pdf viewer in asp.net web application : Copy picture to pdf application SDK utility azure wpf html visual studio Short_term_memory_for_serial_order__A_recurrent_n1-part1251

Botvinick and Plaut  
Memory for serial order 
on the implications of a core set of theoretical assumptions.  The key aspects of the model may 
be summarized as follows: 
1.  Neural network implementation
.  The model takes the form of a connectionist or artificial 
neural network, composed of simple, interconnected processing units with continuously varying 
activation values. The units in the model are divided into an input group, used to represent list 
items presented during encoding; an output group, which represents the system's responses 
during list encoding and during recall; and an internal or "hidden" group, which mediates 
between input and output (Figure 2). 
FIGURE 2 AROUND HERE 
2.  Recurrent connectivity
. The model’s architecture is characterized by massively recurrent 
connectivity, forming  feedback  loops over  which  activation can reverberate.    Specifically, 
feedback connections run among the units in the model’s hidden layer, allowing the pattern of 
activation in this layer on each time-step to influence its behavior on the next.  A second (less 
critical) feedback loop involves connections running from the output layer back to the hidden 
layer, allowing the model's outputs to influence its subsequent states. 
3. Role of domain-specific experience
 The system's connection weights are set through the 
operation of a learning procedure, which adjusts the weights — gradually, over many trials —  
so as to reduce output error during performance of the serial recall task.  This aspect of the 
simulations has two key implications.  First, it means that the network’s weights are shaped 
only by the basic demands of the ISR task; they are in no way chosen in order to yield the 
benchmark performance patterns (e.g., primacy, recency, and error patterns) that we shall be 
considering.  Second, and more important, it means that if the model is trained in a domain 
10
Copy picture to pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy pictures from a pdf document; paste jpg into pdf preview
Copy picture to pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
copy and paste image from pdf to pdf; copy images from pdf
Botvinick and Plaut  
Memory for serial order 
involving regularities of sequential structure,  this exposure can, in principle, influence  the 
mechanism that develops for performing the serial recall task. 
4. Activation-based rather than weight-based encoding
.  Simulations using the model are 
divided into training and testing phases, each consisting of many individual trials.  Although, as 
just noted, the system’s weights change during training, this is not the case in the testing 
phase, where the performance of the fully trained model is evaluated.  Here, all of the system’s 
connection weights are held constant.  Since the weights are not allowed to change over the 
course of testing trials, the network cannot employ a weight-based mechanism for encoding 
and preserving sequence information.   Its successful performance of the ISR task must rely, 
instead,  on  sustained  patterns  of  unit  activation,  supported  by  the  system’s  recurrent 
connectivity.
5. Random variability
.  The internal representations of the model (i.e., patterns of activations 
over hidden units) display a degree of random variability.  In some simulations, this variability 
derives from noise added to the model’s hidden unit activations.  In others, as explained later, it 
derives from sampling variability in the training process itself.   In both cases, the presence of  
variability in the model’s encodings plays a central role in its recall errors.   
Again, our approach was to simplify wherever possible, so as to focus on the implications of 
these core stipulations.  This strategy has the advantage of making the basis for the model’s 
behavior relatively clear.  However, it also means that the model bears a rather abstract 
relationship to the behavioral processes and neural mechanisms it is meant to elucidate.  The 
role of learning requires specific comment, in this regard.   As noted above, the model is 
trained on the task of immediate serial recall.  Obviously, it is not our claim that the human 
capacity to perform ISR develops through direct practice on the task.  Rather, the training 
11
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
how to copy pdf image to powerpoint; copy a picture from pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
copy image from pdf to pdf; paste image in pdf file
Botvinick and Plaut  
Memory for serial order 
procedure we used is meant to arrive at a pattern of connectivity that, in the human, would 
arise from a combination of innate constraints and experience with behavioral tasks that place 
a premium on sequence information — perhaps most importantly language comprehension 
and production.    This point, and the overall role of learning in our simulations, are discussed 
further in the General Discussion.      
Full details of the model’s implementation are presented in the next section.  Following this, we 
provide a general description of the sequencing mechanism the model developed through 
training.  Next, we detail the specific results of four simulations.  Simulations 1 and 2 address a 
basic set of behavioral phenomena, including list-length effects, primacy and recency effects, 
transposition gradients, and effects of inter-item confusability.  In Simulations 3 and 4, the 
same basic model was applied to phenomena involving interactions between short- and long-
term memory.  
General Methods 
Model architecture 
In all instantiations, the network was comprised of simple units assuming, on each step of 
processing, an activation level between zero and one.   These were partitioned into an input 
group of between 13 and 43 units, depending on the simulation; an output group containing the 
same number of units as the input group; and an internal or hidden layer of 200 units.  Input 
units were externally set to represent the input appropriate to the current time-step.  Activation 
values for units in the other two layers were set according to a standard approach (Rumelhart 
12
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
Copy the demo codes and run your project to see New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to copy image from pdf to word document; how to copy pictures from pdf
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
first! VB.NET Image & Picture Cropping Application. Do you need to save a copy of certain part of an image file in a programming way?
paste image into pdf acrobat; how to cut image from pdf file
Botvinick and Plaut  
Memory for serial order 
& McClelland, 1986).  Specifically, these units assumed activation levels based on their current 
net input, calculated as:  
(1)                                                             
net
j
=
a
i
w
ij
i
where a
j
is the activation of unit i, and w
ij
is the weight of the connection from unit  to unit j. 
For units in the hidden layer, activations were based on the logistic function:  
(2)                                                             
j
net
j
e
a =
1
1
As described below (see Sources of Variability), a small amount of random noise was added to 
hidden unit activations in Simulation 4.  Activations in the output layer were based on the 
softmax function:  
(3)                                                                
a
j
=
e
net
j
e
net
k
k
where indexes all of the units in the output layer.   The softmax activation function simulates a 
form of competition within the layer, ensuring that overall activation in the layer sums to one.  
Moreover, when used with the divergence error metric described below, it can be understood 
as representing the posterior probability of a particular event from a set of mutually exclusive 
alternatives (Rumelhart, Durbin, Golden, & Chauvin, 1996) 
13
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we code demo, which you can directly copy to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to cut image from pdf; copy and paste images from pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor. dll. Open RasterEdge_MVC3 DemoProject, copy following content to your project:
paste jpeg into pdf; how to paste a picture into a pdf
Botvinick and Plaut  
Memory for serial order 
The connectivity of the network, in all instantiations, was as illustrated in Figure 2.  Activation 
fed forward from the input layer to the hidden layer, and from the hidden layer to the output 
layer.  Recurrent connections also allowed activation to flow from the output layer to the hidden 
layer (see the sections on training and testing for additional information on this projection), and 
from units in the hidden layer to all other units in the same layer.    For every projection, all 
units in the sending layer were connected to all units in the receiving layer. Each unit in the 
hidden and output layers also received an input from a single bias unit, with a fixed activation of 
one.   
Weights were initialized to random values between –1 and 1 (for recurrent connections, 
±
0.5; 
weights from the bias unit to hidden units were initialized at –1, in order to avoid strong hidden 
unit activation early in training, which can slow the learning process).  Operation of the network 
was in discrete time, with each step corresponding to an event in the task, either presentation 
of a list item at encoding, or output of an item at recall.  On each time step, activations in the 
hidden layer were determined prior to activations in the output layer.  Recurrent connections 
were associated with a one time-step delay, as is conventional in the simple recurrent network 
implementation (Elman, 1990).   As a result of this conduction delay, the pattern of activation in 
the hidden layer was determined by the joint influence of 1) the pattern of activation in the input 
layer, 2) the pattern of activation in the hidden layer on the previous time step, 3) the pattern of 
activation  in  the  output  layer  on the  previous  time  step  (following  winner-take-all  action 
selection, as described further below).   
14
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned or all image objects from PDF document in
how to copy pictures from pdf in; copy image from pdf reader
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo remove multiple or all images from PDF document.
how to cut an image out of a pdf file; extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste
Botvinick and Plaut  
Memory for serial order 
Task and Representations 
The input and output representations used in the simulations were straightforward.  Simulations 
1, 3 and 4 used single units to represent individual list items (English letters in Simulations 1 
and 3, pseudowords in Simulation 4).  To simulate presentation of an item, the input unit 
standing for that item was assigned an activation of one, with all other input units set to zero.  It 
should  be  noted  that  this  localist  representation  scheme  was  not  necessary;  distributed 
representations could just as well have been used.  Localist representations were used for 
simplicity and to avoid spurious similarities. As described in Simulation 2, that study used two-
dimensional item representations, allowing inclusion of confusable items (items identical on  
one dimension) and non-confusable (non-overlapping) items. All instantiations of the model 
included a special unit in the input layer to serve as the recall cue, and one in the output layer 
to signal the end of recall. 
The task addressed in all simulations was forward, immediate serial recall.  During encoding, 
individual item representations in the model’s input layer were activated on successive time-
steps, with the task being to activate the corresponding item representation in the output layer.   
Following the final element in the target list, the recall cue unit in the input layer was activated.  
This unit remained activated throughout the recall phase, during which the task was to output 
the items in the target list, one per time step and in their original order.   The recall cue was the 
only input unit activated during recall.   At the end of recall, the task called for the network to 
activate a special output unit indicating that recall was complete.  List lengths presented during 
training and testing varied from length 1 to length 6, 8 or 9, depending on the simulation. (To 
minimize training time, the maximum list length for each simulation was chosen to match the 
maximum list length in the target empirical studies.  Training to longer list lengths made little 
difference in the model’s behavior).   It is important to note that, in all simulations, the model 
15
Botvinick and Plaut  
Memory for serial order 
was trained on multiple list lengths.  This is not an incidental aspect of the simulations; training 
the model only on a single list length was found to produce results qualitatively different from 
those that will be reported here. 
Training 
The model was trained on the ISR task as just described.  Training began with a list of length 
one.  Following this, list length increased by one element per trial until a simulation-specific 
maximum length was reached.  Following presentation of a list of maximum length, the list 
length returned to one and the cycle repeated.  In what follows, we refer to the processing of a 
single list (including both encoding and recall) as a trial
, and a single pass through the full 
range of list lengths as a training cycle
.  
Lists presented during training in Simulations 1 and 2 were composed of input elements 
selected randomly without replacement.  Lists in Simulations 3 and 4 were generated based on 
specific transition frequencies, as described in conjunction with the simulations themselves.   
Learning  was  accomplished  using  a  version  of  recurrent  backpropagation  through  time, 
adapted to the simple recurrent network architecture (Williams & Zipser, 1995) using binary 
target activations. The divergence error metric was employed: 
(4)                                                             
t
j
j
log
t
j
a
j
⎛ 
⎝ 
⎜ 
⎜ 
⎞ 
⎠ 
⎟ 
⎟ 
16
Botvinick and Plaut  
Memory for serial order 
where j indexes across output units.   When divergence error is combined with the softmax 
activation function in the setting of a multinomial classification problem, such as the present 
ISR task, the learning procedure yields a network that approximates a maximum likelihood or 
Bayesian  classifier (Rumelhart et  al.,  1996),  a point that will become  important in some 
analyses of the model’s behavior below.   
The learning rate was set at 0.001 for all simulations.  Weights were updated at the end of 
each trial.  During training, teacher forcing was used in generating the feedback from output to 
hidden layers.  That is, the activations propagated over the recurrent connections from output 
to hidden layers were based on the target values for the output units, not their actual activation. 
At the beginning of each trial, activations for all units in the hidden layer were set to 0.5, and for 
all units in the output layer to zero (determining the activations propagated over recurrent 
connections on the first time-step). 
For each simulation, training proceeded until the network reached a predetermined level of 
recall accuracy (proportion of lists of a selected length recalled correctly).  For this purpose, 
performance was evaluated after every 10,000 trials.   The reference accuracy level was drawn 
from the relevant empirical studies, as detailed in subsequent sections.  It should be noted that, 
beyond the noise  parameter used in Simulation 4, length of training was the only parameter in 
our simulations  that was varied so as to optimize the fit to empirical data.  
Testing 
At test, the weights in the network were held constant, and further lists were presented. 
Characteristics of the test lists are described in conjunction with each simulation.  As also 
17
Botvinick and Plaut  
Memory for serial order 
detailed there, the probability of any list appearing during both training and testing was, in 
general, very small.  
The network's response was identified by selecting the most highly activated unit in the output 
layer, ignoring the end-of-list unit.  The number of responses collected was set equal to the 
length of the target lists.  This testing method was analogous to presenting subjects in an 
immediate serial recall experiment with fill-in boxes for their responses, and insisting that they 
provide a response in each box, forbidding omissions.   In simulations where recall was 
terminated  upon  selection  of  the  end-of-list unit  (not  further  reported here), the  network 
responded  with  the incorrect list  length infrequently.   For  example, in Simulation 1, this 
occurred on 0% of trials for lists length 3; 1.7% of trials for length 6; and 8.9% of trials for length 
9.  Further simulations in which a response threshold was imposed, allowing omission errors to 
occur, did not change the overall pattern of data to be reported here.    
Unless otherwise noted, accuracy data presented in this report are based on averages over 
5000 trials (at the relevant list length), a sample size associated with negligible variance. Data 
presented for each simulation are based on a single set of weights, generated in a single 
training run.  However, in all cases, the reported patterns of behavior were found to be highly 
reproducible, reliably emerging each time the model was trained. 
Evaluation of Performance 
The specific behavioral phenomena to be addressed in each simulation, and the associated 
approach to analysis, are introduced in conjunction with the simulations themselves.  In each 
case, the behavioral data provide clear qualitative contrasts or trends, and model performance 
18
Botvinick and Plaut  
Memory for serial order 
was evaluated based on the  degree  to which it displayed  the same qualitative patterns.   
Nevertheless, for completeness, root mean squared error is reported for fits involving more 
than two empirical data points.   Note that, given our use of large sample sizes, the data 
presented provide a fairly precise indication of the central tendencies characterizing model 
performance; our goal was not to model the degree of variability in empirical data sets, or to 
address individual differences.  
In selecting which phenomena to address, we applied three criteria.   First, we included basic 
phenomena that have come to be accepted as standard benchmarks for computational models 
in the domain.   Second, we included phenomena that have been considered to militate against 
the application of recurrent networks to serial recall, or to provide special support for accounts 
different from the one presented here.  Finally, we included phenomena that highlight unique 
aspects  of  the  present  account,  in  particular  the  behavioral  data  concerning  the  role 
background knowledge in serial recall. 
Sources of Variability 
In some settings (in particular, Simulation 4) normally distributed noise, with mean zero, was 
added to the network’s hidden unit activations during testing.  In other simulations, noise was 
not added; however, even here, other factors led the network’s internal representations to 
display a degree of random variability.  The sources of this variability relate to the learning 
process.  As described above, during training, the model’s weights were modified in response 
to each list it processes.  Because learning was based on error-reduction, these modifications 
were guaranteed to benefit the processing of the just-presented list.   However, the weight 
modifications made on each trial were not constrained by how they might affect performance 
on other possible lists.  Because the learning rate was small, the weights converged on values 
19
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested