pdf viewer in c# windows application : How to cut an image out of a pdf SDK software project wpf winforms windows UWP sp8112-part1412

Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
Table 7. 
Non-SI Units accepted for use with the SI by the CIPM and this Guide, whose values in SI units 
are obtained experimentally 
Name 
Symbol 
Definition and Value in SI units 
electronvolt 
astronomical unit 
unified atomic mass unit 
dalton 
eV 
ua 
Da 
(a) 
(b) 
(c)  
(d) 
(a)  The electronvolt is the kinetic energy acquired by an electron in passing through a potential difference of 1 V in vacuum, 
1.602 176 487(40) × 10
−19
J.  This value of 1 eV is the 2006 CODATA recommended value with the standard uncertainty in the 
last two digits given in parenthesis [19, 20].  
(b)   The astronomical unit is approximately equal to the mean Earth-Sun distance. It is the radius of an unperturbed circular 
Newtonian orbit about the Sun of a particle having infinitesimal mass, moving with a mean motion of 0.017 202 098 95 radians 
per day (known as the Gaussian constant). The value and standard uncertainty of the astronomical unit, ua, is 1.495 978 706 
91(6) × 10
11
m. This is cited from the IERS Conventions 2003 (D.D. McCarthy and G. Petit eds., IERS Technical Note 32, 
Frankfurt am Main: Verlag des Bundesamts für Kartographie und Geodäsie, 2004, 12). The value of the astronomical unit in 
meters comes from the JPL ephemerides DE403 (Standish E.M., Report of the IAU WGAS Sub-Group on Numerical Standards, 
Highlights of Astronomy, Appenzeller ed., Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1995, 180-184). 
(c)   The unified atomic mass unit is equal to 1/12 times the mass of a free carbon 12 atom, at rest and in its ground state, 
1.660 538 782(83) × 10−27 kg.  This value of 1 u is the 2006 CODATA recommended value with the standard uncertainty in the 
last two digits given in parenthesis [19, 20]. 
(d)   The dalton (Da) and the unified atomic mass unit (u) are alternative names (and symbols) for the same unit, equal to 1/12 times 
the mass of a free carbon 12 atom, at rest and in its ground state. The dalton is often combined with SI prefixes, for example to 
express the masses of large molecules in kilodaltons, kDa, or megadaltons, MDa. 
Note:   The abbreviation, AMU is not an acceptable unit symbol for the unified atomic mass unit. The only allowed name is “unified 
atomic mass unit” and the only allowed symbol is u.  
5.1.3  Units from International Standards 
There  are  a  few  highly  specialized  units  that  are  given  by  the  International  Organization  for 
Standardization (ISO) or the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and which in the view of this 
Guide are also acceptable for use with the SI. They include the octave, phon, and sone, and units used in 
information technology, including the baud (Bd), bit (bit), erlang (E), hartley (Hart), and shannon (Sh)
3
. It 
is the position of this Guide that the only such additional units NIST authors may use with the SI are those 
given in either the International Standards on quantities and units of ISO (Ref. [4]) or of IEC (Ref. [5]).  
5.1.4  Natural and atomic units 
In some  cases,  particularly in basic  science, the values of quantities are  expressed in terms of 
fundamental constants of nature. The two most important of these unit systems are the natural unit (n.u.) 
system used in high energy or particle physics, and the atomic unit (a.u.) system used in atomic physics and 
quantum chemistry. The use of these units with the SI is not formally accepted by the CIPM, but the CIPM 
recognizes their existence and importance. Therefore, this Guide formally accepts their use when it is 
necessary for effective communication. In such cases, the specific unit system used must be identified. 
Examples of physical quantities used as units are given in Table 8.  
Table 8.  
Examples of physical quantities sometimes used as units 
Kind of quantity 
Physical quantity used as a unit 
Symbol 
speed 
action  
mass 
electric charge 
length 
energy 
time 
speed of light in vacuum (n.u.) 
Planck constant divided by 2π (n.u.) 
electron rest mass (n.u. and a.u.) 
elementary charge (a.u.) 
Bohr radius (a.u.) 
Hartree energy (a.u.) 
ratio of action to energy (a.u.) 
ħ 
m
e
a
E
h
ħ/ E
h
3
The symbol in parentheses following the name of the unit is its internationally accepted unit symbol, but the octave, phon, and sone 
have no such unit symbols. For additional information on the neper and bel, see Ref. [5: IEC 60027-3], and Sec. 8.7 of this Guide.  
How to cut an image out of a pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to paste a picture into a pdf; cut picture pdf
How to cut an image out of a pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
copying a pdf image to word; how to copy a picture from a pdf file
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
10 
5.2   Other Non-SI units accepted for use with the SI 
Because of established practice in certain fields or countries, in 1978 the CIPM considered that it 
was permissible for the following units given in Table 9, nautical mile, knot, angstrom, are, barn, bar, and 
millimeter of mercury to continue to be used with the SI. However, these units must not be introduced in 
fields where they are not presently used. Further, this Guide strongly discourages the continued use of these 
units by NIST authors except when absolutely necessary.  If these units are used by NIST authors the 
values of relevant quantities shall be given in terms of SI units first followed by these non-SI units in 
parentheses.  
The curie, roentgen, rad, and rem have been added to the NIST SP 330 [2] and Table 9 of this Guide, 
since they are in wide use in the United States, especially in regulatory documents dealing with health and 
safety. Nevertheless, this Guide strongly discourages the continued use of the curie, roentgen, rad, and rem 
and recommends that SI units should be used by NIST authors only if necessary. If these units are used by 
NIST authors the values of relevant quantities shall be given in terms of SI units first followed by these 
outdated non-SI units in parentheses. 
Table 9. Other non-SI units accepted for use with the SI either by the CIPM and this Guide (indicated by
*
), 
or by this Guide (indicated by
**
Name 
Symbol 
Value in SI units 
nautical mile
*
knot
*
ångström
*
barn
*
bar
*
millimeter of mercury
*
curie
**
roentgen
**
rad
**
rem
**
Å  
bar 
mmHg 
Ci 
rad
(a)
rem 
1 nautical mile = 1852 m 
1 nautical mile per hour = (1852/3600) m/s 
1 Å = 0.1 nm = 10
−10
1 b = 100 fm
2
= 10
−28
m
2
1 bar = 0.1 MPa = 100 kPa = 1000 hPa = 10
5
Pa 
1 mmHg ≈ 133.322 Pa 
1 Ci = 3.7 x 10
10
Bq  
1 R = 2.58 x 10
−4
C/kg 
1 rad = 1 cGy = 10
−2
Gy 
1 rem = 1 cSv = 10
−2
Sv 
(a)   When there is risk of confusion with the symbol for the radian, rd may be used as the symbol for rad. 
5.3   Units not accepted for use with the SI 
The following two sections briefly discuss units not accepted for use with the SI. 
5.3.1 CGS units 
Table 10 gives examples of centimeter-gram-second (CGS) units having special names. These units 
are not accepted for use with the SI by this Guide. Further, no other units of the various CGS systems of 
units, which includes the  CGS  Electrostatic (ESU), CGS Electromagnetic  (EMU), and CGS Gaussian 
systems, are accepted for use with the SI by this Guide except such units as the centimeter, gram, and 
second that are also defined in the SI. 
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
application, this VB.NET image cropper library SDK provides a professional and easy to use .NET solution for developers to crop / cut out image file in a short
how to copy pdf image; copy pdf picture to word
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. C#.NET PDF Windows Viewer, C#.NET convert image to PDF Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page
how to copy an image from a pdf in; paste picture to pdf
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
11 
Table 10. Examples of CGS units with special names (not accepted for use with the SI by this Guide) 
Name 
Symbol 
Value in SI units 
erg 
dyne 
poise
(a)
stokes
(b)
gauss
(c)
oersted
(c)
maxwell
(c)
stilb 
phot 
gal
(d)
erg 
dyn 
St 
Gs, G 
Oe 
Mx 
sb 
ph 
Gal 
1 erg = 10
−7
1 dyn = 10
−5
1 P = 1 dyn · s/cm
2
= 0.1 Pa · s 
1 St = 1 cm
2
/s = 10
−4
m
2
/s 
1 Gs corresponds to 10
−4
1 Oe corresponds to (1000/4π) A/m 
1 Mx corresponds to 10
−8 
Wb 
1 sb = 1 cd/cm
= 10
4
cd/m
2
1 ph = 10
4
lx 
1 Gal = 1 cm s
−2
= 10
−2
m s
−2
(a)   The poise (P) is the CGS unit for viscosity (also called dynamic viscosity). The SI unit is the pascal second (Pa · s). 
(b)   The stokes (St) is the CGS unit for kinematic viscosity. The SI unit is the meter squared per second (m2/s). 
(c)   This unit is part of the so-called electromagnetic three-dimensional CGS system and cannot strictly speaking be compared to the 
corresponding SI unit, which has four dimensions when only mechanical and electric quantities are considered. 
(d)   The gal is employed in geodesy and geophysics to express acceleration due to gravity. 
5.3.2  Other unacceptable units 
There are many units besides CGS units that are outside the SI and not accepted for use with it, 
including, of course, all of the U.S. customary (that is, inch-pound) units. In the view of this Guide such 
units must strictly be avoided and SI units, their multiples or submultiples, or those units accepted or 
temporarily accepted for use with the SI (including their appropriate multiples and submultiples), must be 
used instead. This restriction also applies to the use of unaccepted special names for SI units or special 
names for multiples or submultiples of SI units, such as mho for siemens (S) and micron for micrometer 
(μm). Table 11 gives a few examples of some of these other unacceptable units. 
Table 11. Examples of other unacceptable units 
Name 
Symbol 
Value in SI units 
fermi 
photometric carat 
torr 
standard atmosphere 
kilogram-force 
micron 
calorie (various) 
x unit 
stere 
gamma 
gamma (mass) 
lambda (volume) 
fermi 
metric carat 
Torr 
atm 
kgf 
μ 
cal
th
(thermochemical) 
xu 
st 
γ 
γ 
λ 
1 fermi = 1 fm = 10
−15
1 metric carat = 200 mg = 2 × 10
−4
kg 
1 Torr = (101 325/760) Pa 
1 atm = 101 325 Pa 
1 kgf = 9.806 65 N 
1 m = 1 µm = 10
−6
1 cal
th
= 4.184 J 
1 xu ≈ 0.1002 pm = 1.002 × 10
−13
1 st = 1 m
3
1 γ = 1 nT = 10
−9 
1 γ = 1 µg = 10
−9
kg 
1 λ = 1 µL = 10
−6
L = 10
−9
m
3
5.4   The terms “SI units” and “acceptable units” 
Consistent with accepted practice [1, 2], this Guide uses either the term “SI units” or “units of the 
SI” to mean the SI base units and SI coherent derived units, and multiples and submultiples of these units 
formed  by  using  the SI  prefixes. The term “acceptable  units,” which is  introduced in  this Guide for 
convenience, is used to mean the SI units plus (a) those non-SI units accepted for use with the SI (see 
Tables 6 - 9); and (b) appropriate multiples and submultiples of such accepted non-SI units.  
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Bookmark. Metadata: Edit, Delete Metadata. Support to zoom in and zoom out PDF page.
paste image into pdf in preview; how to copy pictures from pdf in
VB.NET PDF replace text library: replace text in PDF content in vb
Able to pull text out of selected PDF page example illustrates how to perform PDF text replacing WholeWord = True 'Replace "RasterEdge" with "Image" doc.Replace
how to copy a pdf image into a word document; copy image from pdf preview
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
12 
6   Rules and Style Conventions for Printing and Using Units 
6.1   Rules and style conventions for unit symbols 
The following eight sections give rules and style conventions related to the symbols for units. 
6.1.1  Typeface 
Unit symbols are printed in roman (upright) type regardless of the type used in the surrounding text. 
(See also Sec. 10.2 and Secs. 10.2.1 to 10.2.4.) 
6.1.2  Capitalization 
Unit symbols are printed in lower-case letters except that: 
(a)  the symbol or the first letter of the symbol is an upper-case letter when the name of the unit is derived 
from the name of a person; and 
(b)  the recommended symbol for the liter in the United States is L. (See Table 6, footnote (b).) 
Examples:   m (meter)   s (second)  
V (volt) 
Pa (pascal)   lm (lumen)  
Wb (weber) 
6.1.3  Plurals 
Unit symbols are unaltered in the plural. 
Example:   l = 75 cm  
but not:  
l = 75 cms 
Note:   l is the quantity symbol for length. (The rules and style conventions for expressing the values of 
quantities are discussed in detail in Chapter 7.) 
6.1.4  Punctuation 
Unit symbols are not followed by a period unless at the end of a sentence. 
Example:  “Its length is 75 cm.” or “It is 75 cm long.” but not: “It is 75 cm. long.” 
6.1.5  Unit symbols obtained by multiplication 
Symbols for units formed from other units by multiplication are indicated by means of either a half-
high (that is, centered) dot or a space. However, this Guide, as does Ref. [6], prefers the half-high dot 
because it is less likely to lead to confusion.  
Example:  N · m  or  N m 
Notes: 
1.  A half-high dot or space is usually imperative. For example, m · s
−1
is the symbol for the meter per 
second while ms−1 is the symbol for the reciprocal millisecond (10
3
s
−1
— see Sec. 6.2.3). 
2.  Reference [4: ISO 31-0] suggests that if a space is used to indicate units formed by multiplication, 
the  space  may be omitted if  it does not  cause  confusion.  This  possibility  is reflected in  the 
common practice of using the symbol kWh rather than kW · h or kW h for the kilowatt hour. 
Nevertheless, this Guide takes the position that a half-high dot or a space should always be used to 
VB.NET PDF - View PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl Click to zoom out current PDF document page.
how to copy picture from pdf; copy picture from pdf
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document in C#.NET
Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Select text and image to copy and paste using Ctrl Click to zoom out current PDF document page.
copying image from pdf to word; how to copy pictures from pdf
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
avoid possible confusion; for this same reason, only one of these two allowed forms should be 
used in any given manuscript. 
6.1.6 Unit symbols obtained by division 
Symbols for units formed from other units by division are indicated by means of a solidus (oblique 
stroke, /), a horizontal line, or negative exponents. 
Example:  m/s,  
s
m
 or  m · s
−1   
However, to avoid ambiguity, the solidus must not be repeated on the same line unless parentheses 
are used. 
Examples:  m/s
2
or  m · s
−2
but not:  m/s/s 
m · kg/(s
· A)  or  m · kg · s
−3
· A
−1
but not:   m · kg/s
3
/A 
Negative exponents should be used in complicated cases. 
6.1.7  Unacceptability of unit symbols and unit names together 
Unit symbols and unit names are not used together. (See also Secs. 9.5 and 9.8.) 
Example:  C/kg,  C · kg
−1
 or coulomb per kilogram  but not:   coulomb/kg; coulomb per kg; 
C/kilogram;  coulomb  · kg
−1
;  C  per 
kg; coulomb/kilogram 
6.1.8  Unacceptability of abbreviations for units 
Because acceptable units generally have internationally recognized symbols and names, it is not 
permissible to use abbreviations for their unit symbols or names, such as sec (for either s or second), sq. 
mm (for either mm
2
or square millimeter), cc (for either cm
3
or cubic centimeter), mins (for either min or 
minutes), hrs (for either h or hours), lit (for either L or liter), amps (for either A or amperes), AMU (for 
either u or unified atomic mass unit), or mps (for either m/s or meter per second).  Although the values of 
quantities are normally expressed using symbols for numbers and symbols for units (see Sec. 7.6), if for 
some reason the name of a unit is more appropriate than the unit symbol (see Sec. 7.6, note 3), the name of 
the unit should be spelled out in full.  
6.2   Rules and style conventions for SI prefixes 
The following eight sections give rules and style conventions related to the SI prefixes. 
6.2.1  Typeface and spacing 
Prefix names and symbols are printed in roman (upright) type regardless of the type used in the 
surrounding text, and are attached to unit symbols without a space between the prefix name or symbol and 
the unit name or symbol. This last rule also applies to prefixes attached to unit names.  
Examples:  mL (milliliter) 
pm (picometer)  
GΩ (gigaohm)   
THz (terahertz) 
13 
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Able to delete text characters at specified position from PDF.
paste image into pdf acrobat; copy pictures from pdf to word
C# PDF Image Redact Library: redact selected PDF images in C#.net
Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link A professional .NET control allows users to black out image in PDF document in
how to copy picture from pdf and paste in word; copy images from pdf to word
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
14 
6.2.2  Capitalization 
The prefix symbols Y (yotta), Z (zetta), E (exa), P (peta), T (tera), G (giga), and M (mega) are printed in 
upper-case letters while all other prefix symbols are printed in lower-case letters (see Table 5).  Prefix 
names are normally printed in lowercase letters. 
6.2.3  Inseparability of prefix and unit 
The grouping formed by a prefix symbol attached to a unit symbol constitutes a new inseparable 
symbol (forming a multiple or submultiple of the unit concerned) which can be raised to a positive or 
negative power and which can be combined with other unit symbols to form compound unit symbols. 
Examples:  2.3 cm
3
= 2.3 (cm)
3
= 2.3 (10
−2
m)
3
= 2.3 × 10
−6
m
3
1 cm
1
= 1 (cm)
−1
= 1 (10
−2
m)
−1
= 10
m
−1
5000 µs
−1
= 5000 (µs)
−1
= 5000 (10
−6
s)
−1
= 5000 × 10
6
s
−1
= 5 × 10
9
s
−1
1 V/cm = (1 V)/(10
−2 
m) = 10
2
V/m 
Prefix names are also inseparable from the unit names to which they are attached. Thus, for example, 
millimeter, micropascal, and meganewton are single words.  
6.2.4  Unacceptability of compound prefixes 
Compound prefix names or symbols, that is, prefix names or symbols formed by the juxtaposition of 
two or more prefix names or symbols, are not permitted. 
Example:  nm (nanometer) 
but not:  mµm (millimicrometer) 
6.2.5  Use of multiple prefixes 
In a derived unit formed by division, the use of a prefix symbol (or a prefix name) in both the 
numerator and the denominator can cause confusion. Thus, for example, 10 kV/mm is acceptable, but 
10 MV/m  is often considered  preferable because it contains only one prefix  symbol and it is  in  the 
numerator. 
In a derived unit formed by multiplication, the use of more than one prefix symbol (or more than one 
prefix name) can also cause confusion. Thus, for example, 10 MV · ms is acceptable, but 10 kV · s is often 
considered preferable. 
Note:  Such considerations usually do not apply if the derived unit involves the kilogram. For example, 
0.13 mmol/g is not considered preferable to 0.13 mol/kg. 
6.2.6 Unacceptability of stand-alone prefixes 
Prefix symbols cannot stand alone and thus cannot be attached to the number 1, the symbol for the 
unit one. In a similar vein, prefix names cannot be attached to the name of the unit one, that is, to the word 
“one.” (See Sec. 7.10 for a discussion of the unit one.) 
Example:  the number density of Pb atoms is 5 ×10
6
/m
3
 but not:  the number density of Pb atoms 
is 5 M/m
3
6.2.7  Prefixes and the kilogram 
For historical reasons, the name “kilogram” for the SI base unit of mass contains the name “kilo,” 
the SI prefix for 10
3
. Thus, because compound prefixes are unacceptable (see Sec. 6.2.4), symbols for 
decimal multiples and submultiples of the unit of mass are formed by attaching SI prefix symbols to g, the 
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Able to pull text out of selected PDF page or all PDF document in .NET WinForms. Functionality to remove text format by modifying text font, size, color, etc.
preview paste image into pdf; extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste
VB.NET PDF - WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET Program
Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. convert PDF to Word document, Tiff image, TXT file and PDF pages, zoom in or zoom out PDF pages and
copy picture from pdf to word; how to copy pdf image to word
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
15 
unit symbol for gram, and the names of such multiples and submultiples are formed by attaching SI prefix 
names to the name “gram.” 
Example
 10
−6
kg = 1 mg (1 milligram)  
but not
 10
−6
kg = 1 µkg (1 microkilogram) 
6.2.8  Prefixes with the degree Celsius and units accepted for use with the SI 
Prefix symbols may be used with the unit symbol ºC and prefix names may be used with the unit 
name “degree Celsius.” For example, 12 mºC (12 millidegrees Celsius) is acceptable. However, to avoid 
confusion, prefix symbols (and prefix names) are not used with the time-related unit symbols (names) min 
(minute),  h  (hour),  d  (day);  nor  with  the  angle-related  symbols  (names)  º  (degree),  '  (minute),  and 
" (second) (see Table 6). 
Prefix symbols (and prefix names) may be used with the unit symbols (names) L (liter), t (metric 
ton), eV (electronvolt), u (unified atomic mass unit), Da (dalton) (see Tables 6 and 7). However, although 
submultiples of the liter such as mL (milliliter) and dL (deciliter) are in common use, multiples of the liter 
such as kL (kiloliter) and ML (megaliter) are not. Similarly, although multiples of the metric ton such as kt 
(kilometric ton) are commonly used, submultiples such as mt (millimetric ton), which is equal to the 
kilogram  (kg),  are  not.  Examples  of  the  use  of  prefix  symbols  with  eV  and  u  are  80  MeV  (80 
megaelectronvolts) and 15 nu (15 nanounified atomic mass units). 
7  
Rules and Style Conventions for Expressing Values of Quantities 
7.1   Value and numerical value of a quantity 
The 
value 
of a quantity is its magnitude expressed as the product of a number and a unit, and the 
number multiplying the unit is the 
numerical value 
of the quantity expressed in that unit.  
More formally, the value of quantity 
can be written as 
= {
A
}[
A
], where {
A
} is the numerical 
value of 
when the value of 
is expressed in the unit [
A
]. The numerical value can therefore be written as 
{
A
} = 
/ [
A
], which is a convenient form for use in figures and tables. Thus, to eliminate the possibility of 
misunderstanding, an axis of a graph or the heading of a column of a table can be labeled “
t
/ºC” instead of 
(ºC)” or “Temperature (ºC).” Similarly, an axis or column heading can be labeled “
E
/(V/m)” instead of 
(V/m)” or “Electric field strength (V/m).” 
Examples
1.  In the SI, the value of the velocity of light in vacuum is 
c
= 299 792 458 m/s exactly. The number 
299 792 458 is the numerical value of 
c
when 
c
is expressed in the unit m/s, and equals 
c
/(m/s). 
2.  The ordinate of a graph is labeled 
T
/(10
3
K), where 
T
is thermodynamic temperature and K is the 
unit symbol for kelvin, and has scale marks at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. If the ordinate value of a point 
on a curve in the graph is estimated to be 3.2, the corresponding temperature is 
T
/ (10
3
K) = 3.2 or 
T
= 3200 K. Notice the lack of ambiguity in this form of labeling compared with “Temperature 
(10
3
K).” 
3.  An expression such as ln(
p
/MPa), where 
p
is the quantity symbol for pressure and MPa is the unit 
symbol for megapascal, is perfectly acceptable, because 
p
/MPa is the numerical value of 
p
when 
p
is expressed in the unit MPa and is simply a number. 
Notes
1.  For the conventions concerning the grouping of digits, see Sec. 10.5.3. 
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
16 
2.  An alternative way of writing c/(m/s)  is  {c}
m/s
, meaning the numerical value of c when c is 
expressed in the unit m/s. 
7.2   Space between numerical value and unit symbol 
In the expression for the value of a quantity, the unit symbol is placed after the numerical value and 
a space is left between the numerical value and the unit symbol.  
The only exceptions to this rule are for the unit symbols for degree, minute, and second for plane 
angle: º, ', and ", respectively (see Table 6), in which case no space is left between the numerical value and 
the unit symbol. 
Example:  α = 30º22'8" 
Note:    α is a quantity symbol for plane angle. 
This rule means that: 
(a)  The symbol ºC for the degree Celsius is preceded by a space when one expresses the values of Celsius 
temperatures. 
Example:  t = 30.2 ºC 
but not: 
t = 30.2ºC 
or 
t = 30.2º C 
(b)  Even when the value of a quantity is used as an adjective, a space is left between the numerical value 
and  the  unit  symbol.  (This  rule  recognizes  that  unit  symbols  are  not  like  ordinary  words  or 
abbreviations but are mathematical entities, and that the value of a quantity should be expressed in a 
way that is as independent of language as possible—sees Secs. 7.6 and 7.10.3.) 
Examples:  a 1 m end gauge  
but not: 
a 1-m end gauge 
a 10 kΩ resistor  
but not: 
a 10-kΩ resistor 
However,  if  there  is  any  ambiguity,  the  words  should  be  rearranged  accordingly.  For  example,  the 
statement “the samples were placed in 22 mL vials” should be replaced with the statement “the samples 
were placed in vials of volume 22 mL.” 
Note:  When unit names are spelled out, the normal rules of English apply. Thus, for example, “a roll of 
35-millimeter film” is acceptable (see Sec. 7.6, note 3). 
7.3 Number of units per value of a quantity 
The value of a quantity is expressed using no more than one unit. 
Example:   l = 10.234 m  
but not:  
l = 10 m 23 cm 4 mm 
Note:   Expressing the values of time intervals and of plane angles are exceptions to this rule. However, it 
is preferable to divide the degree decimally. Thus one should write 22.20º rather than 22º12', 
except in fields such as cartography and astronomy. 
7.4   Unacceptability of attaching information to units 
When one gives the value of a quantity, it is incorrect to attach letters or other symbols to the unit in 
order to provide information about the quantity or its conditions of measurement. Instead, the letters or 
other symbols should be attached to the quantity. 
Example:  V
max
= 1000 V   but not:  
V = 1000 V
max
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
17 
Note:  V is a quantity symbol for potential difference. 
7.5   Unacceptability of mixing information with units 
When one gives the value of a quantity, any information concerning the quantity or its conditions of 
measurement must be presented in such a way as not to be associated with the unit. This means that 
quantities must be defined so that they can be expressed solely in acceptable units (including the unit 
one — see Sec. 7.10).  
Examples: 
the Pb content is 5 ng/L  
but not: 
5 ng Pb/L or 5 ng of lead/L 
the sensitivity for NO
3
molecules is 5 × 10
10
/cm
3
 but not: 
the sensitivity is 5 × 10
10   
NO
3
molecules/cm
3
the neutron emission rate is 5 × 10
10
/s  
but not: 
the emission rate is 5 × 10
10
n/s 
the number density of O
2
atoms is 3 × 10
18
/cm
3
 but not: 
the density is 3 × 10
18
O
2
atoms/cm
3
the resistance per square is 100 Ω  
but not:  
the resistance is 100 Ω/square 
7.6   Symbols for numbers and units versus spelled-out names of numbers and units 
This Guide takes the position that the key elements of a scientific or technical paper, particularly the 
results of measurements and the values of quantities that influence the measurements, should be presented 
in a way that is as independent of language as possible. This will allow the paper to be understood by as 
broad an audience as possible, including readers with limited knowledge of English. Thus, to promote the 
comprehension of quantitative information in general and its broad understandability in particular, values 
of quantities should be expressed in acceptable units using  
—  the Arabic symbols for numbers, that is, the Arabic numerals, not the spelled-out names of the 
Arabic numerals; and 
—  the symbols for the units, not the spelled-out names of the units. 
Examples: 
the length of the laser is 5 m  
but not:   the length of the laser is five meters 
the sample was annealed at a  
but not:   the sample was annealed at a temperature 
temperature of 955 K for 12 h  
of 955 kelvins for 12 hours 
Notes: 
1.  If the intended audience for a publication is unlikely to be familiar with a particular unit symbol, it 
should be defined when first used. 
2.  Because the use of the spelled-out name of an Arabic numeral with a unit symbol can cause 
confusion, such combinations must strictly be avoided. For example, one should never write “the 
length of the laser is five m.” 
3.  Occasionally, a value is used in a descriptive or literary manner and it is fitting to use the spelled-
out name of the unit rather than its symbol. Thus, this Guide considers acceptable statements such 
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
18 
as “the reading lamp was designed to take two 60-watt light bulbs,” or “the rocket journeyed 
uneventfully across 380 000 kilometers of space,” or “they bought a roll of 35-millimeter film for 
their camera.” 
4.  The United States Government Printing Office Style Manual (Ref. [3], pp. 181-189) gives the rule 
that symbols for numbers are always to be used when one expresses (a) the value of a quantity in 
terms of a unit of measurement, (b) time (including dates), and (c) an amount of money. This 
publication should be consulted for the rules governing the choice between the use of symbols for 
numbers and the spelled-out names of numbers when numbers are dealt with in general. 
7.7   Clarity in writing values of quantities 
The value of a quantity is expressed as the product of a number and a unit (see Sec. 7.1). Thus, to 
avoid possible confusion, this Guide takes the position that values of quantities must be written so that it is 
completely  clear to  which unit  symbols the numerical  values of the quantities belong. Also to  avoid 
possible confusion, this Guide strongly recommends that the word “to” be used to indicate a range of 
values  for  a  quantity  instead  of  a  range  dash  (that  is,  a  long  hyphen)  because  the  dash  could  be 
misinterpreted  as a  minus  sign. (The  first  of  these  recommendations once  again recognizes  that unit 
symbols are not like ordinary words or abbreviations but are mathematical entities—see Sec. 7.2.) 
Examples: 
51 mm × 51 mm × 25 mm  
but not:  51 × 51 × 25 mm 
225 nm to 2400 nm or (225 to 2400) nm  
but not:   225 to 2400 nm 
0 ºC to 100 ºC or (0 to 100) ºC  
but not:   0 ºC − 100 ºC 
0 V to 5 V or (0 to 5) V  
but not:   0 − 5 V 
(8.2, 9.0, 9.5, 9.8, 10.0) GHz  
but not:   8.2, 9.0, 9.5, 9.8, 10.0 GHz 
63.2 m ± 0.1 m or (63.2 ± 0.1) m  
but not:   63.2 ± 0.1 m or 63.2 m ± 0.1 
129 s − 3 s = 126 s or (129 − 3) s = 126 s  
but not:   129 − 3 s = 126 s 
Note:  For the conventions concerning the use of the multiplication sign, see Sec. 10.5.4. 
7.8   Unacceptability of stand-alone unit symbols 
Symbols for  units are never used  without  numerical  values  or  quantity  symbols  (they  are  not 
abbreviations). 
Examples:   there are 10
6
mm in 1 km  
but not:   there are many mm in a km 
it is sold by the cubic meter  
but not:   it is sold by the m
3
t/ºC, E/(V/m), p/MPa, and the like are perfectly acceptable (see Sec. 7.1). 
7.9   Choosing SI prefixes 
The selection of the appropriate decimal multiple or submultiple of a unit for expressing the value of 
a quantity, and thus the choice of SI prefix, is governed by several factors.  
These include:  
—  the need to indicate which digits of a numerical value are significant,  
—  the need to have numerical values that are easily understood, and  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested