pdf viewer in c# code project : How to copy pdf image to word document application software utility azure html asp.net visual studio PRMmanual1-part132

PREPARING YOUR PRINTER
-
READY MANUSCRIPT
staff before you begin to format the manuscript. Photographs should be 
electronically created or scanned, embedded within the manuscript, and 
output or printed to the PDF file (see below, “Preparing a Printer-Ready 
PDF File”). 
Photographs should be scanned at a minimum of 300 dpi (dots per 
inch), though 600 dpi is generally preferable.  If  you have access to 
image-editing software such as Adobe
®
Photoshop
®
, the end product is 
often best if the photograph is initially scanned as rgb (red, green, blue), 
then converted to grayscale in Photoshop and saved as a tiff (tag image 
file format) file. 
Line-art illustrations should be created or scanned at a minimum of 
600 dpi and saved as either vector-based eps (encapsulated postscript) 
files or pixel-based tiff files. The size of a scanned line-art file will be 
greatly  reduced  if  you  have  the  software  (Adobe
®
Streamline
®
and 
Adobe
®
Illustrator
®
) to convert tiff files to vector-based eps files. 
Most word-processing software can insert a photograph or line-art 
illustration into the document (Insert > Picture in Microsoft Word). If text 
is to wrap around an illustration, you should leave approximately .25 
inch  of  white  space  all around  the picture  (and  its caption) and  the 
surrounding text. 
All  photographs,  maps,  figures,  and  illustrations  should  be 
accompanied by an appropriate caption and, if needed, a permissions 
statement (e.g., Courtesy Israel Exploration Society). Use of photographs 
usually requires obtaining permission  from  copyright holders. This  is 
always the author’s responsibility, and appropriate credits must appear 
in captions or in the front matter of the book. In addition, the original 
documentation  granting  permission  must  be  forwarded  to  the  SBL 
production staff before the book can be sent to the printer. 
C
OVER 
D
ESIGN
Most  books  published  by  the  SBL  are  published  as  part  of  an 
ongoing  series.  The  cover  design  for  many  of  the  series  has  been 
standardized  in  order  to  create  series-wide  identification  and  for 
economy. The SBL will send a proof of the cover to the author, who is to 
check it for factual and typographical accuracy before publication. In 
the event that an author does become involved in the design of a cover, 
it must be understood that the design is ultimately the responsibility of 
the SBL and is determined by marketing strategies and cost as well as 
aesthetic appeal. 
How to copy pdf image to word document - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy pdf image into powerpoint; copy images from pdf
How to copy pdf image to word document - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to paste a picture in a pdf; how to copy pdf image to jpg
10 
PREPARING YOUR PRINTER
-
READY MANUSCRIPT
P
REPARING A 
P
RINTER
-R
EADY 
PDF
F
ILE
SOFTWARE
Creating PDF files requires access to either the full version of Adobe
®
Acrobat
®
(including Acrobat Distiller, a component of the full version of 
Acrobat), or a desktop printer such as PDFWriter®. The free version of 
Acrobat Reader
®
will not enable you to create PDF files. 
SETTINGS
Adjusting the settings is the most important part of creating a PDF 
file. Although some details may vary depending on the platform and 
software you use (and although there are several ways to accomplish the 
same  results  in  Acrobat), the following  summary, which is based  on 
Acrobat for Windows XP, identifies the best way to account for the most 
crucial elements. 
Begin by opening the window containing the conversion settings: go 
to File > Print and select Acrobat Distiller as your printer. Then, with the 
Print window still open,  go to  Properties  >  Adobe PDF Settings > Edit 
Conversion Settings. (You may also open the Distiller application directly 
and type in Ctrl-j [Command-j for Mac users] to access the conversion 
settings.) At this point you should see a window with five tabs: General, 
Compression,  Fonts,  Color,  Advanced.  The  first  three  are  the  most 
important. (If you have selected PDFWriter as your printer, you can find 
the Compression and Fonts settings by going to File > Page Setup.) 
GENERAL
. Make sure that compatibility is set for Acrobat 3.0 and Optimize 
(for fast Web view). Set the resolution to 2400 dpi and binding left. 
COMPRESSION
. This tab is important only if your book includes photos or 
illustrations. Within  the  Grayscale  Images  section,  select  the  Average 
Downsampling button and specify 300 dpi; select the Compression button 
and specify Zip; and set Quality to 8-bit. Finally, select the Compress Text 
and Line Art button. 
FONTS
. Select both the Embed All Fonts and the Subset Embedded Fonts 
buttons. If any fonts appear in the Never Embed section, select them and 
remove them. If you do not embed all fonts used in your book, the printer 
will be unable to guarantee the quality of the finished product. Finally, if 
a font cannot be removed from the Never Embed list, it is probably a 
proprietary font that cannot be used for publication. You will need either 
to contact the font’s copyright holder for permission (and directions) to 
embed the font or to select another font. 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF on. Able to edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF document image. Extract
how to copy picture from pdf to word; how to copy images from pdf to word
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
how to copy pdf image into powerpoint; copy image from pdf to pdf
PREPARING YOUR PRINTER
-
READY MANUSCRIPT
11 
COLOR
. No adjustments need to be made. 
ADVANCED
. Select all the buttons except Save Portable Job Ticket Inside 
PDF File and Resize Page and Center Artwork for EPS Files. (If your 
version of Acrobat allows you to specify a default page size, set it to 8.5 x 
11 inches. 
CREATING A PDF FILE
To print (create) a PDF file, select Acrobat Distiller® or PDFWriter as 
your printer, confirm that the page size is set to 8.5 x 11 (letter), click OK 
(or Print), and save the file. The entire book should be saved as one PDF 
file. If you have created sections or chapters in separate word-processing 
files, print each one to a separate file, then combine them all into one PDF 
file by opening the first file and inserting the second file at the end of the 
first (Document > Insert Pages). Repeat until the entire book is contained 
within one PDF file. 
CHECKING YOUR PRINTER
-
READY FILE
Open the file in Acrobat and scroll  through  the  entire document 
(page by page) to the very end. Then go to File > Document Properties > 
Fonts. When the window appears, click on  List All Fonts, then scroll 
through the entire list to ensure that each font indicates either Embedded 
or Embedded Subset in the Actual Font column. Any font that has not 
embedded properly may not print adequately in the finished product. 
P
RINTING A 
F
INAL 
C
OPY OF 
Y
OUR 
M
ANUSCRIPT
After creating the printer-ready PDF files, print a copy of the entire 
book from the PDF files (to ensure that the files print adequately) on a 
laser printer with a minimum resolution of 300 dpi (600 dpi will show 
you what the published version should look like). 
The final printout of a document should be checked carefully. Computers 
are notorious for dropping lines for no apparent reason or printing a 
default font rather than a font that has been used for occasional foreign- 
language or special characters. Additionally, word-processing programs 
sometimes place footnotes on different pages from the text they refer to. 
Proofreading  is  the  sole  responsibility  of  the  author  and,  in  some 
instances, his or her editor. While the spell-check (or grammar-check) 
feature of a word processor can be a helpful tool, remember that it cannot 
detect inadvertently repeated words unless they appear together. Neither 
can it detect the nonsense that can result if words are unintentionally 
omitted or if words are correctly spelled but inappropriately used (e.g., 
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into The portable document format, known as PDF document, is a they are using different types of word processors.
paste picture into pdf preview; how to copy a picture from a pdf to a word document
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the point VB.NET: Clone a PDF Page. Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(filepath) ' Copy the first
how to copy text from pdf image to word; how to copy a pdf image into a word document
12 
PREPARING YOUR PRINTER
-
READY MANUSCRIPT
from/form). Authors should not rely on the good graces of the computer 
to replicate the last, corrected version of the manuscript perfectly. Be sure 
to check each and every page of your final printout before sending the PDF files 
and final printout to the SBL. 
S
UBMITTING 
Y
OUR 
M
ANUSCRIPT TO THE 
SBL 
Completed  manuscripts  should  be  approved  by  the  appropriate 
series editor prior to shipping the printer-ready PDF files and a printout 
of the complete book  to the SBL. The SBL strongly urges authors to send their 
files and manuscripts via UPS or some other courier service. If the U.S. Postal 
Service is used, it is advisable to send the manuscript via registered mail. 
Always  keep  backup  copies,  regardless  of  the  shipper!  The  delivery 
address for all packages is: 
Society of Biblical Literature 
825 Houston Mill Road, Suite 350 
Atlanta, GA 30329-4211. 
Please send your manuscript in both printed form and on a labeled 
CD
-
ROM
or disk. The label should reflect the author and title of the book as 
well as the program in which it was created. Computer disks or 
CD
-
ROM
will become part of the SBL electronic archive. 
C
ONTACT 
I
NFORMATION
Questions about the preparation of printer-ready manuscripts should 
be directed to the SBL at (404) 727-2327 or by writing the Managing Editor 
at Society of Biblical Literature, 825 Houston Mill Road, Suite 350, Atlanta, 
GA 30329 (fax: [404] 727-3101). 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
It's 100% managed .NET solution that supports converting each PDF page to Word document file by VB.NET code. Convert PDF to Word Document in VB.NET Demo Code.
copy image from pdf reader; copy and paste image into pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Additionally, this PDF document image inserting toolkit in VB.NET still offers users the capabilities of burning and merging the added image with source PDF
how to cut pdf image; cut image from pdf online
PREPARING YOUR PRINTER
-
READY MANUSCRIPT
13 
G
LOSSARY
ASCII: American Standard Code for Information Interchange (pronounced 
as-key) is a text format that contains only characters and symbols (i.e., no 
formatting, few diacriticals, etc.). 
body type: the type used for the main text of a book. 
ellipsis: three dots that signify an omission of a word or a line (...). 
em-dash: the width of the letter M; used to signify a break in thought 
(—) . 
en-dash: the width of the letter N; used to indicate inclusive numbers 
(e.g., 1–2) and to divide compound adjectives, one or both parts of which 
contain an open or hyphenated compound (e.g., pre–Civil War). 
font: a set of alphabet and symbols of a typeface. 
hyphen: used to divide words (-). 
kerning: selective adjustments to the space between letters of a word. 
Kerned characters overlap slightly to give a more pleasing appearance (as 
when a lowercase letter sits slightly under a capital T that precedes it). 
leading: (pronounced “ledding,” a.k.a. line-spacing) the amount of space 
between lines of text. 
OCR: Optical Character Recognition turns scanned hard copy text into an 
electronic form that a word processor can use. 
orphan: single line at the top of the page separated from the rest of its 
paragraph. 
point: unit of measurement commonly used for type: 72 pts.= 1 inch; 12 
pts.= 1 pica; 6 picas=1 inch. 
sans  serif:  type  that  is  defined  by  unadorned  horizontal  strokes. 
Helvetica is a sans serif font. 
serif: type that has decorations or flourishes at the edges of the letter. This 
is the kind of type most often used for body text because of its elegance 
and readability. 
smart  quote:  curved  or  slanted quotation  mark (or  apostrophe);  it is 
usually preferable to use (“ “) rather than (ʺ ʺ). Straight marks are used 
when a mathematical “prime” symbol is required (e.g., when depicting 
elements of chiasmus or referencing pages that are so numbered in a 
source). 
tracking: the amount of space between words on a line. 
widow: single  line left  at  the  bottom  of a  page  when the  rest  of its 
paragraph prints on next page. 
WYSIWYG: what you see is what you get (often computer screen images— 
and always printer-ready copy)! 
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Evaluation Library for converting PDF to Word in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and
how to copy images from pdf file; how to copy pictures from pdf to powerpoint
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
A convenient C#.NET control able to turn all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting.
copy a picture from pdf; how to copy pictures from a pdf
14 
PREPARING YOUR PRINTER
-
READY MANUSCRIPT
A
PPENDIX
F
ORMATTING 
Y
OUR 
B
OOK IN 
M
ICROSOFT® 
W
ORD
Although written primarily for Word 2001 for Mac and Word 2002 
for Windows XP, this appendix contains information that will be helpful 
regardless  of  the  word-processing  software  you  use.  The  time  spent 
reading it will be more than repaid in time saved during the formatting of 
your book. 
P
RELIMINARY 
C
OMMENTS
The following information is provided as a guide to the formatting 
settings that we use at the SBL (and that were used in the creation of this 
manual). The appendix is specifically oriented to Microsoft Word, since 
that is the most popular word-processing program and one that the SBL 
publications department often uses. Other programs are also acceptable, 
but we are unable to create an appendix for each one.  
Please note: these are intended as beginning guidelines only. They 
are not complete instructions, and if you are insufficiently familiar with 
word processing to follow them comfortably and to consult the user’s 
manuals  easily, we suggest that  you  enlist the  assistance of someone 
more experienced.  
If you are working with a series of discrete chapters (such as essays 
contributed by various scholars) or with many embedded graphics that 
make your text files overly large, it may be convenient to save your book 
as a series of separate files. However, there are advantages to compiling 
everything into a single document, and we generally recommend this 
practice if you have a reasonably fast computer and sufficient RAM. 
I
NITIAL 
S
ETTINGS
After opening your new Word file, go to Format > Paragraph. On the 
Indents and Spacing tab, set your alignment (Justified), Indentation (Left: 
0; Right: 0; Special: First line: .25), and Line Spacing (Before: 0; After: 0). 
Most often the Exactly setting is the best, and you should enter 12 points 
under At if you will be using a 10-point body font. (See p. 5  above for line 
spacing/leading). 
Click on the Line and Page Breaks tab at the top and select Widow/ 
Orphan Control. Click OK at the bottom right to close the Paragraph 
window. 
Next,  go  to  Format  >  Document  (Mac)  or  File  >  Page  Setup 
(Windows). Every chapter in your book should begin on a right-hand 
page; therefore, under the Layout tab, you will select new page or odd 
PREPARING YOUR PRINTER
-
READY MANUSCRIPT
15 
page from the  Section  Start  pop-up  menu. (At  a  later  stage,  you  can 
change the setting in an individual section by selecting This Section from 
the Apply To popup menu, but for now you want that menu to read 
whole document.) Check both boxes in the Headers and Footers menu 
(Different Odd and Even and Different First Page). Vertical alignment is 
Top. 
Under the Margins tab, you can set the top, bottom, left, and right 
margins. For a 6 x 9 book set on 8.5 x 11–inch paper, set the top margin to 
2 inches, the bottom margin to 1.75 inches, the left margin to 2 inches, and 
the right margin to 2 inches. You can set the distance headers and footers 
are set from the top and bottom of pages on the same Margins tab (Mac) 
or on the Layout tab (Windows). Set the header to 1.75 inches and the 
footer to 1.75 inches.  
Do not check the Mirror Margins box. Finally, click the Page Setup 
button (Mac) or the Paper tab (Windows) and define the paper you will 
be using (U.S. Letter = 8.5 x 11) and the Scale (100%). Close the Page Setup 
and/or Document windows by clicking OK at the bottom. 
Under the Insert menu, choose Page Numbers (Windows and Mac 
MS Word 98; Mac MS Word 2001 and later formats page numbers within 
headers  or  footers).  Click  Format,  and  under  Number  Format  select 
roman numerals (i, ii, iii) for introductory material (preface, introduction, 
etc.), and arabic numerals (1, 2, 3) for your text page numbers. These 
choices appear in a pop-up menu. You’ll have to perform this operation 
for each new section of the document when you want the pagination 
format to change. You may at some point also have to change the page 
numbering option in this format menu from Continue From Previous 
Section to Start At and insert the number 1 in the box. When you are 
finished, click OK at the bottom of the Page number format box and Close 
(NOT OK) at the bottom of the Page number box. (Your purpose at this 
point is only to tell the program how to format page numbers, not to tell it 
to actually insert those numbers; the latter step will be taken when you 
define the headers and footers.) 
If your text has footnotes, go to Insert > Footnote (Mac) or Insert > 
Reference > Footnote (Windows). Select Options at the lower left (Mac 
only), and under the All Footnotes tab choose Bottom of Page from the 
Place At pop-up menu. If you are using endnotes, select the All Endnotes 
Tab and choose End of Section. Since each chapter will number notes 
beginning with 1, type a 1 in the Start At box, and select Restart Each 
Section for Numbering. Click Apply (Windows) or OK and then Close 
(Mac). Do not Click Insert (Windows) or OK and OK (Mac), since doing 
so will actually insert a footnote in your text rather than merely define 
how subsequently inserted notes are to be formatted.) When you type 
your  notes,  remember  that  you  do  not  need  line  spaces  (paragraph 
16 
PREPARING YOUR PRINTER
-
READY MANUSCRIPT
returns) between them; that can be added automatically by later defining 
the style of footnote paragraphs as having, e.g., 4 points before them. 
Go to Edit > Preferences > Print (this setting is Mac only) and select 
Fractional Widths under Options for Current Document Only. You may 
want  to  change  other  preferences  as  well,  but  this  one  will  greatly 
improve the letter- and word-spacing of your book. 
In addition to initial formatting, a few other pointers will add to the 
professional look of your book. Go to Tools > AutoCorrect (Options) > 
AutoFormat  as  You  Type  and select  Replace  “Straight  Quotes”  with 
“Smart Quotes.” This will instruct your word processor to used curved 
marks like the ones in this manual rather than the prime symbols and 
inch marks that are often used by default. This must be done at the start 
of composition or you will have to do a global search and replace. (N.B.: 
This is a setting that you will have to undo—and be sure it stays undone 
on  the  AutoFormat As  You Type  tab—whenever  you type  in Greek, 
Hebrew,  or  any  other  language  font  that  uses  the  apostrophe  and 
option-bracket  keys  on the keyboard differently than  standard roman 
fonts do.) 
It is often easiest to set the text for your headers and footers after 
you have compiled all the sections (or chapters) of the book. That way 
you can define each header in succession rather than having to repeat 
the process every time you come to (or start) a new section. To do this, 
go to View > Header and Footer. A window will open showing the 
whole text, and a dialogue box will allow you to jump from section to 
section  and  top  to  bottom,  inserting  automatic  page  numbers  and 
typing in the text you want. We suggest that you consult the MS Word 
documentation if you are unsure how this works. (N.B.: be alert as to 
whether the Same as Previous icon is selected or not. You will probably 
want  it  selected  throughout  the  even-page  headers  and  first-page 
footers  [where  the  book  title  or  a  lone  page  number  appears 
consistently], but for the odd-page headers [where you will want to type 
the  changing  chapter  titles],  you  need  to  make  sure  that  Same  as 
Previous is not highlighted; if you do have it highlighted and type a new 
chapter title in a header, that title will be applied backward to whatever 
point in the book is not defined Same as Previous [i.e., you will never be 
able  successfully  to  insert  a  different  recto  header for  each  chapter 
because every new title you type will substitute itself for the titles that 
existed in previous chapters].) 
For true WYSIWYG viewing, you will want to uncheck the Wrap to 
Window box under Tools > Options > View > Window (Windows only; 
not available in MS Word 2001 for Mac). 
PREPARING YOUR PRINTER
-
READY MANUSCRIPT
17 
C
OMPOSITION
Because  type  produced  on computers  is  proportional rather  than 
monospaced, there is no need to type two spaces between each pair of 
sentences. The effect of doing so will be to add too much space in the line, 
and the overall text may be too loose. For typewriter users, this can be a 
hard habit to break, but learn to type only one space after periods or other 
ending punctuation. See page 4 of this manual for more information on 
proportional fonts. 
Similarly, your results will be much more predictable if you use tabs 
rather than the space bar when creating tables. With proportional fonts, 
the screen appearance is consistent with the printed copy (i.e., genuinely 
WYSIWYG) for tabs but not for spaces. (N.B.: It is usually best to define 
Normal paragraphs as having an indented first line rather than manually 
placing a tab at the beginning of each. In any case, be certain not to type 
spaces for indents. Doing so will produce uneven indents and will cause 
the first line of a fully justified paragraph not to be even with the right 
margin.) 
Underlining is  normally undesirable in  a  professionally designed 
book. Always use italics for book titles in your text or notes. For headings, 
subheadings, and chapter titles, use italics, all capitals, or small capitals. 
Underlining is occasionally acceptable where italics will not work (e.g., to 
call attention to specific words in Hebrew or Greek text). 
If you are aware of a consistent error that you have made or if you 
forget to turn on “smart quotes,” you can easily and quickly correct your 
mistakes by using the Search and Replace feature of your word processor. 
Select Edit > Replace. The window that opens allows you to type in the 
characters for which you want to search (Find What) and to specify what 
is to appear in their place (Replace Width). (To fix smart quotes, you will 
need to make sure that the Smart Quote box is checked under Tools > 
AutoCorrect (Options) > AutoFormat and AutoFormat as You Type. Then 
you type the same quotation mark or apostrophe in both the Find What 
and  Replace  With  boxes;  the  computer  decides  which  direction  the 
replaced character should point.) 
You may click Find Next to test your search, and you may monitor 
every step of the search by clicking the Replace or Find Next button. By 
clicking Replace All, you instruct the computer to search the document 
and make all the changes at the same time. (Warning: Search and Replace 
functions are among the easiest and most perilous things you will ever 
instruct a computer to do, because you are granting the computer license 
to think for you. By clicking the More button, you can reveal additional 
options that allow you to define specific formats and/or special characters 
to be searched and the more precise situations when characters should— 
18 
PREPARING YOUR PRINTER
-
READY MANUSCRIPT
and  should  not—be  replaced.  Be  particularly  wary  if  you  have 
foreign-language materials within the document; unless the computer is 
told, for example, to make changes only in Palatino text, it will replace the 
same  ASCII characters  (representing completely  different symbols) in 
Greek, Hebrew, or anywhere else it finds them. The result, obviously, will 
be garbage scattered through the document for you to find on your own. 
Unless you have thought quite carefully about what the results will be, do 
not click the Replace All button. We also suggest that you save your text 
before every critical Search and Replace (and even  save it afterwards 
under a different name). If you make a mistake in your universal Search 
and Replace, you can immediately choose the Undo command (under 
Edit), but if you later discover that the procedure wreaked unanticipated 
havoc in the document, you will have the earlier version to return to; 
intervening  changes  will,  of  course,  have  to  be  re-entered  (and  an 
electronic document comparison may make this easier), but at least you 
will avoid the frustration of having to proofread and repair an entire 
corrupted manuscript. 
You can reduce your efforts by learning a few special key strokes. The 
appropriate use of em-dashes and en-dashes instead of hyphens will also 
improve the quality look of your text. These marks are so titled because 
they are the width of the M and N characters respectively. Em-dashes 
(often represented in e-mail and on typewriters by double hyphens) are 
used for sudden breaks, amplifying and digressive elements, interrupted 
speech, and the like. They are produced by holding down the Option and 
Shift keys and striking the hyphen (Mac) or the Ctrl and Alt keys and 
striking the hyphen on the number pad (Windows). En-dashes (created 
by holding down the option key and striking the hyphen [Mac] or the Ctrl 
key and striking the hyphen on the number pad [Windows]) are used 
primarily to represent number ranges, as in Ezek 8:1–11:25; 46:1–2, or 
pages 321–46. Plain hyphens are used for compound words and between 
syllables of words when you are forcing a line break. Optional hyphens 
(made by holding down the Command [cloverleaf] key [Mac] or the Ctrl 
key [Windows] and striking the hyphen) are useful if you are unsure how 
lines will end up dividing and you want to leave long-word hyphenation 
to the computer. (Unnecessary optional hyphens—optional hyphens that 
appear in the middle of lines—can sometimes confuse Microsoft Word’s 
proportional spacing, so they are best added selectively). 
Two books that we have found to be extremely helpful resources are 
The Mac Is Not a Typewriter, by Robin Williams, and One-Minute Designer, 
by Roger C. Parker. Both provide shortcuts on keystrokes and ideas to 
help make your book look professional. We recommend the use of these 
books, particularly if you are typesetting a manuscript for the first time. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested