pdf viewer in c# code project : Copy picture from pdf to powerpoint software application dll windows html wpf web forms sp44106-part1396

Copy picture from pdf to powerpoint - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
cut and paste pdf images; how to copy picture from pdf and paste in word
Copy picture from pdf to powerpoint - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
copy image from pdf preview; copy picture from pdf to word
“And so as this century closes, it is in America’s hands 
to determine the kind of people, the kind of planet, we will become 
in the next.  We will leave the Solar System and travel to the stars.  
Not only because it is democracy’s dream, but because it is 
democracy’s destiny.”
President George Bush, 11 May 1990
Throughout the fall of 1989, President Bush had not been heavily engaged in the 
evolution of SEI within his administration. He had largely delegated responsibility 
for the initiative to Vice President Quayle, while he addressed more pressing events 
on the international stage—most importantly, the virtual implosion of communism 
in Eastern Europe. International tensions remained a fact of life during the coming 
months as reunification efforts began in East and West Germany; independence 
movements gained momentum in several Soviet republics; President Gorbachev 
proposed that the Communist Party give up its monopoly on power in the U.S.S.R.; 
and Panamanian dictator General Manuel Noriega overturned democratic elections 
that had effectively ousted him from power. Regardless, during the early part of 
the new year, President Bush was able to return his attention to domestic mat-
ters—including the fate of the American space program.
1
1
John Robert Greene, 周e Presidency of George Bush (Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas Press, 
2000), pp. 89-106.
5
The Battle to Save SEI
107
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
copy image from pdf to; how to copy images from pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
copy and paste image from pdf to pdf; cut and paste image from pdf
108
Mars Wars
109
Chapter 5:  The Battle to Save SEI
–  A baseline program architecture will  be selected from these alternatives
•  Three agencies will carry out the initiative, with the National Space Council 
coordinating all activities
–  NASA will be the principal implementing agency
–  DOD and DOE will have major roles in technology development and  
concept definition
Coming eight months after President Bush first announced the initiative, this direc-
tive provided the direction that had clearly been needed within a fractious policy 
making community.
4
It was among the most significant documents in the chronicle 
of SEI. It represented an outright skirmish in the battle to gain control of strategic 
space policy planning within the Bush administration. Mark Albrecht said later, “it 
took us almost a year to go where we wanted to go directly and it cost us time, it cost 
confusion on the Hill.”
5
Although this was a criticism of NASA, the Administration 
itself shared equally in the blame for not providing the required direction earlier. It 
is unclear whether the ultimate fate of SEI would have changed even if policy guid-
ance had been provided much earlier, but it seems safe to conclude that the lack of 
administration leadership significantly reduced the initiative’s chances of success. 
By the time the council finally supplied the needed direction, it was probably too 
late to resurrect an undertaking Congress presumed would be outrageously expen-
sive. Dick Malow recalled that even with of a presidential directive providing policy 
guidance for SEI, “the general feeling about the program on the Hill continued to 
weaken.”
6
At the end of March, the White House made public a second presidential direc-
tive announcing President Bush’s decision to commence discussions with foreign 
nations regarding international cooperation for SEI. This idea had been encour-
aged the previous summer by Carl Sagan, who sought to take advantage of warmer 
relations between the United States and Soviet Union. The Department of Trans-
portation’s (DOT) Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee had 
likewise recommended cooperation with the U.S.S.R. The committee’s chairman, 
4
Presidential Decision on the Space Exploration Initiative, National Space Council, 21 February 
1990, Bush Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential Library; Press Release, 周e White House 
Office of the Press Secretary, 8 March 1990, Bush Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential 
Library; “Cold Water on Mars,” 周e Economist (10 March 1990), pp. 94-95; “Bush Calls for Two 
Proposals for Missions to Moon, Mars,” Aviation Week and Space Technology (12 March 1990), pp. 18-
19; Memorandum, Mark Albrecht to Ed Rogers, 13 March 1990, Bush Presidential Records, George 
Bush Presidential Library.
5
Albrecht interview.
6
Malow interview.
Presidential Decisions
During the early months of the new year, the Space Council staff began devel-
oping actual policy directives for the implementation of SEI. Based on direction 
provided by the full Council during two meetings on the subject, the staff was 
tasked with drafting two documents. The first would provide general policy guid-
ance, while the second would introduce a course of action for including interna-
tional partners in Moon-Mars missions. In a sign that the Administration had lost 
complete faith in NASA, the staff turned to the Department of Defense to conduct 
most of the analytical work necessary to develop these documents.  Although NASA 
leaders had originally been in favor of re-establishing the Space Council, this view 
had dramatically shifted now that the new organization had turned to the military 
to comment on and critique the space agency’s plans and projects.
2
Regardless, over 
the period of several months, the council staff worked closely with military analysts 
and the ‘deputies committee,’ a group consisting of high-level representatives from 
each of the Council’s member agencies, to gain a consensus on the wording of the 
forthcoming policy statements.
3
On 21 February, President Bush signed a Presidential Decision on the Space 
Exploration Initiative. Fully supported by Vice President Quayle and the National 
Space Council, its public unveiling three weeks later was clearly timed to coincide 
with the release of the NRC review of the 90-Day Study. The NRC panels’ find-
ings and recommendations largely validated the policy guidance found within the 
presidential directive. The objective of the document was to provide the American 
space program with near-term guidance for carrying out the long-term SEI vision.  
The policy consisted of the following components:
•  The initiative will include both lunar and Mars program elements
•  The initiative will include robotic science missions
•  Early research will focus on a search for new and innovative approaches and 
technologies
–  Research will focus on high leverage technologies with the potential to  
greatly reduce costs
–  Mission, concept, and systems analyses will be carried out in parallel with  
technology research
–  Research will lead to definition of two or more significantly different  
exploration architectures
2
Albrecht interview.
3
Mark Albrecht to National Space  Council, 16 January 1990, Bush Presidential Records, 
George Bush Presidential Library; Mark Albrecht to National Space Council, 2 February 1990, Bush 
Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential Library.
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor. dll. Open RasterEdge_MVC3 DemoProject, copy following content to your project:
how to copy pdf image to word; how to cut and paste image from pdf
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
Copy the demo codes and run your project to see New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
copy a picture from pdf to word; paste image on pdf preview
110
Mars Wars
111
Chapter 5:  The Battle to Save SEI
ing and eliminating all funding associated with SEI.  Chairman Traxler began the 
SEI-related questioning by asking NASA if the net increase in spending associated 
with the initiative was approximately $300 million—if on-going programs such 
as the National Aerospace Plane, Space Station Freedom, and Mars Observer were 
not included. NASA Comptroller Thomas Campbell answered that this was cor-
rect. Traxler then asked a series of questions regarding the technologies included in 
the 90-Day Study, which led to a long response from Admiral Truly defending the 
report—he concluded that the $188 million in funding for new technologies were 
dedicated to ascertaining what innovations would be required to efficiently explore 
the Moon and Mars. An undeterred Traxler followed-up by asking whether Truly 
agreed with the NRC report, which concluded that SEI as envisioned in the 90-Day 
Study would be technically challenging and very expensive. After Truly answered 
in the affirmative, Traxler got to the heart of the Congressional concern by asking 
whether fully implementing the TSG plan would require more than doubling the 
NASA budget. Once again answering affirmatively, Truly stated that regardless of 
what technologies or strategies were selected, exploration of the Moon and Mars 
would be an expensive undertaking. Truly suggested that the technological, educa-
tional, and spiritual benefits derived from such an endeavor was worth the cost.
After a brief foray into technical details, Traxler returned to budgetary concerns, 
questioning the space agency’s ability to accurately forecast programmatic costs for 
long term projects.  He asked whether Truly was confident in NASA’s estimate for 
reference approach A ($541 billion).  The administrator simply said it was prema-
ture to make this determination, but that he believed the program would be “very 
expensive.” Traxler followed-up by asking when NASA would be able to provide firm 
numbers, to which Truly said it would take three or four years of focused technology 
development to provide a more definitive estimate. In essence, Truly was suggesting 
that Congress should invest billions of dollars in technology development programs 
before the agency could tell it how much the long-term project would cost. During 
the second day of testimony, with many Congressional concerns presumably con-
firmed, Chairman Traxler only returned to SEI in an attempt to accurately identify 
exactly where new money for SEI could be found within the NASA budget request. 
This was an ominous sign, calling into question whether Congress would provide 
any funding for implementation of the initiative.
10
By the end of April, with Congress preparing to eliminate all SEI-related funding 
from the NASA budget, the Space Council set into motion a concentrated lobby-
ing effort aimed at garnering support for the space program and SEI. The first step 
10
House of Representatives, Committee on Appropriations, “Departments of Veterans Affairs and 
Housing and Urban Development, and Independent Agencies Appropriations for 1991,” in Hearings 
Before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, One Hundred First 
Congress, Second Session: Subcommittee on VA, HUD, and Independent Agencies—Part IV: National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration (Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1990), pp. 
50-57; pp. 136-143.
Alan Lovelace, said “cooperation with the Soviets is logical given the great desire 
of the administration to take steps to support developments in Eastern Europe.” 
Another potential reason to cooperate was to reduce the U.S. contribution to the 
expensive initiative. It was suggested that the issue should be placed on the table 
for the Bush-Gorbachev summit planned for the summer.
7
The policy document 
itself indicated that the nation should pursue negotiations with Europe, Canada, 
Japan, and the Soviet Union. It was believed that this decision directive would sup-
port three important objectives. First, and most importantly, it would expand the 
coalition of initiative supporters by adding a foreign policy rationale. Second, it 
would involve partners capable of contributing financial resources to an expensive 
undertaking. Third, it would involve partners with important technical capabili-
ties—most notably Soviet experience addressing the impacts of prolonged space-
flight and constructing nuclear space systems.
8
The Soviet reaction to President Bush’s call for international cooperation was 
extremely positive. Four years earlier, President Gorbachev had asked President 
Reagan to join his nation in a joint mission to the red planet, which would have 
met a long held ambition within the U.S.S.R. for human space exploration focusing 
on a voyage to Mars. After the release of the presidential directive, the spokesman 
for the Soviet embassy in Washington stated, “we have always been for cooperation 
with the United States in this area.” Despite this encouraging response, by the end 
of the month, the NRC panel that had been evaluating SEI publicly warned against 
any cooperative robotic sample return missions to Mars with the Soviets. While the 
NRC did not address human exploration, it found that a highly interdependent 
undertaking could make planetary science “a potential hostage to political events.” 
In the long-run, the potential benefits sought from exploring international coopera-
tion were never realized.
9
While the Space Council was working to provide long overdue policy guid-
ance for SEI’s implementation, senior NASA officials were appearing on Capitol 
Hill to defend the proposed increase in the agency’s budget. In late March, the 
House Appropriations subcommittee with authority over the NASA budget held 
two days of hearing on the matter. It became apparent very quickly that the com-
mittee, chaired by Representative Bob Traxler (D-MI), was committed to identify-
7
“Bush Seen Cooperating with Soviets on Moon-Mars Project,” Dow Jones News Service (18 
January 1990).
8
“International Cooperation in the President’s Space Exploration Initiative,” 周e White House, 
Office of the Press Secretary, 30 March 1990, Bush Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential 
Library.
9
William J. Broad, “Bush Open to Space Voyages with Soviet Union,” 周e New York Times (3 
April 1990), sec.C2; Craig Covault, “White House Approves Soviet Talks on Moon/Mars Exploration 
Initiative,” Aviation Week & Space Technology (9 April 1990), p. 24; James R. Asker, “NRC Warns U.S. 
Against Joint Missions to Mars With Soviets,” Aviation Week & Space Technology (23 April 1990).
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
first! VB.NET Image & Picture Cropping Application. Do you need to save a copy of certain part of an image file in a programming way?
paste picture to pdf; copy picture from pdf to powerpoint
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we code demo, which you can directly copy to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
copy picture to pdf; how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf
112
Mars Wars
113
Chapter 5:  The Battle to Save SEI
his personal commitment to the American space program, which he believed to be 
of vital importance to the nation’s future. He contended that space leadership was 
crucial to maintaining national leadership in the high tech world—in particular, 
he lauded the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) aboard the Shuttle 
Discovery in late April as an example of U.S. accomplishments in space science. 
He further argued that there were real and tangible benefits derived from invest-
ments in the national space program, including revolutions in communications and 
computerization, advances in industrial materials and medical knowledge, the cre-
ation of millions of high-tech jobs, and inspiring future generations of scientists and 
engineers.  President Bush then appealed for congressional support for his increase 
in civil space spending—which he asserted would put the nation on the path of 
recovery from many years of underinvestment in space. He made the case that Mis-
sion to Planet Earth and SEI embodied what the space program was all about—to 
use space to examine Earth from above and to push outward to new frontiers. In 
conclusion to his remarks, Bush acknowledged that Congress was concerned about 
the proposed investment in the Moon-Mars initiative. To address these issues, he 
turned the meeting over to Vice President Quayle.
16
Vice President Quayle began by emphasizing the Space Council’s priorities, 
including: a balanced mix of human and robotic, scientific and exploratory mis-
sions; pursuit of challenging initiatives; and pushing space innovation designed to 
ensure national leadership in cutting edge technology. He then launched into a 
defense of SEI. Stating that the Council had dedicated significant effort to creating 
a strategy for SEI, Quayle argued that it was fundamentally in the national interest 
to implement a new round of exploration that would produce countless direct and 
indirect benefits. He told the attendees that the council’s approach for SEI was to 
begin a multi-year technology research effort. The administration was asking Con-
gress for the funding ($188 million in FY 1991) and the time to examine alternative 
ways for better, faster, cheaper, safer ways of reaching the Moon and Mars. Quayle 
made clear to the assembled congressional leaders that this should not be considered 
a new program start, but an opportunity to investigate what was involved in achiev-
ing the initiative and ultimately to save money. He was adamant on this point, 
stating unequivocally that the White House was not asking Congress to commit to 
a new program. Quayle argued, however, that it was important to start the technol-
ogy research needed to initiate the program immediately, rather than waiting for the 
program to get bogged down in bipartisan politics during an election year.  He also 
suggested that SEI offered an exceptional opportunity to showcase U.S. leadership 
during a time of rapid political change around the globe.
16
Talking Points for the President, Congressional Leadership Meeting on Space, 27 April 1990, 
Bush Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential Library.
in the strategy was to hold a “space summit” at the White House.  While President 
Bush met weekly with the senior Congressional leadership to discuss selected sub-
jects, this meeting was notable because it was the first time in American history 
that space policy would be the sole topic on the agenda.
11
According to an internal 
White House memorandum, the primary purpose of the summit was for Bush to 
show support for the FY 1991 space budget. Secondarily, the gathering provided 
an opportunity to discuss SEI.  Not since the initiation of the Apollo program had 
a president given such high priority to the space program. During the intervening 
period, space activities were kept alive by a select group of congressional appropria-
tors and top-level NASA officials. The belief within the administration was that 
this traditional coalition would not be able to deliver on President Bush’s ambitious 
request for a 24% increase in funding for the space agency or obtain approval to 
implement SEI. Senator Barbara Mikulski and Senator Jake Garn (chair and rank-
ing member of the Appropriation Subcommittee on VA, HUD, and Independent 
Agencies) had confirmed this opinion, warning the White House that the Moon-
Mars initiative was particularly vulnerable in the current budgetary environment, 
absent strong intervention by the White House.  Based on this advice, the White 
House plan was to have President Bush actively promote the initiative, both pub-
licly and with top congressional powerbrokers.
12
On 1 May, after being delayed in mid-April by the death of Senator Spark Mat-
sunaga (D-HI),
13
the summit took place at the Old Executive Office Building. The 
event was attended by sixteen congressional participants
14
and nearly twenty mem-
bers of the White House staff.
15
President Bush opened the meeting by affirming 
11
Andrew Lawler, “Space Summit Set for May: Bush, Quayle Invite Members of Congress to Talk 
Space,” Space News (23 April 1990), p. 1.
12
Mark Albrecht to Fred Mcclure, 16 April 1990, Bush Presidential Records, George Bush 
Presidential Library; Jim Cicconi to President Bush, 30 April 1990, Bush Presidential Records, George 
Bush Presidential Library.
13
In 1986, Senator Matsunaga wrote 周e Mars Project, Journey Beyond the Cold War, an unabashed 
call for a wide-variety of joint space missions with the Soviet Union and other nations.  Matsunaga was 
one of the U.S. Senate’s most outspoken proponents of outer space development.
14
周e congressional participants included: Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-KS), Senator 
Robert Byrd (D-WV), Senator Mark Hatfield (R-OR), Senator John Danforth (R-MO), Senator 
Barbara Mikulski (D-MD), Senator Jake Garn (R-UT), Senator Howell Heflin (D-AL), House 
Speaker 周omas Foley (D-WA), House Majority Leader Richard Gephardt (D-MO), House Minority 
Whip Newt Gingrich (R-GA), Representative Silvio Conte (R-MA), Representative Robert Traxler 
(D-MI), Representative Bill Green (R-NY), Representative Robert Roe (D-NJ), and Representative 
Robert Walker (R-PA).
15
周e White House participants  included: Chief of Staff John Sununu, National Security 
Advisor Brent Scowcroft, Deputy Chief of Staff Andrew Card, Deputy Chief of Staff Jim Cicconi, 
Communications Director David Demarest, Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater, NSC Executive Secretary 
Mark Albrecht, and Chief of Staff to the Vice President Bill Kristol.
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# Powerful PDF image editor control, compatible with .NET Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo
copy paste picture pdf; copying images from pdf files
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link Visual Studio .NET PDF image editor control, compatible Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo
copy image from pdf to pdf; cut and paste pdf image
114
Mars Wars
115
Chapter 5:  The Battle to Save SEI
answered critics that argued he lacked the vision of a great president.
20
As he had 
done ten months earlier, he did not speak to the cost of achieving these lofty goals. 
When asked by reporters as he boarded Air Force One where the money would 
come from to fund the initiative he simply said, “Thirty years is a long time.”
21
Coming in the wake of months of strategizing within the Space Council regarding 
how to get SEI back on it feet, this answer was most unsatisfying. It left the impres-
sion that either Bush was not fully engaged in the decisions that were being made 
with regard to space policy, or that the White House simply couldn’t produce a good 
answer to this fundamental question.
As had been the case with his speech announcing SEI the previous summer, 
the reaction to President Bush’s commencement address was not entirely positive. 
The New York Times complained he “did not give any estimate…of how much the 
program would cost.  Nor did he discuss whether the mission would be mounted 
alone or with international partners.”
22
The Washington Post quoted Senator Al Gore 
saying, “before the President sets out on his mission to Mars, he should embark on a 
mission to reality by giving us some even faint indication of where the $500 billion 
is going to come from.”
23
Dick Malow actually felt that setting a 30-year timeframe 
weakened the initiative on Capitol Hill. It was the “antithesis of the whole Apollo 
idea.  How do you spread an initiative like this over so many presidential adminis-
trations?”
24
These reactions from key Democratic leaders pointed to the difficult 
position the administration still found itself in due to the expensive policy alterna-
tive generated within the 90-Day Study.  Even some NASA officials felt that setting 
a timetable for the initiative was a mistake, believing it would drive costs up whereas 
a ‘go-as-you-pay’ program would have had a significantly reduced budgetary impact 
on an annual basis.
25
Outside the Capitol Beltway, the speech seemed to play even worse. The edito-
rial page of Salem, Oregon’s Statesman Journal contended, “A rocket trip to Mars 
begins on a foundation of common purpose and sound finances at home. A nation 
20
Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States, 11 May 1990, Remarks at the Texas A&I 
University Commencement Ceremony in Kingsville, Texas, http://bushlibrary.tamu.edu/papers/  (accessed 
2 January 2003).
21
Janet Cawley, “Bush Goal: Man on Mars by 2020,” 周e Chicago Tribune (12 May 1990); James 
Gerstenzang, “Bush Sets 2019 for Mars Landing,” 周e Philadelphia Inquirer (12 May 1990).
22
John Noble Wilford, “Bush Sets Target For Mars Landing: He Seeks to Send Astronauts to 
Planet by Year 2020,” 周e New York Times (12 May 1990).
23
Kathy Sawyer, “Bush Urges Mars Landing By 2019: Democrats Point to Money Problems,” 周e 
Washington Post (12 May 1990).
24
Malow interview.
25
O’Handley interview.
Mark  Albrecht  remembered  the  congressional  position during  the summit 
“hadn’t changed much, it pretty much remained the same—highly skeptical.” The 
participants indicated that while they were willing to provide money for studies, 
they did not believe there was enough justification for a major new program start. 
Instead, they wanted to see more detail regarding what the actual initiative would 
look like before they got fully behind the program.
17
One senior congressional aide 
recalled, “By this time, Chairman Traxler was carrying the message around that ‘we 
can’t afford this given our allocation.  We can’t do it.’  He was already negative about 
it, so coming out of there I don’t think he was convinced differently. Congress had 
already pretty much made up its mind.’”
18
SEI Hits the Road
In early May, with congressional support still very much in doubt, the Space 
Council staff began preparing for President Bush to make a major space policy 
speech. The intention was that this address would provide some much needed focus 
for the program, and at the same time allay Congressional fears that Bush was com-
mitted to a $400 billion, crash program. Mark Albrecht recalled that by this time 
NASA had “leaked their numbers out to everybody on the Hill, attempting the 
crib death of this whole initiative. We still didn’t have the full support of the space 
agency, I don’t believe even at this time NASA was embracing it. I think they were 
more worried about the space station than they were interested in setting a new 
course.” To combat this behind the scenes attack, the White House decided that a 
presidential rebuttal was needed to make it clear that the Administration was not 
talking about a crash program
19
On 11 May, ten days after the space summit, President Bush delivered the com-
mencement address at Texas A&I University. He utilized this speech as an opportu-
nity to discuss the role the national space program would play in America’s future. 
Bush told the assembled graduates that SEI formed the cornerstone of his far-reach-
ing plan for investing in America’s future, saying, “Thirty years ago, NASA was 
founded, and the space race began.  And 30 years from now I believe man will stand 
on another planet. And so, I am pleased to return to Texas today to announce a new 
Age of Exploration, with not only a goal but also a timetable: I believe that before 
Apollo celebrates the 50th anniversary of its landing on the Moon, the American 
flag should be planted on Mars.” With this speech, Bush set a timetable for SEI and 
17
Ibid.; Albrecht interview.
18
Senior Congressional Aide interview via electronic mail, Washington, DC, 15 December 2004.
19
Albrecht interview.
116
Mars Wars
117
Chapter 5:  The Battle to Save SEI
In early June, at the fourth Case for Mars conference, an alternative emerged that 
would captivate Mars enthusiasts for years to come—and would work its way into 
NASA planning years later. The most talked about presentation of the symposium 
was delivered by Martin Marietta aerospace engineers Robert Zubrin and David 
Baker. Named ‘Mars Direct,’ their system architecture included several key elements 
designed to reduce mission costs and increase scientific return, including:
•  Direct flight to and from the Martian surface (which eliminated the need 
to use Space Station Freedom)
•  No earth orbit or lunar orbit rendezvous (which eliminated the need for 
multiple spacecraft)
•  Fueling of the Earth Return Vehicle using propellant generated on Mars 
from the atmosphere
•  Extended operations on the Martian surface (up to 555 days)
Although this approach was considered a high risk alternative to the TSG architec-
ture highlighted in the 90-Day Study, Zubrin and Baker argued Mars Direct would 
only cost $20 billion—approximately one-twentieth the price tag associated with 
the space agency plan.  Because it was based on existing technologies packaged in an 
innovative system architecture, many in the space policy community viewed this as 
an option worth serious consideration.
30
In mid-June, the Bush administration set in motion a flurry of events intended to 
garner public support for SEI. These activities were commenced largely in response 
to a House Appropriations subcommittee vote to eliminate all spending associated 
with the initiative.
31
This lobbying effort began with a series of meetings to brief key 
actors within the space policy community. Held at the White House, the presenta-
tions were tailored to the corresponding audiences in a coordinated effort—with 
Vice President Quayle and Admiral Truly as the featured speakers. The message 
conveyed to a group of congressional staffers was that a failure to provide funding 
for SEI would create the impression that the United States lacked the political will to 
take risks to expand humanity’s reach into the solar system. Reporters that regularly 
Exploration Initiative Outreach Program,” National Aeronautics and  Space Administration, 31 
May 1990, National Aeronautics and Space Administration Historical Archives; “Chronology of the 
President’s Space Exploration Initiative,” National Space Council, Bush Presidential Records, George 
Bush Presidential Library.
30
J. Sebastian Sinisi, “Forum Delegates Confident,” Denver Post (11 June 1990), sec.4B.
31
James Gerstenzang, “Bush Denounces NASA Fund Cuts,” 周e Los Angeles Times (21 June 1990), 
p. 28.
that doesn’t know how to balance its budget, reduce a $3 trillion deficit, and fight 
the decay of its citizens through the effects of drugs, disrupted families and crippled 
schools will never find the money and willpower to visit the heavens. Bush has given 
us an empty challenge. We should ask him to return to Texas and repeat the same 
speech.  This time let him add a page at the beginning, one that spells out how this 
country can first get its feet back on the ground. Then we can head for Mars.”
26
The 
response was no better in The Seattle Post-Intelligencer, where the opening line of an 
opinion editorial read, “Heigh-ho, heigh-ho, it’s off to space we go!”
27
A letter the 
White House received from a local official in Kittery, Maine (just south of President 
Bush’s vacation home in Kennebunkport) suggested, “American pride will best be 
shown by meeting the needs of all the people here on Earth.  $500 billion would 
make a good start.”
28
Once again, this was not the reaction the administration was 
hoping to elicit from a presidential address on the importance of space exploration.
A few weeks later, Vice President Quayle met briefly with the person the Space 
Council hoped would be able to build confidence in SEI—Lieutenant General Tom 
Stafford (USAF-retired). Stafford was a former astronaut who commanded Apollo 
10, the ‘dress rehearsal’ for the first lunar landing mission, and the U.S. portion of 
the 1975 Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.  He had recently agreed to head the Explora-
tion Outreach Program, which had been created by NASA in response to the Space 
Council request that the agency seek out new technical approaches that might reduce 
SEI’s implementation costs. Under this outreach effort, the space agency expected 
to obtain wide-ranging ideas through public solicitations, which would be evaluated 
by the RAND Corporation—a California-based think tank. The most promising 
of these proposals, and others directly from NASA, DOD, and DOE, would then 
go to a “Synthesis Group” headed by General Stafford. This group’s recommenda-
tions would be reviewed by the NRC and reported directly to the Space Council in 
early 1991. At the meeting with Stafford, Vice President Quayle expressed his belief 
that the Synthesis Group would serve as a vehicle for generating enthusiasm and 
support for SEI. He concluded the meeting by conveying his hope that the group 
would identify at least two fundamentally different approaches to carrying out the 
initiative.
29
26
Editorial Board, “Empty Rhetoric Fuels Mars Talk,” 周e Statesman Journal (16 May 1990).
27
Henry Gay, “Reaching For Stars, Er, Mars,” 周e Seattle Post-Intelligencer (24 May 1990), sec.A15.
28
Maria S. Barth to President George Bush, 24 May 1990, Bush Presidential Records, George 
Bush Presidential Library.
29
Mark Albrecht to Vice President Dan Quayle, “Meeting with Lt. General Tom Stafford,”  
31 May 1990, Bush Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential Library; Fact Sheet, “Space 
118
Mars Wars
119
Chapter 5:  The Battle to Save SEI
Following  the  press  confer-
ence, the President took the 
stage before a crowd of 4,000 
MSFC employees.
35
President 
Bush opened his remarks by 
recalling his campaign speech 
at MSFC two and a half years 
earlier, during which he had 
vowed to launch a dynamic 
new program of exploration. 
“I’m pleased to return to Mar-
shall to report that we have 
made  good  on these  prom-
ises,”  Bush  said, “and we’ve 
done it the old-fashioned way, 
done it the American way—
step by step, program by program, all adding up to the most ambitious and far-
reaching effort since Marshall and Apollo took America to the Moon.” He criticized 
House Democrats for voting to deny funding for SEI-related concept and technol-
ogy development, stating that partisan politics had led his opponents to turn their 
backs on progress. He compared them to naysayers in the Court of Queen Isabella 
who argued against Columbus’ voyage that discovered the New World. President 
Bush stated that during the Apollo era, significant funding for the space program 
had fostered a golden age of technology and advancement—one that he hoped 
would be equaled by a permanent return to the Moon and crewed missions to Mars. 
He concluded his remarks with a challenge for Congress “to step forth with the will 
that the moment requires.  Don’t postpone greatness. History tells us what happens 
to nations that forget how to dream. The American people want us in space. So, let 
us continue the dream for our students, for ourselves, and for all humankind.”
36
The day after President Bush spoke at MSFC, the administration coordinated a 
full day of events aimed at further building support for SEI. Newspapers through-
out the nation contained opinion editorials written by supporters of the initiative, 
including: Representative Tom Lewis (R-FL) in the Orlando Sentinel; former astro-
35
Mark Albrecht to Jim Cicconi, “Background Materials, June 20 Marshall Space Flight Center 
Event,”  19 June 1990, Bush Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential Library.
36
Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States, 20 June 1990, Remarks to Employees of the 
George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, http://bushlibrary.tamu.edu /papers/ 
(accessed 2 January 2003).
President Bush at MSFC 
(NASA History Division, Folder 12601)
covered NASA were told that SEI would produce significant economic, technical, 
and educational benefits for the nation. Finally, industry and academic leaders were 
informed that SEI would be part of an overarching administration strategy designed 
to foster innovation by permanently extending the research and experimentation tax 
credit and reducing regulatory burdens on corporations.
32
These briefings were immediately followed by a major presidential address on 
space policy at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. 
After attending a fundraising luncheon for Governor Guy Hunt, President Bush 
arrived at the center for a tour. This included a visit to the Hubble Space Tele-
scope (HST) Orbital Verification Engineering Control Room, where a NASA team 
was coordinating the adjustment and final checkout of the groundbreaking orbital 
observatory.
33
Bush then conducted a full press conference on the center grounds.  
Despite the setting, the majority of the event was spent detailing the American 
response to ongoing unrest in the Middle East. However, Bush was asked a few 
questions regarding the national space program, among them one directed at SEI:
Q: A question about space.  How serious are you about this lunar base and 
Mars mission proposal?  Would you go so far as to veto the bill that con-
tains NASA appropriations if Congress decides to delete all the money?
A: I haven’t even contemplated any veto strategy.  I’d like to get what I 
want.  I think it’s in the national interest.  I think that the United States 
must remain way out front on science and technology; and this broad pro-
gram that I’ve outlined, seed money that I’ve asked for, should be sup-
ported.  But I think it’s way too early to discuss a veto strategy.  We took 
one on the chops in a House committee the other day, and I’ve got to turn 
around now and fight for what I believe.
34
32
Briefing, “White House Briefings on the Space Exploration Initiative,” 8 May 1990, Bush 
Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential Library; Charles Bacarisse and Sihan Siv to Fred 
McClure, “Briefing for Key Congressional Staff on NASA’s Space Exploration Initiative,”  10 May 
1990, Bush Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential Library; Charles Bacarisse to Bob Grady, 
“Briefings for Key Constituent Groups on the Space Exploration Initiative,”  5 June 1990, Bush 
Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential Library; Charles Bacarisse and Sichan Siv to Cece 
Kramer, 23 May 1990, Bush Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential Library.
33
“Tour of Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Verification Engineering Control Center,” Ede Holiday, 
20 June 1990, Bush Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential Library.
34
Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States, 20 June 1990, 周e President’s News Conference 
in Huntsville, Alabama,  http://bushlibrary.tamu.edu/papers/ (accessed 2 January 2003).
120
Mars Wars
121
Chapter 5:  The Battle to Save SEI
Two days after the HST revelation, NASA was forced to ground the entire space 
shuttle fleet because the Columbia and Atlantis had developed deadly hydrogen 
leaks. NASA was forced to admit that they did not know the cause of the leaks, 
although one possibility was a misalignment between the external tank and the 
orbiter vehicles. Program managers announced that expert teams of engineers were 
working feverishly to solve the problem before at least two missions were postponed 
to make way for the upcoming launch of the Ulysses spacecraft—a probe designed 
to study the sun. Coming on the heels of the HST announcement, this effectively 
killed any energy generated by recent administration activities designed to garner 
support for SEI.
42
The Washington Post opined, “the failure of the telescope, which 
two months ago rode into space amid great fanfare in the hold of a Space Shuttle, 
led more than a few Americans to wonder whether their country can get anything 
right anymore. The questioning became even more poignant…when the National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration announced that the shuttles, too, would be 
grounded indefinitely because of vexing and dangerous fuel leakages.  [These prob-
lems] may foster beliefs that the United States is a sunset power, incapable of repeat-
ing its technological feats of the past.”
43
On Capitol Hill, Dick Malow recalled 
thinking that these problems greatly hampered the administration’s ability to make 
a case for SEI. “There were a lot of other things on NASA’s plate and that hiccup 
certainly was a detractor. Given the budget environment, Hubble became the focus 
and SEI tended to get pushed back” on the congressional agenda.
44
During this same period, the House Appropriations Committee released its 
mark-up of NASA’s budget. Although the space agency would receive a significant 
overall increase of $2.1 billion ($800 million less than the president’s request), the 
entire budget for SEI was eliminated.  Fears that had been raised during budget 
hearings in April were confirmed. The committee had surgically removed all new 
monies associated with the initiative (see Table on next page).
Instrument in Space is Crippled by Flaw in a Mirror,” 周e New York Times (27 June 1990), sec.A1; 
Bob Davis, “NASA Finds Hubble Mirror is Defective,” 周e Wall Street Journal (28 June 1990).
42
Joyce Price, “Chief Calls NASA Funding ‘Crucial for U.S. Survival,” 周e Washington Times (3 
July 1990).
43
John Burgess, “Can U.S. Get 周ings Right Anymore?  Hubble Telescope, Space Shuttle Problems 
Raise Questions About American Technology,” 周e Washington Post (3 July 1990).
44
Malow interview.
naut Buzz Aldrin in the Los Angeles Times; Dartmouth University Professor Robert 
Jastrow in the Baltimore Sun; and former astronaut Eugene Cernan in the Hous-
ton Chronicle.
37
On Capitol Hill, Representatives Bob Walker and Newt Gingrich 
hosted a press conference praising Bush for his leadership with regard to the Ameri-
can space program. On the Senate floor, Senator Jake Garn formally introduced 
the program and Senators Bob Dole, Phil Gramm, and Malcolm Wallop spoke 
on SEI’s behalf. In the late afternoon Vice President Quayle appeared in a series 
of satellite interviews in targeted states, including California, Florida, Texas, and 
Virginia. Finally, the Republican National Committee released radio actualities in 
key districts around the country.
38,39
By mid-June, there was a feeling that “SEI was 
gaining momentum.”
40
Losing Faith in NASA
Despite any progress that may have been made during mid-June, the emergence 
of a series of crises at the end of the month halted any momentum the administra-
tion had gained. On 26 June, NASA held a press conference to reveal that its engi-
neers had discovered a crippling flaw in the main light gathering mirrors of the $1.5 
billion HST. The space agency reported that this defect would mean the largest and 
most complex civilian orbiting observatory ever launched would not be able to view 
the depths of space until a permanent correction could be made—which would 
likely have to wait two to three years for an astronaut visit with newly manufactured 
parts. Although many of the instruments aboard the HST would still be functional, 
the impacted wide-field and planetary camera would be inoperable (reducing by 
40% the planned scientific work of the platform). Project managers announced they 
suspected the problem was in one of two precisely ground mirrors, although they 
were not sure which one. The two mirrors had tested perfectly on Earth, but once in 
orbit, they failed to perform together as expected—they were not tested together on 
the ground because of the huge potential expense and inability to replicate a zero-g 
environment. Associate Administrator for Space Science Dr. Lennard Fisk disclosed 
that the agency was forming a review board to investigate the problem.
41
37
Earlier in the week, Roll Call had dedicated an entire issue to the space program, with opposing 
views expressed on SEI from Senator Jake Garn (pro) and Senator Al Gore (con).
38
A radio actuality is a group of sound bites sent out to radio stations to be used in news reports.
39
“Moon/Mars Initiative,” 19 June 1990, Bush Presidential Records, George Bush Presidential 
Library.
40
O’Handley interview.
41
Warren E. Leary, “Hubble Telescope Loses Large Part of Optical Ability: Most Complex 
122
Mars Wars
123
Chapter 5:  The Battle to Save SEI
seemed to be grounded all the time with fuel leaks; the mirror on the Hubble tele-
scope couldn’t focus; and the agency was pushing a space station design that was so 
overblown it looked as if we were asking to launch a big white elephant. The mood 
at the Space Council was grim…. I was searching for a solution for NASA.”
49
On 
11 July, Vice President Quayle invited a group of space experts (including Tom 
Paine, Gene Cernan, Dr. Bruce Murray from the California Institute of Technology, 
and Dr. Hans Mark of the University of Texas) aboard Air Force Two for a meeting 
to discuss the systemic problems with NASA. He asked for opinions regarding the 
appropriate actions, if any, the administration should take. During the meeting, 
an idea emerged to establish a task force to examine how the space program could 
be restructured to better support an era of sustained long-term space operations. 
Quayle liked the idea.
Six days later, Vice President Quayle hosted a second meeting at the White House 
with senior administration officials Bill Kristol, Mark Albrecht, Admiral Truly, and 
Chief of Staff Sununu to discuss procedures to create such a panel. Quayle recalled 
in his memoirs:
I wanted [the study] to get NASA moving again. If that was going to 
happen, then the commission had to have the authority to look into every 
aspect of the space agency. 周e result was a long negotiation about the 
commission’s scope. Truly’s original position was that it should look only 
at the future management structure of NASA—that is, what would come 
after the space station was built. “No,” I said, “it will look at the current 
management situation.” Truly next tried to exempt programs from review, 
and I said “No, programs will be reviewed as well.” He asked that the space 
station be “off the table” and said that we would all be better served if both 
it and the Moon-Mars missions were off limits to the commission. In other 
words, the commission shouldn’t pay attention to all the most important 
things we were trying to do during the next couple of decades.  “I’m sorry,” 
I said to Truly, “but everything is on the table, and let the chips fall where 
they may….” I tried to soothe Truly’s feelings by making the commission 
report through him to me.
By the end of the meeting, Quayle had directed Truly to put together an outside 
task force to consider the future long-term direction of the space program. That 
same afternoon the White House announced the creation of the board. On 25 
49
Quayle, Standing Firm, p. 184.
Space Station (advanced programs)
$20M
Advanced Launch System
$40M
Heavy-Lift Vehicle
$10M
LifeSat/Centrifuge
$8M
Lunar Observer
$15M
Exploration Mission Studies
$37M
Pathfinder Program
$154M
Civil Space Technology Initiative
$45M
TOTAL
$329M
The budget report indicated that the Space Shuttle and Space Station programs 
should remain NASA’s top priorities. It stated that even if additional funds became 
available in the future, they should be directed toward these important programs 
rather than being targeted at SEI.
45
Chairman Traxler was quoted in the Washing-
ton Post saying, “We didn’t have the money.”
46
The Senate Commerce Commit-
tee promptly followed suit with the release of an authorization bill that similarly 
eliminated funding for SEI. Senator Al Gore, who authored the legislation, said he 
feared that funding the initiative would endanger on-going efforts, in particular the 
Mission to Planet Earth.
47
By early July, NASA was clearly reeling from this series of setbacks—with SEI 
a clear casualty, and in some respects a cause, of the outspoken criticism focused 
on the agency. The view within the White House was that the space program had 
been terribly crippled.
48
In his memoirs, Vice President Quayle wrote, “The Shuttle 
45
U.S. House of Representatives, 101st Congress, 2d sess., “Report 101-556: Departments of 
Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, and Independent Agencies Appropriations 
Bill, 1991,” 26 June 1990; U.S. House of Representatives, 101st Congress, 2d sess., “H.R. 5158,” 26 
June 1990.
46
Dan Morgan, “Panel Boosts NASA Funds 17 Percent: Moon-Mars Mission Cut $300 Million, 
Higher-Priority Items Backed,” 周e Washington Post (27 June 1990), sec.A4.
47
James W. Brosnan, “Senate Panel Cuts Funds for Mars Trip From NASA Budget,” 周e Commercial 
Appeal (28 June 1990), sec.A12.
48
Albrecht interview.
SEI Budget Cuts
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested