 
up on the table.
3. Ask groups to choose a group leader. The 
leader picks up the cards and shuffles them.
4. The leader places one card at a time face 
up in a stack on the table. All students say the 
word as its revealed.
5. When two consecutive cards make a 
collocation, the first student to bang their hand 
on top of the cards and say ‘snap!’ wins a 
point.
6. The winner is the first to five points.
Variation:
•  You could use snap for any sort of vocab 
matching (e.g. synonyms, antonyms, picture + 
word).
7. Collocations from a text
Before class: Use a text students are going to read 
for understanding first. Make sure it has a number 
of relatively strong and useful collocations (e.g. 
weak tea rather than expensive tea).
1. First have students read the text for gist and 
detailed understanding.
2. Draw students’ attention to an adjective + 
noun collocation in the text.
3. Ask them to underline any other adjective + 
noun collocations they can find.
4. Have students write a short text related to the 
topic using the collocations they found.
Variations:
•  Students could find different types of 
collocation (e.g. noun + noun, adverb + 
adjective, verb + adverb etc).
•  Students could use learner’s dictionaries to 
do this – you could highlight the fact the 
dictionaries list common collocations.
Adverbs in -ly : GRAMMAR
1. Adverb role play
No preparation
1. In groups, students write a script for a role play 
based on functional language they have been 
studying.
2. They need to give directions to the performers 
in brackets, e.g. ‘Customer (angrily): I want my 
money back!’
3. Students practise and perform their role play.
2. Adverb mime
see page 191 - Describing actions:  -ly 
Before class: Photocopy and cut up the cards 
on page 98. Create one set for each group 
of around 4-5 students. Keep A (action) and B 
(adverb) separate.
1. Divide students into groups.
2. In turn, each student takes two cards, one from 
A and one from B. They mime the action in the 
way the adverb says. The other students have 
to guess the complete sentence, e.g. ‘You’re 
playing pool badly’.
3. The student who guesses correctly keeps both 
cards. 
4. The student with the most cards is the winner.
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
how to copy a picture from a pdf to a word document; copying a pdf image to word
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
how to copy pictures from pdf file; paste image into pdf preview
H
o
w
t
o
T
e
a
c
h
A
c
t
i
v
i
t
i
e
s
L
e
s
s
o
n
P
l
a
n
s
G
r
a
m
m
a
r
A
p
p
e
n
d
i
x
I
n
t
r
o
d
u
c
t
i
o
n
Lesson Plans 
Introduction
A major challenge for teachers is how to bring 
ideas and activities together quickly to plan a 
cohesive lesson. This section proposes two essential 
models of lesson plans which you can use as the 
basis for any sort of lesson. In addition, the section 
includes a range of complete lesson plans (Lesson 
Plans A-Z), together with photocopiable materials, 
ready to use.
1. Two Lesson Plans Structures You Must 
Know
These are two lesson types and stages you can 
use to teach just about anything.
2. Lesson Plans A-Z
Here we’ve put the theory into practice, with 
a range of complete lesson plans, including 
photocopiable materials.
3. Lesson Plans A-Z: Photocopiable 
Materials
These are the photocopiable materials referred to 
and cross-referenced in Lesson Plans A-Z
.
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor. dll. Open RasterEdge_MVC3 DemoProject, copy following content to your project:
paste image in pdf file; paste jpeg into pdf
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
Copy the demo codes and run your project to see New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf document; paste picture into pdf preview
116
3.2 Lesson Plans A-Z
A
Animation: using the Web 
Variations: Students can produce new episodes of a story each week, like a TV series.
B
Blog: using the Web
Aim: Students practise creative writing using a Web animation application
Assumptions: Students are familiar with basic navigation on the Web; students will enjoy the chance 
to be creative and to use text-to-speech
Materials: Computers connected to the Internet (one between two students, with a recent operating 
system)
Level: All
Time: One hour
Anticipated problems: 
•  Students do not understand how to use the 
application
Solutions: 
•  Ask IT-savvy students to monitor and help less 
confident students
Aim: Students practise reading for main idea and detail on the Web; students practise writing opinions.
Assumptions: Students are familiar with basic searches on the Internet; students enjoy expressing 
opinions.
Materials: Computers connected to the Internet (one between two students).
Level: Pre-intermediate and higher
Time: One hour
Anticipated problems: 
•  Students will not understand ungraded material 
(language could be above their level/ability).
•  Students will access inappropriate material.
•  Students will post inaccurate language.
Solutions: 
•  Suggest concrete topics appropriate to their 
level (e.g. language learning, food, pets rather 
than politics for an elementary class etc).
•  Research and guide students to trusted sites 
with links to blogs.
•  Help students with accuracy before posting.
Activities
Procedure
State lesson aim
Aim: students understand objective 
of using Internet in the lesson
Time: 5 minutes
•  Have students work in pairs on one computer.
•  Tell students they’re going to make a movie!
Familiarisation with application
Aim: students become familiar with 
what the application can do.
Time: 15 minutes
•  Direct students to a free Web animation application, that 
includes text-to-speech, such as www.xtranormal.com.
•  Students look at some of the movies posted by other users.
•  Students experiment with a two-line dialogue (including text-
to-speech) to become familiar with using the application.
Create animation
Aim: students prepare and create 
their animation
Time: 30 minutes
•  Set a very general topic (possibly related to what they’ve 
been doing in class). Pairs work on a script in Word. Monitor 
and correct errors. 
•  Students create and upload their finalised movies.
Follow-up
Aim: students see result of their 
work; students receive feedback
Time: 10 minutes
•  Students watch (and vote on) each others’ animations.
•  Give individual and whole-class feedback.
•  Students visit later to see feedback posted by other viewers.
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
first! VB.NET Image & Picture Cropping Application. Do you need to save a copy of certain part of an image file in a programming way?
how to copy picture from pdf; paste image in pdf preview
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we code demo, which you can directly copy to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
copying image from pdf to powerpoint; copy pdf picture to powerpoint
H
o
w
t
o
T
e
a
c
h
A
c
t
i
v
i
t
i
e
s
L
e
s
s
o
n
P
l
a
n
s
G
r
a
m
m
a
r
A
p
p
e
n
d
i
x
I
n
t
r
o
d
u
c
t
i
o
n
Grammar 
Introduction
Grammar can be a sore spot for even the most 
experienced of teachers. This section demystifies 
virtually all the grammar you’ll be asked to teach 
up to upper-intermediate level (and includes much 
that advanced students will be hazy about). 
It’s designed to be easy for you to find a grammar 
point, understand it, and know how to teach it.
1. Nouns & Determiners
2. Pronouns
3. Adjectives
4. Adverbs
5. Questions
6. Building Sentences
7. Verbs
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# Powerful PDF image editor control, compatible with .NET Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo
copy image from pdf reader; copy paste image pdf
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link Visual Studio .NET PDF image editor control, compatible Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo
how to cut an image out of a pdf file; how to cut a picture out of a pdf file
262
7: Verbs
Form
positive
negative 
1. The two subjects can be different (e.g. My husband… I) – the rule doesn’t change.
2. After I/he/she/it use was in informal language and were in formal language.
3. For past simple forms see page 221 past simple.
Meaning
Wanting now to be different.
Anticipated problems and solutions
Teaching ideas
From a situation 
The situation should clearly show that someone is in a bad situation, and they’re dreaming of a
better life. 
subject
wish (present)
subject
past simple
I
wish
I
had
a better job.
My husband
wishes
I
was
happier.
subject
wish (present)
subject
aux do (past)
not
bare infinitive
I
wish
I
did
n’t
work
here.
past simple (negative)
Meaning
Checking meaning
•  She wants something different.
•  She’s thinking about now. 
•  Does she want something different? (Yes)
•  Is she thinking about now  or the past? (Now)  
Problems
Solutions
The past tense verb makes students think 
we’re talking about the past.  
Contrast form and meaning explicitly:
‘What’s the tense called?’ (Past)
‘Is she thinking about the past?’ (No)
‘Is she thinking about now ?’ (Yes)
Some students may have learnt they must 
use were not was. (See also page 259 2nd 
conditional.).
Clarify that were is correct but formal. Check the level of 
formality: ‘Is this a formal or informal situation?’
Students try to use this structure to wish 
other people luck for the future, e.g. ‘I wish 
your exam went well tomorrow’. 
Ensure the context is clear so students are confident with 
the meaning of wish + past simple. 
(To wish people success, 
use hope + present simple, e.g. ‘I hope your exam goes well 
tomorrow’ – consider teaching this in a different lesson.)
7
:
V
e
r
b
s
7: Verbs
263
H
o
w
t
o
T
e
a
c
h
A
c
t
i
v
i
t
i
e
s
L
e
s
s
o
n
P
l
a
n
s
G
r
a
m
m
a
r
A
p
p
e
n
d
i
x
I
n
t
r
o
d
u
c
t
i
o
n
For example: 
Is he happy? Why/Why not?
He talks to a friend about life. What does he say? 
I wish I had a sports car.
  wish + past perfect                                                                 
Wanting the past to be different.
Form
positive
I wish I’d
caught the
train!
Level:
Intermediate
Upper Intermediate
subject
wish (present)
subject
aux have (past) past participle
I
wish
I
‘d
caught
the train.
My wife
wishes
we
‘d
bought
a newer car.
Appendix 
Introduction
These appendices provide an ongoing useful 
source of instant information – come to this section 
to clarify anything you’re unclear about!
1. TEFL A-Z
TEFL A-Z covers all the common terms associated 
with language teaching.
2. Grammar A-Z
Grammar A-Z is the place to go to clear up any 
grammar question.
3. Common Irregular Verbs
This is a list of common irregular verbs
4. Spelling Rules
This lists English spelling rules that students need to 
know (e.g. why you need a double t in getting). It 
also looks at key differences between UK and US 
spelling.
5. Useful Resources 
Here you’ll find recommendations for print and 
online resources to find information, teaching ideas 
and opportunities for work.
6. Phonemic Symbols and Abbreviations
These are the symbols you can use to represent 
sounds, so you can highlight particular sounds on 
the board, and students can record pronunciation 
of words. There’s also a list of abbreviations we use 
as shorthand in this book.
H
o
w
t
o
T
e
a
c
h
A
c
t
i
v
i
t
i
e
s
L
e
s
s
o
n
P
l
a
n
s
G
r
a
m
m
a
r
A
p
p
e
n
d
i
x
I
n
t
r
o
d
u
c
t
i
o
n
282
5.1: TEFL A-Z
5.1 TEFL A-Z 
accuracy
Producing written or spoken language without errors. It's 
often contrasted with fluency; when a learner focuses on 
being accurate, their speech can slow down. 
active vocabulary
Vocabulary learners can produce when they speak 
and write. It's generally much smaller than their passive 
vocabulary, which is words they can understand when they 
read or listen.
activity book
A book containing activities for the classroom. These often 
include handouts that you can legally photocopy.
advanced
See proficiency level.
affect
Emotions. Affect plays probably the most important part 
in a language learner's success. Trust in the teacher, and 
a supportive classroom environment, have huge affective 
benefits. Anxiety and boredom of course have the 
opposite result. 
agent  
Also called a recruiter, a person or company that arranges 
teaching work. While there are unquestionably effective 
agents in the TEFL world, do consider carefully what value 
an agent will add when it's generally easy to contact 
schools directly.
aim, lesson
What students will take from a lesson. Consider phrasing an 
aim from the point of view of the students, for example 'to 
learn and practise 'used to' for past habits'. Students tend 
to like a clear aim as it makes the class seem organised 
and purposeful. You can write the lesson aim in the corner 
of the whiteboard before you start a class.
anticipated problems and solutions
What you think students will have trouble with in a lesson, 
and, if so, how you're going to help them. This could be 
problems they'll have doing an activity (a good solution 
is often to demonstrate rather than explain), or difficulties 
they'll have with the form, meaning or pronunciation of the 
target language.
approach
A fairly general set of principles describing a way of 
teaching. For example, the communicative approach 
suggests students need to practise speaking in class. The 
lexical approach believes vocabulary should be the 
primary focus in the classroom. Approach contrasts with 
the more dogmatic method.
application letter
A letter sent to an employer, together with a resume, to 
apply for a job. 
H
o
w
t
o
T
e
a
c
h
A
c
t
i
v
i
t
i
e
s
L
e
s
s
o
n
P
l
a
n
s
G
r
a
m
m
a
r
I
n
t
r
o
d
u
c
t
i
o
n
283
A
p
p
e
n
d
i
x
5.1: TEFL A-Z
applied linguistics
The study of how language is used in the real world. 
Applied linguistics includes SLA (Second Language 
Acquisition), which investigates how languages are taught 
and learned. 
aptitude
How 'good' someone is at languages. It's a controversial 
term, because there are so many factors (affect, 
motivation, input, opportunities for practice etc) that 
influence someone's success. Some people confuse 
aptitude with intelligence, but there's little to no correlation 
between intelligence and the ability to speak a language.
ARC
Authentic use, restricted use, clarification. These are 
proposed by the author Scrivener as an alternative to 
the PPP model. He suggests the times when explanation, 
accuracy practice and fluency practice happen in a 
lesson need to be fluid, and not occur in a set order.
assessment
Any measurement of a person's language ability. We 
tend to associate assessment with formal tests where 
students receive a mark (summative assessment). However, 
informal assessment - such as regular quizzes - can help 
students gauge their own progress. Also, it's very helpful 
if assessment can give students feedback to help them 
improve (formative assessment).
assimilation
When a sound changes because it's next to another sound. 
It makes sound combinations easier to say. English has 
backwards assimilation: an initial sound changes to 'get 
ready' for the second sound. For example, if you say 'ten 
girls' at natural speed, the /n/ sound becomes //, which is 
more similar to the following sound //.
attitude
A learner's beliefs about English as well as their own 
learning. Believing English is the language of imperialism, for 
example, can create a negative attitude towards learning 
English.
audiolingualism
A teaching method popular for several decades after 
World War Two. It suggested that we learn language 
through performing habit-forming exercises. Drilling, a by-
product of audiolingualism, is still frequently used today.
audio-visual aids
Teaching aids such as CD and DVD players, OHPs, 
visualisers, flash cards etc. 
aural
Related to listening. 
aural learners
See learning style.
authentic task
A task that replicates real use of language outside the 
classroom, for example making a phone call, writing an 
email or filling in a form. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested