pdf viewer in c# code project : Cut image from pdf online Library SDK class asp.net wpf azure ajax software-architecture-practice12-part1349

[ Team LiB ]
Part Four
: Moving from One System to Many
Chapter 14
– Product Lines: Re-using Architectural Assets within an Organization
One of the most powerful applications of software architecture is its use as the foundation of a software
product line. This chapter presents the basics of software product line production, highlighting
architecture as the keystone for achieving large improvements in productivity, time-to-market, quality, and
cost. The chapter explores in detail a few of the software engineering development and management
activities that take on a special dimension in a product line context.
Chapter 15
– CelsiusTech: A Case Study in Product Line Development
CelsiusTech is an organization that successfully implemented a product line based on an architecture.
This chapter describes the architecture of the product line and shows why this architecture was crucial to
CelsiusTech's success. Without this approach, it would not have been able to build these systems—it
simply did not have adequate personnel. The product line approach brought consequent changes to the
organizational structure and the manner in which it both solicits and contracts for business.
Chapter 16
– J2EE/EJB: A Case Study of an Industry-Standard Computing Infrastructure
This chapter presents an overview of Sun Microsystems's Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) architecture
specification, as well as an important portion of that specification, the Enterprise JavaBeans (EJBs)
architecture specification. The J2EE specification provides a standard description of how distributed
object-oriented programs written in Java should be designed and developed. The chapter examines the
business drivers that led to the creation of such an industry standard architecture for building distributed
systems, and shows how the J2EE/EJB architecture addresses such needs.
Chapter 17
– The Luther Architecture: A Case Study in Mobile Applications Using J2EE
The Luther architecture was designed to provide a general framework to provide customized solutions in
the domain of maintenance or operation of large vehicles or industrial infrastructure. It is based on J2EE,
and so this chapter becomes an application of the general J2EE/EJB framework discussed in Chapter 16
.
This case deals with an environment where the end user is connected over a wireless network and has a
device with limited input/output capabilities, limited computational capabilities, or both.
Chapter 18
– Building Systems from Off-the-Shelf Components
Systems are being constructed with more and more off-the-shelf components. The use of such
components changes the design process because the components can constrain the architecture.
Typically, components are chosen to achieve some set of functionality, but they also embody architectural
(and hence quality) assumptions. This chapter describes a lightweight process to guide an architect in
choosing components that will work well in concert. The chapter includes a demonstration of the process
applied to a recently fielded system.
Chapter 19
– Software Architecture in the Future
We look at the Architecture Business Cycle again and identify some of the yet to be solved problems
associated with software architecture and discuss why more research is needed.
[ Team LiB ]
This PDF file was converted by Atop CHM to PDF Converter free version!  http://www.chmconverter.com/chm-to-pdf/
Addison Wesley : Software Architecture in Practice, Second Edition
20 / 463
Cut image from pdf online - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
copying a pdf image to word; how to copy an image from a pdf in preview
Cut image from pdf online - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy pdf image to word; how to copy pictures from a pdf to word
[ Team LiB ]
Case Study Organization
We realize that different readers of the book will want to mine different information from it, and that most
of them will want to read the book at various levels of detail. To address this need, we have organized the
case studies in a consistent fashion around the following sections:
A brief description of the study, the problems it was solving, and the points about software
architecture it illustrates
A description of how the ABC was realized (or partially realized) in this study
The requirements and qualities that propelled the design
The architectural solution: a detailed discussion that comprises the bulk of many of the case studies
A summary of the important points made in the chapter
The architectural solution contains most of the detail in the case studies. If you are interested only in the
technical and business environment and a high-level description of the architectural approach, you can
get the gist of a case study by reading the brief description of it, its requirements and quality goals, and
the summary. For a fuller discussion, you can also read the architectural solution section of each case.
[ Team LiB ]
This PDF file was converted by Atop CHM to PDF Converter free version!  http://www.chmconverter.com/chm-to-pdf/
Addison Wesley : Software Architecture in Practice, Second Edition
21 / 463
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
image. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components and online C# class source code. A powerful
how to copy image from pdf file; paste image into pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
NET framework component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF control installed. Access to freeware download and online VB.NET class
paste image into pdf preview; paste image into pdf
[ Team LiB ]
Threads Through the Book
While the ABC is the primary theme of the book, other conceptual threads run through it. A reader
interested in pursuing a particular aspect of architecture may wish to concentrate on the chapters that
carry one or more of the following threads:
Where do architectures come from?— Chapters 1
2
4
7
11
and 12
Business issues— Chapters 1
4
7
11
12
14
15
and 18
How qualities derive from architectures— Chapters 4
5
11
and 12
and the case studies
Case studies of qualities deriving from architecture— Chapters 3
6
8
13
15
16
and 17
Architecture as a re-usable asset— Chapters 14
15
16
17
and 18
Component-based systems and commercial infrastructures— Chapters 13
16
17
and 18
Architectures for real-time systems— Chapters 3
5
6
8
and 15
Architectures for information systems— Chapters 13
16
17
and 18
[ Team LiB ]
This PDF file was converted by Atop CHM to PDF Converter free version!  http://www.chmconverter.com/chm-to-pdf/
Addison Wesley : Software Architecture in Practice, Second Edition
22 / 463
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components for .NET. Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class.
how to copy an image from a pdf to powerpoint; copy picture from pdf
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL.
how to paste a picture in a pdf; how to cut a picture from a pdf document
[ Team LiB ]
Sidebars
Throughout the book we have located short, signed, visually separated sidebars written by only one of
us. These features are intended to give background or perspective that is outside the normal flow of the
text.
[ Team LiB ]
This PDF file was converted by Atop CHM to PDF Converter free version!  http://www.chmconverter.com/chm-to-pdf/
Addison Wesley : Software Architecture in Practice, Second Edition
23 / 463
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Text: Replace Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit
copy and paste image from pdf to word; copying image from pdf to powerpoint
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
to zoom and crop image and achieve image resizing. Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field. Access to freeware download and online C#.NET
paste picture into pdf preview; how to copy and paste a pdf image into a word document
[ Team LiB ]
Part One: Envisioning Architecture
Where do architectures come from? They spring from the minds of architects, of course, but
how? What must go 
into
the mind of an architect for an architecture to come 
out?
For that
matter, what 
is
a software architecture? Is it the same as design? If so, what's the fuss? If it's
different, how so and why is it important?
In Part One
, we focus on the forces and influences that are at work as the architect begins
creating—
envisioning
—the central artifact of a system whose influences persist beyond the
lifetime of the system. Whereas we often think of design as taking the right steps to ensure that
the system will perform as expected—produce the correct answer or provide the expected
functionality—architecture is additionally concerned with much longer-range issues. The
architect is faced with a swarm of competing, if not conflicting, influences and demands,
surprisingly few of which are concerned with getting the system to work correctly. The
organizational and technical environment brings to bear a weighty set of sometimes implicit
demands, and in practice these are as important as any of the explicit requirements for the
software even though they are almost never written down.
Also surprising are the ways in which the architecture produces a deep influence on the
organization that spawned it. It is decidedly not the case that the organization produces the
architecture, ties it to the system for which it was developed, and locks it away in that
compartment. Instead, architectures and their developing organizations dance an intricate waltz
of influence and counterinfluence, helping each other to grow, evolve, and take on larger roles.
The Architecture Business Cycle (ABC) is the name we give to this waltz, and it is the theme of
this book and the focus of Chapter 1
Chapter 2
lays the foundations for the study of software
architecture, defines it, places it in the context of software engineering, and provides some
conceptual tools for its consideration. Chief among the concepts is the notion that architectures
consist of separate coordinated structures and that each structure provides an engineering
leverage point in system development.
Chapter 3
is the first case study in the book. It illustrates how a particular architecture solved a
unique set of requirements—in this case, a real-time embedded avionics system whose focus
was on long-term modifiability—but also brings home the conceptual points made earlier. Three
separate architectural structures—module decomposition, uses, and process structures—came
together to provide the architectural solution for this system.
With this introduction, we begin our tour of the Architecture Business Cycle.
[ Team LiB ]
This PDF file was converted by Atop CHM to PDF Converter free version!  http://www.chmconverter.com/chm-to-pdf/
Addison Wesley : Software Architecture in Practice, Second Edition
24 / 463
VB.NET PDF - Create PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL.
how to copy image from pdf to word; how to copy pdf image to jpg
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Online source codes for quick evaluation in VB.NET class. use it to extract all images from PDF document. page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the
copy image from pdf; how to copy pictures from pdf in
[ Team LiB ]
Chapter 1. The Architecture Business Cycle
Simply stated, competitive success flows to the company that manages to establish
proprietary architectural control over a broad, fast-moving, competitive space.
—C. Morris and C. Ferguson [Morris 93]
For decades, software designers have been taught to build systems based exclusively on the technical
requirements. Conceptually, the requirements document is tossed over the wall into the designer's
cubicle, and the designer must come forth with a satisfactory design. Requirements beget design, which
begets system. Of course, modern software development methods recognize the naïveté of this model
and provide all sorts of feedback loops from designer to analyst. But they still make the implicit
assumption that design is a product of the system's technical requirements, period.
Architecture
has emerged as a crucial part of the design process and is the subject of this book. 
Software
architecture
encompasses the structures of large software systems. The architectural view of a system is
abstract, distilling away details of implementation, algorithm, and data representation and concentrating
on the behavior and interaction of "black box" elements. A software architecture is developed as the first
step toward designing a system that has a collection of desired properties. We will discuss software
architecture in detail in Chapter 2
. For now we provide, without comment, the following definition:
The software architecture of a program or computing system is the structure or structures of the
system, which comprise software elements, the externally visible properties of those elements,
and the relationships among them.
Chapter 2
will provide our working definitions and distinguish between architecture and other forms of
design. For reasons we will see throughout, architecture serves as an important communication,
reasoning, analysis, and growth tool for systems. Until now, however, architectural design has been
discussed in the light that, if you know the requirements for a system, you can build the architecture for it.
The Swedish Ship 
Vasa
In the 1620s, Sweden and Poland were at war. The king of Sweden, Gustavus Adolphus, was
determined to put a swift end to it and commissioned a new warship the likes of which had
never been seen before. The 
Vasa
, shown in Figure 1.1
, was to be the world's most
formidable instrument of war: 70 meters long, able to carry 300 soldiers, and with an
astonishing 64 heavy guns mounted on two gun decks. Seeking to add overwhelming
firepower to his navy to strike a decisive blow, the king insisted on stretching the 
Vasa
's
armaments to the limits. Her architect, Henrik Hybertsson, was a seasoned Dutch shipbuilder
with an impeccable reputation, but the 
Vasa
was beyond even his broad experience. Two-
gun-deck ships were rare, and none had been built of the 
Vasa
's size and armament.
Figure 1.1. The warship 
Vasa.
Used with permission of The Vasa Museum, Stockholm, Sweden.
This PDF file was converted by Atop CHM to PDF Converter free version!  http://www.chmconverter.com/chm-to-pdf/
Addison Wesley : Software Architecture in Practice, Second Edition
25 / 463
Like all architects of systems that push the envelope of experience, Hybertsson had to
balance many concerns. Swift time to deployment was critical, but so were performance,
functionality, safety, reliability, and cost. He was also responsible to a variety of stakeholders.
In this case, the primary customer was the king, but Hybertsson also was responsible to the
crew that would sail his creation. Also like all architects, Hybertsson brought his experience
with him to the task. In this case, his experience told him to design the 
Vasa
as though it were
a single-gun-deck ship and then extrapolate, which was in accordance with the technical
environment of the day. Faced with an impossible task, Hybertsson had the good sense to die
about a year before the ship was finished.
The project was completed to his specifications, however, and on Sunday morning, August 10,
1628, the mighty ship was ready. She set her sails, waddled out into Stockholm's deep-water
harbor, fired her guns in salute, and promptly rolled over. Water poured in through the open
gun ports, and the 
Vasa
plummeted. A few minutes later her first and only voyage ended 30
meters beneath the surface. Dozens among her 150-man crew drowned.
Inquiries followed, which concluded that the ship was well built but "badly proportioned." In
other words, its architecture was flawed. Today we know that Hybertsson did a poor job of
balancing all of the conflicting constraints levied on him. In particular, he did a poor job of risk
management and a poor job of customer management (not that anyone could have fared
better). He simply acquiesced in the face of impossible requirements.
The story of the 
Vasa
, although more than 375 years old, well illustrates the Architecture
Business Cycle: organization goals beget requirements, which beget an architecture, which
begets a system. The architecture flows from the architect's experience and the technical
environment of the day. Hybertsson suffered from the fact that neither of those were up to the
task before him.
In this book, we provide three things that Hybertsson could have used:
1. Case studies of successful architectures crafted to satisfy demanding requirements, so
as to help set the technical playing field of the day.
2. Methods to assess an architecture before any system is built from it, so as to mitigate the
risks associated with launching unprecedented designs.
3. Techniques for incremental architecture-based development, so as to uncover design
flaws before it is too late to correct them.
Our goal is to give architects another way out of their design dilemmas than the one that befell
the ill-fated Dutch ship designer. Death before deployment is not nearly so admired these
days.
— PCC
This is short-sighted (see the sidebar The Swedish Ship 
Vasa
) and fails to tell the whole story. What do
This PDF file was converted by Atop CHM to PDF Converter free version!  http://www.chmconverter.com/chm-to-pdf/
Addison Wesley : Software Architecture in Practice, Second Edition
26 / 463
you suppose would happen if two different architects, working in two different organizations, were given
the same requirements specification for a system? Do you think they would produce the same
architecture or different ones?
The answer is that, in general, they would produce different ones, which immediately belies the notion
that requirements determine architecture. Other factors are at work, and to fail to recognize them is to
continue working in the dark.
The focusing question is this: What is the relationship of a system's software architecture to the
environment in which the system will be constructed and exist? The answer to this question is the
organizing motif of this book. Software architecture is a result of 
technical
business
, and 
social
influences. Its existence in turn affects the technical, business, and social environments that subsequently
influence future architectures. We call this cycle of influences, from the environment to the architecture
and back to the environment, the 
Architecture Business Cycle
(ABC).
This chapter introduces the ABC in detail and sets the stage for the remainder of the book. The major
parts of the book tour the cycle by examining the following:
How organizational goals influence requirements and development strategy.
How requirements lead to an architecture.
How architectures are analyzed.
How architectures yield systems that suggest new organizational capabilities and requirements.
[ Team LiB ]
This PDF file was converted by Atop CHM to PDF Converter free version!  http://www.chmconverter.com/chm-to-pdf/
Addison Wesley : Software Architecture in Practice, Second Edition
27 / 463
[ Team LiB ]
1.1 Where Do Architectures Come From?
An architecture is the result of a set of business and technical decisions. There are many influences at
work in its design, and the realization of these influences will change depending on the environment in
which the architecture is required to perform. An architect designing a system for which the real-time
deadlines are believed to be tight will make one set of design choices; the same architect, designing a
similar system in which the deadlines can be easily satisfied, will make different choices. And the same
architect, designing a non-real-time system, is likely to make quite different choices still. Even with the
same requirements, hardware, support software, and human resources available, an architect designing a
system today is likely to design a different system than might have been designed five years ago.
In any development effort, the requirements make explicit some—but only some—of the desired
properties of the final system. Not all requirements are concerned directly with those properties; a
development process or the use of a particular tool may be mandated by them. But the requirements
specification only begins to tell the story. Failure to satisfy other constraints may render the system just as
problematic as if it functioned poorly.
We begin building the ABC by identifying the influences to and from architectures.
ARCHITECTURES ARE INFLUENCED BY SYSTEM STAKEHOLDERS
Many people and organizations are interested in the construction of a software system. We call these
stakeholders:
The customer, the end users, the developers, the project manager, the maintainers, and
even those who market the system are a few examples. Stakeholders have different concerns that they
wish the system to guarantee or optimize, including things as diverse as providing a certain behavior at
runtime, performing well on a particular piece of hardware, being easy to customize, achieving short time
to market or low cost of development, gainfully employing programmers who have a particular specialty,
or providing a broad range of functions. Figure 1.2
shows the architect receiving helpful stakeholder
"suggestions."
Figure 1.2. Influence of stakeholders on the architect
Having an acceptable system involves properties such as performance, reliability, availability, platform
compatibility, memory utilization, network usage, security, modifiability, usability, and interoperability with
This PDF file was converted by Atop CHM to PDF Converter free version!  http://www.chmconverter.com/chm-to-pdf/
Addison Wesley : Software Architecture in Practice, Second Edition
28 / 463
other systems as well as behavior. Indeed, we will see that these properties determine the overall design
of the architecture. All of them, and others, affect how the delivered system is viewed by its eventual
recipients, and so they find a voice in one or more of the system's stakeholders.
The underlying problem, of course, is that each stakeholder has different concerns and goals, some of
which may be contradictory. Properties can be listed and discussed, of course, in an artifact such as a
requirements document. But it is a rare requirements document that does a good job of capturing all of a
system's quality requirements in testable detail. The reality is that the architect often has to fill in the
blanks and mediate the conflicts.
ARCHITECTURES ARE INFLUENCED BY THE DEVELOPING ORGANIZATION
In addition to the organizational goals expressed through requirements, an architecture is influenced by
the structure or nature of the development organization. For example, if the organization has an
abundance of idle programmers skilled in client-server communications, then a client-server architecture
might be the approach supported by management. If not, it may well be rejected. Staff skills are one
additional influence, but so are the development schedule and budget.
There are three classes of influence that come from the developing organization: immediate business,
long-term business, and organizational structure.
An organization may have an immediate business investment in certain assets, such as existing
architectures and the products based on them. The foundation of a development project may be that
the proposed system is the next in a sequence of similar systems, and the cost estimates assume a
high degree of asset re-use.
An organization may wish to make a long-term business investment in an infrastructure to pursue
strategic goals and may view the proposed system as one means of financing and extending that
infrastructure.
The organizational structure can shape the software architecture. In the case study in Chapter 8
(Flight Simulation: A Case Study in Architecture for Integrability), the development of some of the
subsystems was subcontracted because the subcontractors provided specialized expertise. This
was made possible by a division of functionality in the architecture that allowed isolation of the
specialities.
ARCHITECTURES ARE INFLUENCED BY THE BACKGROUND AND EXPERIENCE OF THE
ARCHITECTS
If the architects for a system have had good results using a particular architectural approach, such as
distributed objects or implicit invocation, chances are that they will try that same approach on a new
development effort. Conversely, if their prior experience with this approach was disastrous, the architects
may be reluctant to try it again. Architectural choices may also come from an architect's education and
training, exposure to successful architectural patterns, or exposure to systems that have worked
particularly poorly or particularly well. The architects may also wish to experiment with an architectural
pattern or technique learned from a book (such as this one) or a course.
ARCHITECTURES ARE INFLUENCED BY THE TECHNICAL ENVIRONMENT
A special case of the architect's background and experience is reflected by the 
technical environment
.
The environment that is current when an architecture is designed will influence that architecture. It might
include standard industry practices or software engineering techniques prevalent in the architect's
professional community. It is a brave architect who, in today's environment, does not at least consider a
Web-based, object-oriented, middleware-supported design for an information system.
RAMIFICATIONS OF INFLUENCES ON AN ARCHITECTURE
Influences on an architecture come from a wide variety of sources. Some are only implied, while others
This PDF file was converted by Atop CHM to PDF Converter free version!  http://www.chmconverter.com/chm-to-pdf/
Addison Wesley : Software Architecture in Practice, Second Edition
29 / 463
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested