pdf viewer in c# windows application : Copy image from pdf preview SDK application service wpf html windows dnn SP800-830-part1400

Special Publication 800-83
Sponsored by the 
Department of Homeland Security
Guide to Malware Incident 
Prevention and Handling 
Recommendations of the National Institute 
of Standards and Technology 
Peter Mell 
Karen Kent 
Joseph Nusbaum 
Copy image from pdf preview - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
paste jpg into pdf; how to cut picture from pdf file
Copy image from pdf preview - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy pdf image; how to paste picture on pdf
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP.NET to reduce or minimize original PDF document size Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or
how to copy a pdf image into a word document; how to copy pdf image into powerpoint
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
NET. An independent .NET framework component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF control installed. Access
copy and paste image from pdf to pdf; paste jpeg into pdf
Guide to Malware Incident Prevention  
and Handling 
Recommendations of the National  
Institute of Standards and Technology 
Peter Mell 
Karen Kent 
Joseph Nusbaum 
NIST Special Publication 800-83 
C  O  M  P  U  T  E  R      S  E  C  U  R  I  T  Y
Computer Security Division 
Information Technology Laboratory 
National Institute of Standards and Technology 
Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8930 
November 2005 
U.S. Department of Commerce 
Carlos M. Gutierrez, Secretary 
Technology Administration 
Michelle O'Neill, Acting Under Secretary of 
Commerce for Technology 
National Institute of Standards and Technology
William A. Jeffrey, Director 
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
Get Preview From File. You may get document preview image from an existing Word file in C#.net. You may get document preview image from stream object in C#.net.
how to copy pictures from pdf to powerpoint; how to copy pdf image to powerpoint
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
You may get document preview image from an existing PowerPoint file in C#.net. You may get document preview image from stream object in C#.net.
how to copy and paste a pdf image; copy images from pdf to powerpoint
G
UIDE TO 
M
ALWARE 
I
NCIDENT 
P
REVENTION AND 
H
ANDLING
Reports on Computer Systems Technology 
The Information Technology Laboratory (ITL) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology 
(NIST) promotes the U.S. economy and public welfare by providing technical leadership for the nation’s 
measurement and standards infrastructure.  ITL develops tests, test methods, reference data, proof of 
concept implementations, and technical analysis to advance the development and productive use of 
information technology.  ITL’s responsibilities include the development of technical, physical, 
administrative, and management standards and guidelines for the cost-effective security and privacy of 
sensitive unclassified information in Federal computer systems.  This Special Publication 800-series 
reports on ITL’s research, guidance, and outreach efforts in computer security and its collaborative 
activities with industry, government, and academic organizations. 
Certain commercial entities, equipment, or materials may be identified in this 
document in order to describe an experimental procedure or concept adequately.  
Such identification is not intended to imply recommendation or endorsement by the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology, nor is it intended to imply that the 
entities, materials, or equipment are necessarily the best available for the purpose. 
National Institute of Standards and Technology Special Publication 800-83 
Natl. Inst. Stand. Technol. Spec. Publ. 800-83, 101 pages (November 2005) 
ii
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Convert PDF to Tiff image (.tif, .tiff). • Convert PDF to HTML (.htm, .html). PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document in preview.
copy paste picture pdf; how to copy pdf image
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
An independent .NET framework viewer component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. Able
copy picture from pdf to word; how to copy picture from pdf
G
UIDE TO 
M
ALWARE 
I
NCIDENT 
P
REVENTION AND 
H
ANDLING
Acknowledgments 
The authors, Peter Mell of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Karen Kent 
and Joseph Nusbaum of Booz Allen Hamilton, wish to thank their colleagues who reviewed drafts of this 
document and contributed to its technical content.  The authors would particularly like to acknowledge 
Tim Grance and Murugiah Souppaya of NIST and Lucinda Gagliano, Thomas Goff, and Pius Uzamere of 
Booz Allen Hamilton for their keen and insightful assistance throughout the development of the 
document.  The authors would also like to express their thanks to security experts Mike Danseglio 
(Microsoft), Kurt Dillard (Microsoft), Michael Gerdes (Getronics RedSiren Security Solutions), Peter 
Szor (Symantec), Miles Tracy (U.S. Federal Reserve System), and Lenny Zeltser (Gemini Systems LLC), 
as well as representatives from the General Accounting Office, and for their particularly valuable 
comments and suggestions. 
The National Institute of Standards and Technology would also like to express its appreciation and thanks 
to the Department of Homeland Security for its sponsorship and support of NIST Special Publication 800-
83. 
Trademark Information 
All product names are registered trademarks or trademarks of their respective companies. 
iii
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# Remove PDF image in preview without adobe
copy image from pdf to word; how to copy picture from pdf to powerpoint
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF document by PDF bookmark and outlines in VB.NET. Independent component for splitting PDF document in preview without using external PDF control.
paste picture into pdf preview; copying a pdf image to word
G
UIDE TO 
M
ALWARE 
I
NCIDENT 
P
REVENTION AND 
H
ANDLING
Table of Contents 
Executive Summary............................................................................................................ES-1
1.
Introduction...................................................................................................................1-1
1.1
Authority................................................................................................................ 1-1
1.2
Purpose and Scope............................................................................................... 1-1
1.3
Audience............................................................................................................... 1-1
1.4
Document Structure .............................................................................................. 1-1
2.
Malware Categories.......................................................................................................2-1
2.1
Viruses.................................................................................................................. 2-1
2.1.1
Compiled Viruses.......................................................................................2-1
2.1.2
Interpreted Viruses.....................................................................................2-2
2.1.3
Virus Obfuscation Techniques....................................................................2-3
2.2
Worms................................................................................................................... 2-3
2.3
Trojan Horses........................................................................................................ 2-4
2.4
Malicious Mobile Code.......................................................................................... 2-5
2.5
Blended Attacks .................................................................................................... 2-5
2.6
Tracking Cookies................................................................................................... 2-6
2.7
Attacker Tools....................................................................................................... 2-6
2.7.1
Backdoors..................................................................................................2-7
2.7.2
Keystroke Loggers.....................................................................................2-7
2.7.3
Rootkits......................................................................................................2-7
2.7.4
Web Browser Plug-Ins................................................................................2-8
2.7.5
E-Mail Generators......................................................................................2-8
2.7.6
Attacker Toolkits.........................................................................................2-8
2.8
Non-Malware Threats............................................................................................ 2-9
2.8.1
Phishing.....................................................................................................2-9
2.8.2
Virus Hoaxes..............................................................................................2-9
2.9
History of Malware............................................................................................... 2-10
2.10
Summary............................................................................................................. 2-11
3.
Malware Incident Prevention........................................................................................3-1
3.1
Policy .................................................................................................................... 3-1
3.2
Awareness............................................................................................................ 3-2
3.3
Vulnerability Mitigation........................................................................................... 3-4
3.3.1
Patch Management....................................................................................3-5
3.3.2
Least Privilege ...........................................................................................3-5
3.3.3
Other Host Hardening Measures................................................................3-5
3.4
Threat Mitigation.................................................................................................... 3-6
3.4.1
Antivirus Software......................................................................................3-6
3.4.2
Spyware Detection and Removal Utilities...................................................3-9
3.4.3
Intrusion Prevention Systems...................................................................3-11
3.4.4
Firewalls and Routers...............................................................................3-12
3.4.5
Application Settings..................................................................................3-14
3.5
Summary............................................................................................................. 3-17
4.
Malware Incident Response..........................................................................................4-1
4.1
Preparation............................................................................................................ 4-1
iv
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Supports adding text to PDF in preview without adobe reader installed in ASP.NET. Powerful .NET PDF edit control allows modify existing scanned PDF text.
copy images from pdf to word; copy images from pdf
G
UIDE TO 
M
ALWARE 
I
NCIDENT 
P
REVENTION AND 
H
ANDLING
4.1.1
Building and Maintaining Malware-Related Skills.......................................4-2
4.1.2
Facilitating Communication and Coordination ............................................4-3
4.1.3
Acquiring Tools and Resources..................................................................4-3
4.2
Detection............................................................................................................... 4-5
4.2.1
Understanding Signs of Malware Incidents.................................................4-5
4.2.2
Identifying Malware Incident Characteristics...............................................4-8
4.2.3
Prioritizing Incident Response....................................................................4-9
4.3
Containment........................................................................................................4-10
4.3.1
Containment Through User Participation..................................................4-10
4.3.2
Containment Through Automated Detection.............................................4-11
4.3.3
Containment Through Disabling Services................................................. 4-13
4.3.4
Containment Through Disabling Connectivity...........................................4-13
4.3.5
Containment Recommendations.............................................................. 4-14
4.3.6
Identification of Infected Hosts .................................................................4-15
4.4
Eradication..........................................................................................................4-19
4.5
Recovery............................................................................................................. 4-21
4.6
Lessons Learned................................................................................................. 4-21
4.7
Summary............................................................................................................. 4-22
5.
The Future of Malware ..................................................................................................5-1
List of Appendices 
Appendix A— Containment Technology Summary............................................................A-1
Appendix B— Malware Incident Handling Scenarios.........................................................B-1
B.1
Scenario Questions...............................................................................................B-1
B.2
Scenarios..............................................................................................................B-2
Appendix C— Glossary........................................................................................................C-1
Appendix D— Acronyms......................................................................................................D-1
Appendix E— Print Resources.............................................................................................E-1
Appendix F— Online Resources..........................................................................................F-1
Appendix G— Index..............................................................................................................G-1
List of Figures 
Figure 4-1.  Incident Response Life Cycle...............................................................................4-1
List of Tables 
Table 2-1.  Differentiating Malware Categories......................................................................2-12
v
G
UIDE TO 
M
ALWARE 
I
NCIDENT 
P
REVENTION AND 
H
ANDLING
Table 4-1.  Tools and Resources for Malware Incident Handlers.............................................4-4
Table 4-2.  Likely Malware Indications ....................................................................................4-7
Table A-1.  Typical Effectiveness of Prevention and Containment Technologies.....................A-2
Table A-2.  Typical Effectiveness Against Simple Threats in Managed Environments.............A-5
Table A-3.  Typical Effectiveness Against Complex Threats in Managed Environments..........A-6
Table A-4.  Typical Effectiveness Against Simple Threats in Non-Managed Environments.....A-7
Table A-5.  Typical Effectiveness Against Complex Threats in Non-Managed Environments..A-8
vi
G
UIDE TO 
M
ALWARE 
I
NCIDENT 
P
REVENTION AND 
H
ANDLING
Executive Summary 
Malware, also known as malicious code and malicious software, refers to a program that is inserted into a 
system, usually covertly, with the intent of compromising the confidentiality, integrity, or availability of 
the victim’s data, applications, or operating system or otherwise annoying or disrupting the victim.  
Malware has become the most significant external threat to most systems, causing widespread damage 
and disruption, and necessitating extensive recovery efforts within most organizations.  Spyware—
malware intended to violate a user’s privacy—has also become a major concern to organizations.  
Although privacy-violating malware has been in use for many years, it has become much more 
widespread recently, with spyware invading many systems to monitor personal activities and conduct 
financial fraud.  Organizations also face similar threats from a few forms of non-malware threats that are 
often associated with malware.  One of these forms that has become commonplace is phishing, which is 
using deceptive computer-based means to trick individuals into disclosing sensitive information.  Another 
common form is virus hoaxes, which are false warnings of new malware threats. 
This publication provides recommendations for improving an organization’s malware incident prevention 
measures.  It also gives extensive recommendations for enhancing an organization’s existing incident 
response capability so that it is better prepared to handle malware incidents, particularly widespread ones.  
The recommendations address several major forms of malware, including viruses, worms, Trojan horses, 
malicious mobile code, blended attacks, spyware tracking cookies, and attacker tools such as backdoors 
and rootkits.  The recommendations encompass various transmission mechanisms, including network 
services (e.g., e-mail, Web browsing, file sharing) and removable media. 
Implementing the following recommendations should facilitate more efficient and effective malware 
incident response activities for Federal departments and agencies. 
Organizations should develop and implement an approach to malware incident prevention. 
Organizations should plan and implement an approach to malware incident prevention based on the attack 
vectors that are most likely to be used, both currently and in the near future.  Because the effectiveness of 
prevention techniques may vary depending on the environment (i.e., a technique that works well in a 
managed environment might be ineffective in a non-managed environment), organizations should choose 
preventive methods that are well-suited to their environment and systems.  An organization’s approach to 
malware incident prevention should incorporate policy considerations, awareness programs for users and 
information technology (IT) staff, and vulnerability and threat mitigation efforts. 
Organizations should ensure that their policies support the prevention of malware incidents. 
An organization’s policy statements should be used as the basis for additional malware prevention efforts, 
such as user and IT staff awareness, vulnerability mitigation, and security tool deployment and 
configuration.  If an organization does not state malware prevention considerations clearly in its policy, it 
is unlikely to perform malware prevention activities consistently and effectively.  Malware prevention–
related policy should be as general as possible to allow flexibility in policy implementation and to reduce 
the need for frequent policy updates, but should also be specific enough to make the intent and scope of 
the policy clear.  Malware prevention–related policy should include provisions related to remote 
workers—both those using systems controlled by the organization and those using systems outside of the 
organization’s control (e.g., contractor computers, employees’ home computers, business partners’ 
computers, mobile devices). 
ES-1 
G
UIDE TO 
M
ALWARE 
I
NCIDENT 
P
REVENTION AND 
H
ANDLING
Organizations should incorporate malware incident prevention and handling into their awareness 
programs. 
Organizations should implement awareness programs that include guidance to users on malware incident 
prevention.  All users should be made aware of the ways that malware spreads, the risks that malware 
poses, the inability of technical controls to prevent all incidents, and the importance of users in preventing 
incidents.  Awareness programs should also make users aware of the policy and procedures that apply to 
malware incident handling, such as how to detect malware on a computer, how to report suspected 
infections, and what users might need to do to assist incident handlers.  In addition, the organization 
should conduct awareness activities for IT staff involved in malware incident prevention and provide 
training on specific tasks. 
Organizations should have vulnerability mitigation capabilities to help prevent malware incidents. 
Organizations should have documented policy, processes, and procedures to mitigate operating system 
and application vulnerabilities that malware might exploit.  Because a vulnerability usually can be 
mitigated through one or more methods, organizations should use an appropriate combination of 
techniques, including patch management, application of security configuration guides and checklists, and 
additional host hardening measures so that effective techniques are readily available for various types of 
vulnerabilities. 
Organizations should have threat mitigation capabilities to assist in containing malware incidents. 
Organizations should perform threat mitigation efforts to detect and stop malware before it can affect its 
targets.  The most commonly used threat mitigation technical control is antivirus software; NIST strongly 
recommends that organizations deploy antivirus software on all systems for which satisfactory antivirus 
software is available.  To mitigate spyware threats, either antivirus software with the ability to recognize 
spyware threats or specialized spyware detection and removal utilities should be used on all systems for 
which satisfactory software is available.  Additional technical controls that are helpful for malware threat 
mitigation include intrusion prevention systems, firewalls, routers, and certain application configuration 
settings.  The System and Information Integrity family of security controls in NIST Special Publication 
800-53, Recommended Security Controls for Federal Information Systems, recommends having malware 
and spyware protection mechanisms on various types of hosts, including workstations, servers, mobile 
computing devices, firewalls, e-mail servers, and remote access servers. 
Organizations should have a robust incident response process capability that addresses malware 
incident handling. 
As defined in NIST Special Publication 800-61, Computer Security Incident Handling Guide, the incident 
response process has four main phases:  preparation, detection and analysis, 
containment/‌eradication/‌recovery, and post-incident activity.  Some major recommendations for malware 
incident handling, by phase or subphase, are as follows: 
Preparation.  Organizations should perform preparatory measures to ensure that they can 
respond effectively to malware incidents.  Recommended actions include— 
– 
Developing malware-specific incident handling policies and procedures 
– 
Regularly conducting malware-oriented training and exercises 
– 
Designating a few individuals or a small team, in advance, to be responsible for coordinating 
the organization’s responses to malware incidents 
ES-2 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested