pdf viewer in c# windows application : Copy image from pdf Library control API .net web page windows sharepoint sp8115-part1415

Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
39 
Appendix A.  Definitions of the SI Base Units 
A.1   Introduction 
The following definitions of the SI base units are taken from Refs. [1, 2]; it should be noted that SI 
derived units are uniquely defined only in terms of SI base units; for example, 1 V = 1 m
2
·kg·s
−3
·A
−1
A.2   Meter 
(17th CGPM, 1983) 
The meter is the length of the path traveled by light in vacuum during a time interval of 
1/299 792 
458 
of a second. 
A.3   Kilogram 
(3d CGPM, 1901) 
The kilogram  is  the unit of mass; it is equal to the mass of  the international prototype of the 
kilogram. 
A.4   Second 
(13th CGPM, 1967) 
The second is the duration of 
9 192 631 770 
periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition 
between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the cesium-
133 
atom. 
A.5   Ampere 
(9th CGPM, 1948) 
The ampere is that constant current which, if maintained in two straight parallel conductors of 
infinite length, of negligible circular cross section, and placed 
meter apart in vacuum, would produce 
between these conductors a force equal to 
2 × 10
−7
newton per meter of length. 
A.6   Kelvin 
(13th CGPM, 1967) 
The  kelvin, unit of thermodynamic  temperature,  is the fraction 
1/273.16 
of the thermodynamic 
temperature of the triple point of water.
A.7   Mole 
(14th CGPM, 1971) 
1. 
The mole is the amount of substance of a system which contains as many elementary entities as 
there are atoms in
0.012
kilogram of carbon 
12
.
2. 
When the mole is used, the elementary entities must be specified and may be atoms, molecules, 
ions, electrons, other particles, or specified groups of such particles.
In the definition of the mole, it is understood that unbound atoms of carbon 12, at rest and in their 
ground state, are referred to. 
Note
:   This definition specifies at the same time the nature of the quantity whose unit is the mole. 
A.8   Candela 
(16th CGPM, 1979) 
The candela is the luminous intensity, in a given direction, of a source that emits monochromatic 
radiation of frequency 
540 × 10
12
hertz and that has a radiant intensity in that direction of 
(1/683)
watt per 
steradian. 
Copy image from pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
copy images from pdf file; copy a picture from pdf
Copy image from pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy and paste an image from a pdf; paste image on pdf preview
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
40 
Appendix B. Conversion Factors
6
B.1   Introduction 
Sections B.8 and B.9 give factors for converting values of quantities expressed in various units—
predominantly units outside the SI that are unacceptable for use with it—to values expressed either in (a) SI 
units, (b) units that are accepted for use with the SI (especially units that better reflect the nature of the 
unconverted units), (c) units formed from such accepted units and SI units, or (d) decimal multiples or 
submultiples of the units of (a) to (c) that yield numerical values of convenient magnitudes. 
An example of (d) is the following: the values of quantities expressed in ångströms, such as the 
wavelengths of  visible  laser  radiations, are  usually  converted to values  expressed  in  nanometers, not 
meters. More generally, if desired, one can eliminate powers of 10 that appear in converted values as a 
result of using the conversion factors (or simply factors for brevity) of Secs. B.8 and B.9 by selecting an 
appropriate SI prefix (see Sec. B.3). 
B.2   Notation 
The factors given in Secs. B.8 and B.9 are written as a number equal to or greater than 1 and less 
than 10, with 6 or fewer decimal places. The number is followed by the letter E, which stands for exponent, 
a plus (+) or minus (–) sign, and two digits that indicate the power of 10 by which the number is multiplied. 
Examples:   3.523 907 E−02 means 3.523 907 × 10
−2
= 0.035 239 07 
3.386 389 E+03 means 3.386 389 × 10
3
= 3386.389 
A factor  in  boldface is  exact.  All other factors have  been  rounded  to  the  significant digits  given  in 
accordance with accepted practice (see Secs. 7.9, B.7.2, and Refs. [4: ISO 31-0] and [6]). Where less than 
six digits after the decimal place are given, the unit does not warrant a greater number of digits in its 
conversion. However, for the convenience of the user, this practice is not followed for all such units, 
including the cord, cup, quad, and teaspoon. 
B.3   Use of conversion factors 
Each entry in Secs. B.8 and B.9 is to be interpreted as in these two examples: 
To convert from  
to  
Multiply by 
atmosphere, standard (atm) ...........................pascal (Pa).......................................1.01325....................E+05 
cubic foot per second (ft
3
/s) ..........................cubic meter per second (m
3
/s).........2.831 685.................E−02 
means  
1 atm = 101 325 Pa (exactly); 
1 ft
3
/s = 0.028 316 85 m
3
/s. 
Thus to express, for example, the pressure p = 11.8 standard atmospheres (atm) in pascals (Pa), write 
p = 11.8 atm × 101 325 Pa/atm and obtain the converted numerical value 11.8 × 101 325 = 1 195 635 and 
the converted value p = 1.20 MPa. 
6
This appendix is essentially the same as Appendix B of the 1995 Edition.  That appendix was significantly revised version of 
Appendix C of the 1991 Edition, which  was reprinted from ANSI/IEEE Std 268-1982, American National Standard Metric Practice, 
©1982 by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc., with the permission of the IEEE. The origin of this material is E. 
A. Mechtly, The International System of Units — Physical Constants and Conversion Factors, NASA SP-7012, Second Revision, 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC, 1973). 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. List<PDFImage> allImages = PDFImageHandler. ExtractImages(page); C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
paste image into pdf form; how to copy pdf image to jpg
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for
how to copy picture from pdf to powerpoint; how to copy pdf image
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
41 
Notes: 
1.   Guidance on rounding converted numerical values of quantities is given in Sec. B.7.2.  
2.   If the value of a quantity is expressed in a unit of the center column of Sec. B.8 or B.9 and it is 
necessary to express it in the corresponding unit of the first column, divide by the factor. 
The factors for derived units not included in Secs. B.8 and B.9 can readily be found from the 
factors given.  
Examples:   To find the factor for converting values in lb·ft/s to values in kg·m/s, obtain from Sec. B.8 or 
B.9 
1 lb = 4.535 924 E−01 kg 
1 ft = 3.048 E−01 m 
and substitute these values into the unit lb·ft/s to obtain  
1 lb·ft/s = 0.453 592 4 kg × 0.3048 m/s 
= 0.138 255 0 kg·m/s 
and the factor is 1.382 550 E−01. 
To find the factor for converting values in (avoirdupois) oz·in
2
to values in kg·m
2
, obtain from 
Sec. B.8 or B.9 
1 oz = 2.834 952 E−02 kg 
1 in
2
= 6.4516 E−04 m
and substitute these values into the unit oz·in
2
to obtain 
1 oz·in
2
= 0.028 349 52 kg × 0.000 645 16 m
2
= 0.000 018 289 98 kg·m
2
and the factor is 1.828 998 E−05. 
B.4   Organization of entries and style 
In Sec. B.8 the units for which factors are given are listed alphabetically, while in Sec B.9 the same 
units are listed alphabetically within the following alphabetized list of kinds of quantities and fields of 
science: 
ACCELERATION 
FORCE DIVIDED BY LENGTH  
ANGLE 
HEAT   
AREA AND SECOND MOMENT  
Available Energy 
OF AREA 
Coefficient of Heat Transfer 
CAPACITY (see VOLUME) 
Density of Heat 
DENSITY (that is, MASS DENSITY) 
Density of Heat Flow Rate 
(see MASS DIVIDED BY VOLUME) 
Fuel Consumption  
ELECTRICITY and MAGNETISM 
Heat Capacity and Entropy 
ENERGY (includes WORK) 
Heat Flow Rate 
ENERGY DIVIDED BY AREA TIME 
Specific Heat Capacity and Specific Entropy 
FLOW (see MASS DIVIDED BY TIME  
Thermal Conductivity 
or VOLUME DIVIDED BY TIME) 
Thermal Diffusivity   
FORCE 
Thermal Insulance 
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into another PDF file. The
how to copy pictures from a pdf file; how to copy text from pdf image
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the point VB.NET: Clone a PDF Page. Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(filepath) ' Copy the first
how to copy picture from pdf and paste in word; copy image from pdf to powerpoint
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
42 
FORCE DIVIDED BY AREA 
Thermal Resistance 
(see PRESSURE) 
Thermal Resistivity 
LENGTH 
POWER 
LIGHT 
PRESSURE or STRESS (FORCE 
MASS and MOMENT OF INERTIA 
DIVIDED BY AREA) 
MASS DENSITY (see MASS DIVIDED 
RADIOLOGY   
BY VOLUME) 
SPEED (see VELOCITY)  
MASS DIVIDED BY AREA 
STRESS (see PRESSURE) 
MASS DIVIDED BY CAPACITY 
TEMPERATURE 
(see MASS DIVIDED BY VOLUME) 
TEMPERATURE INTERVAL 
MASS DIVIDED BY LENGTH 
TIME 
MASS DIVIDED BY TIME 
TORQUE (see MOMENT OF FORCE) 
(includes FLOW) 
VELOCITY (includes SPEED) 
MASS DIVIDED BY VOLUME 
VISCOSITY, DYNAMIC 
(includes MASS DENSITY and 
VISCOSITY, KINEMATIC 
MASS CONCENTRATION)   
VOLUME (includes CAPACITY) 
MOMENT OF FORCE or TORQUE 
VOLUME DIVIDED BY TIME   
MOMENT OF FORCE or TORQUE, 
(includes FLOW) 
DIVIDED BY LENGTH 
WORK (see ENERGY) 
PERMEABILITY 
In  Secs.  B.8  and  B.9,  the  units  in  the  left-hand  columns  are  written  as  they  are  often  used 
customarily; the rules and style conventions recommended in this Guide are not necessarily observed. 
Further, many are obsolete and some are not consistent with good technical practice. The corresponding 
units in the center columns  are,  however, written in  accordance with the rules  and style  conventions 
recommended in this Guide
B.5   Factor for converting motor vehicle efficiency 
The efficiency of motor vehicles in the United States is commonly expressed in miles per U.S. 
gallon, while in most other countries it is expressed in liters per one hundred kilometers. To convert fuel 
economy stated in miles per U.S. gallon to fuel consumption expressed in L/(100 km), divide 235.215 by 
the numerical value of the stated fuel economy. Thus 24 miles per gallon corresponds to 9.8 L/(100 km). 
B.6   U.S. survey foot and mile 
The U.S. Metric Law of 1866 gave the relationship 1 m = 39.37 in (in is the unit symbol for the 
inch). From 1893 until 1959, the yard was defined as being exactly equal to (3600/3937) m, and thus the 
foot was defined as being exactly equal to (1200/3937) m.  
In 1959 the definition of the yard was changed to bring the U.S. yard and the yard used in other 
countries into agreement; see Ref. [7: FR 1959]. Since then the yard has been defined as exactly equal to 
0.9144 m, and thus the foot has been defined as exactly equal to 0.3048 m. At the same time it was decided 
that any data expressed in feet derived from geodetic surveys within the United States would continue to 
bear the relationship as defined in 1893, namely, 1 ft = (1200/3937) m (ft is the unit symbol for the foot). 
The  name  of  this  foot  is  “U.S.  survey  foot,”  while  the  name  of  the  new  foot  defined  in  1959  is 
“international  foot.”  The  two  are  related  to  each  other  through  the  expression  1  international 
foot = 0.999 998 U.S. survey foot exactly. 
In Secs. B.8 and B.9, the factors given are based on the international foot unless otherwise indicated. 
Users  of  this Guide will  also  find  the  following  summary of  exact  relationships  helpful,  where for 
convenience in this section, the symbols ft and mi, that is, ft and mi in italic type, indicate that it is the U.S. 
survey foot or U.S. survey mile that is meant rather than the international foot (ft) or international mile (mi), 
and where rd is the unit symbol for the rod and fur is the unit symbol for the furlong. 
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Insert Image to PDF Page Using VB. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
paste image into pdf preview; how to copy pictures from a pdf document
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Best and professional C# image to PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. C#.NET Example: Convert One Image to PDF in Visual C# .NET Class.
how to copy picture from pdf file; how to copy images from pdf
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
43 
1 ft = (1200/3937) m 
1 ft = 0.3048 m 
1 ft = 0.999 998 ft 
1 rd, pole, or perch = 16 ½ ft 
40 rd = 1 fur = 660 ft 
8 fur = 1 U.S. survey mile (also called “statute mile”) = 1 mi = 5280 ft 
1 fathom = 6 ft 
1 international mile = 1 mi = 5280 ft 
272 1/4 ft
2
= 1 rd
2
160 rd
2
= 1 acre = 43 560 ft
2
640 acre = 1 mi
2
B.7   Rules for rounding numbers and converted numerical values of quantities 
Rules for rounding numbers are discussed in Refs. [4: ISO 31-0] and [6]; the latter reference also 
gives rules for rounding the converted numerical values of quantities whose values expressed in units that 
are not accepted for use with the SI (primarily customary or inch-pound units) are converted to values 
expressed in acceptable units. This Guide gives the principal rules for rounding numbers in Sec. B.7.1, and 
the basic principle for rounding converted numerical values of quantities in Sec. B.7.2. The cited references 
should be consulted for additional details. 
B.7.1  Rounding numbers 
To replace a number having a given number of digits with a number (called the rounded number) 
having a smaller number of digits, one may follow these rules: 
1.  If the digits to be discarded begin with a digit less than 5, the digit preceding the 5 is not changed. 
Example:  6.974 951 5 rounded to 3 digits is 6.97 
2.  If the digits to be discarded begin with a 5 and at least one of the following digits is greater than 0, 
the digit preceding the 5 is increased by 1. 
Examples:  6.974 951 5 rounded to 2 digits is 7.0 
6.974 951 5 rounded to 5 digits is 6.9750 
3.  If the digits to be discarded begin with a 5 and all of the following digits are 0, the digit preceding 
the 5 is unchanged if it is even and increased by 1 if it is odd. (Note that this means that the final 
digit is always even.) 
Examples:   6.974 951 5 rounded to 7 digits is 6.974 952 
6.974 950 5 rounded to 7 digits is 6.974 950 
B.7.2  Rounding converted numerical values of quantities 
The use of the factors given in Secs. B.8 and B.9 to convert values of quantities was demonstrated in 
Sec. B.3. In most cases the product of the unconverted numerical value and the factor will be a numerical 
value with a number of digits that exceeds the number of significant digits (see Sec. 7.9) of the unconverted 
numerical value. Proper conversion procedure requires rounding this converted numerical value to the 
number of significant digits that is consistent with the maximum possible rounding error of the unconverted 
numerical value. 
Example:  To express the value l = 36 ft in meters, use the factor 3.048 E−01 from Sec. B.8 or Sec. B.9 
and write 
l = 36 ft × 0.3048 m/ft = 10.9728 m = 11.0 m. 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
copy images from pdf to powerpoint; how to cut picture from pdf file
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Replace Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL.
paste image in pdf preview; how to copy an image from a pdf to word
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
44 
The final result, l = 11.0 m, is based on the following reasoning: The numerical value “36” has two 
significant digits, and thus a relative maximum possible rounding error (abbreviated RE in this Guide for 
simplicity) of ± 0.5/36 = ± 1.4 %, because it could have resulted from rounding the number 35.5, 36.5, or 
any  number  between  35.5  and  36.5.  To  be  consistent  with  this  RE,  the  converted  numerical  value 
“10.9728”  is  rounded  to  11.0  or  three  significant  digits  because  the  number  11.0  has  an  RE 
of ± 0.05/11.0 = ± 0.45 %. Although this ± 0.45 % RE is one-third of the ± 1.4 % RE of the unconverted 
numerical  value  “36,”  if  the  converted  numerical  value  “10.9728”  had  been  rounded  to  11  or  two 
significant digits, information contained in the unconverted numerical value “36” would have been lost. 
This is because the RE of the numerical value “11” is ± 0.5/11 = ± 4.5 %, which is three times the 
± 1.4 % RE of the unconverted numerical value “36.” This example therefore shows that when selecting the 
number of digits to retain in the numerical value of a converted quantity, one must often choose between 
discarding  information  or  providing  unwarranted  information.  Consideration  of  the  end  use  of  the 
converted value can often help one decide which choice to make. 
Note:  Consider that one had been told initially that the value l = 36 ft had been rounded to the nearest inch. 
Then in this case, since l is known to within ± 1 in, the RE of the numerical value “36” is ± 1 
in/(36 ft × 12 in/ft) = ± 0.23 %. Although this is less than the ± 0.45 % RE of the number 11.0, it is 
comparable to it. Therefore, the result l = 11.0 m is still given as the converted value. (Note that the 
numerical value “10.97” would give excessive unwarranted information because it has an RE that is 
one-fifth of ± 0.23 %.) 
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
45 
B.8   Factors for units listed alphabetically 
Caution: The units listed in column 1 are in general not to be used in NIST publications, with the exception 
of those few in italic type. 
Factors in boldface are exact 
To convert from  
to  
Multiply by 
abampere.............................................................. ampere (A) ...................................................... 1.0   E+01 
abcoulomb ........................................................... coulomb (C) .................................................... 1.0   E+01 
abfarad.................................................................. farad (F) .......................................................... 1.0   E+09 
abhenry ................................................................ henry (H) ......................................................... 1.0   E−09 
abmho................................................................... siemens (S) ...................................................... 1.0   E+09 
abohm................................................................... ohm (Ω) ........................................................... 1.0   E−09 
abvolt ................................................................... volt (V) ............................................................ 1.0   E−08 
acceleration of free fall, standard (g
n
)................... meter per second squared (m / s
2
)........... 9.806 65   E+00 
acre (based on U.S. survey foot)
7
........................ square meter (m
2
).................................. 4.046 873   E+03 
acre foot (based on U.S. survey foot)
7
................. cubic meter (m
3
) ................................... 1.233 489   E+03 
ampere hour (A·h) ............................................... coulomb (C) .................................................... 3.6   E+03 
ångström (Å)......................................................... meter (m)  ........................................................ 1.0   E−10 
ångström (Å)......................................................... nanometer (nm)................................................ 1.0   E−01 
are (a) ................................................................... square meter (m
2
) ............................................ 1.0   E+02 
astronomical unit (ua) ......................................... meter (m)  ............................................. 1.495 979   E+11 
atmosphere, standard (atm) .................................. pascal (Pa) .............................................. 1.013 25   E+05 
atmosphere, standard (atm)  ................................. kilopascal (kPa) ...................................... 1.013 25   E+02 
atmosphere, technical (at)
8
................................... pascal (Pa) .............................................. 9.806 65   E+04 
atmosphere, technical (at)
8
................................... kilopascal (kPa) ...................................... 9.806 65   E+01 
bar (bar) ............................................................... pascal (Pa) ....................................................... 1.0   E+05 
bar (bar) ............................................................... kilopascal (kPa) ............................................... 1.0   E+02 
barn (b) ................................................................ square meter (m
2
)............................................. 1.0   E−28 
barrel [for petroleum, 42 gallons (U.S.)](bbl) ...... cubic meter (m
3
) ................................... 1.589 873   E−01 
barrel [for petroleum, 42 gallons (U.S.)](bbl) ..... liter (L) ................................................. 1.589 873   E+02 
biot (Bi)................................................................ ampere (A) ...................................................... 1.0   E+01 
British thermal unit
IT
(Btu
IT
)
9
............................... joule (J) ................................................ 1.055 056   E+03 
British thermal unit
th
(Btu
IT
)
9
................................ joule (J) ................................................ 1.054 350   E+03 
British thermal unit (mean) (Btu) ........................ joule (J)................................................... 1.055 87   E+03 
British thermal unit (39 ºF) (Btu) ........................ joule (J)................................................... 1.059 67   E+03 
British thermal unit (59 ºF) (Btu) ........................ joule (J)................................................... 1.054 80   E+03 
British thermal unit (60 ºF) (Btu) ........................ joule (J)................................................... 1.054 68   E+03 
British thermal unit
IT
foot per hour square foot degree Fahrenheit 
[Btu
IT
·ft/(h·ft
2
·ºF)].......................................... watt per meter kelvin [W / (m · K)]...... 1.730 735   E+00 
British thermal unit
th
foot per hour square foot degree Fahrenheit 
[Btu
th
·ft/(h·ft
2
·ºF)] .........................................watt per meter kelvin [W / (m · K)] ...... 1.729 577   E+00 
British thermal unit
IT
inch per hour square foot degree Fahrenheit 
[Btu
IT
·in/(h·ft
2
·ºF)] ........................................ watt per meter kelvin [W / (m · K)]...... 1.442 279   E−01 
British thermal unit
th
inch per hour square foot degree Fahrenheit 
[Btu
th
·in/(h·ft
2
·ºF)] ........................................ watt per meter kelvin [W / (m · K)] ..... 1.441 314   E−01 
British thermal unit
IT
inch per second square foot degree Fahrenheit 
[Btu
IT
·in/(s·ft
2
·ºF)]......................................... watt per meter kelvin [W / (m · K)] ..... 5.192 204   E+02 
7 For remarks on U.S. survey foot, see Sec. B.6. 
8 One technical atmosphere equals one kilogram-force per square centimeter (1 at = 1 kgf/cm2). 
9 The Fifth International Conference on the Properties of Steam (London, July 1956) defined the International Table calorie as 
4.1868 J. Therefore, the exact conversion factor for the International Table Btu is 1.055 055 852 62 kJ. Note that the notation for 
International Table used in this listing is subscript “IT.”  Similarily, the notation for thermochemical is subscript “th.” Further, the 
thermochemical Btu, Btuth, is based on the thermochemical calorie, calth, where calth = 4.184 J exactly. 
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
46 
To convert from  
to  
Multiply by 
British thermal unit
th
inch per second square foot degree Fahrenheit 
[Btu
th
·in/(s·ft
2
·ºF)] ......................................... watt per meter kelvin [W / (m · K)] ..... 5.188 732   E+02 
British thermal unit
IT
per cubic foot 
(Btu
IT
/ft
3
) ...................................................... joule per cubic meter (J / m
3
)................ 3.725 895   E+04 
British thermal unit
th
per cubic foot 
(Btu
th
/ft
3
)  ...................................................... joule per cubic meter (J / m
3
) ............... 3.723 403   E+04 
British thermal unit
IT
per degree Fahrenheit 
(Btu
IT
/ºF) ...................................................... joule per kelvin (J / K) ......................... 1.899 101   E+03 
British thermal unit
th
per degree Fahrenheit 
(Btu
th
/ºF)........................................................ joule per kelvin (J  / K) ........................ 1.897 830   E+03 
British thermal unit
IT
per degree Rankine 
(Btu
IT 
/ ºR)..................................................... joule per kelvin (J / K) ......................... 1.899 101   E+03 
British thermal unit
th
per degree Rankine 
(Btu
th 
/ ºR) ..................................................... joule per kelvin (J / K) ......................... 1.897 830   E+03 
British thermal unit
IT
per hour (Btu
IT
/h) .............. watt (W)................................................ 2.930 711   E−01 
British thermal unit
th
per hour (Btu
th
/h) ............... watt (W)................................................ 2.928 751   E−01 
British thermal unit
IT
per hour square foot degree Fahrenheit 
[Btu
IT 
/ (h·ft
2
·ºF)] .......................................... watt per square meter kelvin 
[W / (m
· K)]........................................ 5.678 263   E+00 
British thermal unit
th
per hour square foot degree Fahrenheit 
[Btu
th 
/ (h·ft
2
·ºF)] ........................................... watt per square meter kelvin 
[W / (m
· K)]........................................ 5.674 466   E+00 
British thermal unit
th
per minute (Btu
th 
/ min)...... watt (W) ............................................... 1.757 250   E+01 
British thermal unit
IT
per pound (Btu
IT 
/ lb) ......... joule per kilogram (J / kg) ........................... 
2.326   E+03 
British thermal unit
th
per pound (Btu
th 
/ lb) .......... joule per kilogram (J / kg) .................... 2.324 444   E+03 
British thermal unit
IT
per pound degree Fahrenheit 
[Btu
IT 
/ (lb·ºF)] .............................................. joule per kilogram kelvin (J / (kg
· K)] ...... 
4.1868   E+03 
British thermal unit
th
per pound degree Fahrenheit 
[Btu
th 
/ (lb·ºF)]  .............................................. joule per kilogram kelvin [J / (kg
· K)] ........ 
4.184   E+03 
British thermal unit
IT
per pound degree Rankine 
[Btu
IT 
/ (lb·ºR)] .............................................. joule per kilogram kelvin [J / (kg
· K)] ...... 
4.1868   E+03 
British thermal unit
t
h per pound degree Rankine 
[Btu
th 
/ (lb·ºR)] .............................................. joule per kilogram kelvin [J / (kg
· K)] ........ 
4.184   E+03 
British thermal unit
IT
per second (Btu
IT 
/ s) ......... watt (W) ............................................... 1.055 056   E+03 
British thermal unit
th
per second (Btu
th 
/ s) .......... watt (W) ............................................... 1.054 350   E+03 
British thermal unit
IT
per second square foot degree Fahrenheit 
[Btu
IT 
/ (s
· ft
2
·ºF)] ......................................... watt per square meter kelvin 
[W/(m
· K)] ......................................... 2.044 175   E+04 
British thermal unit
th
per second square foot degree Fahrenheit 
[Btu
th 
/ (s
· ft
2
·ºF)] .......................................... watt per square meter kelvin 
[W/(m
· K)] ......................................... 2.042 808   E+04 
British thermal unit
IT
per square foot 
(Btu
IT 
/ ft
2
) .................................................... joule per square meter (J / m
2
) ............. 1.135 653   E+04 
British thermal unit
th
per square foot 
(Btu
th 
/ ft
2
) ..................................................... joule per square meter (J / m
2
) ............. 1.134 893   E+04 
British thermal unit
IT
per square foot hour 
[(Btu
IT 
/ (ft
· h)] ............................................ watt per square meter (W / m
2
) ............ 3.154 591   E+00 
British thermal unit
th
per square foot hour 
[Btu
th 
/ (ft
· h)] .............................................. watt per square meter (W / m
2
) ............ 3.152 481   E+00 
British thermal unit
t
h per square foot minute 
[Btu
th 
/ (ft
· min)] ......................................... watt per square meter (W / m
2
) ............ 1.891 489   E+02 
British thermal unit
IT
per square foot second 
[(Btu
IT 
/ (ft
· s)] ............................................ watt per square meter (W / m
2
) ............ 1.135 653   E+04 
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
47 
To convert from  
to  
Multiply by 
British thermal unit
th
per square foot second 
[Btu
th 
/ (ft
· s)] .............................................. watt per square meter (W / m
2
) ............ 1.134 893   E+04 
British thermal unit
th
per square inch second 
[Btu
th 
/(in
· s)] .............................................. watt per square meter (W / m
2
) ............ 1.634 246   E+06 
bushel (U.S.) (bu) ................................................ cubic meter (m
3
) ................................... 3.523 907   E−02 
bushel (U.S.) (bu) ................................................ liter (L) ................................................. 3.523 907   E+01 
calorie
IT
(cal
IT
)
10
.................................................. joule (J) ..................................................... 4.1868   E+00 
calorie
th
(cal
th
)
10
................................................... joule (J) ....................................................... 4.184   E+00 
calorie (cal) (mean) .............................................. joule (J) .................................................. 4.190 02   E+00 
calorie (15 ºC) (cal
15
)
........................................... joule (J)................................................... 4.185 80   E+00 
calorie (20 ºC) (cal
20
)
........................................... joule (J)................................................... 4.181 90   E+00 
calorie
IT
, kilogram (nutrition)
11
........................... joule (J) ..................................................... 4.1868   E+03 
calorie
th
, kilogram (nutrition)
11
............................ joule (J) ....................................................... 4.184   E+03 
calorie (mean), kilogram (nutrition)
11 
.................. joule (J) .................................................. 4.190 02   E+03 
calorie
th
per centimeter second degree Celsius 
[cal
th 
/ (cm
· s
· ºC)]  ....................................... watt per meter kelvin [W / (m
· K)] ............. 4.184   E+02 
calorie
IT
per gram (cal
IT 
/ g) ................................. joule per kilogram (J / kg) ......................... 4.1868   E+03 
calorie
th
per gram (cal
th 
/ g) .................................. joule per kilogram (J / kg) ........................... 4.184   E+03 
calorie
IT
per gram degree Celsius 
[cal
IT
/ (g·ºC)] ............................................... joule per kilogram kelvin [J / (kg
· K)] ...... 4.1868   E+03 
calorie
th
per gram degree Celsius 
[cal
th
/ (g·ºC)] ................................................ joule per kilogram kelvin [J / (kg
· K)] ........ 4.184   E+03 
calorie
IT
per gram kelvin [cal
IT
/ (g·K)] ............... joule per kilogram kelvin [J / (kg
· K)] ...... 4.1868   E+03 
calorie
th
per gram kelvin [cal
th
/ (g·K)] ................ joule per kilogram kelvin [J / (kg
· K)] ........ 4.184   E+03 
calorie
th
per minute (cal
th
/ min)  .......................... watt (W) ............................................... 6.973 333   E−02 
calorie
th
per second (cal
th
/ s) ............................... watt (W) ...................................................... 4.184   E+00 
calorie
th
per square centimeter (cal
th
/ cm
2
) ......... joule per square meter (J / m
2
) .................... 4.184   E+04 
calorie
th
per square centimeter minute 
[cal
th
/ (cm
· min)] ........................................ watt per square meter (W / m
2
) ............ 6.973 333   E+02 
calorie
th
per square centimeter second 
cal
th
/ (cm
· s)] .............................................. watt per square meter (W / m
2
) ................... 4.184   E+04 
candela per square inch (cd / in
2
) ......................... candela per square meter (cd / m
2
) ....... 1.550 003   E+03 
carat, metric ......................................................... kilogram (kg) .................................................. 2.0   E−04 
carat, metric ......................................................... gram (g) .......................................................... 2.0   E−01 
centimeter of mercury (0 ºC)
12
............................ pascal (Pa) .............................................. 1.333 22   E+03 
centimeter of mercury (0 ºC)
12
............................ kilopascal (kPa)....................................... 1.333 22   E+00 
centimeter of mercury, conventional (cmHg)
12
... pascal (Pa) . .......................................... 1.333 224   E+03 
centimeter of mercury, conventional (cmHg)
12
... kilopascal (kPa) .................................... 1.333 224   E+00 
centimeter of water (4 ºC)
12
................................. pascal (Pa) .............................................. 9.806 38   E+01 
centimeter of water, conventional (cmH
2
O)
12
..... pascal (Pa) .............................................. 9.806 65   E+01 
centipoise (cP) ..................................................... pascal second (Pa·s) ........................................ 1.0   E−03 
centistokes (cSt) .................................................. meter squared per second (m
2
/s) ..................... 1.0   E−06 
chain (based on U.S. survey foot) (ch)
7
............... meter (m)  ............................................. 2.011 684   E+01 
circular mil .......................................................... square meter (m
2
) ................................. 5.067 075   E−10 
10 The small calorie or gram calorie approximates the energy needed to increase the temperature of 1 gram of water by 1 °C. 
Subscripts  
“IT”
and 
“th”
refer to International Table and thermochemical calories, respectively; see footnote 9. 
11
The kilogram calorie or ‘‘large calorie’’ is an obsolete term used for the kilocalorie, which is the calorie used to express the energy 
content of foods. However, in practice, the prefix ‘‘kilo’’ is usually omitted. 
12 Conversion factors for mercury manometer pressure units are calculated using the standard value for the acceleration of gravity and 
the density of mercury at the stated temperature. Additional digits are not justified because the definitions of the units do not take into 
account the compressibility of mercury or the change in density caused by the revised practical temperature scale, ITS-90. Similar 
comments also apply to water manometer pressure units. Conversion factors for conventional mercury and water manometer pressure 
units are based on Ref. [4: ISO 80000-4]. 
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
48 
To convert from  
to  
Multiply by 
circular mil .......................................................... square millimeter (mm
2
) ...................... 5.067 075   E−04 
clo ........................................................................ square meter kelvin per watt (m
2
·K / W) ...... 1.55   E−01 
cord (128 ft
3
) ....................................................... cubic meter (m
3
) ................................... 3.624 556   E+00 
cubic foot (ft
3
)  ..................................................... cubic meter (m
3
) ................................... 2.831 685   E−02 
cubic foot per minute (ft
3
/ min) .......................... cubic meter per second (m
3
/ s) ............ 4.719 474   E−04 
cubic foot per minute (ft
3
/ min) .......................... liter per second (L/s) ............................ 4.719 474   E−01 
cubic foot per second (ft
3
/ s) ............................... cubic meter per second (m
3
/ s) ............ 2.831 685   E−02 
cubic inch (in
3
)
13
................................................... cubic meter (m
3
) ................................... 1.638 706   E−05 
cubic inch per minute (in
3
/ min) ......................... cubic meter per second (m
3
/ s) ............ 2.731 177   E−07 
cubic mile (mi
3
) ................................................... cubic meter (m
3
).................................... 4.168 182   E+09 
cubic yard (yd
3
) ................................................... cubic meter (m
3
) ................................... 7.645 549   E−01 
cubic yard per minute (yd
3
/ min) ........................ cubic meter per second (m
3
/ s) ............ 1.274 258   E−02 
cup (U.S.) ............................................................ cubic meter (m
3
) ................................... 2.365 882   E−04 
cup (U.S.) ............................................................ liter (L) ................................................. 2.365 882   E−01 
cup (U.S.) ............................................................ milliliter (mL) ...................................... 2.365 882   E+02 
curie 
(Ci) ............................................................. becquerel (Bq) ................................................. 
3.7   E+10 
darcy
14
................................................................. meter squared (m
2
) ............................... 9.869 233   E−13 
day 
(d).................................................................. second (s)  ..................................................... 
8.64   E+04 
day (sidereal) ....................................................... second (s).............................................. 8.616 409   E+04 
debye (D) ............................................................. coulomb meter (C · m)..........................
3.335 641   E−30 
degree 
(angle) ( º ) ............................................... radian (rad) ........................................... 1.745 329   E−02 
degree Celsius 
(temperature) (ºC) ....................... kelvin (K) ..................................... 
T/
= t/
ºC + 
273.15 
degree Celsius 
(temperature interval) (ºC) .......... kelvin (K) ........................................................ 
1.0   E+00 
degree centigrade (temperature)
15
........................ degree Celsius (ºC) .......................... 
t/
ºC ≈ 
t
/ deg. cent. 
degree centigrade (temperature interval)
15
.......... degree Celsius (ºC) ......................................... 1.0   E+00 
degree Fahrenheit (temperature) (ºF) ................... degree Celsius (ºC) .................... 
t/
ºC = (
t/
ºF − 
32
)/
1.8 
degree Fahrenheit (temperature) (ºF) ................... kelvin (K) ............................. 
T/
K = (
t/
ºF + 
459.67
)/
1.8 
degree Fahrenheit (temperature interval)(ºF)  ...... degree Celsius (ºC) ............................... 5.555 556   E−01 
degree Fahrenheit (temperature interval) (ºF) ...... kelvin (K) ............................................. 5.555 556   E−01 
degree Fahrenheit hour per British thermal unit
IT
(ºF
· h/Btu
IT
) .................................................. kelvin per watt (K/W) ......................... 1.895 634   E+00
degree Fahrenheit hour per British thermal unit
th
(ºF·h / Btu
th
) .................................................. kelvin per watt (K / W) ........................ 1.896 903   E+00 
degree Fahrenheit hour square foot per British 
thermal unit
IT  
(ºF
· h
· ft
2
/ Btu
IT
)................. square meter kelvin per watt  
(m
· K / W) ......................................... 1.761 102   E−01 
degree Fahrenheit hour square foot per British  
thermal unit
th  
(ºF
· h
· ft
2
/ Btu
th
) .................. square meter kelvin per watt  
(m
 
·  K / W) ....................................... 1.762 280   E−01 
degree Fahrenheit hour square foot per British  
thermal unit
IT
inch  [ºF
· h
· ft
2
/ (Btu
IT
· in)]. meter kelvin per watt (m
· K / W) ........ 6.933 472   E+00
degree Fahrenheit hour square foot per British  
thermal unit
th
inch [ºF
· h
· ft
2
/ (Btu
th
· in)] .. meter kelvin per watt (m
· K / W) ....... 6.938 112    E+00 
degree Fahrenheit second per British thermal unit
IT
(ºF
· s / Btu
IT
) ................................................ kelvin per watt (K / W) ........................ 5.265 651   E−04 
degree Fahrenheit second per British thermal unit
th
(ºF
· s / Btu
th
) ................................................ kelvin per watt (K / W)  ....................... 5.269 175   E−04 
degree Rankine (ºR) ............................................. kelvin (K) ........................................ 
T / 
K = (
T / 
ºR) / 
1.8 
13
The exact conversion factor is 1.638 706 4   E−05. 
14
The darcy is a unit for expressing the permeability of porous solids, not area. 
15 The centigrade temperature scale is obsolete; the degree centigrade is only approximately equal to the degree Celsius.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested