pdf viewer in c# code project : How to copy picture from pdf to powerpoint control SDK platform web page wpf winforms web browser sp44100-part1390

The NASA History Series
National Aeronautics and Space Administration
NASA History Division
Office of External Relations
Washington, DC
May 2007
NASA SP-2007-4410
Mars Wars
The Rise and Fall of the
Space Exploration Initiative
Thor Hogan
How to copy picture from pdf to powerpoint - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
paste image in pdf file; how to copy pictures from pdf
How to copy picture from pdf to powerpoint - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
paste jpeg into pdf; how to cut picture from pdf file
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste; paste image into pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
how to paste a picture into pdf; copy image from pdf to pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor. dll. Open RasterEdge_MVC3 DemoProject, copy following content to your project:
copy image from pdf to word; pasting image into pdf
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
Copy the demo codes and run your project to see New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
paste image in pdf preview; copy picture from pdf reader
Acknowledgements
A great many people provided me with assistance during the preparation of this 
book. I am particularly indebted to John Logsdon and Roger Launius for their 
invaluable insights regarding the history of the American space program, the role of 
various actors within the space policy community, and the context in which Mars 
exploration should be viewed. I also owe a great deal to Steve Balla and Jeff Henig, 
who helped me employ the political science and public policy theories that are 
used in this book.  I would also like to thank Ray Williamson and Joe Cordes for 
their support and helpful comments.  I am also very grateful for all the hard work 
contributed by Steve Dick and Steve Garber getting this book ready for publica-
tion.  I would like to thank Heidi Pongratz at Maryland Composition, Angela Lane 
and Danny Nowlin at Stennis Space Center, and Jeffrey McLean at NASA Head-
quarters for handling the copyediting, layout, and printing of the book.  Finally, 
I would like to thank the dedicated archivists at both the NASA History Divi-
sion in Washington, D.C. and the George Bush Presidential Library at Texas A&M 
– they were all crucial to the successful completion of this project.  In particular, I 
would like to thank Colin Fries and Jane Odom at the NASA History Division and 
Debbie Carter, Bob Holzweiss, John Laster, Laura Spencer, and Melissa Walker at 
the George Bush Presidential Library.
This book is dedicated to Joe Hogan, for teaching me how to dream big dreams; 
to Ron Beck, for believing in my potential when few others did; and to Kate Kuva-
lanka, for inspiring me on a daily basis
iii
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
first! VB.NET Image & Picture Cropping Application. Do you need to save a copy of certain part of an image file in a programming way?
how to copy a pdf image into a word document; how to copy pdf image to word document
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we code demo, which you can directly copy to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to copy picture from pdf to word; how to cut an image out of a pdf
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# Powerful PDF image editor control, compatible with .NET Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo
copy picture from pdf to word; how to copy picture from pdf to powerpoint
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link Visual Studio .NET PDF image editor control, compatible Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo
how to copy an image from a pdf in; copy image from pdf reader
3
Chapter 1:  Introduction
the government agenda and what factors led to its ultimate demise. John Kingdon’s 
Policy Streams Model describes how problems come to the attention of policy makers, 
how agendas are set, how policy alternatives are generated, and why policy windows 
open.
3
This theory will be utilized to develop the story of SEI’s rise and fall, and will 
more specifically be used to assess who the important actors are within the space 
policy community. Frank Baumgartner and Bryan Jones’s Punctuated Equilibrium 
Model depicts the policy process as comprising long periods of stability, which are 
interrupted by predictable periods of instability that lead to major policy changes.
4
This model will be utilized to provide a better understanding of the larger trends 
that led to SEI’s promotion to the government agenda and may explain its eventual 
downfall.
5
These two models contributed a number of descriptive statistics that 
were used to develop a collection of lessons learned from the SEI experience.
In 1972, Michael Cohen, James March, and Johan Olsen introduced Garbage 
Can Theory in an article describing what they called “organized anarchies.” The 
authors emphasized the chaotic character of organizations as loose collections of 
ideas as opposed to rational, coherent structures. They found that each, organized 
anarchy was composed of four separate process streams: problems, solutions, partici-
pants, and choice opportunities. They concluded that organizations are “a collection 
of choices looking for problems, issues and feelings looking for decision situations in 
which they might be aired, solutions looking for issues to which they might be the 
answer, and decision makers looking for work.” Finally, a choice opportunity was:
…a garbage can into which various kinds of problems and solutions 
are dumped by participants as they are generated.  The mix of garbage in 
a single can depends on the mix of cans available, on the labels attached to 
the alternative cans, on what garbage is currently being produced, and on 
the speed with which garbage is collected and removed from the scene.
Therefore, the three found that policy outcomes are the result of the garbage avail-
able and the process chosen to sift through that garbage.
6
3
John W. Kingdon, Agendas, Alternatives, and Public Policies (New York: HarperCollins College 
Publishers, 1995).
4
Frank R. Baumgartner and Bryan D. Jones, Agendas and Instability in American Politics (Chicago: 
University of Chicago Press, 1993), pp. 3-24.
5
Wayne Parsons, Public Policy: An Introduction to the 周eory and Practice of Policy Analysis 
(Brookfield, Vermont: Edward Elgar Publishing, 1995), pp. 193-207.
6
Michael Cohen, James March, and Johan Olsen, “A Garbage Can Model of Organizational 
Choice,” Administrative Science Quarterly (March 1972), pp. 1-25; Parsons, Public Policy, pp. 192-193.
5
Chapter 1:  Introduction
do issues rise to the top of the government agenda to be dealt with independently.  
At a fundamental level, the punctuated equilibrium model seeks to explain why the 
policy process is largely incremental and conservative, but is also subject to periods 
of radical change.
8
Baumgartner and Jones argue that to understand the complexities of the policy 
making process, one must study specific policy problems over extended periods of 
time. To comprehend the policy dynamics of an issue, one must develop indicators 
that explain how the issue is understood.  They introduce a new approach to policy 
research that attempts to meld the policy typology literature and the agenda status 
literature—the former based on  cross-sectional comparisons  of  multiple public 
policy issues, the latter focused on longitudinal studies of a single issue over time. 
The new approach concentrates on the long-term trends related to interest in, and 
discussion of, important policy questions. In particular, they are interested in two 
related concepts, whether an issue is on the agenda of a given institution (venue 
access) and whether the tone of activity within that institution is positive or nega-
tive (policy image).
9
The two utilize an eclectic group of measures to gauge venue 
access and policy image.  Baumgartner and Jones’s model provided a useful method 
for understanding where SEI fits within the history of the American space program. 
More importantly, it provided a means to evaluate whether long-term space policy 
trends predetermined the initiative’s failed outcome.
Why Mars?
Any discussion of human exploration of Mars must begin with a description 
of the reasons why this planetary destination has continually reemerged during 
the post-Apollo period as the “next logical step” for the American space program. 
Understanding the deep-rooted human interest in Mars provides some insight into 
the space program’s recurring focus on it as an objective for both robotic and human 
missions. Crewed Mars exploration has been seriously considered three times during 
the past 35 years, but our fascination with the red planet began a great deal earlier. 
For thousands of years, the human race has been drawn to Mars—our celestial 
neighbor fuels the imagination unlike any other planet in the solar system. Ancient 
humans examined the red planet as they attempted to unlock the mystery of the 
heavens. To primitive humans, the fourth planet from the sun was nothing more 
then a reddish point of light dancing across the night sky.  Early civilizations gave 
8
Frank R. Baumgartner and Bryan D. Jones, Agendas and Instability in American Politics (Chicago: 
University of Chicago Press, 1993), pp. 3-24.
9
Ibid., pp. 39-55.
7
Chapter 1:  Introduction
motion—stating that planetary orbits about the Sun were elliptical (as opposed 
to circular as Aristarchus and Copernicus had assumed) and that a planet’s speed 
increases as it approaches the sun and decreases proportionally as it moves farther 
away. As a result of Tycho and Kepler’s observations and theories, the heliocentric 
system finally overcame Ptolemy’s geocentric model.
12
In 1609, the same year that Kepler published On the Motion of Mars, Galileo 
Galilei made the first celestial observations with a telescope. The next year, after 
making observations of the Moon, Jupiter, and Venus, Galileo turned his telescope 
toward Mars. Due to the use of a relatively crude instrument, Galileo’s observations 
of Mars where not particularly informative—other than to suggest that the planet 
was not a perfect sphere. In 1659, Dutch astronomer Christian Huygens, using a 
considerably more advanced telescope, was able to detect the first surface feature on 
Mars. The dark triangular area that he observed over a period of months, which is 
today called Syrtis Major, allowed him to conclude that Mars rotated on its axis like 
the Earth. Seven years later, in 1666, Italian astronomer Giovanni Cassini began a 
series of observations and discovered the planet’s white polar caps.
13
In 1783, astronomer William Herschel, who two years earlier had discovered 
the planet Uranus, made a series of observations of Mars and found that the planet 
was tilted at an angle of almost 24 degrees on its axis of rotation. This finding 
showed that like Earth, Mars had seasons; however, considering that a Martian year 
is almost double that of Earth, its seasons are nearly twice as long. Herschel also 
confirmed the existence of Mars’s polar caps, and postulated correctly that they were 
composed of ice. Finally, Herschel found that the planet had “a considerable but 
moderate atmosphere.”
14
Canals on Mars
In 1877, Mars came to a perihelic opposition just 35 million miles from Earth. 
That year Asaph Hall, director of the U.S. Naval Observatory, turned that institu-
tion’s 26-inch refractor telescope toward the red planet in search of satellites.  In 
August, he discovered two small moons orbiting Mars, which he named Phobos 
(fear) and Deimos (flight)—these were Mars’ attendants in Homer’s Iliad. Hall con-
tinued his observations for several months, using the data he acquired to make an 
estimate of the mass of Mars. His calculation of 0.1076 times that of Earth proved 
to be quite accurate (the current accepted value being 0.1074).
15
12
Ibid.
13
Sheehan, 周e Planet Mars, pp. 9-15; Wilford, Mars Beckons, pp. 3-17.
14
Sheehan, 周e Planet Mars, pp. 16-22; Wilford, Mars Beckons, pp. 3-17.
15
Sheehan, 周e Planet Mars, pp. 23-30. 
9
Chapter 1:  Introduction
of his canals are but they are not straight lines at all.” It is now believed that Lowell’s 
canals were simply optical illusions produced because the human eye attempts to 
arrange scattered spots into a line. Despite the eventual erosion of his theories, how-
ever, there is little doubt that Lowell’s declarations about extraterrestrial Martian life 
led to greatly increased public interest in the red planet.
19
Mars in Popular Culture
In 1898, just three years after Percival Lowell popularized the vision of a Mars 
threaded by canals and peopled by ancient beings, the first great Martian science 
fiction book was published. The War of the Worlds, written by H.G. Wells, is hailed 
as the greatest alien invasion story in history. The book began with a Martian assault 
just outside of London.  While the Martians at first seemed helpless in the heavy 
Earth gravity, they quickly exposed their advanced technology in the form of huge 
death machines that began destroying the surrounding countryside, forcing the 
evacuation of London. The saving grace for the badly overmatched humans turned 
out to be common bacteria that the Martians had no immune system to fight off.  
In 1938, the book was famously adapted for radio by Orson Welles. The retelling of 
the story, portrayed as a news program about a Martian landing in rural New Jersey, 
was so believable that millions of Americans actually thought that Earth was being 
invaded.
20
Starting in 1917, author Edgar Rice Burroughs began a highly popular series 
about Mars exploration with the publication of A Princess of Mars. In subsequent 
years, he wrote ten more books tracking the adventures of Captain John Carter on 
Mars. The series was first published as a longer sequence of serials printed in All-
Story Magazine, which represented a common strategy for the publication of science 
fiction novels during that period. The Carter books were considered to be more 
fantasy than hard science fiction, which was exhibited by the lack of detail regard-
ing how Carter actually got to the red planet—he was magically taken there in the 
book.
21
During the Great Depression and the Second World War, there was a conspic-
uous absence of popular books regarding Mars exploration. The lull was broken 
when author Robert Heinlein wrote Red Planet. Published in 1949, the book fol-
lowed teenager Jim Marlowe, his friend Frank, and his Martian “roundhead” pet 
Willis on their travels across the planet to warn a human colony that was the target 
19
Ibid.
20
H.G. Wells, War of the Worlds (1898; reprint, New York: Tor, 1986).
21
Edgar Rice Burroughs, A Princess of Mars (1917; reprint, New York: Ballantine Books, 1990).
11
Chapter 1:  Introduction
Mariner and Viking
While there was substantial progress made in telescope technology during the 
70 years after Lowell’s sensational observations, it was still beyond the abilities of 
astronomers of the time to unequivocally disprove his theories. In fact, during this 
period there was little sustained interest in planetary astronomy, and as a result, few 
new discoveries were made. In 1957, the Soviet launch of Sputnik opened vast new 
opportunities for scientific investigations. Once the concept of robotic planetary 
exploration was conceived during the coming years, it was taken for granted that 
missions to Mars would be a priority. Several failed attempts by both the Americans 
and Soviets to send spacecraft to Mars during the early 1960s, however, delayed the 
first close up examination of the red planet.
26
On 28 December 1964, NASA launched Mariner 4 on a mission to explore 
Mars. About halfway to the planet, the spacecraft experienced technical difficulties 
that greatly concerned ground controllers. The “Great Galactic Ghoul,”
27
however, 
was unsuccessful in its efforts at crippling the probe. On 14 July 1965, Mariner 4 
made a flyby to within 6,118 miles of the planet’s surface. It was able to relay 22 
images back to Earth with its single camera before passing out of range. The data 
that was obtained from those images, as well as from the spacecraft’s other instru-
ments,
28
were nothing less than stunning.  Instead of the living planet that Lowell 
had envisioned, Mariner 4 discovered a surface that was apparently devoid of life 
and seemingly unchanged for billions of years. In addition, results of an S-band 
radio occultation experiment found that the Martian atmospheric density was con-
siderably lower than expected and that its makeup was approximately 95% carbon 
dioxide. Finally, it was discovered that the planet had no discernible magnetic field. 
The information returned by Mariner 4 resulted in a complete revision of human 
thinking about Mars, ending forever Lowellian theories regarding vegetation and 
intelligent beings.
29
During the early months of 1969, the Americans and the Soviets each sent two 
more spacecraft towards Mars.
30
While the Soviets continued their string of failures, 
both Mariner 6 and Mariner 7 were successful. These spacecraft, like Mariner 4, 
were designed as flyby missions, but they were capable of photographing the planet 
26
Wilford, Mars Beckons, pp. 53-56.
27
A myth developed by flight engineers after earlier missions to Mars failed, which lives on today.
28
Including a magnetometer and a trapped-radiation detector.
29
Sheehan, 周e Planet Mars, chapter 11.
30
About every 26 months, Mars and Earth reach a position in their respective orbits that offers the 
best trajectory between the two planets.  During this time period, the Mariner missions were launched 
to take advantage of these launch windows.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested