pdf viewer in c# code project : Cut picture pdf SDK control API .net web page asp.net sharepoint PoythressVernInTheBeginningWasTheWord16-part15

P a
r
 
3
i
Discourse
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   161
5/14/09   4:46:24 PM
Cut picture pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to cut and paste image from pdf; copy and paste image from pdf
Cut picture pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to cut a picture from a pdf document; how to copy image from pdf to word
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   162
5/14/09   4:46:25 PM
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
VB.NET Image & Picture Cropping Application. Do you need to save a copy of certain part of an image file in a programming way? Do you need to cut out certain
paste image into pdf; how to copy a picture from a pdf to a word document
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
how to copy a picture from a pdf; copy picture from pdf to word
163
C
H
A
P
T
E
 
20
-
Speaking and Writing
All the ways of a man are pure in his own eyes,
but the Lord weighs the spirit.
—Proverbs 16:2
周e heart of the wise makes his speech judicious
and adds persuasiveness to his lips.
—Proverbs 16:23
A dishonest man spreads strife,
and a whisperer separates close friends.
—Proverbs 16:28
V
erbal u瑴erances are one kind of human action. Since we are interested in 
language, we can focus specifically on verbal u瑴erances amid the many other 
kinds of action that surround them. We include both speaking and writing.
Whole u瑴erances have a unity that an insider can recognize. 周at unity is re-
lated to human purposes. Speakers and writers have intentions in what they do. 
One way of defining meaning is to say that the meaning is the speaker’s intention 
or the author’s intention.
1
1. On the possibility of other definitions of “meaning” and other foci for interpretation, see 
the next chapter.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   163
5/14/09   4:46:25 PM
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
like VB.NET image cropping application to cut out an NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
copy and paste image from pdf to pdf; extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned remove a specific image from PDF document page. Able to cut and paste image into another
how to copy a picture from a pdf file; paste picture to pdf
164
Part  3: Discourse
Unified Meaning
It is natural in many ways to assume that we will find a unified meaning. Consider 
again my statement to my wife, “I am going to the store to get more bananas.” 
周at has a definite meaning that I expect my wife to grasp. But sometimes I 
may be sloppy. I say “bananas,” but maybe I am looking for plantains, and don’t 
realize that there is a different word to designate them. I say, “I am going,” but 
maybe I don’t go right out the door; I leave only five hours later. Maybe I am 
going to an open-air market rather than a conventional store. And maybe I 
already have in mind that I might make more fruit purchases, and not just stop 
with bananas. So my purpose in going to the store is broader than just “to get 
more bananas.”
With published writing we expect more, because we know that more care goes 
into published work, and people check and recheck the product. 周e author has 
organized his thoughts, and we keep working with his text in order to see the 
meaning of any one piece in harmony with the rest. Yes, that makes sense up to 
a point. But there are complexities.
For one thing, some authors may not be as organized as we could wish. Maybe 
they hold views on various subjects that in fact contradict one another, but they 
are unaware of the contradiction. Maybe the problem is not outright contradic-
tion but a lesser tension in an author’s text. Nevertheless, the interpreter keeps 
working toward harmony for a long while, in order to make sure that he has not 
missed something. In the end, he may sometimes conclude that there is tension 
or contradiction.
Good authors do be瑴er. But even here we must reckon with the effects of 
the fall. Human beings contaminated by sin are never in perfect harmony with 
themselves. On the one hand, they are made in the image of God, with the built-in 
impulse to be in fellowship with God and to worship God. On the other hand, 
they are in rebellion. 周ey are not only in rebellion against God but in a sense 
in rebellion against themselves, against what they were created to be. 周e result 
is double-mindedness. At a deep level, they are not of one mind. And so they 
cannot have one, perfectly unified intention in producing a text.
We may illustrate with the example from Acts 17:28, “In him we live and move 
and have our being.” 周e apostle Paul here quotes from a Greek poet, probably 
Epimenides of Crete. 周ere is some uncertainty about the poet’s views, but he 
probably meant the sentence in a pantheistic sense. 周at is, he meant that we are 
a part of god or identical with god. 周is view misrepresents our relation to God. 
But it also distorts a more original knowledge of God that we cannot escape. 
On the one hand, in opposition to the true knowledge of God, the poet affirms 
pantheism. On the other hand, in harmony with true knowledge of God, he af-
firms the presence of God and his dependence on God. 周e poet is in conflict 
between two possible meanings of God’s immanence, namely, a Christian and 
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   164
5/14/09   4:46:25 PM
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
copy paste picture pdf; how to copy a pdf image into a word document
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned or all image objects from PDF document in
preview paste image into pdf; how to paste a picture into pdf
165
Chapter  20: Speaking and Writing
a non-Christian view.
2
周is instance is only one possible way in which a person 
may be in conflict with himself.
When a person comes to faith in Christ, he is renewed and transformed. He 
has a renewed mind: “Do not lie to one another, seeing that you have put off the 
old self with its practices and have put on the new self, which is being renewed 
in knowledge a晴er the image of its creator” (Col. 3:9–10; see 1 Cor. 2:16). But 
the renewal is progressive (Rom. 12:1–2). Consequently, insofar as the believer 
is not yet perfected in his mind, he too is double-minded. As a result, no text of 
merely human origin represents fully unified meaning.
周e same is true even of a simple u瑴erance like “I am going to the store to get 
more bananas.” My purpose is not completely unified, but at a deep level includes 
double-mindedness. I am going to the store partly to serve my wife and my family. 
But, in addition, I am going partly in order to appear to be good and helpful, and 
selfishly to get the benefit of the appearance. Neither the good nor the bad inten-
tion gets directly expressed. One of my intentions in the u瑴erance is not only to 
give my wife information but to reinforce our personal relationship by keeping 
her informed. And that contains within it the possibility of a double intention, 
one side of which is godly and the other side of which is not. In many cases I am 
not conscious of being double-minded. I seem to be sane, and to have a coherent 
idea about what I am going to do. But my intentions are still divided.
周e difficulties occur with readers as well. 周e same double-mindedness pre-
sents itself when a reader reads a text. He may read it with love for the author, 
genuinely wanting to understand. At the same time, he may read with imperfect 
love, and in selfishness may also want to twist the text for his own benefit. He 
obtains a result that is a mixture of good and bad.
We once again confront the importance of redemption and of receiving wisdom 
from God. 周e same observations that we made earlier concerning the work of 
Christ apply in the sphere of language as well as every other area of life.
3
God’s Meanings
God himself is holy, pure, and unified in his own mind. 周ere is complete har-
mony. And so he produces harmonious communication. When Christ became 
incarnate as man, he spoke with complete truthfulness, and with harmony not 
only with respect to his divine nature but with respect to his human nature. But 
there is disharmony in the confrontation between God’s holiness and the human 
2. See the discussion of Christian and non-Christian views of immanence in John M. Frame, 
周e Doctrine of the Knowledge of God (Phillipsburg, NJ: Presbyterian & Reformed, 1987), 13–15; 
and appendix C.
3. See Vern S. Poythress, “Christ the Only Savior of Interpretation,” Westminster 周eological 
Journal 50/2 (Fall 1988): 161–173.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   165
5/14/09   4:46:25 PM
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
After getting an image / picture / photo with image capturing device, in general, people will perform some editing or processing functions on source image file
how to copy image from pdf to word document; how to cut pdf image
166
Part  3: Discourse
unholiness of sin. Christ had severe words to say concerning the seriousness of 
sin. 周ese words, as well as the Bible as a whole, present not only the unity of the 
divine mind but also instruction and divine power to renew us, to pull us out of 
the mire of sin, and to give us unity of mind.
But we should note one other truth. 周e unity of the mind of God is a unity 
of one God, with one plan. It is also the unity of the Father, the Son, and the 
Holy Spirit, in the diversity of persons. Unity of meaning within God himself is 
not unitarian, but Trinitarian. Each person in the Trinity knows all truth and all 
meaning in knowing the other persons.
Among the persons of the Trinity, each person’s knowledge is unique to that 
person, as well as in total harmony with the knowledge of the other persons. God’s 
unity is the model or archetype for the unity in diversity that is to be achieved by 
many cultures and many peoples coming together in the body of Christ.
But this analogy is limited. God is infinite, and we are finite. And as long as 
we are in this life, our minds are not entirely free from sin. So within the church 
we have to sort good from bad. Scripture, by contrast, is perfectly pure (Ps. 12:6; 
Prov. 30:5).
Diversity within Unity
We can look at several instances of diversity within unity. Consider first what 
happens with inspired speech in the Bible. A person who speaks in the power of 
the Holy Spirit is speaking not just his own mind but also the mind of the Spirit. 
周e Spirit as well as the human person speaks. 周e Spirit knows his meaning 
perfectly. 周e speech through the human author has perfect purity, because he 
is guided by the Spirit. 周e human being agrees with the Spirit, and so there 
is unity of meaning. But the human author remains finite and does not plumb 
all the depths of the implications of what he says. And so his understanding is 
not exactly the same as the understanding by the Holy Spirit. 周is is a diversity 
in understanding. And so there is both unity and diversity in meaning when a 
human being speaks by the power of the Spirit. 周is is true for the writings of Old 
Testament prophets and New Testament apostles and other divinely authorized 
spokesmen for God.
4
Now consider noninspired speech by human beings. In such cases the human 
beings are fallible. But they may sometimes speak the truth. 周e Bible says, “Let 
the word of Christ dwell in you richly, teaching and admonishing one another in 
all wisdom, singing psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, with thankfulness in 
your hearts to God” (Col. 3:16) Christians can be filled with the Spirit, and the 
4. See Vern S. Poythress, “Divine Meaning of Scripture,” Westminster 周eological Journal 48 
(1986): 241–279; and appendix J. 
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   166
5/14/09   4:46:25 PM
167
Chapter  20: Speaking and Writing
Spirit can use what they say, even though it is not infallible or absolutely pure. 
So the Holy Spirit has his intentions even in this kind of case. In this case also 
there is a unity between the Spirit’s meaning and the human speaker’s meaning. 
But there is also diversity, because the Holy Spirit understands more, and under-
stands more deeply, than the human speaker. And what the Holy Spirit means is 
completely pure, while what the human speaker intends may be contaminated 
by his remaining sinfulness.
周e goal of human communication, the goal that will be climactically fulfilled 
in the new heaven and the new earth, is not autonomous, independent speech on 
the part of human beings, but speaking out of a mind in deep fellowship with God 
and empowered by the Spirit of God. Such speech has both unity and diversity 
in meaning. It is not human speech in isolation from God, but speech that makes 
manifest the wisdom of God and the power of God, speech that surpasses the 
capacity of “independent” humanity. We aim for harmony in fellowship with 
God. We aim to express God’s meanings along with our own.
Meaning Under Control
Let us continue to reflect on some of the limitations in noninspired speech. Even 
if an author could enjoy full unity as an individual, he would still experience 
limitations in his expression. For example, I may not know that there is a word 
for “plantain,” and so I say, “banana,” which is the nearest word I can find. I show 
my limited mastery of English vocabulary.
Because authors are made in the image of God, they do have powers of speech. 
周ey have dominion and control. But they are not God, and so their control 
is not exhaustive. As illustrated in fig. 20.1, they do not completely master the 
language they use; they do not exhaustively control the meanings of its words or 
its constructions; they do not know their own thoughts perfectly; they do not 
plan completely what they write; when writing a longer work they do not remain 
completely the same over the time during which they are writing; they are not 
conscious of all the implications that they may want readers to draw from what 
they write. When the content of the communication is simple, these limitations 
may not make much difference. But with more complex communication they 
have their effects.
We can see some of these limitations more clearly when we consider a small 
child learning language, or an adult learning a second language. Neither is master 
of the language. So when does a child become master? At ten years of age, or 
fi晴een, or twenty, or fi晴y? In fact, through conversation and reading and practice 
in writing, or through formal instruction, people can always develop greater skill 
in writing. No one is a perfect master.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   167
5/14/09   4:46:25 PM
168
Part  3: Discourse
Moreover, because of the presence of variation in meanings and in words and 
in sentences and in authors’ contexts, meaning is not fixed with infinite precision. 
周ere are different varieties of banana. 周e word “banana” does not distinguish 
among them. 周ere are different kinds of store. 周e word “store” does not dis-
tinguish among them.
Authors do not have the God-like control to a瑴ain infinite precision. 周ey 
have only partial control, both in their thoughts and in their previous mastery 
of language and in their expressive products. 周ey may express things about 
themselves that they hoped to conceal; they may fail to express some aspects 
of what they wanted to express. My tone of voice may tell my wife that I re-
sent having to go to the store, even though I didn’t want that information to 
be shown.
Moreover, even in their own minds authors do not define with perfect 
precision what they intend. I say that I am going to get more bananas. But 
I may not have decided one way or the other whether I intend to shop for 
more kinds of fruit as well. 周e statement that I am going to get bananas may 
nevertheless tend to imply that I will limit my goal to the bananas. 周us the 
ideal of perfectly precise authorial intention is indeed an ideal, and a danger-
ous ideal as well, since it could appear to give to man the kind of control that 
only God possesses.
Reader Limitations
Similar limitations affect readers. Readers do not perfectly master their language; 
they do not exhaustively control the meanings of words and sentences that they 
Partial Mastery of Language
F
igure
20:1
relation  
to God
motives
thoughts
planning
stability  
of self
reader  
effects
allusions
constructions 
into larger 
language pieces
word 
meanings
language 
resources
author
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   168
5/14/09   4:46:26 PM
169
Chapter  20: Speaking and Writing
receive; they do not know their own thoughts perfectly as they go through 
the experience of reading; they do not remain completely the same as they go 
through the process of reading; they do not plumb all the implications of what 
they read. A reader who grasps an author’s meaning does “control” it in some 
sense. But for human beings the grasp of meaning is partial, and the control is 
partial. Each reader is different from each author and from every other reader, 
and even subtle differences are instances of variation that affect understanding 
in subtle ways.
Effective Communication
We have been focusing on limitations. But many times communication still suc-
ceeds. We rightly pay a瑴ention to speakers and authors because we assume that 
they have something to say and that they are capable of saying it. We assume that 
they give us a stable intended meaning because in many easy cases we can discern 
what their intention is, and we can re-express their meaning in paraphrases. We 
have real understanding, understanding that is sufficient and effective for practi-
cal goals. For example, when the photographer says, “Stand roughly there,” you 
know what to do, even though the communication is not as precise as it could 
be.
5
So with communication in general. 周e presence of imprecision, and the 
presence of the possibility of variation, does not destroy all stability.
6
Stability 
is still there, and we express that stability when we give paraphrases. We rightly 
talk about two expressions having the same meaning or two speakers meaning 
the same thing.
5. I owe this example to John Frame.
6. Stability is the focus of contrastive-identificational features, which express the unity of 
meaning. Stability is enhanced, rather than destroyed, by recognition that the meaning of a par-
ticular u瑴erance depends also on distributional context. See the previous chapter for discussion 
of contrastive-identification features, variation, and distribution.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   169
5/14/09   4:46:26 PM
170
C
H
A
P
T
E
 
21
-
Analysis and Verbal Interpretation
It is the glory of God to conceal things, 
but the glory of kings is to search things out.
—Proverbs 25:2
H
uman action includes instances where human beings undertake me-
thodical analysis of human action. Human beings study themselves, 
and that shows our ability to stand back and “transcend” the immediacy of our 
situation.
1
Analysis as Human Action
In the West, especially, we have developed a complex tradition of “scientific” 
analysis that includes not only natural sciences but social sciences as well. 周e 
social sciences in one sense have an advantage over the natural sciences, in that the 
subject of study is always close at hand. We are studying ourselves, human beings, 
or at least some aspect of human beings. But the advantage is also a disadvantage, 
because our own preconceptions about ourselves and others threaten to have an 
influential role in the actual work. 周e problem is the problem of transcendence. 
How do we obtain a grasp of a whole of which we ourselves are a part?
In fact, as one aspect of being made in the image of God, human beings can 
“stand back” from their involvement in some sense. 周is standing back can take 
place with great self-conscious a瑴ention to establishing and maintaining meth-
odological controls, o晴en in imitation of the natural sciences. Some investigators 
1. On backlooping and human imitation of God’s transcendence, see chapters 11–12.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   170
5/14/09   4:46:26 PM
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested