pdf viewer in c# code project : Cut picture pdf SDK Library API wpf asp.net html sharepoint Social%20Commerce%20Beyond%20Word%20of%20Mouth-%20Role%20of%20Social%20Distance%20and0-part1333

S
OCIAL 
C
OMMERCE 
B
EYOND 
W
ORD OF 
M
OUTH
:
R
OLE OF 
S
OCIAL 
D
ISTANCE AND 
S
OCIAL 
N
ORMS IN 
O
NLINE 
R
EFERRAL 
I
NCENTIVE 
S
YSTEMS
Completed Research Paper 
Nan Shi 
Xi’an Jiaotong University 
No. 28, Xianning West Road, Xi’an, 
Shaanxi, P. R. China 
Shinan10@hotmail.com 
Kevin Yili Hong 
Temple University 
1810 N. 13
th
St., Philadelphia, PA 19144 
Hong@temple.edu 
Kanliang Wang 
Renmin University of China 
No. 59, Zhongguancun Street, Beijing, 
P. R. China 
Kanliang.wang@gmail.com 
Paul A. Pavlou 
Temple University 
1810 N. 13
th
St., Philadelphia, PA 19144 
Pavlou@temple.edu 
Abstract 
Online social referral incentive systems help attract new customers to commercial 
websites by leveraging existing customers’ social networks. Designing an appropriate 
referral incentive system allows websites to increase their customer base and enhance 
sales. This study integrates ultimatum game (fairness) theory with construal level 
theory to investigate the impacts of social distance, social norms, and monetary 
incentives on the performance of different designs of online social referral incentive 
systems. Incentivized controlled lab experiments and randomized field experiments with 
an online ticketing company were conducted to test hypotheses on the effects of social 
distance, social norms, and the split of the referral bonus (monetary incentive) between 
a proposer and a responder on the performance of online social referral incentive 
systems. Results show that with small social distance (friends), the success of a referral 
is determined by the social norms between friends but not by the split of the referral 
bonus; with a large social distance (acquaintances), the success of the referral is 
determined by a fair split of the bonus between acquaintances. By studying the 
dynamics of social networking, our research stresses the role of social elements in e-
commerce when rational economic rules can be potentially harmful. 
Keywords: Electronic commerce, online social referral incentive systems, social distance, 
social norms, social commerce, incentive design, ultimatum game, construal level theory 
Cut picture pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
paste image on pdf preview; paste image into pdf acrobat
Cut picture pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
paste image into pdf preview; how to copy a pdf image into a word document
E-Business and Competitive Strategy 
Introduction
Recently, online social referral incentive systems are burgeoning as e-commerce penetrates people's 
everyday life. These systems offer monetary incentives to motivate existing customers not only to spread 
positive word of mouth (WOM), but also to directly invite people who are networked with them via email, 
instant messaging, or other social networking tools (such as Twitter or Facebook) to register on a website 
and purchase products or services. Referral incentive systems are one of the many common practices 
companies employ to attract potential customers. Companies are increasingly focusing on leveraging the 
social network of existing customers using monetary incentives to increase their customer base (Dellarocas 
2006). However, although online referral incentive systems may be a cost-effective way to recruit new 
customers, they could be a costly and unnecessary expense if not designed and implemented properly. For 
example, aiming at current customers’ sending the referral, the firm initiates an online social referral 
incentive system by spending a great deal of money on advertising in an effort to attract current customers’ 
attention. Current customers aim to gain rewards from online social referral incentive systems for inviting 
their friends to be new customers by involving their social networks.  Friends have certain social 
relationships that involve social norms determining their behavior rules. Negative emotion can be aroused 
when the split of bonus goes against customers’ social behavior rules, and this can decrease the 
effectiveness of online social referral incentive systems. Without a careful approach to design, the online 
social referral incentive systems not only waste money spent on advertising, but also decrease current 
customers’ future intention to purchase. Therefore, a proper design of the social elements related to 
referral incentive systems is crucial to companies, particular start-up websites that aim to expand their 
online business by relying on their existing customers to reach new customers. 
Over the past decade, the Internet has changed peoples’ communication style (Lamb et al. 2003). Now 
people can use Instant Messaging (IM) services such as Skype to communicate with their friends anytime, 
anywhere. These conversations underlie online social networks, which are based on peoples’ real-life social 
relationships (Aral et al. 2013; Ganley et al. 2009). Facebook is a successful example of a social network 
that offers customers a chance to find their friends’ social relationships online and to make new friends 
through their friends’ social networks. The transformative nature of communication on social networks 
has attracted the attention of practitioners, and we witness companies earnestly hoping their existing 
customers will send WOM through their social networks.  
As an important measure of performance, new customer acquisition is crucial for online businesses, 
especially for start-up firms. For example, the emerging “star” in e-commerce – Groupon - tries to recruit 
new customers by relying on the social networks of the existing customers and paying for their referrals. 
Besides “Groupon-type” group-buy websites, online retailers such as Rulala.com also actively use referral 
incentive systems. Referral bonuses are usually $10 in different splits (reward only the proposer, only the 
responder, or divide the reward between the two). Referral, in the conventional wisdom, is a type of WOM 
occurring among close friends. With the development of the Internet, customers use IM and other social 
networking services (SNS) for communication, and they can easily connect with a stranger or an 
acquaintance more frequently than ever before (Ganley et al. 2009). Without Internet, the net-friends 
similar as strangers would not become the potential customers for online companies. Accordingly, the 
Internet and corresponding online communication tools have made social referrals simpler, faster, and 
more pervasive.  
Online social referral is distinct from electronic WOM such as seller feedback and online product reviews, 
which attracted a lot of attention both from academic scholars (Archak et al. 2011; Ba et al. 2006; 
Dellarocas 2006; Sun 2012) and companies (such as Amazon and Yelp). On the one hand, social referrals 
are more intimate than seller feedback systems and online product reviews that are usually posted publicly. 
Online social referrals involve a direct and active communication between an existing customer and her 
“friends”. On the other hand, online product reviews and seller feedback systems take a long time to 
develop, and their effect is not necessarily positive (existing customers may post negative reviews for the 
company or its products, which will be detrimental to their success). Start-up electronic retailers, in 
particular, cannot afford a long wait, and they may be willing to sacrifice some upfront costs (referral fees) 
to quickly acquire a sizeable customer base. This makes social referrals particularly valuable to them.  
Online social referral systems typically involve a monetary incentive, which means that they should 
conform to the economic consumer utility theory to leverage proper monetary incentives. The monetary 
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
VB.NET Image & Picture Cropping Application. Do you need to save a copy of certain part of an image file in a programming way? Do you need to cut out certain
paste image in pdf preview; copy image from pdf to
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
how to copy picture from pdf and paste in word; how to copy a picture from a pdf
Shi et al. /Social Distance and Norms in Referral Incentive System 
Thirty Fourth International Conference on Information Systems, Milan 2013       3 
incentive might govern customers’ behavior because of the homo economicus assumption, that every 
individual is economically rational and utility-maximizing (Persky 1995). Although this assumption has 
been testified not to be severely violated (Henrich et al. 2001), the extent to which human beings are 
rational is bounded (Persky 1995). Therefore, the effect of monetary incentives may be bounded by social 
norms. The concept of social norms is at the core of sociological theory. Coleman (1994) proposed this 
concept as “a norm concerning a specific action [that] exists when the socially defined right to control the 
action is held not by the actor but by the others.” The authority of the others “is not voluntarily vested in 
them, either unilaterally or as a part of an exchange, but is created by the social consensus”. Finally, social 
norms are enforced by an external sanctioning system or, if the norm is internalized, by an internal 
sanctioning system. Therefore, if monetary incentives are not complementary or compatible with the 
social norms, they may be harmful to the effectiveness of a social referral.  
Only focusing on the monetary incentive in a networked “social” relationship may render the referral 
message confusing (referral for a profit or referral to truly recommend a product/service/merchant), 
which may be harmful for friendships and lowering the effectiveness of referral systems (Heyman et al. 
2004). If the split of bonus in online social referral incentive systems is harmful to the social relationship 
between proposers and responders, they tend to refuse to send or accept the referral. Therefore, a proper 
online social referral system should not solely rely on monetary incentives to attract new customers, but to 
take care of the social relationship between proposers and responders as well. Therefore, companies 
should pay special attention to both social norms and economic norms in designing their incentive 
systems. Specifically, online social referral incentive systems attract potential customers by introducing a 
monetary incentive. However, a monetary incentive alone does not determine the success of online social 
referral incentive systems. The split of bonus should be designed on the basis of a certain social distance 
between proposer and responder, which can take full advantage of social networks (Hevner et al. 2004). 
In this paper, we seek to extend understanding of the effectiveness of online social referral incentive 
systems by examining the interaction of various splits of bonus and different social norms, specifically 
social distance. One widely used view of social distance focuses on affectivity (Bogardus 1925). According 
to this approach, social distance is associated with affective distance, i.e. how much or little sympathy the 
members of a group feel for another group. In this paper, we rely on the "Bogardus social distance scale" to 
measure subjective-affective conceptions of social distance (Bogardus 1933). 
In social distance studies the center of attention is on the feeling reactions of persons toward other persons 
and toward groups of people. Therefore, our research questions are: 
•  What are the effects of monetary incentives and social distance on the design of online social referral 
incentive systems? 
•  How does social distance impact the relative effectiveness of monetary incentives on the success of 
online social referral incentive systems? 
In this paper, we leveraged ultimatum game theory and construal level theory to develop our testable 
hypotheses in the context of online social referrals. We conducted both a set of controlled lab experiments 
and a randomized field experiment to examine our research questions. Our results show that with small 
social distance, customers choose their behavior rule according to social norms. Social norms encourage 
customers to focus on the close social relationship rather than the benefit. With small social distance, 
proposers choose to deviate from the fair split of the monetary incentive, while responders intend to 
accept the unfair split of bonus. This is different from the results of ultimatum games among strangers. 
With large social distance, people choose their behavioral rules according to their own utility maximization. 
Proposers tend to offer a fair split of bonus and responders tend to refuse an unfair split of bonus. This is 
similar to the result of the ultimatum game in the economics literature (Güth et al. 1982; Güth et al. 1990).  
Our paper makes several contributions to the IS literature on online WOM and social e-commerce. First, 
we leveraged theories from economics and psychology to understand the proper design of an IT artifact 
(online social referral system) that is increasingly important in e-commerce. We also introduce the social 
distance into our study. Different norms determine different behavioral rules of proposers and responders. 
This study also applies the ultimatum game in an IS context and extends the theory from strangers to 
acquaintances and friends. To achieve success for the online social referral incentive systems, companies 
should take social norms and individual rationality into consideration. 
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
like VB.NET image cropping application to cut out an NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to copy a picture from a pdf to a word document; how to copy pictures from pdf file
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned remove a specific image from PDF document page. Able to cut and paste image into another
how to cut a picture out of a pdf file; cut picture pdf
E-Business and Competitive Strategy 
Before developing our hypotheses, we review the related literature on online social referral incentive 
systems and social commerce. Hypotheses development is followed by a description of the research setting, 
research design, and methods of analyses. Then, we report the results, conclusion and implications.  
Literature Review 
Online Social Networks and Influence 
Online social networks create a virtual world based on people’s own social relationships. Internet 2.0 has 
revealed peoples’ concealed social relationships with various types of applications, such as SNS (Oinas-
Kukkonen et al. 2010). The emergence of Internet-based social networks also has changed customers’ 
communication style (Cheung et al. 2010; Jasperson et al. 2002). An average Facebook user has 130 
friends.
1
Close friends, acquaintances or even strangers may share common interests through social 
networks. This collective and connected mass of humanity could be taken as a reservoir of social and 
economic influence. Social influence from online networks can have an impact on customers’ behavior 
such as encouraging adoption of a system or purchase of a product (Aral et al. 2013). The impact of social 
networks has attracted the attention of many companies who have a perennial interest in leveraging social 
relationships to extend their customer base. Research has found that the connectedness of a social 
network’s structure influences the effectiveness of “buzz” as a marketing instrument, with the network 
effect moderating the payoff from a company’s investment to promote the social “buzz” (Amblee et al. 
2011; Ganley et al. 2009).  
Online social networks render online WOM more convenient than traditional WOM (Dellarocas 2003; Zhu 
et al. 2010). Online WOM spreads rapidly through social networks, which impacts potential customers’ 
intention to purchase (Forman et al. 2008). The quality and price of products are also impacted by online 
WOM (Hu et al. 2006; Li et al. 2010). The large number of users in online social networks creates a large 
potential for online WOM. Improving the quality of online WOM is crucial for companies (Duan et al. 
2008; Mudambi et al. 2010). Online WOM could help customers to find the appropriate products from a 
company (Clemons et al. 2006). At present, we should view users in online social networks as social actors 
(Lamb et al. 2003). Correctly treating customers in online social networks may entail taking full advantage 
of online social networks. 
Online Social Referral 
Online social referral incentive systems are important company strategies that use monetary incentives to 
leverage positive WOM of existing customers to attract new customers. When a company’s current market 
penetration or the proposer’s referral effectiveness is sufficiently high, the referral incentive system 
dominates advertising (Xiao et al. 2011). The advantage of monetary incentives lies in selecting only the 
positive WOM, as opposed to existing customers’ true revelations of their feelings of the company/product. 
For example, in the case of online product reviews (Dellarocas et al. 2008; Li et al. 2008), customers will 
post either positive or negative experiences, which may not be effective in acquiring new customers. 
Referral typically used to occur among offline friends and relatives. However, online social networks create 
a platform of communication among friends, distant acquaintances, and even strangers. This convenient 
communication style makes online social referrals possible between friends with different social distances. 
Although referral systems originated a long time ago, they go beyond simply gathering customer opinions, 
but they take steps to foster the opinions, such as establishing a customer recommendation system in 
managing social interactions (Awad et al. 2008; Hennig-Thurau et al. 2003; Li et al. 2011).  
In the literature, experimental work on referral systems has largely focused on the proposers’ response to 
referral incentives. Studies show that the referral incentive is an effective mechanism to increase the 
proposer’s likelihood of spreading WOM in the form of referral (Wirtz et al. 2002) when the proposer is 
highly satisfied with the company’s products. Ryu and Wirtz (2007) examined the impact of tie strength 
(the relationship between the proposer and the responder), brand strength, and the reward structure on 
the proposer’s likelihood of making referrals to find that monetary incentives are effective in increasing 
1 http://www.facebook.com/Press/info.php?statistics 
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
copy picture from pdf reader; preview paste image into pdf
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned or all image objects from PDF document in
how to copy picture from pdf to powerpoint; how to cut a picture out of a pdf
Shi et al. /Social Distance and Norms in Referral Incentive System 
Thirty Fourth International Conference on Information Systems, Milan 2013       5 
referrals to weak ties. On the other hand, Tuk (2009) examined the responder’s responses to referral 
incentives to show that a proposer’s reward might reduce the responder’s likelihood of purchasing because 
the proposer’s reward could be ill perceived by the responder and reduce the proposer’s perceived sincerity.  
There are also many studies focusing on referral incentive designs and their impacts. Existing studies of 
customer referral systems have provided substantial guidance on when rewards should be offered 
(Biyalogorsky et al. 2001), they have quantified the impact of rewards and tie strength on the proposer's 
referral likelihood (Ryu et al. 2007; Wirtz et al. 2002). The key unanswered questions are whether 
different types of split schemes (e.g., how to split the $10 incentive) would make a difference in terms of 
referral performance for different types of dyadic proposer-responder relationships (i.e., different social 
distances). We consider split of referral bonus and social distance between the proposer and responder to 
be the two key antecedents to referral performance.  
Hypotheses Development 
An important metric to understand the effectiveness of online referral incentive systems is to identify who 
will send the invitation, who will receive the invitation and what these two parties want to get from the 
invitation. It is important to know the intrinsic and extrinsic motivations of the proposer and the 
responder. Intrinsic motivation is driven by an interest or enjoyment in the task itself, and exists within 
the person rather than relying on external pressures or a desire for reward (Wigfield et al. 2004). Extrinsic 
motivation refers to the performance of an activity to attain an outcome (Lepper et al. 1973). The two 
aspects of motivation can be applied in our context of social referrals: (a) referral out of goodwill; (b) 
referral out of bonus. When two parties are friends, referral can be attributed to intrinsic motivation. On 
the other hand, referral due to the monetary incentive is attributed to extrinsic motivation. According to 
the analysis above, we focus on the relationship between the two parties (social distance) and the split of a 
given amount (e.g., $10) (monetary incentive) as the initial set up.  
Effect of Social Distance on Referral Performance 
Different social relationships mean different social distances. Close social relationship means small social 
distance while distant social relationship means large social distance. Our conception of social distance 
focuses on affectivity. Within this approach, social distance is associated with affective distance, i.e. how 
much or little sympathy the members of a group feel for another group.  This is different from tie strength 
which uses the frequency of communication to classify social tie. The frequency of communication could 
not determine the affective distance, such as your classmates or co-workers are not all your close friends. 
They still have different affective distance. But classmates or co-works have the similar social tie. Social 
relationship involves affectivity that arouses different social norms. So this approach uses the affective 
distance as our social distance to reflect different social relationships. 
Social relationship is a factor influencing friends’ sharing behavior (Liang et al. 2011). Friends with a large 
social distance act as virtual strangers. An action outside what is in common between two parties would 
lead people to think about the underlying purpose of the action. In the context of social referral, if people 
cannot clearly understand the purpose of the referral, they tend to refuse to do what they are asked to. 
Close friends have a small social distance, and they share similar interests, knowledge and experience. 
They may also share similar values, have many topics to talk about, and know each other very well (Johar 
2005). Therefore, when social distance is small, they have more common information and understand 
each other more easily. With a large social distance, it is difficult for people to communicate or understand 
the real purpose of a referral, leading them to hesitate in sending or accepting a referral. Also, responders 
want to know the “connotations” underlying the referral. For example, what is the purpose of referring 
them to the web retailer? Correctly understanding the purpose will enhance the chance of accepting a 
referral. For proposers, they tend to send referrals to friends who understand their real purpose easily with 
the consideration of social relationship. Responders tend to behave correspondingly. Therefore we 
hypothesize: 
H1a: A proposer is more likely to send a referral to a responder with a small social distance than a 
responder with large social distance. 
H1b: A responder is more likely to accept a referral from a proposer with a small social distance 
than a proposer with large social distance. 
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
After getting an image / picture / photo with image capturing device, in general, people will perform some editing or processing functions on source image file
copy pdf picture to word; copy image from pdf to powerpoint
E-Business and Competitive Strategy 
Proposers and responders with a strong social relationship are helpful for both sending and adopting the 
invitation. A successful invitation does not only depend on the proposer to send it out, but also its 
adoption by the responder as well. Therefore considering both sides of the referral, we hypothesize: 
H1c: A successful referral is more likely to occur between friends with small social distance than 
friends with large social distance. 
Effect of Sense of Fairness on Referral Performance 
In our context, the proposer has the right to send the social referral and would assume the risk that the 
responder would refuse the proposal due to perceived unfairness, which resembles the “ultimatum game”. 
The ultimatum game (Güth et al. 1982; Güth et al. 1990) is a two-player game where Player 1, the proposer, 
can offer to divide a fixed total amount, say $10, by giving x amount to Player 2 and keeping $10-x for 
himself. Player 2 then decides whether to accept or reject the offer. In the unique sub-game perfect Nash 
equilibrium (Gibbons 1989), Player 1 takes the whole amount minus 
ε
(
ε
-->0) and Player 2 accepts 
ε
with an equilibrium solution of (10- 
ε
ε
). As a matter of fact, if 
ε
is given to be 0, multiple equilibriums 
would emerge as (10, 0) and (0, 0), and there should be no noticeable difference in probability between 
these two equilibrium situations for Player 2. However, numerous experimental studies have shown that 
proposers offering less than 30% of the total amount are likely to be rejected, while a fair offer (i.e., 50/50 
split) is most likely to be accepted by responders (Güth et al. 1982; Güth et al. 1990). Previous studies 
point that 50-50 split is a fair split, which is an ‘obvious’ and ‘acceptable’ compromise, and that “such 
considerations are easily displaced by calculations of strategic advantage, once players fully appreciate the 
structure of the game”(Binmore et al. 1985; Güth et al. 1990). We follow the definition of fairness in our 
study. In online social referral incentive systems, proposer and responder gain the same bonus (5$) from 
successful referral which is a fair split (50-50).  
Although many referral incentive systems resemble the classic ultimatum game, they have their own 
unique features. In the traditional ultimatum game studied in prior literatures, the proposer and the 
responder are typically strangers and will not meet in the future. The online social referral incentive 
systems take place in situations where the proposer and responder are connected with social networks, 
albeit with different social distances. The purpose of an ultimatum game focuses on the split of bonus, but 
online social referral incentive systems are based on helping your friends by introducing something new 
and useful to them. Different purposes determine people’s different behavior. Although some extant 
studies have taken the impact of social relationship into the ultimatum game (Charness et al. 2008; 
Macfarlan et al. 2008), based on helping friends, the impact of social relationship in online social referral 
incentive systems differs from an ultimatum game. 
In this study we use the "Bogardus social distance scale" to measure subjective-affective conception of 
social distance (Bogardus 1925). In social distance studies, the center of attention is on the feeling 
reactions of people toward other people and toward groups of people. So we also ground our testable 
hypotheses based upon theories of social distance (Bogardus 1925), in addition to the sense of fairness in a 
quasi-ultimatum game (Güth et al. 1982). With large social distance, the proposer and the responder view 
each other as strangers. Therefore, in this respect, online social referral incentive systems resemble 
ultimatum games. Based on game theory, people are rational or selfish which means their aim focus on 
maximizing their own utility(Güth et al. 1982). Both sides of the referral take fairness into consideration; 
both want to maximize their own utility and proposers also fear the responder’s rejection for getting 
nothing in the online social referral incentive systems. So fairness is crucial for the success of online social 
referral incentive systems with large social distance. Therefore, we propose: 
H2: A successful referral is more likely to occur for a fair offer than an unfair offer when proposer 
and responder’s social distance is large. 
Interaction Effect of Sense of Fairness and Social Distance 
In online social referral incentive systems, sending a referral to friends is based on social norms, while the 
split of bonuses is based on individual rationality (Camerer et al. 2004). Therefore, the effectiveness of 
online social referral incentive systems might be affected by both individual rationality (maximizing 
monetary profits based on the fairness rule) and social norms (deriving utility from helping a friend). At 
this time, proposer and responder should be taken as social actors in online social referral incentive 
Shi et al. /Social Distance and Norms in Referral Incentive System 
Thirty Fourth International Conference on Information Systems, Milan 2013       7 
systems rather than users (Lamb et al. 2003). Online social referral incentive systems should be designed 
in terms of a certain context involving social norms and individual rationality. 
Individual rationalitys are pervasive in interpersonal and inter-organizational relationships (Heyman et al. 
2004). In most cases, especially in business contexts, people make decisions based on utility maximization 
and fairness. On the other hand, social norms capture the behavior of people with different social 
distances (Camerer et al. 2004). Therefore, with different social distances, the utility function can be 
different for the same person. In this study, we use social distance to determine the social context. Social 
distance is one dimension of psychological distance (Liberman et al. 2008). Construal level theory (CLT) 
links psychological distance from objects (events) to the mental construal of those objects (events), which 
offers an explanation as to why psychological distance would affect the impact of monetary incentive on 
the performance of social referrals (Trope et al. 2010). The general idea is that the more distant an object 
is from the individual, the more abstract it will seem to them, while the opposite relation between 
closeness and concreteness is true as well. 
Any event or object can be represented at different levels of construal (high or low). High and low levels of 
construal influence people’s different mental construal processes. Lower-level construals are concrete, 
relatively unstructured and contextualized representations that include subordinate and incidental 
features of events. Higher-level construals are abstract, schematic and decontextualized representations 
that extract the gist from the available information. They emphasize superordinate, core features of events 
and omit incidental features that may vary without significantly changing the meaning of events. Social 
distance as one dimension of psychological distance may influence prediction, evaluation, and action, 
inasmuch as these outcomes are mediated by the construal. High-level construal promotes attunement to 
what is consistent about an object across multiple contexts such as the split of bonus in the referral. As 
social distance increases, the effect of referral bonus split increases. With large social distance, people tend 
to care about the social relationship less; therefore extrinsic motivation such as monetary incentive may 
dominate the proposer's behavior. With small social distance, psychological proximity triggers low-level 
construal, which includes the concrete and contextualized aspects of a referral (the close social 
relationship between proposer and responder). Small social distance triggers the close social relationship 
context. Facing close friends, social norms determine the behavior of proposer and responder. Although 
different cultures have their own social norms (Fiske 1992), friendship is generally viewed similarly across 
cultures.  A friend is someone sharing similar interests, helping when in need. Close friendship is even 
worth spending time and money to maintain. Seeking fairness from close friends would be taken as 
neglecting close social relationship and as harmful for a close social relationship. So with small social 
distance, proposer and responder would focus on the close social relationship to help friends rather than 
fairness of bonus split. At this time, helping friends is the real meaning of a referral, which is good for 
social relationship. Based on social norms, the intrinsic affective motivation dominates people’s behavior. 
Therefore we propose:  
H3a: The split of bonus offered by a proposer is more prone to be a fair offer (5,5) to a responder 
with a large social distance than with a small social distance. 
H3b: A responder is more likely to refuse an unfair split of bonus offered by a proposer with a large 
social distance than with a small social distance. 
Research Methodology 
We use both a set of controlled laboratory experiments with real monetary incentives and a randomized 
field experiment to test our posted hypotheses. We first report the design, data collection, and analysis for 
the lab experiment. We corroborate our lab experiment results with a randomized field experiment. 
Controlled Lab Experiment 
The experiment is divided into two integral parts, one on the proposers and the other on the responders. 
Subjects participating in the experiment as proposers are different from those taking part as responders. 
To resemble a real-life online social referral system, proposers and responders take part in the experiment 
separately and are not allowed to see each other during the experiment. Subjects would be told that the 
referral coming from a normal online group-buy website. The online group-buy website contains many 
kinds of merchandises, which is shown on the screen for subjects. The seats are randomly assigned to 
E-Business and Competitive Strategy 
proposers or responders in the lab. Related concepts such as social distance(large, medium, small) were 
explained to all subjects before the experiment, which is based on the description of Bogardus social 
distance (Bogardus 1925); pretests were conducted to make sure subjects could correctly understand the 
meaning of the context, task and all questions. Demographics are shown in Table 1. Proposers are asked to 
send the referral with the website address to a friend with different social distances by email, IM, or other 
social networking website. Responders are asked to answer whether they would accept the referral coming 
from their friends with certain social distances. We recruited a total of 720 subjects, undergraduate 
students from a large public university. Each subject attending the experiment received $10 as the reward 
for participation. According to extant research in IS and marketing, students are active online shoppers 
and comprise a representative sample (Sia et al. 2009).  
Table 1. Demographics 
Gender 
Age 
Online Shopping 
Experience 
Proposer 
Male 58.86% 
21.35(1.414) 
1.93(0.607) 
Responder 
Male 55.32% 
21.26(1.343) 
2.059(0.53) 
The first factor in the design is social distance. The experiments for proposers had three groups ranging 
from large to small social distance as a trichotomy (Bogardus 1925; Bogardus 1933). For large social 
distance, subjects are asked to imagine friends meeting a few days ago by Internet. You have never met in 
reality. The Internet is the only way to communicate with your friends. For medium social distance, 
subjects are asked to imagine friends as your classmate or co-worker. You would meet every day, but your 
topics always focus on the business rather than a private party. For small social distance, subjects are 
asked to imagine friends having a familial relationship or intimate relationship with each other. You have 
your own private party every week, and your topics are quite private. Each group had 60 proposers. The 
second factor is split of referral bonus. We had three different split schemes: (0, 10), for which the 
proposer would receive $0 and the responder would receive $10; (5, 5), for which both the responder and 
proposer would receive $5; (10, 0), for which the responder would receive $0 and the proposer would 
receive $10. The proposer could choose one of the three splits of bonus under one of the three social 
distance scenarios. Since there are three levels of social distance, and three different referral bonus split 
schemes, we employed two 3*3 full factorial designs for the responders. Subjects were randomly selected 
into each group (60 subjects). We performed the analysis of statistical power (Cohen 1992), and our 
sample size is shown to have adequate statistical power (>80%) to detect an effect. 
Table 2. 3*3 Full Factorial Experimental Design 
(0, 10) 
Small social distance 
(5, 5) 
Small social distance 
(10, 0) 
Small social distance 
(0, 10) 
Medium social distance 
(5, 5) 
Medium social distance 
(10, 0) 
Medium social distance 
(0, 10) 
Large social distance 
(5, 5) 
Large social distance 
(10, 0) 
Large social distance 
Before subjects received treatments, they were told the duty of the responder (register for a website and 
make a purchase) and the purpose of the referral with bonus, respectively within each group. Subjects in 
different groups were not allowed to communicate about the study. After respondents received treatments, 
they were asked to complete a questionnaire. Subjects in each treatment were also informed that the 
experiment was anonymous and they were not allowed to communicate in any form during the experiment.  
We used a 7-point Likert-type scale to measure the tendency of proposers to send referrals to friends. We 
were able to test the tendency of proposers to send referrals to friends with different social distances. 
Proposers were given three choices: give the total referral bonus of $10 to the responder, keep the whole 
referral bonus of $10, or divide it equally. Responders were asked whether they would accept the referral 
with a different split of bonus coming from friends with different social distance. A manipulation check is 
performed to ensure the respondents have received the treatments.  
Shi et al. /Social Distance and Norms in Referral Incentive System 
Thirty Fourth International Conference on Information Systems, Milan 2013       9 
Controlled Lab Experiments Data Analyses  
To test our hypotheses, independent sample t-tests, one- and two-way ANOVA analyses were employed.  
We had three bonus split schemes in our lab experiment study (10,0), (5,5) and (0,10). A proposer’s choice 
of (10,0) means $5 deviation from a fair offer (5,5), and the same goes for (0,10). To measure the deviation 
from a fair offer (5, 5), we treat (10,0) in the same way as (0,10). The choice (5,5) is marked as 5. The 
choice (10,0) (responder gets nothing) and (0,10) (responder gets the whole amount) are both marked as 
10. The average amount offered by the proposer deviates from the fair offer (5,5) with decreasing social 
distance (F=14.343, p=0<0.05), supporting H3a. 
The intention to send referrals to friends increases as social distance decreases (F=73.73, p<0.001), 
supporting H1a. Also, with decreasing social distance, the percentage of responders who accepted the 
referral increased, supporting H1b (F=19.94, p<0.05). We measured referral success by multiplying the 
value of proposers’ intention to send referrals to friends with a given social distance (e.g., large) times the 
percentage of responders who accepted the referral with the same social distance, respectively. We 
observed that the successful referral with small social distance was higher than either large or medium 
social distance. All comparisons were statistically significant. Therefore Hypothesis H1c was supported. 
We then calculated the percentage of responders who accepted the offer in all treatments. With small 
social distance, the average percentage of adoption of responders getting nothing (10, 0), $5 (5, 5) and $10 
(0, 10) was 0.895, 0.912 and 0.933, respectively (Figure 1). The one-way ANOVA analysis revealed an 
insignificant effect (F=0.274, p=0.761>0.1). Therefore, a monetary incentive did not seem to enhance 
referral performance for friends with small social distance. The results indicate that close friends are more 
affected by social norms of accepting a close friend’s recommendation (referral) than by individual 
rationality (monetary incentive). 
Figure 1. Adoption of Referrals with Different Referral Bonuses and Social Distances 
With medium social distance, the average percentage of adoption of the responders getting nothing (10, 0), 
$5 (5, 5) and $10 (0, 10) was 0.64, 0.86 and 0.90, respectively (Figure 1). The percentage of adoption for 
responders who got nothing was lower than for responders who got $5 (t=-2.759, p=0.007<0.05). The 
percentage of adoption for the responders who got nothing was lower than for responders who got $10 
(t=-3.458, p=0.001<0.05). The percentage of adoption for the responders who got $5 was not statistically 
significant in relation to the responders who got $10 (t=-0.668, p=0.506>0.1). The one-way ANOVA 
analysis showed F=7.5, p=0.001<0.05. Therefore, the effect of monetary incentive for medium social 
distance was stronger than the effect for small social distance. 
With large social distance, the average percentage of adoption of the responders getting nothing (10, 0), $5 
(5, 5) and $10 (0, 10) was 0.42, 0.84 and 0.71, respectively (Figure 1). Comparing the percentage of 
responders who accepted the referral, the group with a fair split (5, 5) was higher than the group that got 
nothing (t=-4.982, p=0.001<0.05). For the percentage of responders who accepted the referral, the group 
that got the whole pie (0, 10) was higher than the group that got nothing (t=-3.374, p=0.001<0.05). 
Surprisingly, the group with a fair split (5, 5) was higher than the group that got the whole pie, but 
E-Business and Competitive Strategy 
insignificant (t=1.441, p=0.152>0.1). The one-way ANOVA analysis showed F=12.947, p=0<0.05. In sum, 
H3b was supported. 
The analysis of Hypothesis 3a implied that proposers are prone to choose a fair split of referral bonus 
when facing “friends” with a large social distance. To test this formally, we calculated the percentage of 
successful referrals based on the multiplication of the percentages of proposers who proposed a fair split of 
bonus (e.g., both get $5) with the percentage of adoption by responders with the same split. The result was 
statistically significant and pointed out that a fair split of referral bonus was the most successful incentive 
scheme for friends with large social distance. Therefore, we further support Hypothesis 2.  
Additionally, using two-way ANOVA, we tested the interaction effect of social distance and bonus split on 
responder adoption, and detected a significant effect (F=4.3, p<0.01).  
Randomized Field Experiment 
According to the lab experimental study, the effect of split of bonus was impacted by social distance 
between proposers and responders in online social referral systems. Aiming at achieving external validity 
and gaining more insights, we corroborate our lab experiment with a randomized field experiment. We 
collaborated with 08ticket (http://www.08piao.com/), one of the world’s largest online ticketing 
merchants to conduct the study. This online merchant is a company whose major business is online 
ticketing locating in various provinces of China. Multiple types of tickets are sold on the 08ticket website, 
with the major type being singers’ solo vocal concerts tickets and scenic spot tickets. With the steady 
development of online ticketing business, they have recently extended their business to include mobile 
commerce. The company offered us access to their customer data, and assisted the randomized field 
experiment process. 
Design and Process of the Randomized Field Experiment 
Based on prior literatures, 30% is usually a cutting threshold at which offers are accepted by the responder 
in an ultimatum game (Güth et al. 1982; Güth et al. 1990). If responders are only able to obtain less than 
30% of the whole amount, most responders tend to refuse offers as a way of punishing proposers’ greed. 
So we changed our split of bonus from (10,0), (5,5) and (0,10) in our experimental study into (7,3), (5,5) 
and (3,7) in our field study. We had three different distributional splits: (7,3), for which proposers will 
receive $7 and responders will receive $3; (5,5), for which proposers and responders will receive $5 each 
(fair split); (3,7), for which proposers will receive $3 and responders will receive $7. Proposers and 
responders would not get the bonus until a responder accepts the referral and makes a purchase. We also 
set a control group as (0,0), for which proposer and responder will receive nothing.  
To highlight the impact of social distance, we used two levels of social distance (large and small). Large 
social distance means the friends only have contact information or the friends are similar as the 
workmates only communicate for business. Small social distance means the friends have a familial 
relationship or intimate relationship with each other. Our social distance was based on social distance of 
Bogardus (Bogardus 1933). So our field study had eight treatment and control groups (Table 2). 
Table 3. Factorial Design of Field Study 
(7,3) 
Large social distance 
(5,5) 
Large social distance 
(3,7) 
Large social distance 
(0,0) 
Large social distance 
(7,3) 
Small social distance 
(5,5) 
Small social distance 
(3,7) 
Small social distance 
(0,0) 
Small social distance 
The process of the field study was as follows: 
(1) We randomly selected current customers from the online ticketing company (08ticket) as proposers. 
(2) On behalf of the online ticketing company, we randomly assigned a current customer to one of our 
eight treatment or control groups (the proposers) by sending an email including explanations of the 
company’s online social referral incentive system and the intended split of bonus given a certain social 
distance.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested