pdf viewer in c# code project : Cut picture pdf application control utility azure html web page visual studio sp44104-part1394

68
Mars Wars
69
Chapter 3:  Bush, Quayle, and SEI
Joining the Streams: 
Human Exploration of Mars Reaches the Government Agenda
As these events were unfolding in Washington, President Bush was in Europe 
on a 10-day trip that included an address before the Polish National Assembly, a 
meeting with Solidarity leader Lech Walesa, a meeting with Hungarian leaders, and 
attendance at a G-7 summit in France. While he was away, Bush had essentially 
delegated decision-making responsibility for the exploration initiative to Vice Presi-
dent Quayle. Over the course of the previous month, Bush had discussed the devel-
opment of the exploration initiative with Quayle at several of their weekly lunch 
meetings, but the president had essentially let his vice president make all the critical 
decisions with regard to the strategic plan. One important facet of their discussions 
was whether the Administration should set a target date of 2010 for completion of a 
Moon base and 2020 for an expedition to Mars. Although this debate continued up 
until the last moment, the two ultimately decided against specific deadlines because 
they feared it would adversely impact future budget deliberations. By early July, the 
President had fully committed to the program.
79
On 14 July, Quayle chaired a meeting of the full Space Council to discuss the 
forthcoming announcement of the exploration initiative. Mark Albrecht recalled 
that “everyone lined up, thought it was a great idea and made a recommendation 
to the President that he go ahead and do this.” Thus, when Bush arrived back in 
Washington two days before the speech, everything was already in place for him to 
announce the new plan.
80
Vice President Quayle wrote in his memoirs that if the 
agenda setting process for SEI sounded like a “…somewhat ad hoc, improvisational 
way to think about going to Mars, you’re right. But what was important right then 
was to think big, to put a bit of ‘the vision thing’ back into the program, to get 
people excited about it once again, even if that meant getting ahead of ourselves.” 
Quayle believed the only thing that would enliven the American people was a res-
toration of wonder in the idea of sending people to explore space, not just orbit 
around the Earth.
81
Before the new initiative was officially announced, the 17 July 1989 edition of 
Aviation Week and Space Technology (AW&ST) broke the story that a secret White 
House review was considering a human lunar base and Mars initiative. The article 
opened by stating, “A sharp debate has been sparked within the Bush Administra-
79
Albrecht interview; Karen Hosler, “Bush Unveils Moon, Mars Plans But Withholds Specifics,” 
周e Baltimore Sun, 21 July 1989.
80
Ibid.
81
Quayle, Standing Firm, pp. 177-190.
tion and Congress by Vice President Dan Quayle’s proposal that President Bush 
commit the U.S. this week to developing a manned lunar base as a stepping-stone to 
a manned flight to Mars. Under the proposal, the U.S. could build a lunar outpost 
by 2000-2010 and use the experience gained on the moon to develop that capability 
to mount a manned Mars mission by 2020.” The magazine reported that Quayle 
had been formulating the initiative in secret meetings with a group of NASA offi-
cials, Mark Albrecht, and White House Chief of Staff John Sununu. Administration 
officials were quoted as saying that President Bush would not make a Kennedy-style 
call for reaching Mars within a specific timeframe, instead endorsing “the lunar base 
and manned Mars concepts as overall 21st century goals [and deferring] specific 
program and budget decisions on these goals until NASA completes a more inten-
sive assessment of the mission options.” The magazine reported that NASA’s budget 
would have to double within a decade to pay for the initiative. This was at the same 
time that the House Appropriations Committee was planning on cutting NASA’s FY 
1990 appropriation by more than $1 billion, including a 50% decrease in funding 
for technologies key to Mars exploration. While Vice President Quayle recognized 
that the federal government faced serious budgetary limitations, he was quoted as 
saying that “when we have tight budgets, there will be winners and losers, but I am 
convinced a winner will be space.” Craig Covault of AW&ST reported that NASA 
leaders saw a presidential endorsement as an opportunity to seek increased funding 
and begin serious mission planning. Overall, the article was uncannily accurate and 
set the stage for President Bush’s upcoming address.
82
On Thursday, 20 July 1989, with the decision in favor of an aggressive program 
for human exploration of the Moon and Mars made, President Bush prepared to 
announce the initiative at the anniversary celebration of Apollo 11’s landing on 
the Moon twenty years earlier. At shortly before 10:00 a.m., President and Mrs. 
Bush, accompanied by Vice President and Mrs. Quayle, departed the White House 
for the short drive across the National Mall to the Smithsonian’s National Air and 
Space Museum. Upon their arrival at the museum, the group was escorted to the 
Lunar Module display, where they were greeted by Admiral Truly, Neil Armstrong, 
Michael Collins, Buzz Aldrin, and Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution Robert 
Adams. After a quick photo opportunity attended only by invited pool photogra-
phers, President Bush and his growing entourage were escorted to the museum’s 
front steps, where after a brief hold he was ushered on stage with an obligatory 
rendition of “Hail to the Chief.”
82
Craig Covault, “Manned Lunar Base, Mars Initiative Raised in Secret White House Review,” 
Aviation Week & Space Technology (17 July 1989), pp. 24-26; Michael Mecham, “House Panel Proposes 
$1-Billion Cut for NASA,” Aviation Week & Space Technology (17 July 1989), p. 26.
Cut picture pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
cut picture pdf; how to copy a picture from a pdf to a word document
Cut picture pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to paste a picture into a pdf document; copy picture from pdf to powerpoint
70
Mars Wars
71
Chapter 3:  Bush, Quayle, and SEI
The first order of business for the event was the unveiling of an Apollo 11 post-
age stamp by Postmaster General Anthony Franks. The $2.40 stamp depicted Neil 
Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin raising the American flag on the plains of the Sea of 
Tranquility. After  brief remarks  by Truly, Armstrong,  Collins, and  Aldrin, Vice 
President Quayle introduced George Bush. President Bush opened his remarks by 
saluting “three of the greatest heroes of this or any other century: the crew of Apollo 
11.” Bush used the first several minutes of his address remembering the remarkable 
accomplishment of that first human landing on the lunar surface. He recounted 
his family’s personal recollections of the landing—his children spread throughout 
North America, each listened in their own way. “Within one lifetime,” the presi-
dent stated, “the human race traveled from the dunes of Kitty Hawk to the dust of 
another world. Apollo is a monument to our nation’s unparalleled ability to respond 
swiftly and successfully to a clearly stated challenge and to America’s willingness 
to take great risks for great rewards. We had a challenge. We set a goal. And we 
achieved it.”
Celebrating such an important legacy, Bush asserted, was an appropriate time 
to look to the future of the American space program. He proclaimed the inevita-
bility of human exploration and permanent settlement of the solar system in the 
21st century, in the process confirming the United States’s place as the preeminent 
space faring nation on Earth. Based on this rhetorical foundation, Bush unveiled his 
vision for this future exploration and settlement. “In 1961 it took a crisis—the space 
race—to speed things up. Today we don’t have a crisis; we have an opportunity. To 
seize this opportunity, I’m not proposing a 10-year plan like Apollo; I’m proposing 
a long-range, continuing commitment. First, for the coming decade, for the 1990s: 
Space Station Freedom, our critical next step in all our space endeavors. And next, 
for the new century: back to the Moon; back to the future. And this time, back to 
stay. And then a journey into tomorrow, a journey to another planet: a manned mis-
sion to Mars.” The President stated these missions would follow one another in a 
logical progression, creating a pathway to the stars. He made clear that while setting 
the nation on this visionary course, the primary focus of his Administration would 
be the completion of Space Station Freedom—a crucial stepping stone for missions 
beyond Earth orbit.
President Bush, Vice President Quayle, and the Apollo 11 crew (NASA Image 89-H-382)
President Bush and Postmaster General Anthony Frank unveil Apollo 11 commemorative 
stamp (NASA Image 89-HC-394)
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
VB.NET Image & Picture Cropping Application. Do you need to save a copy of certain part of an image file in a programming way? Do you need to cut out certain
paste image into pdf preview; copy a picture from pdf
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
how to copy an image from a pdf; copying image from pdf to powerpoint
72
Mars Wars
73
Chapter 3:  Bush, Quayle, and SEI
President Bush announced that he was tasking Vice President Quayle to “lead 
the National Space Council in determining specifically what’s needed for the next 
round of exploration: the necessary money, manpower, and materials; the feasibility 
of international cooperation; and develop realistic timetables—milestones—along 
the way.” He requested that the Space Council report its findings to him as soon as 
possible, with concrete recommendations regarding the proper course to the Moon, 
Mars, and beyond. As his remarks wound down, Bush explained the one rationale 
for the grand initiative by alluding to the Apollo 1 fire and the Challenger accident, 
stating, “there are many reasons to explore the universe, but ten very special reasons 
why America must never stop seeking distant frontiers; the ten courageous astro-
nauts who made the ultimate sacrifice to further the cause of space exploration. 
They have taken their place in the heavens so that America can take its place in the 
stars. Like them, and like Columbus, we dream of distant shores we’ve not yet seen. 
Why the Moon? Why Mars? Because it is humanity’s destiny to strive, to seek, to 
find. And because it is America’s destiny to lead.” The President opined that humans 
would ultimately reach out to the stars and to new worlds. While he believed that 
this would not happen in his lifetime or that of his children, making this dream a 
reality for future generations must begin with a commitment by his generation. He 
concluded that “we cannot take the next giant leap for mankind tomorrow unless 
we take a single step today.”
83
83
Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States, 20 July 1989, Remarks on the 20th Anniversary 
of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing; http://bushlibrary.tamu.edu/papers/ (accessed 18 May 2002.)
Shortly after President Bush finished his remarks, Admiral Truly was introduced 
by Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater in the White House Briefing Room to answer 
questions regarding the President’s speech. Truly’s answer to the very first question 
of the press conference was surprising, considering he had been intimately involved 
with the decision-making process for SEI. Asked if there was a proposed date for 
the first human landing on the red planet, he replied, “no…I just, frankly, learned 
this morning what [President Bush’s] direction was.”
84
Following this rocky start, 
Truly stumbled through a series of questions regarding the specifics of the plan and 
the political practicality of obtaining Congressional support for such an ambitious 
undertaking. Asked whether the potential budget for the Moon-base portion of 
the President’s plan would top $100 billion, he replied somewhat lamely that it 
would be affordable over the long-term. When pressed on the probable cost of the 
endeavor, Truly admitted that “we don’t have any detailed NASA figures. We have, 
obviously, in the last several weeks, looked in gross terms at what it would cost, 
84
Press Briefing, Admiral Richard H. Truly, 20 July 1989, Bush Presidential Records, George Bush 
Presidential Library.
President Bush signs Space Exploration Day proclamation (NASA Image 89-HC-402).
President Bush announces SEI on steps of National Air and Space Museum 
(NASA Image 89-H-380).
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
like VB.NET image cropping application to cut out an NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to copy pdf image into powerpoint; how to copy a picture from a pdf
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned remove a specific image from PDF document page. Able to cut and paste image into another
paste image into pdf; how to paste a picture into a pdf
74
Mars Wars
75
Chapter 3:  Bush, Quayle, and SEI
but there was no specific timetable and I have not presented the President with a 
specific and detailed list of budgetary requirements.”
85
The press conference con-
tinued along this shaky path with a question regarding the timetable for announc-
ing a specific plan and budget for the initiative. Truly was once again unable (or 
unwilling) to provide a specific answer to this question, vaguely answering that it 
would take a number of months. He rallied in the end with his answer to a question 
regarding the necessity to bring in foreign partners, stating, “I think we can afford 
to go it alone, although I think that’s probably in the long run not what’s going to 
happen. The world has changed since the 1960s in space. It’s premature…to know 
where we’re heading, but I would think [SEI will] have an international flavor.”
86
In 
retrospect, what is most striking about this press briefing was the lack of specifics 
regarding the Administration’s plans to gain Congressional approval for SEI. Rapid 
decision- making was required to formulate the initiative in time to announce it on 
the Apollo 11 anniversary. Consequently, the White House did not have the time 
to formulate a strategy for winning support on Capitol Hill. Likewise, the Space 
Council had not drafted a top-level policy directive to guide administration activi-
ties aimed at further defining the initiative. In the coming months, these shortcom-
ings would derail SEI.
As Admiral Truly’s briefing was ongoing in the pressroom, guests began assem-
bling on the White House South Lawn for a celebration of Apollo 11’s landing on 
the Moon. With picnic tables spread throughout the center of the lawn and a U.S. 
Navy band playing in the background, the guests sat down to partake of a lunch 
that included barbecue pork ribs, barbecue chicken, potato salad, and deep dish 
apple Betty with ice cream. Among the 300 distinguished attendees were 23 Apollo 
astronauts, 26 key members of Congress, and dozens of NASA officials. President 
and Mrs. Bush arrived at noon and were seated at a table near the bandshell with a 
group of special guests.
87
After lunch, President Bush walked to the stage to deliver some brief remarks 
to the gathered celebrants. He warmed the crowd up with a little astronaut humor, 
joking that planning the barbecue was hectic because he was unsure whether they 
preferred their food grilled or in a tube. He continued to say that “as you might 
85
Ibid.
86
Ibid.
87
Residence Event Task Sheet, Barbecue to Commemorate the 20th Anniversary of the Landing on 
the Moon, 7 July 1989, Bush Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential Library; Menu, Barbecue 
Lunch: 20th Anniversary of the First Moon Walk, 20 July 1989, Bush Presidential Records, George 
Bush Presidential Library.
expect from a former Navy pilot who lived much of his adult life in Houston, I, 
too, am a longtime supporter of the space program.” As an example of this support, 
he pointed to the fact that the single largest percentage increase for any agency in 
his Administration’s first budget proposal was for NASA. He told those assembled, 
“My commitment today to forge ahead with a sustained, manned exploration pro-
gram, mission by mission—the space station, the Moon, Mars, and beyond—is a 
continuing commitment to ask new questions, to seek new answers, both in the 
heavens and on Earth. James Michener was right when he told Congress: ‘There are 
moments in history when challenges occur of such a compelling nature that to miss 
them is to miss the whole meaning of an epoch. Space is such a challenge,’ he said. 
Well, today’s announcement is our recognition that the challenge was not merely 
one that belonged in the sixties; it’s one that will occupy Americans for generations 
to come … the American people, I’m convinced, want us back in space—and this 
time, back in space to stay.” Bush concluded by stating that he looked forward to 
the day when a future president addressed, in similar fashion, the first Americans to 
walk on Mars, “now only children, perhaps your children.”
88
88
Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States, 20 July 1989, Remarks at a White House 
Barbecue on the 20th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing; http://bushlibrary.tamu.edu/papers/ 
(accessed 6 June 2002.)
White House picnic celebrating Apollo 11 anniversary (NASA Image 89-H-396).
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
how to copy image from pdf to word; how to copy pictures from pdf to word
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned or all image objects from PDF document in
copy images from pdf; how to copy images from pdf file
VB.NET Image: How to Process & Edit Image Using VB.NET Image
After getting an image / picture / photo with image capturing device, in general, people will perform some editing or processing functions on source image file
copy picture from pdf reader; copy pdf picture to word
“We are going to return to the Moon and journey to Mars because 
we must, because the United States needs to challenge itself in order 
to be ready for the new world of the 21st century, now just over ten 
years away.”
NASA Administrator Richard Truly, 26 October 1989
4
77
The 90-Day Study
The public reaction to President Bush’s announcement of SEI was swift, and not 
altogether positive. The following day, the headline on the front page of The New 
York Times read, “President Calls for Mars Mission and a Moon Base: Critics Cite 
High Costs—Bush Offers No Timetable or Budget for Plan, Leaving That to Space 
Council.” The article stated the speech set the stage for “the first full-scale debate 
in years on the nation’s troubled space program.” The piece cited expert opinions 
predicting the initiative would cost at least $100 billion, and could rise to as much 
as $400 billion.
1
The reaction from the Democrat-controlled Congress was largely 
critical. Senator Al Gore of Tennessee, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Space, 
Science, and Technology, stated that “by proposing a return to the Moon and a 
manned base on Mars, with no money, no timetable, and no plan, President Bush 
offers the country not a challenge to inspire us, but a daydream.” His fellow senator 
from Tennessee, James Sasser, concurred, stating “the President took one giant leap 
for starry-eyed political rhetoric, and not even a small step for fiscal responsibility. 
The hard fact is this administration doesn’t even have its space priorities established 
for next year, much less for the next century. We have numerous space and science-
1
Bernard Weinraub, “President Call for Mars Mission and a Moon Base,” 周e New York Times, 21 
July 1989, sec. A1.
78
Mars Wars
79
Chapter 4:  The 90-Day Study
related programs already on the table, all of them worthy, all of them high-ticket 
and all of them competing for scarce dollars.”
2
House Budget Committee Chair-
man Leon Panetta was quoted saying, “The budget deficit is stealing the resources 
we need to…resume our nation’s mission in space. When this President is ready 
to recognize that we can’t do all he would like to do even on this planet without 
new revenues, then perhaps we can talk about Mars.”
3
Even fellow Republicans 
were wary. Representative Bill Green of New York, the ranking minority member 
on the subcommittee with oversight of the NASA budget, stated that “given the 
federal budget deficit and earthly demands, I don’t see how we can afford expensive 
manned programs in space in the near future.”
4
The Baltimore Sun captured the mood very well, writing that the announcement 
of a human mission to Mars “was tempered by the financial worries that took much 
of the thrill out of America’s romance with outer space after the historic flight of 
Apollo 11.”
5
For this very reason, the American public was not terribly supportive of 
the new initiative. A Gallup Poll released shortly after the announcement suggested 
that only 27% of Americans believed space spending should be increased, and only 
51% thought being the first nation to land a human on Mars was a meaningful 
goal.
6
Not surprisingly, The Wall Street Journal reported support from the aerospace 
industry for SEI, although many executives believed a strong lobbying effort would 
be required to get Congressional approval for the expensive undertaking. In a pre-
pared response, Martin Marietta Chairman Norman Augustine stated, “we applaud 
the president’s call for renewed vigor in pursuit of the space frontier and the many 
benefits it implies.” Despite similar supportive statements flowing from other aero-
space giants, there remained a sense of pessimism within most corners of the indus-
try—the result of looming questions regarding the source of the billions of dollars 
needed to carry out the ambitious plan. “It’s not the same clarion call that President 
Kennedy gave when he set a moon-landing [goal],” said aerospace analyst Wolfgang 
Demisch.
7
2
Ibid.
3
David C. Morrison, “To Shoot the Moon, and Mars Beyond,” Government Executive (September 
1989), pp. 12-22.
4
Weinraub, “President Call for Mars Mission and a Moon Base.”
5
Ibid.; Karen Hosler, “Bush Unveils Moon, Mars Plans But Withholds Specifics,” 周e Baltimore 
Sun, 21 July 1989.
6
Morrison, “To Shoot the Moon, and Mars Beyond.”
7
Roy Harris Jr., “Firms Rejoice Over Reborn U.S. Space Program,” 周e Wall Street Journal, 24 
July 1989.
There  were  somewhat  diverse  opinions  regarding  President  Bush’s  speech 
amongst NASA’s senior leaders. On one hand, many were impressed that Bush was 
able to depart from the written text during his speech, which they felt proved that 
Vice President Quayle really understood NASA’s plan and had effectively briefed the 
president. Douglas O’Handley recalls that this was probably the most positive thing 
ever said about Quayle by NASA officials.
8
On the other hand, some agency officials 
believed the address laid the foundation for a ruinous relationship between the Space 
Council and NASA. Aaron Cohen felt this was the case because neither organiza-
tion was paying attention to what the other was saying. Top NASA leaders thought 
the speech was a Kennedyesque declaration calling for a large-scale national effort 
to build a lunar base and send humans to Mars. Quayle and Albrecht, in contrast, 
wanted to introduce a new way of doing business within the space program—one 
that involved smaller budgets and more aggressive technology development (which 
they believed would lead to large cost efficiencies). Cohen recalled, “the day that 
the initiative was announced was a day of great elation [at NASA]. It took everyone 
back to the days of Apollo.”
9
For a White House that wanted to change the Apollo 
paradigm, this was not the desired reaction from the space agency.
After the euphoria of the announcement died down, Douglas O’Handley argues 
“Frank Martin and Admiral Truly realized that they needed to back up the skel-
etal AHWG studies.”
10
This effort would include validating data that had been 
presented to the Space Council and assessing the technology readiness levels for 
the equipment needed to carry out the initiative—this review became known as 
the 90-Day Study. Mark Albrecht remembered later that NASA “stepped forward 
and almost demanded to lead this effort, which indicated the beginnings of a little 
friction” between the space agency and the Space Council staff. From the NASA 
perspective, however, the study was initiated because President Bush’s speech had 
provided the agency with a charter to develop a plan for a lunar base and human 
mission to Mars. There was a fundamental belief among senior leaders at the agency 
that this was exactly what the Space Council wanted. In fact, some of Albrecht’s 
public statements at the time seemed to indicate this was the case. He was quoted 
in Government Executive magazine saying that now that a national space policy goal 
had been set, the council would “leave it to the departments and agencies to decide 
how they’re going to achieve that. Once they’ve made that determination, we’ll 
review that to see whether or not it comports with national policy, or whether it’s 
8
O’Handley interview.
9
Cohen interview.
10
O’Handley interview.
80
Mars Wars
81
Chapter 4:  The 90-Day Study
realistic or plausible. But in terms of getting into their programs and plans for the 
purposes of  ‘We know a better way,’ that’s just not what we’re here to do.”
11
Later in 
the process, however, the White House had changed its tune, and both Albrecht and 
Vice President Quayle were arguing that they never wanted NASA to conduct the 
90-Day Study. Aaron Cohen argues this problem arose because the Council didn’t 
have its own ideas regarding how to start the process. Although it had announced 
the initiative, the administration didn’t have a good sense regarding how to proceed 
after the speech. He contends this was the main reason problems emerged between 
the two organizations.
12
In the end, Albrecht asked NASA to provide “a variety of different approaches … 
we want a variety of time frames, we want a variety of cost profiles, we want a variety 
of technologies, so the President can choose among different options rather than 
being told ‘this is how to do it.’”
13
This was not the method, however, that Admi-
ral Truly favored. The Administrator simply wanted to pull together the wealth 
of data that had been generated during the preceding five years and draft a report 
that would be ready within three months.
14
Over the coming months, Truly was 
warned during two meetings of the full Space Council that his plan “was not the 
approach most members wanted to pursue.”
15
The Council members wanted NASA 
to develop options based on innovative new technologies that could potentially 
offer reduced long-term costs.
16
Admiral Truly essentially disregarded this direction 
from the Council. At the same time, by allowing the space agency to pursue its own 
course, the Council in effect delegated the authority granted to it by President Bush 
to conduct a review of options for implementing SEI.
A week after President Bush’s speech, Admiral Truly assigned Aaron Cohen to 
lead an agency-wide effort to fashion a plan for establishing a lunar base and explor-
ing Mars, drawing upon existing NASA planning documents. During the remain-
der of the year, the space agency never wavered from this approach.
17
Although 
he was asked to examine both technical and management issues, Cohen chose to 
11
Morrison, “To Shoot the Moon, and Mars Beyond.”
12
Albrecht interview; Cohen interview.
13
Albrecht interview.
14
Martin interview.
15
James Fisher and Andrew Lawler, “NASA, Space Council Split Over Moon-Mars Report,” Space 
News (11 December 1989), p. 10.
16
Ibid.
17
Press Release 89-126, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 27 July 1989, Bush 
Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential Library.
ignore questions regarding changes in NASA’s management culture. Some believed 
this decision was fueled by his view that the new initiative was laying out another 
Apollo program—in essence, a reinstitution of Kennedy’s mandate.”
18
As a result, 
there was no need to change the management culture that had successfully landed 
humans  on  the  Moon. The  only  task  was  to  define  an  aggressive program to 
meet President Bush’s new mandate. In his book Dragonfly: NASA and the Crisis 
Aboard  Mir,  author  Bryan Burrough detailed a  revealing conversation between 
Albrecht and Cohen after the latter had been named to lead the 90-Day Study: 
“Most of all  we  want  alternatives,  plenty  of  alternatives,” Albrecht  told 
Cohen.
“What do you mean, alternatives?” Cohen asked. From the blank look on 
the JSC director’s face, Albrecht could tell he wasn’t getting through.
“Alternatives,” Albrecht repeated. “I mean, there has to be more than one 
way to do this. Give us a Cadillac option, then give us the El Cheapo alter-
native, with the incumbent risks. Talk about all the different technologies 
that could be learned.”
19
Albrecht believed this interaction, and NASA’s reaction over the coming months, was 
the beginning of a never healed rift between the Space Council staff and NASA.
20
Cohen later recalled the conversation differently. Although he remembered Albre-
cht asking for several options, he has no recollection of being asked to provide 
alternatives with significantly different cost profiles. Without this direction, mission 
planners at JSC felt the only course of action was to develop a program plan based 
on the President’s speech.
21
Frank Martin believed the cause of this burgeoning conflict was the differing 
approaches of the two organizations. The Space Council staff, with backgrounds 
largely in the national security space sector, wanted NASA to develop alternatives 
starting “with a clean sheet of paper.” The JSC view was that it would be a shame not 
to take advantage of the research that had been conducted during recent years. In 
18
Wendell Mendell interview via electronic-mail, 15 September 2003.
19
Bryan Burrough, Dragonfly: NASA and the Crisis Aboard Mir (New York, NY: HarperCollins 
Publishers, 1998), p. 240.
20
Albrecht interview.
21
Cohen interview.
82
Mars Wars
83
Chapter 4:  The 90-Day Study
fact, Mark Craig remembered later that “there were never any debates about using a 
‘clean sheet.’ Our goal was to find the best approach to meet a set of requirements, 
not to just find something new for its own sake.”
22
In the end, NASA employed the 
JSC methodology and began developing an SEI strategy that was highly dependent 
on past studies and didn’t consider multiple alternatives with different budgetary 
requirements.
23
Douglas O’Handley contends, “this is where the initiative fell apart, 
when it was taken over by the Johnson Space Center.”
24
Waiting for NASA
By late August, the White House was getting gradually more worried about the 
progress NASA was making on the 90-Day Study. Mark Albrecht was concerned 
with the weekly status reports he was receiving from the Technical Study Group 
(TSG), which was the JSC-led team tasked with carrying out the study. “We didn’t 
like the reaction we got from NASA,” he remembered. “It had an ‘uh oh’ quality to 
it. NASA reports seemed to be full of lofty verbiage but few technical outlines or 
alternatives for what a lunar base and a Mars mission would actually look like.”
25
Throughout this period, Albrecht kept emphasizing that the President wanted to 
see a lot of technical and budgetary options. Based on the space agency’s responses, 
however, the council staff was beginning to get the strong feeling that it wasn’t 
going to get any alternatives. Although Congress wasn’t heavily engaged during this 
period, there was rising concern because of the increasingly frayed Space Council-
NASA relationship. The feeling on Capitol Hill was that this strain was caused 
largely because NASA was “running their own plan, which wasn’t the same as the 
White House’s plan.”
26
As time went on, these stressed relations escalated into an all out war between the 
TSG and the Space Council. NASA’s Douglas O’Handley had actually made a few 
friends among the Space Council staff, and they were pleading with him to provide 
assistance. In the end, however, he was not able to provide any support because 
Admiral Truly and the TSG controlled all information relating to the 90-Day Study. 
Things got so bad that every time senior NASA officials returned from a White 
House meeting, there was another story about “those dumb [expletive] on the Space 
22
Mark Craig interview via electronic-mail, 12 September 2003.
23
Martin interview.
24
O’Handley interview.
25
Bryan Burrough, Dragonfly, p. 240.
26
Malow interview.
Council. I have often thought,” O’Handley stated later, that the conflicting “per-
sonalities caused many of the problems. If, instead of fighting with the Space Coun-
cil, we had tried to work with them, the outcome might have been different.”
27
While this external  battle was being waged between the Space Council and 
NASA, there was another internal battle being waged within the agency. There was 
rising apprehension regarding JSC’s control of strategic planning for the initiative. 
Although the TSG was to a degree soliciting advice from other field centers, there 
was a feeling that the JSC leadership didn’t really take outside advice very well. 
Douglas O’Handley argued later, “I absolutely think a wider net should have been 
cast within NASA, but JSC deprived the other centers an opportunity to contribute 
to the initiative.”
28
The aerospace industry also wanted to play a role in the mission 
development, but weren’t heavily involved. Although there were numerous techni-
cal concepts and architectural options floating about, the TSG essentially ignored 
them. JSC became “Fortress NASA” and outside ideas were not welcome.
29
Despite ongoing problems between the Space Council and NASA, and misgiv-
ings about the initiative on Capitol Hill, the TSG was allowed to continue compil-
ing the 90-Day Study. The study group was staffed with about 450 people led on a 
day-to-day basis by Mark Craig, with an average of 250 people working directly on 
the study on any given day—although the core team was formed by the members 
of the AHWG.
30
The study began by decomposing the President’s objectives into 
top level technology requirements. These requirements were then used to develop 
an end-to-end architecture, which included the following features:
• Characterize the environment in which humans and machines must 
function with robotic missions
• Launch personnel and equipment from Earth
• Exploit the unique capabilities of human presence aboard the 
Space Station Freedom
• Transport crew and cargo from Earth orbit to lunar and Mars orbits 
and surfaces
• Conduct scientific studies and investigate in-situ resource development
27
O’Handley interview.
28
Ibid.
29
Ibid.
30
Craig interview, 12 September 2003; Cohen interview, 9 December 2004.
84
Mars Wars
85
Chapter 4:  The 90-Day Study
The TSG assumed the agency would utilize the Space Shuttle and Space Station 
Freedom to implement SEI. This, in essence, meant the group never considered 
whether leveraging these systems was feasible or desirable given the existing fiscal 
environment. The inclusion of the two systems was almost a foregone conclusion 
because JSC wanted to protect the Shuttle and continue Station development—in 
the near term, this meant the ultimate success of SEI was not necessarily the agency’s 
top priority. From the agency’s perspective, completion of an orbital station was 
part of a serial progression that started with the shuttle and would eventually end 
with a human mission to Mars—an idea that dated back to post-Apollo planning. 
This viewpoint was directly influenced by Admiral Truly’s decision to base the 90-
Day Study’s technical analysis on past NASA studies. Douglas O’Handley argues, 
“this is where the Space Council and the agency were on a collision course. NASA 
was documenting the past and the Space Council wanted options and innovative 
thinking. None of the NASA principals knew how to go about” providing those 
alternatives.
31
The 90-Day Study alternative generation process was far from optimal. Because 
the TSG was so JSC-centric, technical and architectural concepts from other seg-
ments of the space policy community were not solicited. Perhaps more importantly, 
the group considered budgetary constraints last. This should have been the first 
thing that was evaluated, with all programmatic options tailored to the fiscal reali-
ties. Instead, the TSG put together a virtual ‘wish list’ for human exploration with-
out taking into account the existing political environment. This eventually became 
an even greater problem because the group never paid “much attention to lowering 
the initiative’s costs by using emergent technologies.”
32
There is some indication 
that part of the reason for this was because NASA had been directed to virtually 
guarantee the safety of the astronauts. Based upon the Apollo experience and a con-
temporary understanding of the life science challenges, the TSG had calculated that 
one member of a seven-person crew may not return. The Space Council staff told 
agency planners they wanted ‘seven out and seven back.’
33
This would have required 
99.9999% mission reliability. As much as anything done by the space agency, this 
31
Report of the 90-Day Study on Human Exploration of the Moon and Mars, National Aeronautics 
and  Space Administration, 20  November  1989, National Aeronautics and  Space Administration 
Historical Archives, 2-2 to 2-5; NASA Administrator Richard Truly to Vice President Dan Quayle, 
5 September 1989, Bush Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential Library; Craig interview, 12 
September 2003; O’Handley interview.
32
O’Handley interview.
33
Ibid.
White House decision drove costs up enormously.
34
SEI Takes Shape
In early November, the Report of the 90-Day Study on Human Exploration of the 
Moon and Mars began circulating at the Space Council.
35
The cover letter attached 
to the report stated the purpose of the study was intended as a data source for the 
Space Council to refer to as it considered strategic planning issues related to SEI. 
The document purported not to contain any official recommendations or estimates 
of total mission cost.
36
The preface made it abundantly clear that the TSG regarded 
President Bush’s announcement speech as the initiative’s guiding policy directive. 
As a result, the key doctrine that emerged from the report was expressed as follows. 
“The five reference approaches presented reflect the President’s strategy: First, Space 
Station Freedom, and next, back to the Moon, and then a journey to Mars. The des-
tination is, therefore, determined, and with that determination the general mission 
objectives and key program and supporting elements are defined. As a result, regard-
less of the implementation approach selected, heavy-lift launch vehicles, space-based 
transportation systems, surface vehicles, habitats, and support systems for living and 
working in an extraterrestrial environment are required.” The analytic team did 
not include any alternative paths, but chose to strictly interpret Bush’s announce-
ment speech. This dogmatic approach was carried through the entire report, with 
a predictable outcome—a set of reference approaches requiring a massive in-orbit 
infrastructure and large capital investments.
37
34
On 2 November, President Bush signed National Space Policy Directive 1—a slight revision of 
the policy issued by the Reagan Administration 20 months earlier. 周e expansion of human presence 
and activity “beyond Earth orbit into the solar system” remained one of the nation’s primary goals 
in space. Considering the administration’s desire to have SEI provide a long-term direction for the 
American space program, however, the document didn’t place a great deal of emphasis on the new 
initiative. Within the section dealing directly with civil space policy, human exploration was relegated 
to the bottom of a list of stated objectives for NASA—with Earth science, space science, technology 
development, and space applications at the top of the list. Even when addressing human exploration 
more  specifically,  the  policy  highlighted completion  of  Space Station  Freedom and  downplayed 
human missions beyond Earth orbit. Finally, the directive provided no specific guidance with regard to 
implementing the Moon-Mars initiative. [National Space Policy Directive 1, National Space Council, 
2 November 1989, Bush Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential Library; Press Release, 周e 
White House Office of the Press Secretary, 16 November 1989, Bush Presidential Records, George 
Bush Presidential Library.]
35
It was not officially released until 20 November 1989.
36
Report of the 90-Day Study on Human Exploration of the Moon and Mars, National Aeronautics 
and  Space Administration, 20  November  1989, National Aeronautics and  Space Administration 
Historical Archives, cover letter.
37
Ibid., Preface.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested