pdf viewer in c# windows application : Copy a picture from pdf software application dll windows winforms asp.net web forms sp8114-part1414

Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
prefixes to them, such as the millineper, symbol mNp (1 mNp = 0.001 Np), and the decibel, symbol dB 
(1 dB = 0.1 B). 
Level-of-a-field-quantity  is defined  by  the relation  L
F
=  ln(F/F
0
), where F/F
0
is  the ratio of two 
amplitudes of the same kind, F
0
being a reference amplitude. Level-of-a-power-quantity is defined by the 
relation L
P
= (1/2) ln(P/P
0
), where P/P
0
is the ratio of two powers, P
0
being a reference power. (Note that if 
P/P
0
= (F/F
0
)
2
,  then  L
P
=  L
F
.) Similar names, symbols,  and  definitions  apply  to  levels  based  on  other 
quantities which are linear or quadratic functions of the amplitudes, respectively. In practice, the name of 
the field quantity forms the name of L
F
and the symbol F is replaced by the symbol of the field quantity. 
For example, if the field quantity in question is electric field strength, symbol E, the name of the quantity is 
“level-of-electric-field-strength” and it is defined by the relation L
E
= ln(E/E
0
). 
The  difference between  two  levels-of-a-field-quantity  (called  “field-level  difference”)  having  the 
same reference amplitude F
0
is ΔL
F
2
1
F
F
L
L −
= ln(F
1
/F
0
) − ln(F
2
/F
0
) = ln(F
1
/F
2
), and is independent of 
F
0
. This is also  the case for the  difference between  two levels-of-a-power-quantity (called “power-level 
difference”) having the same reference power P
0
: ΔL
P
2
1
P
P
L
L −
= ln(P
1
/P
0
) − ln(P
2
/P
0
) = ln(P
1
/P
2
). 
It is clear from their definitions that both L
F
and L
P
are quantities of dimension one and thus have as 
their  units  the unit one, symbol 1. However, in this  case, which recalls  the case of plane angle and the 
radian (and solid angle and the steradian), it is convenient to give the unit one the special name “neper” or 
“bel” and to define these so-called dimensionless units as follows:  
One  neper  (1  Np)  is  the  level-of-a-field-quantity  when  F/F
0
 e,  that  is,  when  ln(F/F
0
 =  1. 
Equivalently, 1 Np is the level-of-a-power-quantity when P/P
0
= e
2
, that is, when (1/2) ln(P/P
0
) = 1. These 
definitions imply that the numerical value of L
F
when L
F
is expressed in the unit neper is {L
F
}
Np
= ln(F/F
0
), 
and that the numerical value of L
P
when L
P
is expressed in the unit neper is {L
P
}
Np
= (1/2) ln(P/P
0
); that is 
L
F
= ln(F/F
0
) Np  
L
P
= (1/2) ln(P/P
0
) Np. 
One bel (1 B) is the level-of-a-field-quantity when F/F
0
=
10
, that is, when 2 lg(F/F
0
) = 1 (note that 
lg x = log
10
x – see Sec. 10.1.2).  Equivalently, 1 B is the level- of-a-power-quantity when P/P
0
= 10, that is, 
when lg(P/P
0
) = 1.  These definitions imply that the numerical value of L
F
when L
F
is expressed in the unit 
bel  is  {L
F
}
B
=  2  lg(F/F
0
)  and  that  the  numerical  value  of  L
P
when  L
P
is  expressed  in  the  unit  bel  is 
{L
P
}
= lg(P/P
0
); that is  
L
F
= 2 lg(F/F
0
) B = 20 lg(F/F
0
) dB 
L
P
= lg(P/P
0
) B = 10 lg(P/P
0
) dB. 
Since the value of L
F
(or L
P
) is independent of the unit used to express that value, one may equate L
F
in the above expressions to obtain ln(F/F
0
) Np = 2 lg(F/F
0
) B, which implies 
1 B
2
ln10
=
Np exactly 
≈ 1.151 293 Np 
1 dB ≈ 0.115 129 3 Np. 
When reporting values of L
F
and L
P
, one must always give the reference level. According to Ref. [5: 
IEC 60027-3], this may be done in one of two ways: L
x
(re x
ref
) or L 
x / x
ref
where x is the quantity symbol for 
29 
Copy a picture from pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy and paste a pdf image into a word document; copy and paste image from pdf to word
Copy a picture from pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy text from pdf image; cut image from pdf online
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
30 
the quantity whose level is being reported, for example, electric field strength E or sound pressure p, and 
x
ref
is the value of the reference quantity, for example, 1 μV/m for E
0
, and 20 μPa for p
0
. Thus  
L
E
(re 1 μV/m) = − 0.58 Np          or          L
E/(1 μV/m)
= − 0.58 Np 
means that the level of a certain electric field strength is 0.58 Np below the reference electric field strength 
E
0
= 1 μV/m.  Similarly  
L
p
(re 20 μPa) = 25 dB           or          L
p/(20 μPa) 
= 25 dB 
means that the level of a certain sound pressure is 25 dB above the reference pressure p
0
= 20 μPa.  
Notes: 
1.   When such data are presented in a table or in a figure, the following condensed notation may be 
used instead: − 0.58 Np (1 μV/m); 25 dB (20 μPa). 
2.   When the same reference level applies repeatedly in a given context, it may be omitted if its value 
is clearly stated initially and if its planned omission is pointed out.  
3.   The rules of Ref. [5: IEC 60027-3] preclude, for example, the use of the symbol dBm to indicate a 
reference level of power of 1 mW. This restriction is based on the rule of Sec. 7.4, which does not 
permit attachments to unit symbols. 
8.8   Viscosity 
The proper SI units for expressing values of viscosity η (also called dynamic viscosity) and values of 
kinematic viscosity 
ν
are, respectively, the pascal second (Pa·s) and the meter squared per second (m
2
/s) 
(and their decimal multiples and submultiples as appropriate). The CGS units commonly used to express 
values of these quantities, the poise (P) and the stoke (St), respectively [and their decimal submultiples the 
centipoise (cP) and the centistoke (cSt)], are not to be used; see Sec. 5.3.1 and Table 10, which gives the 
relations 1 P = 0.1 Pa·s and 1 St = 10
−4
m
2
/s. 
8.9   Massic, volumic, areic, lineic 
Reference  [4:  ISO  31-0]  has  introduced  the  new  adjectives  “massic,”  “volumic,”  “areic,”  and 
“lineic”  into  the  English  language  based  on  their  French  counterparts:  “massique,”  “volumique,” 
“surfacique,” and “linéique.”  They are convenient and NIST  authors may wish to use them.  They  are 
equivalent,  respectively,  to  “specific,”  “density,”  “surface  .  .  .  density,”  and  “linear  .  .  .  density,”  as 
explained below. 
(a)  The adjective massic, or the adjective specific, is used to modify the name of a quantity to indicate the 
quotient of that quantity and its associated mass. 
Examples:  massic volume or specific volume: υ = V / m 
massic entropy or specific entropy: s = S / m 
(b)  The adjective volumic is used to modify the name of a quantity, or the term density is added to it, to 
indicate the quotient of that quantity and its associated volume.  
Examples:   volumic mass or (mass) density: ρ = m / V 
volumic number or number density: n = N / V 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
paste picture pdf; how to cut picture from pdf file
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
how to copy pdf image into powerpoint; copy image from pdf to powerpoint
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
31 
Note:
Parentheses around a word means that the word is often omitted. 
(c)  The adjective areic is used to modify the name of a quantity, or the terms surface . . . density are added 
to it, to indicate the quotient of that quantity (a scalar) and its associated surface area. 
Examples
 areic mass or surface (mass) density: 
ρ
A
m / A 
areic charge or surface charge density: 
σ
Q / A 
(d)  The adjective 
lineic 
is used to modify the name of a quantity, or the terms 
linear . . . density 
are added 
to it, to indicate the quotient of that quantity and its associated length. 
Examples
 lineic mass or linear (mass) density: 
ρ
l
m / l
lineic electric current or linear electric current density: 
I / b
9   Rules and Style Conventions for Spelling Unit Names 
The following eight sections give rules and style conventions related to spelling the names of units. 
9.1   Capitalization 
When spelled out in full, unit names are treated like ordinary English nouns. Thus the names of all 
units start with a lower-case letter, except at the beginning of a sentence or in capitalized material such as a 
title. 
In keeping with this rule, the correct spelling of the name of the unit ºC is “degree Celsius” (the unit 
“degree” begins with a lowercase “d” and the modifier “Celsius” begins with an uppercase “C” because it 
is the name of a person). 
9.2   Plurals 
Plural  unit  names  are  used  when  they  are  required  by  the  rules  of  English  grammar.  They  are 
normally  formed  regularly,  for  example,  “henries”  is  the  plural  of  henry.  According  to  Ref.  [6],  the 
following  plurals  are  irregular: 
Singular 
—lux,  hertz,  siemens; 
Plural 
—lux,  hertz,  siemens.  (See  also 
Sec. 9.7.) 
9.3   Spelling unit names with prefixes 
When the name of a unit containing a prefix is spelled out, no space or hyphen is used between the 
prefix and unit name (see Sec. 6.2.3). 
Examples
:   milligram 
but not:
milli-gram  
kilopascal  
but not:
kilo-pascal 
Reference  [6]  points  out  that  there  are  three  cases  in  which  the  final  vowel  of  an  SI  prefix  is 
commonly omitted: megohm (
not 
megaohm), kilohm (
not 
kiloohm), and hectare (
not 
hectoare). In all other 
cases in which the unit name begins with a vowel, both the final vowel of the prefix and the vowel of the 
unit name are retained and both are pronounced. 
9.4   Spelling unit names obtained by multiplication 
When the name of a derived unit formed from other units by multiplication is spelled out, a space, 
which is preferred by Ref. [6] and this 
Guide
, or a hyphen is used to separate the names of the individual 
units. 
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
Copy the demo codes and run your project to see New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to cut image from pdf file; paste jpeg into pdf
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
first! VB.NET Image & Picture Cropping Application. Do you need to save a copy of certain part of an image file in a programming way?
how to paste a picture into pdf; copy image from pdf to ppt
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
32 
Example:   pascal second or pascal-second 
9.5   Spelling unit names obtained by division 
When the name of a derived unit formed from other units by division is spelled out, the word “per” is used 
and not a solidus. (See also Secs. 6.1.7 and 9.8.) 
Example:   ampere per meter (A/m)  
but not:  
ampere/meter 
9.6   Spelling unit names raised to powers 
When the names of units raised to powers are spelled out, modifiers such as “squared” or “cubed” are used 
and are placed after the unit name.  
Example:   meter per second squared (m/s
2
The modifiers “square” or “cubic” may, however, be placed before the unit name in the case of area or 
volume. 
Examples:   square centimeter (cm
2
 
cubic millimeter (mm
3
ampere per square meter (A/m
2
)  
kilogram per cubic meter (kg/m
3
9.7   Other spelling conventions 
A derived unit is usually singular in English, for example, the value 3 m
2
·K/W is usually spelled out 
as “three square meter kelvin per watt,” and the value 3 C·m
2
/V is usually spelled out as “three coulomb 
meter squared per volt.” However, a “single” unit may be plural; for example, the value 5 kPa is spelled out 
as “five kilopascals,” although “five kilopascal” is acceptable. If in such a single-unit case the number is 
less than one, the unit is always singular when spelled out; for example, 0.5 kPa is spelled out as “five-
tenths kilopascal.”  
Note:  These other spelling conventions are given  for completeness; as  indicated in  Sec.  7.6, it  is the 
position of this Guide that symbols for numbers and units should be used to express the values of 
quantities,  not  the  spelled-out  names  of  numbers  and  units. Reference  [3] also  requires that  a 
symbol for a number be used whenever the value of a quantity is expressed in terms of a unit of 
measurement. 
9.8   Unacceptability of applying mathematical operations to unit names 
Because it could possibly lead to confusion, mathematical operations are not applied to unit names 
but only to unit symbols. (See also Secs. 6.1.7 and 9.5.) 
Example:   joule per kilogram or J/kg  or  J·kg
−1
 but not: 
joule/kilogram or  
joule·kilogram
−1
10   More on Printing and Using Symbols and Numbers in Scientific and Technical 
Documents
By following the guidance given in this chapter, NIST authors can prepare manuscripts that are consistent 
with accepted typesetting practice. 
4
This chapter is adapted in part from Refs. [4: ISO 31-0], and [4: ISO 31-11].
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we code demo, which you can directly copy to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
cut and paste image from pdf; copy image from pdf to
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor. dll. Open RasterEdge_MVC3 DemoProject, copy following content to your project:
how to cut and paste image from pdf; how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf document
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
33 
10.1   Kinds of symbols 
Letter symbols are of three principal kinds: (a) symbols for quantities, (b) symbols for units, and (c) 
symbols for descriptive terms. Quantity symbols, which are always printed in italic (that is, sloping) type, 
are,  with  few  exceptions,  single  letters  of  the  Latin  or  Greek  alphabets  that  may  have  subscripts  or 
superscripts or other identifying signs. Symbols for units, in particular those for acceptable units, have been 
discussed in detail in earlier portions of this Guide. Symbols for descriptive terms include the symbols for 
the  chemical  elements,  certain  mathematical  symbols,  and  modifying  superscripts  and  subscripts  on 
quantity symbols. 
10.1.1   Standardized quantity symbols 
The use of words, acronyms, or other ad hoc groups of letters as quantity symbols should be avoided 
by NIST authors. For example, use the quantity symbol Z
m
for mechanical impedance, not MI. In fact, there 
are nationally and internationally accepted symbols for literally hundreds of quantities used in the physical 
sciences and technology. Many of these are given in Refs. [4] and [5], and it is likely that symbols for the 
quantities used in most NIST publications can be found in these international standards or can readily be 
adapted  from  the  symbols  and  principles  given  in  these  standards.  Because  of  their  international 
acceptance, NIST authors are urged to use the symbols of Refs. [4] and [5] to the fullest extent possible.
5
Examples:   Ω (solid angle)  
Z
m
(mechanical impedance) 
L
P
(level of a power quantity)  
Δ
r
(relative mass excess) 
p (pressure)  
σ
tot
(total cross section) 
ĸ
T
(isothermal compressibility)  
Eu (Euler number) 
E (electric field strength)  
T
N
(Néel temperature) 
10.1.2   Standardized mathematical signs and symbols 
As is the case for quantity symbols, most of the mathematical signs and symbols used in the physical 
sciences and technology are standardized. They may be found in Ref. [4: ISO 31-11] and should be used by 
NIST authors to the fullest possible extent.
5
Examples:    
^
(conjunction sign, p 
^
q means p and q) 
(a ≠ b, a is not equal to b) 
def
=
(
a b,
def
=
a is by definition equal to b) 
≈ 
(a ≈ b, a is approximately equal to b) 
   
(a ~ b, a is proportionally equal to b) 
arcsin x   
(arc sine of x) 
log
  
(logarithm to the base a of x) 
lb x 
(lb x = log
x) 
ln x 
(ln x = log
x) 
lg x  
(lg x = log
10 
x) 
10.2 Typefaces for symbols  
Most word processing systems now in use at NIST are capable of producing lightface (that is, regular) or 
boldface letters of  the Latin or Greek alphabets in both roman (upright) and  italic (sloping) types. The 
5
In addition to Refs. [4] and [5], quantity symbols can also be found in ANSI/IEEE Std 280-1985, IEEE Standard Letter Symbols for 
Quantities Used in Electrical Science and Electrical Engineering. Similarly, in addition to Ref. [4: ISO 31-11], mathematical signs and 
symbols  are  also  given  in  ANSI/IEEE  Std  260.3-1993,  Mathematical  Signs  and  Symbols for  Use  in  Physical  Sciences  and 
Technology. Another publication is the book, Symbols, Units, Nomenclature and Fundamental Constants in Physics, 1987 Revision, 
by E. R. Cohen and P. Giacomo, International Union of Pure and Applied Physics, SUNAMCO Commission [reprinted from Physica, 
Vol. 146A, Nos. 1-2, p. 1 (November, 1987)].  See also Ref. [6], Note 3. 
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned or all image objects from PDF document in
copy image from pdf to pdf; copy image from pdf to word
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo remove multiple or all images from PDF document.
how to copy images from pdf to word; how to copy pdf image to word document
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
34 
understandability of NIST typed and typeset scientific and technical publications is facilitated if symbols 
are  in the correct typeface.  The  typeface in  which  a  symbol  appears helps to  define  what  the  symbol 
represents. For example, irrespective of the typeface used in the surrounding text, “A” would be typed or 
typeset in: 
— italic type for the scalar quantity area: A; 
— roman type for the unit ampere: A; 
— italic boldface for the vector quantity vector potential: 
A
More specifically, the three major categories of symbols found in scientific and technical publications 
should be typed or typeset in either italic or roman type, as follows: 
— symbols for quantities and variables: italic; 
— symbols for units: roman; 
— symbols for descriptive terms: roman. 
These rules imply that a subscript or superscript on a quantity symbol is in roman type if it is descriptive 
(for example, if it is a number or represents the name of a person or a particle); but it is in italic type if it 
represents a quantity, or is a variable such as x in E
x
or an index such as i in ∑
i
x
i
that represents a number 
(see Secs. 10.2.1, 10.2.3, and 10.2.4). An index that represents a number is also called a “running number” 
[4: ISO 31-0]. 
Notes: 
1.  The above rules also imply, for example, that μ, the symbol for the SI prefix micro (10
!6
), that Ω, 
the symbol for the SI derived unit ohm, and that F, the symbol for the SI derived unit farad, are in 
roman  type;  but  they  are  in  italic  type  if  they  represent  quantities  (μ,  Ω,  and  F  are  the 
recommended symbols for the quantities magnetic moment of a particle, solid angle, and force, 
respectively). 
2.  The typeface for numbers is discussed in Sec. 10.5.1. The following four sections give examples 
of the proper typefaces for these three major categories. 
10.2.1   Quantities and variables — italic 
Symbols for quantities are italic, as are symbols for functions in general, for example, f (x):  
t = 3 s  
time, s second  
T = 22 K 
T temperature, K kelvin
r = 11 cm  
r radius, cm centimeter   λ = 633 nm  
λ wavelength, nm nanometer 
Constants  are  usually  physical  quantities  and  thus  their  symbols  are  italic;  however,  in  general, 
symbols used as subscripts and superscripts are roman if descriptive (see Sec. 10.2.3): 
N
A  
Avogadro constant, A Avogadro  
R   molar gas constant 
θ
D
 Debye temperature, D Debye  
  atomic number 
e  
elementary charge  
m
e
 m mass, e electron 
Running numbers and symbols for variables in mathematical equations are italic, as are symbols for 
parameters such as a and b that may be considered constant in a given context: 
=
=
m
i
i i
xz
y
1
x
2
= ay
2
= bz
2
Symbols for vectors are boldface italic, symbols for tensors are sans-serif bold italic, and symbols 
for matrices are italic: 
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
A
·
(vectors)   
T
(tensors)  
(matrices) 
=
21
11
22
21
a a
a a
A
Symbols used as subscripts and superscripts are italic if they represent quantities or variables: 
C
p
  pressure  
q
m
 m  mass  
σ
 Ω  solid angle  
z
ω
z   z coordinate 
10.2.2   Units— roman 
The symbols for units and SI prefixes are roman: 
  meter  
gram  
 
liter 
cm   centimeter  
μg   microgram  
mL   milliliter 
10.2.3   Descriptive terms — roman 
Symbols representing purely descriptive terms (for example, the chemical elements) are roman, as 
are  symbols  representing  mathematical  constants  that  never  change  (for  example,  π)  and  symbols 
representing explicitly defined functions or well defined operators (for example, Γ(x) or div): 
Chemical elements: 
Ar   argon  
B  
boron  
C  
carbon 
Mathematical constants, functions, and operators: 
e  
base of natural logarithms  
Σx
i
Σ 
sum of 
exp x   exp  exponential of  
log
a
x   log
a
 logarithm to the base a of 
dx/dt   d  
1st derivative of  
sin x   sin   sine of 
Symbols used as subscripts and superscripts are roman if descriptive: 
ir  
irrational  
E
k
k  
kinetic 
(ir)
0
ε
  molar, l liquid phase  
μ
B
B  
Bohr 
1
m
V
10.2.4   Sample equations showing correct type 
2
0
1 2
4
r
q q
F
πε
=
F = ma   
pV = nRT 
φ
B
= x
B
V
*
m,B 
/
E
a
= RT
2
d(1n k) / dT 
c
1
= λ
−5
/[exp(c
2
/ λT) − 1] 
A
A
xV
,
*
m
E = mc
2
/ )
(
lim
~
B
B
0
B
B
λ
λ
x p
p
p→
=
V
Q
grad
= −
F
10.3   Greek alphabet in roman and italic type 
Table 13 shows the proper form, in both roman and italic type, of the upper-case and lower-case letters of 
the Greek alphabet. 
35 
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
36 
Table 13. Greek alphabet in roman and italic type 
Greek Letter Name 
Roman 
Italic 
alpha 
Α 
α 
Α 
α 
beta 
Β 
β 
Β
β
gamma 
Γ 
γ 
Γ 
γ 
delta 
Δ 
δ 
Δ 
δ 
epsilon 
Ε 
ε 
Ε 
ε 
zeta 
Ζ 
ζ 
Ζ 
ζ 
eta 
Η 
η 
Η 
η 
theta 
Θ, Ө
(a)
θ, ϑ 
(b)
Θ, 
Ө
(a)
θ, 
ϑ
(b)
iota 
Ι 
ι 
Ι 
kappa 
Κ 
κ, ϰ 
(
β
)
Κ 
κ, 
ϰ
(b)
lambda 
Λ 
λ 
Λ 
λ 
mu 
Μ 
μ 
Μ 
μ 
nu 
Ν 
ν 
Ν 
ν 
xi 
Ξ 
ξ 
Ξ 
ξ 
omicron 
Ο 
ο 
Ο 
ο 
pi 
Π 
π, ϖ
(b)
Π 
π, 
ϖ
(b)
rho 
Ρ 
ρ 
Ρ 
ρ 
sigma 
Σ 
σ 
Σ 
σ 
tau 
Τ 
τ 
Τ 
τ 
upsilon 
Υ 
υ 
Υ 
υ 
phi 
Φ 
ϕ, φ 
Φ 
φ,
 φ
chi 
Χ 
χ 
Χ 
χ 
psi 
Ψ 
ψ 
Ψ 
ψ 
omega 
Ω 
ω 
Ω 
ω 
(a)   ISO (see Ref. [4: ISO 31-0]) gives only the first of these two letters. 
(b)   ISO (see Ref. [4: ISO 31-0]) gives these two letters in the reverse order. 
10.4   Symbols for the elements 
The following two sections give the rules and style conventions for the symbols for the elements. 
10.4.1   Typeface and punctuation for element symbols 
Symbols for the elements are normally printed in roman type without regard to the type used in the 
surrounding text (see Sec. 10.2.3). They are not followed by a period unless at the end of a sentence. 
10.4.2   Subscripts and superscripts on element symbols 
The nucleon number (mass number) of a nuclide is indicated in the left superscript position:   
28
Si.  
The  number  of  atoms  in  a  molecule  of  a  particular  nuclide  is  shown  in  the  right  subscript 
position:  
1
H
2
The proton number (atomic number) is indicated in the left subscript position: 
29
Cu. 
The state of ionization or excitation is indicated in the right superscript position, some examples of 
which are as follows: 
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
State of ionization:   Ba
++
Co(NO
2
)
6
− − −.
or  
or 
[Co(NO
2
)
6
]
3 −
3−
2 6
)
Co(NO
Electronic excited state:  
Ne*, CO
Nuclear excited state:  
15
N* or 
15
N
m
10.5   Printing numbers 
The following three sections give rules and style conventions related to the printing of numbers. 
10.5.1   Typeface for numbers 
Arabic numerals expressing the numerical values of quantities (see Sec. 7.6) are generally printed in 
lightface  (that  is,  regular)  roman  type  irrespective  of  the  type  used  for  the  surrounding  text.    Arabic 
numerals other than numerical values of quantities may be printed in lightface or bold italics, or in bold 
roman type, but lightface roman type is usually preferred. 
10.5.2   Decimal sign or marker 
The recommended decimal sign or marker for use in the United States is the dot on the line [3, 6]. 
For numbers less than one, a zero is written before the decimal marker. For example, 0.25 s is the correct 
form, not .25 s. 
10.5.3   Grouping digits 
Because the comma is widely used as the decimal marker outside the United States, it should not be 
used  to  separate  digits  into  groups  of  three.  Instead,  digits  should  be  separated  into  groups  of  three, 
counting from the decimal marker towards the left and right, by the use of a thin, fixed space. However, 
this  practice  is  not  usually  followed  for  numbers having only  four digits on either side of  the  decimal 
marker except when uniformity in a table is desired. 
Examples:   76 483 522  
but not:  
76,483,522 
43 279.168 29  
but not:  
43,279.168 29 
8012 or 8 012  
but not:  
8,012 
0.491 722 3  
is highly preferred to:  
0.4917223 
0.5947 or 0.594 7  
but not:  
0.59 47 
8012.5947 or 8 012.594 7  
but not:  
8 012.5947 or 8012.594 7 
Note:   The  practice  of  using  a  space  to  group  digits  is  not  usually  followed  in  certain  specialized 
applications, such as engineering drawings and financial statements. 
10.5.4   Multiplying numbers 
When  the  dot  is used  as  the  decimal  marker  as  in  the  United  States, the  preferred  sign  for  the 
multiplication of numbers or values of quantities is a cross (that is, multiplication sign) (×), not a half-high 
(that is, centered) dot (·). 
Examples:   25 × 60.5  
but not:  
25·60.5 
53 m/s × 10.2 s  
but not:  
53 m/s·10.2 s 
15 × 72 kg  
but not:  
15·72 kg 
37 
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
38 
Notes: 
1.   When  the  comma  is  used  as  the  decimal  marker,  the  preferred  sign  for  the  multiplication  of 
numbers is the half-high dot. However, even when the comma is so used, this Guide prefers the 
cross for the multiplication of values of quantities. 
2.   The  multiplication  of  quantity  symbols  (or  numbers  in  parentheses  or  values  of  quantities  in 
parentheses) may be indicated in one of the following ways: ab, a b, a·b, a × b. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested