pdf viewer in c# windows application : How to copy and paste a pdf image into a word document Library application class asp.net html .net ajax sp8110-part1410

NIST Special Publication 811    2008 Edition
Ambler Thompson and Barry N. Taylor
Guide for the
Use of the International
System of Units (SI)
SI
m
A
K
cd
mol
kg
s
How to copy and paste a pdf image into a word document - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
paste image into pdf in preview; how to copy image from pdf to word
How to copy and paste a pdf image into a word document - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
copy picture from pdf reader; how to copy and paste image from pdf to word
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into another PDF The portable document format, known as PDF document, is a widely-used form of file that
cut and paste pdf images; cut picture pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
VB.NET: Copy and Paste PDF Pages. VB.NET programming example below will show you how to copy pages from a PDF file and paste into another one.
copy image from pdf acrobat; cut and paste pdf image
NIST Special Publication 811 
2008 Edition 
Guide for the Use of the International 
System of Units (SI) 
Ambler Thompson 
Technology Services
and 
Barry N. Taylor 
Physics Laboratory 
National Institute of Standards and Technology 
Gaithersburg, MD 20899 
(Supersedes NIST Special Publication 811, 1995 Edition, April 1995) 
March 2008 
U.S. Department of Commerce 
Carlos M. Gutierrez, Secretary 
National Institute of Standards and Technology 
James M. Turner, Acting Director 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF on. Able to edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF document image. Extract
how to paste picture on pdf; how to cut picture from pdf file
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
how to copy image from pdf to word; how to copy images from pdf
National Institute of Standards and Technology Special Publication 811, 2008 Edition 
(Supersedes NIST Special Publication 811, April 1995 Edition) 
Natl. Inst. Stand. Technol. Spec. Publ. 811, 2008 Ed., 85 pages (March 2008; 2
nd
printing November 2008) 
CODEN: NSPUE3 
Note on 2
nd
printing:  This 2
nd
printing dated November 2008 of NIST SP811 
corrects a number of minor typographical errors present in the 1
st
printing dated 
March 2008. 
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET. Ability to put image into defined location on PDF page.
copy picture to pdf; copy paste image pdf
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
A convenient C#.NET control able to turn all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting.
how to copy picture from pdf to word; copy image from pdf reader
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
Preface 
The International System of Units, universally abbreviated SI (from the French Le Système 
International d’Unités), is the modern metric system of measurement. Long the dominant measurement 
system used in science, the SI is becoming the dominant measurement system used in international 
commerce. 
The Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of August 1988 [Public Law (PL) 100-418] changed 
the name of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) to the National Institute of Standards and Technology 
(NIST) and gave to NIST the added task of helping U.S. industry increase its competitiveness in the global 
marketplace. It also recognized the rapidly expanding use of the SI by amending the Metric Conversion Act 
of 1975 (PL 94-168). In particular, section 5164 (Metric Usage) of PL 100-418 designates 
the metric system of measurement as the preferred system of weights and measures for United 
States trade and commerce . . .  
and requires that  
each Federal agency, by a date certain and to the extent economically feasible by the end of 
fiscal year 1992, use the metric system of measurement in its procurements, grants, and other 
business-related activities, except to the extent that such use is impractical or is likely to cause 
significant inefficiencies or loss of markets for United States firms . . . 
In January 1991, the Department of Commerce issued an addition to the Code of Federal 
Regulations entitled “Metric Conversion Policy for Federal Agencies,” 15 CFR 1170, which removes the 
voluntary aspect of the conversion to the SI for Federal agencies and gives in detail the policy for that 
conversion. Executive Order 12770, issued in July 1991, reinforces that policy by providing Presidential 
authority and direction for the use of the metric system of measurement by Federal agencies and 
departments.* 
The Metric Act of 1866 allowed use of the metric system of measurement in the United States. In 
2007, the 1866 law was amended by PL 110–69, also known as the America COMPETES Act.  This 
amendment updated the definition of the metric system:   
“The metric system of measurement shall be defined as the International System of Units as 
established in 1960, and subsequently maintained, by the General Conference of Weights and 
Measures, and as interpreted or modified for the United States by the Secretary of Commerce.” 
The America COMPETES Act also repealed separate legislation on electrical and photometric units, 
as they are included in SI, and it established UTC (Coordinated Universal Time) as the basis for standard 
time in the United States. 
Because of the importance of the SI to both science and technology, NIST has over the years 
published documents to assist NIST authors and other users of the SI, especially to inform them of changes 
in the SI and in SI usage. For example, this third edition of the Guide replaces the second edition (1995) 
prepared by Barry N. Taylor, which replaced the first edition (1991) prepared by Arthur O. McCoubrey. 
That edition, in turn, replaced NBS Letter Circular LC 1120 (1979), which was widely distributed in the 
United States and which was incorporated into the NBS Communications Manual for Scientific, Technical, 
and Public Information, a manual  of instructions issued in 1980 for  the preparation of technical 
publications at NBS.  
* Executive Order 12770 was published in the Federal Register, Vol. 56, No. 145, p. 35801, July 29, 1991; 15 CFR 1170 was 
originally published in the Federal Register, Vol. 56, No. 1, p. 160, January 2, 1991, as 15 CFR Part 19, but was redesignated 
15 CFR 1170.
iii 
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink The magnification of the original PDF page size with specified resolution and save it into stream
copy image from pdf acrobat; how to copy pictures from a pdf file
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
textMgr.AddString(msg, font, pageIndex, cursor, fontColor); // Output the new document. value, The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
paste image into pdf preview; paste image in pdf file
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
It is quite natural for NIST to publish documents on the use of the SI. First, NIST coordinates the 
Federal Government policy on the conversion to the SI by Federal agencies and on the use of the SI by U.S. 
industry and the public. Second, NIST provides official U.S. representation in the various international 
bodies established by the Meter Convention (Convention du Mètre, often called the Treaty of the Meter in 
the United States), which was signed in Paris in 1875 by seventeen countries, including the United States 
(51 countries are now members of the Convention). 
One body created by the Meter Convention is the General Conference on Weights and Measures 
(CGPM,  Conférence  Générale  des  Poids  et  Mesures),  a  formal  diplomatic  organization.**  The 
International System was in fact established by the 11th CGPM in 1960, and it is the responsibility of the 
CGPM to ensure that the SI is widely disseminated and that it reflects the latest advances in science and 
technology. 
This 2008 edition of the Guide corrects a small number of misprints in the 1995 edition, incorporates 
the modifications made to the SI by the CGPM and CIPM in the last 13 years, and updates the 
bibliography. Some minor changes in format have also been made in an attempt to improve the ease of use 
of the Guide. 
In keeping with U.S. and International practice (see Sec. C.2), this Guide uses the dot on the line as 
the decimal marker. In addition this Guide utilizes the American spellings “meter,” “liter,” and “deka” 
rather than “metre,” “litre,” and “deca,” and the name “metric ton” rather than “tonne.” 
March 2008 
Ambler Thompson 
Barry N. Taylor 
__________________ 
** See Ref. [1] or [2] for a brief description of the various bodies established by the Meter Convention: The International Bureau of 
Weights and Measures (BIPM, Bureau International des Poids et Mesures), the International Committee for Weights and Measures 
(CIPM, Comité International des Poids et Mesures ), and the CGPM. The BIPM, which is located in Sèvres, a suburb of Paris, France, 
and which has the task of ensuring worldwide unification of physical measurements, operates under the exclusive supervision of the 
CIPM, which itself comes under the authority of the CGPM. In addition to a complete description of the SI, Refs. [1] and [2] also give 
the various CGPM and CIPM resolutions on which it is based. 
iv 
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
Check List for Reviewing Manuscripts
The following check list is intended to help NIST authors review the conformity of their 
manuscripts with proper SI usage and the basic principles concerning quantities and units. (The chapter or 
section numbers in parentheses indicate where additional information may be found.) 
(1)  †
Only SI units and those units recognized for use with the SI are used to express the values of 
quantities. Equivalent values in other units are given in parentheses following values in 
acceptable units only when deemed necessary for the intended audience. (See Chapter 2.) 
(2) † 
Abbreviations such as sec (for either s or second), cc (for either cm
3
or cubic centimeter), or 
mps (for either m/s or meter per second), are avoided and only standard unit symbols, SI 
prefix symbols, unit names, and SI prefix names are used. (See Sec. 6.1.8.) 
(3) †
The combinations of letters “ppm,” “ppb,” and “ppt,” and the terms part per million, part per 
billion, and part per trillion, and the like, are not used to express the values of quantities. The 
following forms, for example, are used instead: 2.0 µL/L or 2.0 × 10
–6 
V, 4.3 nm/m or 
4.3 × 10
–9 
l, 7 ps/s or 7 × 10
−12 
t, where V, l, and t are, respectively, the quantity symbols for 
volume, length, and time.  (See Sec. 7.10.3.)  
(4)
†
Unit symbols (or names) are not modified by the addition of subscripts or other information.  
The following forms, for example, are used instead.  (See Secs. 7.4 and 7.10.2.) 
V
max 
= 1000 V  
but not:    V = 1000 V
max 
a mass fraction of 10 %  
but not:    10 % (m/m) or 10 % (by weight) 
(5) †
Statements such as “the length l
1
exceeds the length l
2
by 0.2 %” are avoided because it is 
recognized that the symbol % represents simply the number 0.01. Instead, forms such as 
“l
= l
2
(1 + 0.2 %)” or “Δ = 0.2 %” are used, where Δ is defined by the relation 
Δ = (l
1
− l
2
)/l
2
 (See Sec. 7.10.2.) 
(6) †
Information is not mixed with unit symbols (or names). For example, the form “the water 
content is 20 mL/kg” is used and not “20 mL H
2
O/kg” or “20 mL of water/kg.” (See 
Sec. 7.5.) 
(7) † 
It is clear to which unit symbol a numerical value belongs and which mathematical operation 
applies to the value of a quantity because forms such as the following are used. (See 
Sec. 7.7.) 
35 cm × 48 cm  
but not:   35 × 48 cm 
1MHz to 10 MHz or (1 to 10) MHz  but not:   1 MHz – 10 MHz or 1 to 10 MHz 
20 ºC to 30 ºC or (20 to 30) ºC  
but not:    20 ºC – 30 ºC or 20 to 30 ºC 
123 g ± 2 g or (123 ± 2) g  
but not:   123 ± 2 g 
70 % ± 5 % or (70 ± 5) %  
but not:   70 ± 5 % 
240 × (1 ± 10 %) V 
but not:   240 V ± 10 % (one cannot add  
240 V and 10 %) 
(8)
†
Unit symbols and unit names are not mixed and mathematical operations are not applied to 
unit names. For example, only forms such as kg/m
3
, kg · m
−3
, or kilogram per cubic meter 
are used and not forms such as kilogram/m
3
, kg/cubic meter, kilogram/cubic meter, kg per 
m
3
, or kilogram per meter
3
. (See Secs. 6.1.7, 9.5, and 9.8.) 
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
vi 
(9) †
Values of quantities are expressed in acceptable units using Arabic numerals and the 
symbols for the units. (See Sec. 7.6.) 
m = 5 kg  
but not:   
m = five kilograms or m = five kg 
the current was 15 A  
but not:   
the current was 15 amperes. 
(10) †
There is a space between the numerical value and unit symbol, even when the value is used 
as an adjective, except in the case of superscript units for plane angle. (See Sec. 7.2.) 
a 25 kg sphere  
but not:  
a 25-kg sphere 
an angle of 2º3'4"  
but not:  
an angle of 2 º3 '4 " 
If the spelled-out name of a unit is used, the normal rules of English are applied: “a roll of 
35-millimeter film.” (See Sec. 7.6, note 3.) 
(11) †
The digits of numerical values having more than four digits on either side of the decimal 
marker are separated into groups of three using a thin, fixed space counting from both the 
left and right of the decimal marker. For example, 15 739.012 53 is highly preferred to 
15739.01253. Commas are not used to separate digits into groups of three. (See Sec. 10.5.3.) 
(12) †
Equations between quantities are used in preference to equations between numerical values, 
and symbols representing numerical values are different from symbols representing the 
corresponding quantities. When a numerical-value equation is used, it is properly written 
and the corresponding quantity equation is given where possible. (See Sec. 7.11.) 
(13) †
Standardized quantity symbols such as those given in Refs. [4] and [5] are used, for 
example, R for resistance and A
for relative atomic mass, and not words, acronyms, or ad 
hoc groups of letters. Similarly, standardized mathematical signs and symbols such as are 
given in Ref. [4: ISO 31-11] are used, for example, “tan x” and not “tg x.” More specifically, 
the base of “log” in equations is specified when required by writing log
a
x (meaning log to 
the base a of x), lb x (meaning log
x ), ln x (meaning log
e
x), or lg x (meaning log
10
x ). (See 
Secs. 10.1.1 and 10.1.2.) 
(14) †
Unit symbols are in roman type, and quantity symbols are in italic type with superscripts and 
subscripts in roman or italic type as appropriate. (See Sec. 10.2 and Secs. 10.2.1 to 10.2.4.) 
(15) †
When the word “weight” is used, the intended meaning is clear. (In science and technology, 
weight is a force, for which the SI unit is the newton; in commerce and everyday use, weight 
is usually a synonym for mass, for which the SI unit is the kilogram.) (See Sec. 8.3.) 
(16) †
A quotient quantity, for example, mass density, is written “mass divided by volume” rather 
than “mass per unit volume.” (See Sec. 7.12.) 
(17) †
An object and any quantity describing the object are distinguished. (Note the difference 
between “surface” and “area,” “body” and “mass,” “resistor” and “resistance,” “coil” and 
“inductance.”) (See Sec. 7.13.) 
(18) †
The obsolete term normality and the symbol N, and the obsolete term molarity and the 
symbol 
M
, are not used, but the quantity amount-of-substance concentration of B (more 
commonly called concentration of B), and its symbol c
B
and SI unit mol/m
3
(or a related 
acceptable unit), are used instead. Similarly, the obsolete term molal and the symbol m are 
not used, but the quantity molality of solute B, and its symbol b
B
or m
B
and SI unit mol/kg 
(or a related SI unit), are used instead. (See Secs. 8.6.5 and 8.6.8.) 
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
vii 
Contents 
Preface..................................................................................................................................................  iii 
Check List for Reviewing Manuscripts.................................................................................................   v 
1 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................   1 
1.1 Purpose of Guide.....................................................................................................................   1 
1.2 Outline of Guide ....................................................................................................................   1 
2 NIST policy on the Use of the SI.......................................................................................................   2 
2.1 Essential data..........................................................................................................................   2 
2.1.1 Tables and graphs ..........................................................................................................   2 
2.2 Descriptive information .........................................................................................................   2 
3 Other Sources of Information on the SI..............................................................................................   3 
3.1  Publications ...........................................................................................................................   3 
3.2  Fundamental Constants Data Center .....................................................................................   3 
3.3  Metric Program .....................................................................................................................   3 
4 The Two Classes of SI Units and the SI Prefixes ..............................................................................   3 
4.1  SI base units ..........................................................................................................................   4 
4.2  SI derived units .....................................................................................................................   4 
4.2.1  SI derived units with special names and symbols.........................................................   4 
4.2.1.1 Degree Celsius .................................................................................................   5 
4.2.2 Use of SI derived units with special names and symbols...............................................   6 
4.3 Decimal multiples and submultiples of SI units: SI prefixes .................................................   7 
5 Units Outside the SI............................................................................................................................   7 
5.1 Units accepted for use with the SI..........................................................................................   7 
5.1.1 Hour, degree, liter, and the like......................................................................................   8 
5.1.2 Neper, bel, shannon, and the like...................................................................................   8 
5.1.3 Electronvolt, astronomical unit, and unified atomic mass unit......................................   9 
5.1.4 Natural and atomic units................................................................................................   9 
5.2 Non-SI units accepted for use with the SI.............................................................................   10 
5.3 Units not accepted for use with the SI...................................................................................  10 
5.3.1 CGS units .....................................................................................................................  10 
5.3.2 Other unacceptable units ..............................................................................................  11 
5.4 The terms “SI units” and “acceptable units”..........................................................................  11 
6 Rules and Style Conventions for Printing and Using Units ..............................................................  12 
6.1 Rules and style conventions for unit symbols .......................................................................  12 
6.1.1 Typeface .......................................................................................................................  12 
6.1.2 Capitalization................................................................................................................  12 
6.1.3 Plurals............................................................................................................................  12 
6.1.4 Punctuation....................................................................................................................  12 
6.1.5 Unit symbols obtained by multiplication......................................................................  12 
6.1.6 Unit symbols obtained by division................................................................................  13 
6.1.7 Unacceptability of unit symbols and unit names together ............................................  13 
6.1.8 Unacceptability of abbreviations for units ...................................................................  13 
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
viii 
6.2 Rules and style conventions for SI prefixes...........................................................................  13 
6.2.1 Typeface and spacing ...................................................................................................  13 
6.2.2 Capitalization................................................................................................................  14 
6.2.3 Inseparability of prefix and unit....................................................................................  14 
6.2.4 Unacceptability of compound prefixes .........................................................................  14 
6.2.5 Use of multiple prefixes................................................................................................  14 
6.2.6 Unacceptability of stand-alone prefixes .......................................................................  14 
6.2.7 Prefixes and the kilogram .............................................................................................  14 
6.2.8 Prefixes with the degree Celsius and units accepted for use with the SI.......................  15 
7 Rules and Style Conventions for Expressing Values of Quantities ..................................................  15 
7.1  Value and numerical value of a quantity............................................................................  15 
7.2   Space between numerical value and unit symbol...............................................................  16 
7.3  Number of units per value of a quantity.............................................................................  16 
7.4  Unacceptability of attaching information to units..............................................................  16 
7.5   Unacceptability of mixing information with units .............................................................  17 
7.6   Symbols for numbers and units versus spelled-out names of numbers and units...............  17 
7.7   Clarity in writing values of quantities ................................................................................  18 
7.8   Unacceptability of stand-alone unit symbols .....................................................................  18 
7.9   Choosing SI prefixes .........................................................................................................  18 
7.10 Values of quantities expressed simply as numbers: the unit one, symbol 1.......................  19 
7.10.1   Decimal multiples and submultiples of the unit one ...........................................  19 
7.10.2  %, percentage by, fraction ...................................................................................  19 
7.10.3   ppm, ppb, and ppt ................................................................................................  20 
7.10.4   Roman numerals ..................................................................................................  21 
7.11  Quantity equations and numerical-value equations............................................................  21 
7.12  Proper names of quotient quantities ...................................................................................  22 
7.13  Distinction between an object and its attribute...................................................................  22 
7.14  Dimension of a quantity ....................................................................................................  22 
8 Comments on Some Quantities and Their Units ..............................................................................  23 
8.1  Time and rotational frequency............................................................................................  23 
8.2   Volume...............................................................................................................................  23 
8.3   Weight................................................................................................................................  23 
8.4   Relative atomic mass and relative molecular mass.............................................................  24 
8.5   Temperature interval and temperature difference...............................................................  24 
8.6   Amount of substance, concentration, molality, and the like...............................................  25 
8.6.1   Amount of substance ...........................................................................................  25 
8.6.2   Mole fraction of B; amount-of-substance fraction of B ......................................  25 
8.6.3   Molar volume ......................................................................................................  26 
8.6.4   Molar mass...........................................................................................................  27 
8.6.5   Concentration of B; amount-of-substance concentration of B ............................  27 
8.6.6   Volume fraction of B ...........................................................................................  27 
8.6.7   Mass density; density ..........................................................................................  28 
8.6.8   Molality of solute B..............................................................................................  28 
8.6.9   Specific volume ...................................................................................................  28 
8.6.10   Mass fraction of B ...............................................................................................  28 
8.7   Logarithmic quantities and units: level, neper, bel.............................................................  28 
8.8   Viscosity ............................................................................................................................  30 
8.9   Massic, volumic, areic, lineic ............................................................................................  30 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested