pdf viewer in c# code project : How to copy pictures from pdf to word SDK application service wpf html azure dnn sp44105-part1395

86
Mars Wars
87
Chapter 4:  The 90-Day Study
To achieve the objectives set out in President Bush’s announcement speech, the 
TSG adopted an evolutionary 30-year plan for SEI implementation. As the AHWG 
had done before it, the group put forth a strategic approach that depended on Space 
Station Freedom and followed initial human missions to the Moon and Mars with 
phased development of permanent human outposts on these celestial bodies—start-
ing with emplacement, continuing with consolidation, and finishing with opera-
tions. Unlike the briefing that had been prepared during the agenda setting pro-
cess, the 90-Day Study included a highly detailed description of NASA’s vision 
for the robotic, lunar, and Martian phases of exploration beyond Earth orbit.
38
The initiative would begin with precursor robotic missions intended to “obtain 
data to assist in the design and development of subsequent human exploration mis-
sions and systems, demonstrate technology and long communication time operation 
concepts, and dramatically advance scientific knowledge of the Moon and Mars.” 
The TSG developed a logical progression of robotic explorers to address specific 
operational and scientific priorities. First, a Lunar Observer program would launch 
two identical flight systems on one-year polar mapping missions. Second, a Mars 
Global Network program would launch two identical flight systems carrying orbit-
ers and multiple landers to provide high-resolution surface data at several locations. 
Third, a Mars Sample Return program would launch two identical flight systems to 
return five kilograms each of Martian rocks, soil, and atmosphere to Earth—this was 
the centerpiece of the robotic sequence. Fourth, a Mars Site Reconnaissance Orbiter 
program would launch two orbiters and two communications satellites to charac-
terize landing sites, assess landing hazards, and provide data for subsequent rover 
navigation. Finally, up to five Mars Rover missions would certify three sites to deter-
mine the greatest potential for piloted vehicle landing and outpost establishment.
39
38
Ibid., section 3, 周e Human Exploration Initiative.
39
Report of the 90-Day Study on Human Exploration of the Moon and Mars, section 3, 周e 
Human Exploration Initiative.
Space Station Freedom 
(Source: 90-Day Study)
As robotic exploration of the red planet was ongoing, the TSG strategy called for 
the development of a permanent lunar outpost. The mission concept for achieving 
this goal was highly complicated, relying on a vast in-orbit infrastructure, numer-
ous spacecraft, and multiple resource transfers. The plan called for “two to three 
launches of the lunar payload, crew, transportation vehicles, and propellants from 
Earth to Space Station Freedom. At Freedom, the crew, payloads, and propellants 
are loaded onto the lunar transfer vehicle that will take them to low lunar orbit. 
The lunar transfer vehicle meets in lunar orbit with an excursion vehicle, which will 
either be parked in lunar orbit or will ascend from the lunar surface, and payload, 
crew, and propellants are transferred. [Then] the excursion vehicle descends to the 
lunar surface.” A combination of cargo and piloted flights (with four crew mem-
bers) would be utilized to construct the lunar outpost. The emplacement phase 
would begin with two cargo flights to deliver the initial habitation facilities, which 
included a habitation module (to be covered with lunar regolith to provide radia-
tion shielding), airlock, power system, unpressurized manned/robotic rover, and 
associated support equipment. Emplacement would prepare the way for extended 
human missions during the consolidation phase, which would include erection of a 
constructible habitat to provide additional living space and experimentation with in 
situ resource utilization.
40
The final step in the TSG strategy was the establishment of a human outpost 
on Mars. Similar to the lunar program, the Martian sequence would begin with the 
launch of the crew, surface payload, transportation vehicles, and propellant from 
Earth to Space Station Freedom. In LEO, the transfer and excursion vehicles would 
be inspected before setting out on the long journey toward the red planet. “Upon 
approach to Mars, the transfer and excursion vehicles separate and perform aero-
braking maneuvers to enter the Martian atmosphere separately. The vehicles rendez-
40
Report of the 90-Day Study on Human Exploration of the Moon and Mars, section 3, 周e 
Human Exploration Initiative.
Lunar Transfer Vehicle would have 
provided transportation between Space 
Station Freedom and lunar orbit 
(Source: 90-Day Study)
How to copy pictures from pdf to word - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy and paste an image from a pdf; copy image from pdf to powerpoint
How to copy pictures from pdf to word - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy and paste a pdf image into a word document; copy picture from pdf
88
Mars Wars
89
Chapter 4:  The 90-Day Study
vous in Mars orbit, and the crew of four transfers to the excursion vehicle, which 
descends to the surface using the same aero-brake. When their tour of duty is com-
plete, the crew leaves the surface in the ascent module of the Mars excursion vehicle 
to rendezvous with the transfer vehicle in Mars orbit. The transfer vehicle leaves 
Mars orbit and returns the crew to Space Station Freedom.”
41
Standard mission 
profiles for crewed flights to Mars would follow two different trajectory classes: one 
for a 500-day roundtrip with surface stays up to 100 days and one for a 1,000-day 
roundtrip with surface stays of approximately 600 days. After initial emplacement, 
the consolidation phase would entail assembly of a constructible habitat and utiliza-
tion of a pressurized rover for long-range surface exploration.
42
As envisioned by the TSG, implementation of SEI would require the construc-
tion of a new launch vehicle and multiple spacecraft to travel beyond Earth orbit. 
The study introduced two primary concepts for a heavy launcher, one a Shuttle-
derived alternative and the other based on the proposed Advanced Launch System.
43
As indicated above, the in-space transportation system consisted of transfer and 
excursion  vehicles—these  systems  would  utilize  chemical  propulsion,  although 
the report called for research funding to investigate nuclear propulsion. For Mars 
exploration, the transfer vehicle would actually carry the excursion vehicle to the 
red planet utilizing a large trans-Mars injection stage. The transfer vehicle would 
41
For cargo flights, an  integrated configuration of two  excursion vehicles is launched. Upon 
approach to Mars, the two vehicles separate and enter Mars orbit using aero-brakes. 周e first cargo 
flight in the Mars outpost mission sequence delivers the habitat facility to the outpost site.
42
Report of the 90-Day Study on Human Exploration of the Moon and Mars, section 3, 周e 
Human Exploration Initiative.
43
周e Advanced Launch System (ALS) emerged in the mid-1980s as the rocket that would be 
used to deploy the space-based elements of the Strategic Defense Initiative program. However, by late 
1989, it had become increasingly apparent that the requirements for the ALS program had largely 
disappeared. 周e initial phase of SDI would be deployed using existing Titan 4 and Atlas 2 rockets, 
and the launch requirements for subsequent phases of SDI deployment were too vague to require 
immediate development of ALS.
Inflatable lunar habitat would have been 
outpost for up to 12 astronauts 
(Source: 90-Day Study)
include a crew module that would be a “single, pressurized structure 7.6 meters 
in diameter and 9 meters in length with…a life support system that recycles water 
and oxygen. The crew is provided private quarters, exercise equipment, and space 
suits that are appropriate for the long mission duration.” The excursion vehicle crew 
module would provide living space during descent, ascent, and for up to 30 days in 
case of problems with the surface habitat.
44
The TSG developed similar planetary surface systems for both Moon and Mar-
tian missions. In fact, the main rationale for development of a lunar outpost was 
as a testing ground for subsystem technologies for later missions to the red planet. 
The initial habitats for both outposts would be horizontal Space Station Freedom-
derived cylinders 4.45 meters in diameter and 8.2 meters long. Laboratory modules 
would be attached to add expanded living volume. Each of these habitats would 
have regenerative life support systems capable of recovering 90% of the oxygen 
from carbon dioxide and potable water from hygiene and waste water. During the 
consolidation phase, an expanded habitat would be required to accommodate large 
crews and longer stays by providing more space. This would be a “constructible [11 
meter] diameter inflatable structure partially buried in a crater or a prepared hole. 
This structure is an order of magnitude lighter than multi-module configurations 
of equivalent volume. Its internal structure includes self-deploying columns that 
44
Report of the 90-Day Study on Human Exploration of the Moon and Mars, section 3, 周e 
Human Exploration Initiative.
Mars Transfer Vehicle would have propelled 
crew and mars excursion vehicle to Mars orbit 
(Source: 90-Day Study)
Mars Excursion Vehicle would have 
transported four astronauts and 25-tons of 
cargo to Martian surface
(Source: 90 Day Study)
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
application. In addition, texts, pictures and font formatting of source PDF file are accurately retained in converted Word document file.
paste image into pdf preview; copy and paste image from pdf to word
VB Imaging - VB Code 93 Generator Tutorial
pictures on PDF documents, multi-page TIFF, Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Please create a Windows application or ASP.NET web form and copy the
how to paste a picture into pdf; extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste
90
Mars Wars
91
Chapter 4:  The 90-Day Study
telescope upward and lock into place when the structure is inflated. When fully 
assembled and outfitted, the constructible habitat provides three levels, and has the 
volume required for expansion of habitat and science facilities. Major subsystems 
of the constructible habitat include the life support and thermal control systems, 
pressure vessels and internal structure, communications and information manage-
ment systems, and interior outfitting.” During this stage, a 100- kilowatt nuclear 
dynamic power system would begin providing the growing outpost much needed 
electric power (the plan called for ongoing progression of this capability, leading 
to a 550-kilowatt system). Initial surface exploration would be conducted using 
electric powered, unpressurized rovers. These vehicles would only have a range of 
50 kilometers with human occupants, although they could be telerobotically oper-
ated for missions up to 1,000 kilometers from the outpost. This provided very lim-
ited capacity for long-range human exploration, which was nominally the primary 
reason for making the journey.
45
The TSG  mission  plan  was  designed  as the  framework  for  selection  of  an 
overall “reference approach.” The 90-Day Study included five different reference 
approaches, which were intended to provide different options (using only one mis-
sion strategy) for achieving President Bush’s goals. The report introduced a set of 
metrics (cost, schedule, complexity, and program risk) that could be used by policy 
makers to decide the appropriate timeframe for SEI implementation. The reference 
approaches simply altered these metrics to provide different milestones for a single 
strategic plan. Thus, instead of examining numerous technical, operational, or stra-
tegic alternatives, the TSG chose to put forward one basic system architecture with 
slight timeline modifications. The different reference approaches included:
•  Reference Approach A: Formulated to establish human presence on the 
Moon in 2001, using the lunar outpost as a learning center to develop 
the capabilities to move on to Mars. An initial expedition to Mars would 
allow a 30-day stay on the surface, with the first 600-day visit in 2018.
•  Reference Approach B: A variation of Reference Approach A, which 
advanced the date of the first human Mars landing to 2011. 周is would 
reduce the ability to use the lunar outpost as a learning center for the 
Mars outpost.
•  Reference Approach C: A variation of Reference Approach A, which 
advanced even further the date of the first Mars mission, but maintained 
the same expansion schedule for Mars outpost development.
•  Reference Approach D: A variation of Reference Approach A, which 
45
Ibid.
slipped all major milestones two to three years.
•  Reference Approach E: Formulated to reduce the scale of lunar outpost 
activity by using only a human-tended mode of operation and limiting 
the flight rate to the Moon to one mission per year. 周ree expeditionary 
missions to Mars (with 90-day surface stays) would precede the 2027 
establishment of a permanent outpost with 600-day occupancy.
In essence, this set of reference approaches provided two limited alternatives (Refer-
ence Approaches A and E). The only difference between the two was the magnitude 
of lunar development and the timing of different milestones. There were no alterna-
tives provided that suggested that it was not feasible from a budgetary perspective 
to attempt both a permanent return to the Moon and human exploration of Mars. 
In addition, as pointed out above, there were no alternatives that were based on sig-
nificantly different mission profiles or technical systems. This represented a major 
shortcoming of the report, which would come back to haunt the space agency in 
subsequent months and years.
46
The 90-Day Study included a cost estimate for the TSG’s vision of SEI. It was 
based on a 30-year planning horizon and employed historical experience to “derive 
the approximate values for supporting development, systems engineering and inte-
gration, program management, recurring operations, new facilities, and civil service 
staffing levels.” The TSG performed a parametric cost analysis using three regression 
models developed at different NASA field centers. The Marshall Space Flight Center 
Cost Model consisted of subsystem level data gathered from past human spaceflight 
programs, which was employed to estimate space transportation vehicle costs as a 
function of mass (assigning each reference approach a subjective complexity factor). 
The Johnson Space Center Advanced Mission Cost Model used a broader dataset 
drawing on developmental program statistics from NASA and other technology 
organizations to calculate expected surface system costs. Finally, the Jet Propulsion 
Laboratory Project Cost Model estimated program costs for robotic missions draw-
ing on past analogous mission figures.
47
The study provided funding estimates for reference approaches A and E, apprais-
ing expected costs from 1991 to 2025 (in constant fiscal year 1991 dollars). The esti-
mates included reserves that accounted for nearly 55% of predicted expenditures, 
which was intended to allow for programmatic uncertainties. The report included 
tables that detailed the cost estimates for both reference approaches, separated into 
key phases:
46
Ibid., section 4, Reference Approaches.
47
Ibid., Cost Summary.
C# Imaging - C# Code 93 Generator Tutorial
pictures on PDF documents, multi-page TIFF, Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Please create a Windows application or ASP.NET web form and copy the
how to copy pictures from a pdf document; copy a picture from pdf
C#: Use OCR SDK Library to Get Image and Document Text
color image recognition for scanned documents and pictures in C#. text content from whole PDF file, single PDF page and You can directly copy demos to your .NET
paste image in pdf preview; how to copy pictures from a pdf
92
Mars Wars
93
Chapter 4:  The 90-Day Study
• Reference Approach A
–  Lunar Outpost: $100 billion (FY 1991-2001)
–  Lunar Outpost Emplacement & Operations: $208 billion 
(FY 2002-2025)
–  Mars Outpost: $158 billion (FY 1991-2016)
–  Mars Outpost Emplacement & Operations: $75 billion 
(FY 2017-2025)
–  Total: $541 billion 
• Reference Approach E
–  Lunar Outpost: $98 billion (FY 1991-2004)
–  Lunar Outpost Emplacement & Operations: $137 billion 
(FY 2005-2025)
–  Mars Outpost: $160 billion (FY 1991-2016)
–  Mars Outpost Emplacement & Operations: $76 billion 
(FY 2017-2025)
–  Total: $471 billion
The report also included two startling charts, which illustrated the impact of the 
reference approaches on the overall NASA budget. Starting with a base budget of 
approximately $15 billion, the implementation of both reference approaches would 
require increasing the annual agency appropriation to $30 billion by FY 2000, 
where it would stay for another 25 years.
48
In the coming weeks and months, it 
would become increasingly clear that these budgetary requirements were simply 
staggering to all outside observers. Admiral Truly and the TSG clearly believed that 
President Bush was prepared to support a major escalation in annual spending for 
the space program. This judgment was reached despite the fact that the nation was 
facing large budget deficits and almost every other sector of the government was 
expecting significant funding cuts. It proved to be a tremendous miscalculation.
Mars Wars
Behind closed doors, the White House’s reaction to the 90-Day Study was out-
right shock. The Space Council staff could not believe the TSG had produced a 
report that essentially had no real alternatives.
49
Mark Albrecht recalled later that 
the report included “basically one architecture…different technologies did not exist 
48
Ibid.
49
Bryan Burrough, Dragonfly, p. 241.
at all, it was one plan offered three ways; slow, moderate, and fast. We were just 
stunned, felt completely betrayed. Vice President Quayle was furious. The 90-Day 
Study was the biggest ‘F’ flunk, you could ever get in government. The real problem 
with the NASA plan was not that we didn’t think the technology was right, but 
that it was just the most expensive possible approach. It was just so fabulously unaf-
fordable, it showed no imagination.”
50
OMB Director Darman later told Congress, 
“some of us in the administration felt that the NASA report itself was very much 
biased towards what you might think of as the off-the-shelf approach to the Moon and 
Mars, that it didn’t really seek highly divergent new technologies.” When asked about 
the study after he left office, President Bush recalled feeling that “I got set up.”
51
The release led to a rapid disintegration in the already tenuous Space Coun-
cil-NASA relationship. Douglas O’Handley remembers the study “made the situ-
ation worse than it was at the beginning. The NASA plan was not what the Space 
Council wanted. Admiral Truly lost all credibility with the Space Council. There 
was clearly a clash of personalities.”
52
Although the White House was highly critical 
of NASA, agency officials believed the report was received unfavorably because of 
poor guidance from the Space Council. Admiral Truly and Aaron Cohen felt the 
council staff didn’t really understand the technical complexities involved in going 
to the Moon and Mars. In their opinion, significantly different cost profiles were 
not needed because establishing a permanent human presence on those celestial 
bodies would require approximately the same amount of resources, regardless of the 
strategic architectures that were selected. If the Space Council wanted options with 
different budgetary impacts, they argued, NASA should have been asked to examine 
different mission content—such as eliminating construction of a permanent lunar 
base or a human mission to Mars.
In  retrospect, this argument was  somewhat disingenuous considering it  was 
Admiral Truly who had originally argued that any new initiative should include a 
permanent return to the Moon and human missions to Mars. The White House 
had initially wanted to consider simply returning to the Moon, although Quayle 
and Albrecht went along with the space agency’s revised plan and adopted it for 
President Bush’s announcement speech. In any case, it was NASA’s feeling that short 
of changing mission content, it would be nearly impossible to reduce significantly 
the budgetary requirements. This conclusion was reached at least partially because 
50
Albrecht interview.
51
Warren E. Leary, “Plans for Space Are Realistic, Official Says,” New York Times (17 December 
2003).
52
O’Handley interview.
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Codes to Load Images from File / Stream in .
Now you can freely copy the VB.NET sample this VB.NET imaging library with pictures of your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to copy pictures from pdf to word; copying image from pdf to word
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Create Watermark on Images in .NET
and whether to burn it to the pictures to make Please feel free to copy them to your program provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to copy and paste image from pdf to word; how to copy pdf image into word
94
Mars Wars
95
Chapter 4:  The 90-Day Study
the administration was believed to be highly risk averse, which increased program-
matic costs. Additionally, the TSG didn’t believe that approaching technological 
changes more aggressively would reduce costs markedly.
53
NASA leaders were actually surprised with the White House reaction to the 
90-Day Study. Even after submitting it, they believed that it was an appropriate 
response to President Bush’s speech. This was particularly true regarding the cost 
estimates for a long-term initiative. The TSG believed that given Quayle’s approval 
of similar budget estimates in June, these new figures were acceptable. Years later, 
Aaron Cohen concluded that the primary reason for this misunderstanding was 
poor communication between the two organizations. He maintained that the pri-
mary problem was not that the council staff asked for options, but that “NASA did 
not try to understand what the customer really wanted. That is a very important 
rule in design. Know what the customer really wants. The president’s speech was 
not what they really wanted. We should have tried harder to understand what they 
really wanted.”
54
From his point of view, the primary lesson learned from this failure 
of communication was that technical agencies like NASA need to work very closely 
with its customer to understand their policy needs.
55
Before the public release of the report, Vice President Quayle and Mark Albrecht 
began preparing a plan to downplay the importance of the 90-Day Study. The Space 
Council staff fashioned a strategy intended to discourage speculation that the TSG 
vision for SEI matched that of President Bush. The Administration would argue the 
study was only one data source within an ongoing alternative generation process 
that would seek inputs from other government agencies, industry, and the scientific 
community. In fact, such a process had not yet been initiated. Regardless, the White 
House would suggest that the TSG report was merely a starting point for identify-
ing ways to minimize risk, maximize performance, keep costs at an affordable level, 
and achieve overall program goals.
56
This was clearly an ad hoc effort at damage 
control. It proved to be a near total failure.
The clearest sign that the Space Council staff was on high alert was the deci-
sion to ask NASA to remove the cost estimation section from the public report. 
Mark Albrecht recalled this determination was made because “we had only one 
alternative, and it had this $400 billion price tag. We knew right away that this was 
53
Cohen interview.
54
Ibid.
55
Ibid.
56
Talking Points, NASA Moon/Mars Database Report, National Space Council, 14 November 
1989, Bush Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential Library; Albrecht interview.
dead on arrival. Just what you need, to go out and say President Bush’s initiative 
is going to cost $400 billion. Dead. That’s exactly what we didn’t want to happen. 
So, we asked NASA to keep it separate while we began in earnest to look for real 
alternatives.” Regardless, the administration correctly concluded that rumors would 
quickly surface that the agency had indeed conducted an internal cost analysis. To 
counter these stories, the council staff planned to cast doubt on the TSG’s estima-
tion techniques—most importantly challenging the group’s conservative technical 
approach.
57
In mid-November, the White House scheduled a meeting of the full Space Coun-
cil to provide NASA with an opportunity to officially brief the 90-Day Study. This 
meeting would prove to be one of the seminal events in the history of SEI. In the 
days leading up to the meeting, the Space Council staff began searching for alterna-
tive approaches for Moon-Mars exploration. In particular, they were interested in 
an architecture developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by 
a team led by physicist Lowell Wood. The concept was designed to put humans on 
Mars in ten years, for $10 billion, using inflatable modules to build spacecraft and 
Martian bases. Although this option was considered technically risky (and would 
probably cost more than Livermore estimated), Vice President Quayle was eager to 
investigate inventive approaches that differed from those proposed by the TSG. Two 
days before the council meeting, Mark Albrecht called Wood and asked “how fast 
can you get your concept printed up into a document.” The reply was overnight. On 
16 November, Albrecht contacted Kathy Sawyer from The Washington Post and told 
her that two different mission architectures would be briefed at the council meeting 
the following morning—one from NASA and one from LLNL. He made it clear 
that the administration would be searching for additional technical alternatives for 
accomplishing the Moon-Mars mission.
58
The next day, The Washington Post ran a story indicating that Vice President 
Quayle had decided to end NASA’s monopoly on developing concepts for space 
exploration. The piece indicated that Quayle was greatly concerned with the agency’s 
big budget approach to SEI and wanted Congress to know that the administration 
would be considering other options. White House aides were quoted saying he had 
directed the Space Council to conduct an “open competition for money-saving ideas 
for human exploration of the Moon and Mars.”
59
While this was clearly designed 
57
Ibid.
58
Albrecht interview.
59
Kathy Sawyer, “Quayle to Give NASA Competition on Ideas for  Space Exploration,” 周e 
Washington Post (17 November 1989).
C# Imaging - C# MSI Plessey Barcode Tutorial
Create high-quality MSI Plessey bar code pictures for almost Copy C#.NET code below to print an MSI a document file, like Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF and TIFF
how to copy pictures from pdf to powerpoint; cut picture pdf
C# Imaging - Scan RM4SCC Barcode in C#.NET
detect & decode RM4SCC barcode from scanned documents and pictures in your Decode RM4SCC from documents (PDF, Word, Excel and PPT) and extract barcode value as
how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf document; how to copy and paste a pdf image
96
Mars Wars
97
Chapter 4:  The 90-Day Study
to assuage Congressional concerns, it was also an admission that the Council had 
initially abdicated this responsibility. The article highlighted the LLNL concept as 
one potential alternative. Douglas O’Handley, who up until that point had gener-
ally been sympathetic toward the Space Council, was quoted as saying, “I’m amazed 
it would be taken…seriously. If it is, it’s by an individual that doesn’t understand 
space risks.”
60
O’Handley believed the LLNL concept was not even worth discuss-
ing because it displayed a fundamental lack of knowledge. Within the space policy 
community, consideration of the Livermore architecture raised serious questions 
regarding the technical credibility of the Space Council staff.
61
That morning the Space Council met at the White House. When the members 
entered the room, the LLNL study was on everybody’s seat. A senior White House 
aide who attended the meeting recalled, “the NASA guys were absolutely furious, 
and we were furious because they’d tried to screw us, and we screwed them right 
back.”
62
After opening the meeting, Vice President Quayle asked NASA and LLNL 
to brief their respective studies. After the presentations were made, Dick Darman, 
James Watson (Secretary of Energy), and Donald Rice (Secretary of the Air Force) 
asked Admiral Truly a series of pointed technology-related questions. The thrust of 
these queries centered on whether SEI was politically viable or possible given the 
budgetary realities without breakthrough developments in technology. The Coun-
cil’s position was clearly that NASA needed to aggressively force some technologies 
through the system.
63
As a result, the group decided to ask the National Research 
Council to conduct a review of the 90-Day Study and search for possible alterna-
tives.
64
With the economy in a rut and a growing budget deficit, the Council felt the 
Administration needed to investigate cheaper options. Thus, the most significant 
outcome of the meeting was the displacement of NASA as the agency responsible 
for developing technical approaches for the initiative. Mark Albrecht recalled, “At 
60
Ibid.
61
O’Handley interview.
62
Senior Administration Official interview via electronic-mail, 5 November 2003.
63
James Fisher and Andrew Lawler, “NASA, Space Council Split Over Moon-Mars Report,” Space 
News (11 December 1989), p. 10.
64
On 4 December, Vice President Quayle sent a letter to Dr. Frank Press, Chairman of the National 
Research Council (NRC), officially requesting that his organization conduct a review of the 90-Day 
Study. Quayle requested that the NRC consider alternative approaches, or a range of options, for 
human exploration of the solar system. He included a list of questions that he hoped the NRC would 
address in its review, focusing on whether the 90-Day Study addressed the widest range of technically 
credible approaches for implementing SEI. 周e letter concluded by requesting that the NRC complete 
the review by the end of February 1990. [Vice President Quayle to Dr. Frank Press, 4 December 1989, 
Bush Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential Library.]
that meeting, the Space Council basically took over the SEI project.”
65
In retrospect, 
however, one must ask why this authority was ever in question.
When the 90-Day Study was released publicly, the Congressional reaction closely 
matched that of the Space Council—which did not bode well for SEI. For Dick 
Malow, one of the key problems with the TSG approach was that it only called for a 
30-day surface stay for initial Martian landings. Based on this short time period for 
scientific exploration, he remembered thinking the costs seemed horrifically high. “I 
think the idea of only spending 30 days on the Martian surface drove me gradually 
to the feeling that SEI was a mistake and that it wouldn’t sell. I couldn’t see how it 
made sense to spend $400 billion for a 30-day stay on Mars.”
66
There was a sense 
on Capitol Hill that the study was basically Johnson Space Center’s position on 
how the initiative should be carried out and that it was ultimately doomed. Malow 
recalled thinking even before the study was released that there was “just something 
totally out of whack. When you coupled the cost of the initiative with the problems 
ongoing with the space station, it just seemed like the wrong time and the wrong 
approach. The study only reinforced that view.”
67
Fellow staffer Stephen Kohashi 
shared this opinion and felt that the Administration never truly recovered momen-
tum after the report was released. “The biggest problem was the cost of the Space 
Station development, as well as the cost of maintaining development schedules for 
other on-going projects. With on-going projects getting cut back because of overall 
budgetary constraints, initiation of a manned Mars mission, with its enormous run-
out costs, seemed fanciful at best.”
68
As a result, the report lacked all credibility as a 
serious proposal in Congress.
The timing of the study’s release, combined with its poor reception, could not 
have been worse for the space agency. During this period, the White House was 
working on its fiscal year 1991 budget. NASA had proposed new funding to develop 
the necessary technology base to undertake future missions to the Moon and Mars. 
The initial budget submission included an SEI-specific increase of $450 million. 
There were also SEI-related increases to on-going projects. In late November, in 
the aftermath of NASA’s unveiling of the 90-Day Study, the OMB passback cut 
65
Albrecht interview.
66
Malow interview.
67
Ibid.
68
Kohashi interview.
C# Imaging - Scan ISBN Barcode in C#.NET
which can be used to track images, pictures and documents BarcodeType.ISBN); // read barcode from PDF page Barcode from PowerPoint slide, you can copy demo code
paste picture into pdf preview; paste jpg into pdf preview
VB.NET Image: Easy to Create Ellipse Annotation with VB.NET
ellipse annotation to document files, like PDF & Word ellipse annotation on documents, images & pictures using VB in Visual Studio, you can copy the following
how to copy a picture from a pdf; paste image in pdf file
98
Mars Wars
99
Chapter 4:  The 90-Day Study
nearly $270 million from the SEI-specific request.
69
The Administration realized 
that given the Congressional reaction to the report, it had to significantly reign in 
the agency’s efforts to obtain a large budget increase. The hope was that this would 
give the administration time to reorient the initiative and build momentum for its 
implementation among key members of Congress. The $188 million in SEI-spe-
cific funds that were ultimately included in the President’s budget were intended to 
commence technology efforts deemed crucial for eventual Moon-Mars missions, 
including:
•  Space Transportation Capability Development 
–  Space Transportation Main Engine: develop a low-cost advanced 
main engine propulsion system critical to any advanced transportation 
system ($40M) 
–  Heavy-lift Technologies: define advanced transportation technology 
development activities for a heavy-lift launch vehicle to support lunar 
and Mars missions ($10M)
•  Space Science 
–  Mars Observer: extend planned mission duration and upgrade image 
processing capability to provide more detailed topographical data to 
determine potential landing sites for future Mars missions ($15M) 
–  Lunar Observer: new mission to provide detailed data on the moon’s 
topography, geology, and climatology to assist in determining potential 
landing sites of optimal scientific merit ($15M)
•  Space Research & Technology 
–  Exploration Technology Increment: develop applications such as 
atmospheric aero-braking, advanced automation and robotics, space 
nuclear power, space transfer vehicle propulsion, cryogenic fuel transfer 
and conservation, regenerative life support systems, radiation protec-
tion shielding, high-rate optical frequency and Ka-band communica-
tions, and science multi-spectral sensors ($88M)
•  Space Station 
–  Advanced Programs Increment: assess and do preliminary designs of 
high-pressure space suit, solar dynamics power, and advanced propul-
sion system for reaction control ($20M)
70
69
Admiral Richard Truly to Richard G. Darman, 27 November 1989, Library of the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration Chief Financial Officer.
70
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, “Budget Estimates: Fiscal Year 1991, Volume 
1,” Library of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Chief Financial Officer.
Combined with approximately $140 million in new funds for ongoing programs, 
these budget augmentations were intended to be the first steps in the development 
of the necessary technology to undertake human exploration beyond Earth orbit.
At the end of November, the Space Council invited a Blue Ribbon Discussion 
Group to the White House to provide it with advice regarding the administration’s 
approach to SEI. Mark Albrecht recalled the council staff was trying to figure out 
how to get what “we asked for, given that NASA has completely flunked the course.”
71
The panel included such space policy luminaries as astronomer Carl Sagan, physi-
cist Edward Teller, former astronaut and U.S. Senator Harrison Schmitt, former 
astronaut Michael Collins, former Air Force Secretary Pete Aldridge, and former 
NASA Administrator Thomas Paine. The group spent its first day and a half receiv-
ing briefings on a wide variety of topics, ranging from technology to international 
cooperation  to  program  rationales.  NASA presented  the 90-Day  Study. Lowell 
Wood briefed the LLNL plan. Finally, Boeing shared its plans for development of 
heavy-lift expendable launch vehicles and next-generation human spacecraft.
72
During the final afternoon of the two-day summit, Dr. Laurel Wilkening of the 
University of Washington provided Vice President Quayle, Budget Director Richard 
Darman, and Science Advisor Allan Bromley with an overview of the group’s find-
ings and recommendations. First, the administration had not outlined an adequate 
rationale for SEI. Without a more compelling justification for the initiative, the 
administration would be unlikely to gain long-term public and congressional sup-
port for the undertaking. Second, NASA should be directed to prepare a broad range 
of technical options for presidential consideration, drawing on external and internal 
sources outside JSC. The 90-Day Study reference approaches were seen as “business 
as usual” approaches that did not seek to leverage breakthrough technologies. Third, 
NASA should embark on the rapid development of advanced heavy launch vehicles 
as the most important initial implementation step. Fourth, Tom Paine and others 
argued NASA’s managerial structure was not well suited to carry out the program. 
They suggested that a new ‘exploration agency’ should be created within NASA, 
likely requiring a new field center separate from the existing operational side of the 
organization. Finally, the administration should evaluate opportunities for inter-
71
Albrecht interview.
72
Schedule Proposal,  Mark Albrecht to CeCe Kramer, 9 November 1989, Bush Presidential 
Records, George Bush Presidential Library; Memorandum, Mark Albrecht, 30 November 1989, Bush 
Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential Library; Andrew Lawler, “Panel: Rationale Missing for 
Moon-Mars Proposal,” Space News (11 December 1989); Brad Mitchell to Andy Card, 4 December 
1989, Bush Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential Library.
100
Mars Wars
101
Chapter 4:  The 90-Day Study
national cooperation that would not make the space program dependent on other 
nations for mission essential activities.
73
By mid-December, the clash underway within the Bush administration regard-
ing the future direction of the American space program had become public knowl-
edge. The Washington Post described this out of sight “Mars Wars,” as an on-going 
conflict between the Space Council and NASA, characterized by communications 
failures, disagreements, and outright turf battles. As had been the case for many 
months, the Council’s continued appeal for a more imaginative technical approach 
for implementing SEI caused friction. The White House position, supported most 
importantly by Vice President Quayle and OBM Director Darman, was that SEI 
should be used as an opportunity to seek economic benefits from directed technol-
ogy investments. This would have the added benefit, they believed, of dramati-
cally reducing the costs of future Moon-Mars missions. Quayle and Darman were 
clearly disappointed with the 90-Day Study’s failure to cast a wider net in search of 
new technologies. They believed the TSG plan was simply bureaucratic business as 
usual. On 1 December, Admiral Truly and Mark Albrecht had had a private con-
frontation at NASA headquarters when the latter expressed this White House view. 
Although the meeting was downplayed publicly, there was clearly a heated conversa-
tion regarding the appropriate course of action for SEI.
74
An article in Space News 
captured the essential dilemma SEI posed for both the administration and NASA. 
“Administration officials have privately chastised NASA for preparing a report that 
some felt was unimaginative and did not adequately address new technologies that 
could dramatically cut costs for the venture. NASA officials have blamed the Space 
Council for the problems, saying that direction given to the agency was unclear.”
75
Regardless of the ongoing hostilities between the Space Council and NASA, the 
latter was working to salvage SEI. On 14 December, the full council met to discuss 
a staff report drafted after the conclusion of the two-day Blue Ribbon Discussion 
Group meeting. The report suggested that NASA should be instructed to issue a 
call to industry, universities, and research centers for high leverage system concepts 
based on new technology developments—including nuclear propulsion and inno-
vative uses of existing technologies. Following an agency review of all inputs to pro-
vide a “sanity check,” these alternatives would be forwarded to the NRC for more 
73
Ibid.
74
Kathy Sawyer, “En Route to Space Goal, Groups Diverge: Friction Between NASA and Quayle’s 
National Council Erupts in “Mars Wars,’” 周e Washington Post (11 December 1989).
75
James Fisher and Andrew Lawler, “NASA, Space Council Split Over Moon-Mars Report,” Space 
News (11 December 1989).
detailed analysis. This process was expected to take a year.
76
The panel also addressed 
the Blue Ribbon Discussion Group’s concern regarding the need for a compelling 
rationale for SEI. The council members decided the space program should be por-
trayed as an investment that was greater than the sum of its parts, which provided 
the nation with a unique combination of benefits. The group selected the following 
framework to describe the administration’s vision:
The Council believed that NASA should build on its proven track record “for 
calling forth factors which are critical to America’s greatness—pushing the fron-
tier, creating economic opportunity from adversity, and looking over the horizon to 
create a better world for tomorrow’s generation.”
77
In retrospect, this rationale was 
more of a propaganda statement than an actual description of the Bush administra-
tion’s reasoning for supporting human exploration of the Moon and Mars. The real 
motivation for SEI was quite simple—provide direction to a directionless agency. 
While this justification may have been adequate to force a fundamental redirection 
of existing NASA programs, it was not compelling enough to gain Congressional 
support for an initiative that would require doubling the space agency’s budget. In 
fact, this had never been the administration’s intent. The Space Council’s inability 
to control the alternative generation process, however, led to the release of a NASA 
report that necessitated a massive increase in funding.
76
Simon P. Worden to the National Space Council, “Strategic Planning for the Space Exploration 
Initiative: 周e How, What, and When?” 14 December 1989, Bush Presidential Records, George Bush 
Presidential Library.
77
Courtney Stadd to Brad Mitchell, Ed McNally, and Joe Heizer, “Space Exploration Initiative,” 
18 December 1989, Bush Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential Library.
Leadership / Pride
Explore new frontiers
Challenge best and 
brightest
Foster standard of 
excellence in science 
education
Manifest destiny
Economic Impact
Enjoy unanticipated 
benefits
Create new jobs and foster 
aerospace industry
Enhance economic 
competitiveness
Promote science and 
medical innovation
Legacy
Create a better world 
for next generation
102
Mars Wars
103
Chapter 4:  The 90-Day Study
On 19 December, based on the recommendation of the Blue Ribbon Discussion 
Group, Vice President Quayle directed NASA to take the lead in seeking out and 
evaluating technical and policy alternatives for implementing SEI. Quayle wrote 
Admiral Truly saying “America’s space program has always been a recognized source 
of innovation. We need to bring that same innovativeness to bear today [and] ensure 
that all reasonable conceptual space exploration alternatives have been evaluated. 
We need to cast our net widely drawing upon America’s creative potential to ensure 
that we are benefiting from a broad range of promising new technologies, and inno-
vative uses of existing technologies.” Quayle’s position was clearly that not only had 
the 90-Day Study been based on outdated technology, but the TSG had not even 
applied those technologies in innovative ways. This was harsh criticism. The deci-
sion to give the space agency competition for strategic planning for human explora-
tion was unprecedented in the history of the space age. It removed a 30-year NASA 
monopoly and signaled a serious lack of confidence in the organization’s ability to 
formulate pioneering mission designs while taking into account the challenges of 
the existing political environment.
78
Two days later, a seemingly humbled Truly announced that “the time has come 
now, not only to continue our analysis of exploration mission alternatives but also 
to begin actual pursuit of the innovative and enabling technologies that have been 
identified as necessary to proceed.” This statement was a very public admission 
that the TSG had not identified innovative approaches for SEI. Nevertheless, Truly 
stated his belief that the Office of Exploration had conducted exceptional work 
setting a foundation for future human missions to the Moon and Mars. This was 
perhaps an indication that NASA still felt that its vision represented the best option 
for exploration of the solar system.
79
/
80
78
Vice President Quayle to Admiral Richard Truly, 19 December 1989, Bush Presidential Records, 
George Bush Presidential Library.
79
Press Release 89-185, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 21 December 1989, 
Bush Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential Library; William J. Broad, “NASA Losing 30-
Year Monopoly In Planning for Moon and Mars,” 周e New York Times (15 January 1990).
80
Admiral Truly did not formally reply to the White House direction until 31 January 1990. 
In a letter to Vice President Quayle, he provided details of a process for soliciting outside strategic 
approaches for SEI implementation. 周is process would include the release of a NASA Research 
Announcement. 周e space agency would specifically seek inputs from professional societies (including 
the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics—AIAA) and other federal agencies. 周e plan 
also envisioned a national conference that would be jointly sponsored by NASA and AIAA. All of 
these efforts would be coordinated through a newly created Office of Aeronautics, Exploration, and 
Technology. [Admiral Richard Truly to Vice President Quayle, 31 January 1990, Bush Presidential 
Records, George Bush Presidential Library.]
Over the course of the subsequent month, the Space Council began working 
behind the scenes to get SEI back on track. This included Council meetings aimed 
at developing a policy directive for the initiative and conferences with key members 
of Congress. Most importantly, however, the Administration was working on its 
fiscal year 1991 budget. President Bush was set to request a dramatically increased 
space budget, 24% higher than the previous year. This included a significant com-
mitment to Mission to Planet Earth (raised 53%), a considerable boost in fund-
ing for Space Station Freedom (raised 39%), and a noteworthy enlargement of the 
space exploration budget (raised 32%). The budget included a new account for the 
Moon-Mars initiative, but the administration intended to make it clear that for the 
next few years SEI-related efforts would focus on pushing emerging and new tech-
nologies—those with the greatest potential for achieving the initiative faster, better, 
and cheaper.
81
The White House did not intend to lock onto any single program 
design or architecture until a thorough search for innovative technical alternatives 
had been completed.
82
In late January, when the budget was officially submitted to Congress, the new 
funding for SEI was grouped together with on-going exploration efforts. Combining 
these budget lines made it appear that the space agency was asking for approximately 
$1.3 billion to support the robotic science missions and research and development 
activities required to push the initiative forward. In reality, only $300 million rep-
resented new spending for programs associated with SEI.
83
After the budget’s public 
release, The New York Times reported that the proposed 24% increase in the NASA 
budget (a $2.8 billion boost to $15.1 billion) signaled President Bush’s commitment 
to put money behind the exploration initiative. Admiral Truly stated “this is the 
most important budget for us … it’s going to set our course, if we’re successful, for 
many years to come and over a wide range of programs.”
84
The article pointed out 
81
A few years later, NASA Administrator Dan Goldin, who would become the second administrator 
appointed by the Bush administration, made “faster, better, cheaper” the mantra of NASA. 周e concept 
emerged earlier, however, as the administration was trying to “infuse that kind of SDI mentality” into 
the SEI alternative generation process. [Albrecht interview]
82
Talking Points, Meeting with Republican Members of House Science Committee, National 
Space Council, 22 January 1990, Bush Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential Library.
83
White House Office of Management and Budget, “Budget of the United States of American, 
Fiscal Year 1991,” 29 January 1990, pp. 49-82.
84
“NASA Budget Press Conference: Statement of Richard H. Truly, NASA Administrator,” NASA 
News (29 January 1990); John Noble Wilford, “Budget for the Space Agency Sets Broader Course in 
Exploration,” 周e New York Times (2 February 1990), p. 19.
104
Mars Wars
105
Chapter 4:  The 90-Day Study
that although the first year funding for SEI was modest, it would presumably mul-
tiply several times over coming years. John Pike from the Federation of American 
Scientists was quoted saying, “There’s a danger with all these big projects just get-
ting started. They could just about devour everything else in the space program.”
85
This was clearly a congressional concern and easing this worry would be the focus 
of the administration in the coming months.
A month later, the National Research Council briefed the findings of its review 
of the 90-Day Study to the full Space Council. The fundamental conclusion of 
the 14-member review panel was that the TSG report had critical flaws and that 
additional options needed to be studied to provide decision-makers with a ‘menu 
of  opportunities.’ Former Presidential  Science Advisor H. Guyford  Stever,  who 
chaired the NRC committee, argued SEI warranted “more intense scrutiny and 
evaluation of options must take place before decisions are made regarding mission 
architecture.” This was an apparent criticism of the rushed nature of NASA’s internal 
analysis and the resultant lack of real options for policy makers to choose between. 
The committee also subtly reproved past White House actions, stating that three 
crucial questions needed to be answered before moving on to actual concept devel-
opment. These questions included: what is the appropriate pace for SEI; what is the 
appropriate scope of SEI; and what level of long-term support will SEI receive.
86
These were clearly high-level policy questions under the Space Council’s purview 
that arguably should have been answered before the space agency was allowed to 
embark on the 90-Day Study.
After examining the reference approaches presented by the TSG, the NRC panel 
concluded that the JSC-led team was overly risk averse in the area of technology 
development. While there is some evidence that this was the result of guidance from 
the White House, the committee believed advanced technologies offered oppor-
tunities for more rapid and cost-effective access to and exploration of space. The 
group suggested a balanced technical approach would provide risk reduction and 
management opportunities. To this end, it recommended that early technical work 
should be focused on developments in four areas:
• A new generation of heavy-lift launch vehicles to transport large 
cargoes to LEO
• A new, robust, and efficient reusable launch vehicle for transport of 
humans and precious cargo to LEO
85
Ibid.
86
Committee on Human Exploration of Space, Human Exploration of Space: A Review of NASA’s 90-
Day Study and Alternatives (Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1990); Press Release, National 
Research Council, 1 March 1990, Bush Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential Library.
• Nuclear propulsion technologies for more rapid transport of human 
crews across the solar system
• Nuclear electric power to meet the high energy requirements of lunar 
and Martian outposts
The panel openly criticized NASA’s failure to discuss the eventual phase-out of the 
Shuttle, which it deemed to be a crucial step in providing highly reliable, less labor-
intensive launch operations. It further expressed its belief that NASA should have 
emphasized the importance of safe nuclear power and propulsion for SEI. The NRC 
found that these technologies were essential to meeting the mission’s substantial 
electricity demands and to reduce weight and travel time to Mars. In conclusion, 
the committee made an appeal to Congress to reserve judgment regarding SEI until 
investigations had been carried out to examine the merits of different technical 
approaches that may prove more feasible in the existing political environment.
87
The White House reaction to the NRC review was extremely positive. Mark 
Albrecht felt “it was independent verification that we’re not dreaming in the search 
for viable and credible alternative architectures.” There was relief among the coun-
cil staff that the NRC had concurred with their conclusion that there was a lim-
ited amount of technical imagination in the 90-Day Study, which made the TSG 
approach very expensive. They were also pleased that the report indicated there were 
additional alternatives that could dramatically decrease the overall cost of imple-
menting SEI. Mark Albrecht recalled the report “was just a huge boost in our cred-
ibility around town and inside the White House.”
88
Even many at NASA felt the 
report was a fair criticism of the 90-Day Study, but even at this point, the space 
agency had no plans to expand the envelope at all.
89
The release of the NRC review was a critical turning point in lifecycle of SEI. 
It represented an authoritative declaration that NASA’s 90-Day Study had serious 
flaws and failed to provide policy makers with an adequate tool to decide the future 
course of the American space program. While it clearly criticized the space agency, 
it also implied that there had been a White House failure to provide necessary guid-
ance with regard to the pace, scope, and long-term commitment to the initiative. 
This public revelation forced the administration to step up an ongoing process 
aimed at saving the program. Over the coming months and years, intensified efforts 
were made to make President Bush’s vision of a permanent return to the Moon and 
human exploration of Mars a reality.
87
Ibid.
88
Albrecht interview.
89
O’Handley interview.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested