pdf viewer in c# windows application : How to copy picture from pdf and paste in word application software tool html windows winforms online sp8118-part1418

Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
69 
To convert from  
to  
Multiply by 
VOLUME DIVIDED BY TIME (includes FLOW) 
cubic foot per minute (ft
3
/ min)  .......................... cubic meter per second (m
3
/ s) ............ 4.719 474   E−04 
cubic foot per minute (ft
3
/ min)  .......................... liter per second (L / s)  .......................... 4.719 474   E−01 
cubic foot per second (ft
3
/ s) ............................... cubic meter per second (m
3
/ s) ............ 2.831 685   E−02 
cubic inch per minute (in
3
/ min).......................... cubic meter per second (m
3
/ s) ............ 2.731 177   E−07 
cubic yard per minute (yd
3
/ min) ........................ cubic meter per second (m
3
/ s) ............ 1.274 258   E−02 
gallon (U.S.) per day (gal / d) .............................. cubic meter per second (m
3
/ s) ............ 4.381 264   E−08 
gallon (U.S.) per day (gal / d) .............................. liter per second (L / s) .......................... 4.381 264   E−05 
gallon (U.S.) per minute (gpm) (gal / min............ cubic meter per second (m
3
/ s) ............ 6.309 020   E−05 
gallon (U.S.) per minute (gpm) (gal / min) .......... liter per second (L / s) .......................... 6.309 020   E−02 
WORK (see ENERGY) 
How to copy picture from pdf and paste in word - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy picture from pdf to powerpoint; how to copy a picture from a pdf to a word document
How to copy picture from pdf and paste in word - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to paste a picture into a pdf; preview paste image into pdf
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
70 
Appendix C. Comments on the References of Appendix D— Bibliography 
C.1 Defining document for the SI: BIPM SI Brochure 
The defining document  for  the International  System of Units is the Brochure published by  the 
International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM) in French, followed by an English translation [1]. 
This document is revised from time to time in accordance with the decisions of the General Conference on 
Weights and Measures (CGPM) and the International Committee for Weights and Measures (CIPM). 
C.2 United States version of defining document for the SI: NIST SP 330 
The United States edition of the English translation in the BIPM SI Brochure (see Sec. C.1) is 
published by the National Institute of Standards and Technology as NIST Special Publication 330 [2]; it 
differs from the translation in the BIPM publication in the following details:  
—  the  spelling  of  English-language  words—for  example,  “meter,”  “liter,”  and  “deka”  are  used 
instead  of  “metre,”  “litre,” and “deca”—is  in  accordance  with the United States Government 
Printing Office Style Manual [3], which follows Webster’s Third New International Dictionary 
rather than the Oxford Dictionary used in many English-speaking countries. This spelling also 
reflects recommended United States practice (see Secs. C.1 and C.5); 
—  editorial notes regarding the use of the SI in the United States are added. 
Inasmuch  as NIST  Special  Publication  330 reflects  the  interpretation  of  the  SI for  the  United 
States by the U.S. Secretary of Commerce (see the Preface) while at the same time highly consistent with 
Ref. [1]  (see Sec. C.1), SP 330  is the  authoritative source  document  on the SI for the  purposes of  this 
Guide.  
C.3 ISO and IEC 
The International  Organization for Standardization (ISO)  and  the  International Electrotechnical 
Commission  (IEC)  both  publish  a  series  of  international  consensus  standards  to  promote  international 
uniformity in the practical use of the SI in various fields of science and technology, and in particular to 
standardize the  symbols  for  various quantities and the  units in which the  values of  these quantities  are 
expressed. These standards are in general compatible with Ref. [1] published by the BIPM (see Sec. C.1).  
Currently ISO 31 is being revised jointly by technical committees ISO TC12 and IEC TC25. The 
revised standards ISO/IEC 80000-1—ISO/IEC 80000-15, will supersede ISO 31-0:1992—ISO 31-13:1992 
[4], which constitute a series of international consensus standards published by ISO. 
IEC 60027-1—IEC 60027-4 [5] constitute a series of international consensus standards published 
by the IEC to promote international uniformity in the practical use of the SI in electrical technology, and in 
particular to standardize the symbols for various quantities used in electrotechnology and the units in which 
the  values  of  these  quantities  are  expressed.  These  IEC  standards  are  also  compatible  with  Ref.  [1] 
published by the BIPM (see Sec. C.1), and they are coordinated with the ISO standards [4]. 
C.4 IEEE/ASTM SI 10 
SI 10-2002 “American National Standard for Use of the International System of Units (SI): The 
Modern Metric System,” Ref. [6], is the product of a joint effort by Institute of Electrical and Electronics 
Engineers  (IEEE)  and  ASTM  International  (ASTM)  to  develop  a  single  American  National  Standard 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
how to cut a picture from a pdf document; copy image from pdf to
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
paste image into pdf acrobat; how to copy image from pdf to word document
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
71 
Institute (ANSI) standard.
26
It is based on the International System of Units as interpreted for use in the 
United States (see Secs. C.1 and C.2), and has been approved by a consensus of providers and consumers 
that includes interests in industrial organizations, government agencies, and scientific associations. SI 10 is 
recommended as a comprehensive source of authoritative information for the practical use of the SI in the 
United  States.  (Similar  documents  have  also  been  developed  by  other  North  American  technical 
organizations; see Ref. [6], note 1.)  
C.5 Federal Register Notices 
Important details concerning United States customary units of measurement and the interpretation 
of the SI for the United States are published from time to time in the Federal Register; these notices have 
the status of official United States Government policy.  
A Federal Register Notice of July 1, 1959, [7] states the values of conversion factors to be used in 
technical and scientific fields to obtain the values of the United States yard and pound from the SI base 
units for length and mass, the meter and the kilogram. These conversion factors were adopted on the basis 
of  an  agreement  of English-speaking countries to reconcile small  differences in the  values of  the  inch-
pound units as they were used in different parts of the world. This action would have affected the value of 
the yard or foot used for geodetic surveys in the United States. To prevent this from happening, it became 
necessary to recognize on a temporary basis a small difference between United States customary units of 
length for “international measure” and “survey measure.” A Federal Register Notice of July 19, 1988, [8] 
announced  a  tentative decision  not  to  adopt  the  international  foot  of  0.3048  meters  for  surveying  and 
mapping activities in the United States. A final decision to continue the use of the survey foot indefinitely 
is pending the completion of an analysis of public comments on the tentative decision; this decision will 
also be announced in the Federal Register.  
Even if a final decision affirms  the continued use of the survey foot in surveying and mapping 
services of the United States, it is significant to note that the Office of Charting and Geodetic Services of 
the  National  Ocean  Service  in  the  National  Oceanic  and  Atmospheric  Administration  uses  the  meter 
exclusively  for  the  North  American  Datum  [9].  The  North  American Datum of 1983,  the  most  recent 
definition and adjustment of this information, was announced in a Federal Register Notice of June 14, 1989 
[10].  
The definitions of  the  international foot and yard  and  the  corresponding  survey  units  are  also 
addressed in a Federal Register Notice published on February 3, 1975, [11]. 
A  Federal  Register  Notice  of  July  27,  1968,  [12]  provides  a  list  of  the  common  customary 
measurement units used in commerce throughout the United States, together with the conversion factors 
that link them with the meter and the kilogram.  
A Federal  Register Notice  concerning  the  SI  [13]  is  a restatement of the interpretation  of  the 
International System for use in the United States, and it updates the corresponding information published in 
earlier notices. 
A Federal Register Notice of January 2, 1991, [14] removes the voluntary aspect of the conversion 
to the SI for Federal agencies and provides policy direction to assist Federal agencies in their transition to 
the use of the metric system of measurement.  
A Federal Register Notice of July 29, 1991, [15] provides Presidential authority and direction for 
the use of the metric system of measurement by Federal departments and agencies in their programs. 
26
The American National Standards Institute, Inc. (11 West 42nd Street, New York, NY 10036) is a private sector organization that 
serves as a standards coordinating body, accredits standards developers that follow procedures sanctioned by ANSI, designates as 
American National Standards those standards submitted for and receiving approval, serves as the United States Member Body of the 
International Organization for Standardization (ISO), and functions as the administrator of the United States National Committee for 
the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo or all image objects from PDF document in .NET
cut and paste image from pdf; how to cut image from pdf file
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo to remove a specific image from PDF document page.
cut and paste pdf image; copy picture from pdf reader
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
72 
A Federal Register Notice of July 28, 1998, [16] declares that there are now only two classes of 
units in the International System of Units: base units and derived units. The units of these two classes form 
a coherent set of units and are designated by the name ‘‘SI units.” 
C.6 Federal Standard 376B 
Federal Standard 376B [17] was developed by the Standards and Metric Practices Subcommittee 
of the Metrication Operating Committee, which operates under the Interagency Council on Metric Policy. 
Specified  in  the Federal Standardization Handbook and  issued  by,  and  available  from,  the  General 
Services Administration, Washington, DC, 20406, it is the basic Federal standard that lists preferred metric 
units for use throughout the Federal Government. It gives guidance on the selection of metric units required 
to  comply with PL 94-168 (see  Preface)  as amended by  PL  100-418 (see Preface), and  with  Executive 
Order 12770 [15] (see Sec. C.5). 
C.7 2006 CODATA recommended values of the fundamental constants 
The set of self-consistent recommended values of the fundamental physical constants resulting from 
the  2006  Committee  on  Data  for  Science  and  Technology  (CODATA)  least-squares  adjustment  of  the 
constants, see Ref. [19], can be found at the NIST website: http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Constants/index.html
C.8 Uncertainty in measurement 
Reference [20] cites two publications that describe the evaluation and expression of uncertainty in 
measurement based on the approach recommended by the CIPM in 1981 and  which have been adopted 
worldwide.  
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor. dll. Open RasterEdge_MVC3 DemoProject, copy following content to your project:
copy pictures from pdf to word; copy images from pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on IIS
Copy according dll files listed below under RasterEdge.DocImagSDK/Bin directory and paste to Xdoc.HTML5 RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor.dll. (see picture).
how to copy pictures from a pdf to word; how to copy a picture from a pdf
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
73 
Appendix D. Bibliography 
[1]   Le Systéme International d’Unités (SI), The International System of Units (SI), 8th Edition (Bur. Intl. 
Poids et Mesures, Sèvres, France, 2006). 
Note:  This publication, which is commonly called the BIPM SI Brochure, consists of the official 
French text followed by an English translation. 
[2]   The International System of Units (SI), Ed. by B. N. Taylor and Ambler Thompson, Natl. Inst. Stand. 
Technol. Spec. Publ. 330, 2008 Edition (U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC, March 
2008). 
It 
is 
available 
in 
electronic 
form 
at 
no 
charge 
at 
http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/bibliography.html. 
Note:  This publication is the United States edition of the English translation in Ref. [1]. 
[3]   United  States  Government  Printing  Office  Style  Manual  (U.S.  Government  Printing  Office, 
Washington, DC, 2000). 
[4]   ISO 31-0 is cited in the text in the form [4:  ISO 31-0].  Currently ISO 31 is being revised jointly by 
ISO TC12 and IEC TC25. The revised joint standards ISO/IEC 80000-1—ISO/IEC 80000-15 will 
supersede ISO 31-0:1992—ISO 31-13. The completed revised joint standards published to date are 
included in this list, though the part numbers maybe different from the earlier designation. 
Quantities and units — Part 0: General principles, ISO 31-0:1992. 
Quantities and units — Part 2: Periodic and related phenomena, ISO 31-2:1992. 
Quantities and units — Part 3: Space and time, ISO 80000-3 (2006). 
Quantities and units — Part 4: Mechanics, ISO 80000-4 (2006). 
Quantities and units — Part 4: Heat, ISO 31-4:1992. 
Quantities and units — Part 5: Electricity and magnetism, ISO 31-5:1992. 
Quantities and units — Part 5: Thermodynamics, ISO 80000-5 (2007). 
Quantities and units — Part 6: Light and related electromagnetic radiations, ISO 31-6:1992. 
Quantities and units — Part 7: Acoustics, ISO 31-7:1992. 
Quantities and units — Part 8: Physical chemistry and molecular physics, ISO 31-8:1992. 
Quantities and units — Part 9: Atomic and nuclear physics, ISO 31-9:1992. 
Quantities and units — Part 10: Nuclear reactions and ionizing radiations, ISO 31-10:1992. 
Quantities and units — Part 11: Mathematical signs and symbols for use in physical sciences and 
technology, ISO 31-11:1992. 
Quantities and units — Part 12: Characteristic numbers, ISO 31-12:1992. 
Quantities and units — Part 13: Solid state physics, ISO 31-13:1992. 
C# Raster - Modify Image Palette in C#.NET
& pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET VB.NET How-to, VB.NET PDF, VB.NET Word, VB is used to reduce the size of the picture, especially in
copy image from pdf; how to copy pictures from a pdf
VB Imaging - VB Code 128 Generation Guide
Code 128 settings), then the barcode is drawn on the picture! Copy the VB sample code below to your .NET imaging Create Code 128 on PDF, Multi-Page TIFF, Word
copying images from pdf files; paste picture to pdf
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
74 
Note: ISO 31-0:1992— ISO 31-13:1992 and ISO 1000:1992 are reprinted in the ISO Standards 
Handbook Quantities and units (International Organization  for  Standardization,  Geneva, 
Switzerland, 1993). 
[5]   The following four standards, which are cited in the text in the form [IEC 60027-X], are published 
by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), Geneva, Switzerland.  
Letter symbols to be used in electrical technology, Part 1: General, IEC 60027-1 (1992). 
Letter symbols to be used in electrical technology, Part 2: Telecommunications and electronics, IEC 
60027-2 (2005). 
Note: As pointed out in Sec. 4.3, the SI prefixes refer strictly to powers of 10. They should not be 
used to indicate powers of 2 (for example, one kilobit represents 1000 bits and not 1024 
bits). The IEC has adopted prefixes for binary powers in the above standard.  The names 
and symbols for the prefixes corresponding to 2
10
, 2
20
, 2
30
, 2
40
, 2
50
, and 2
60
are, respectively: 
kibi, Ki; mebi, Mi; gibi, Gi; tebi, Ti; pebi, Pi; and exbi, Ei.  Thus, for example, one kibibyte 
would  be  written:  1  KiB  =  2
10
B = 1024 B, where B denotes a byte.  Although these 
prefixes are not part of the SI, they should be used in the field of information technology to 
avoid the incorrect usage of the SI prefixes. 
Letter symbols to be used in electrical technology, Part 3: Logarithmic and related quantities and 
their units, IEC 60027-3 (2003). 
Letter  symbols  to  be  used  in  electrical  technology,  Part 4: Rotating  electrical  machines, 
IEC
60027-4 (2006). 
[6]   SI 10-2002 IEEE/ASTM Standard for Use of the International System of Units (SI): The Modern 
Metric System. A joint ASTM-IEEE effort to develop a single ANSI standard. 
Notes: 
1.  A number of similar standards for metric practice are published by technical organizations. 
They include: 
Rules  for  SAE  Use  of  SI  (Metric)  Units, TSB003 MAY 1999 (Society of Automotive 
Engineers, Warrendale, PA, May 1999). 
2.   The  Canadian  Standards  Association,  5060  Spectrum  Way,  Suite  100,  Mississauga, 
Ontario,  Canada,  L4W  5N6,  publishes  CAN/CSA-Z234.1-00  (R2006),  Canadian  Metric 
Practice Guide, a Canadian National Standard. 
3.   The  application  of  the  SI  to  physical  chemistry  is  discussed  in Quantities, Units and 
Symbols in  Physical Chemistry, Third Edition (International Union of Pure and Applied 
Chemistry, RSC Publications, Cambridge, 2007). 
[7]  Federal Register, Vol. 24, No. 128, p. 5348, July 1, 1959. 
[8]  Federal Register, Vol. 53, No. 138, p. 27213, July 19, 1988. 
[9]  Federal Register, Vol. 42, No. 57, p. 8847, March 24, 1977. 
[10]  Federal Register, Vol. 54, No. 113, p. 25318, June 14, 1989. 
[11]  Federal Register, Vol. 40, No. 23, p. 5954, February 3, 1975. 
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
75 
[12]  Federal Register, Vol. 33, No. 146, p. 10755, July 27, 1968. 
[13]  Federal Register, Vol. 55, No. 245, p. 52242, December 20, 1990. 
[14]  Federal Register, Vol. 56, No. 1, p. 160, January 2, 1991. 
[15]  Federal Register, Vol. 56, No. 145, p. 35801, July 29, 1991. 
[16]  Federal Register, Vol. 63, No. 144, p. 40334, July 28, 1998. 
[17]  Preferred Metric Units for General Use by the Federal Government,  Federal  Standard  376B 
(General Services Administration, Washington, DC, 1993). 
[18]  Quantities and Units in Radiation Protection Dosimetry,  ICRU  Report  51,  1993  (International 
Commission  on  Radiation  Units  and  Measurements,  7910  Woodmont  Avenue,  Bethesda,  MD, 
20814). 
[19]   Values from the 2006 adjustment of the fundamental physical constants can be found at the NIST 
website:  http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Constants/index.html
 The definitive paper describing the 2006 
adjustment has been published in two journals:  P. J. Mohr, B. N. Taylor, and D. B. Newell, Rev. 
Mod. Phys. 80(2), 633-730 (2008); J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data. 37(3), 1187-1284 (2008).  The paper 
may be obtained electronically through a link on the above web page.  
[20]   The term standard uncertainty used in the footnotes to Table 7 of this Guide, and the related terms 
expanded uncertainty and relative expanded uncertainty used in some of the examples of Sec. 7.10.3, 
are  discussed  in  ISO, Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (International 
Organization for Standardization, Geneva, Switzerland, 1995); and in B. N. Taylor and C. E. Kuyatt, 
Guidelines for Evaluating and Expressing the Uncertainty of NIST Measurement Results, Natl. Inst. 
Stand. Technol. Spec. Publ. 1297, 1994 Edition (U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC, 
September 1994). 
Guide for the Use of the International System of Units (SI) 
76 
This page intentionally left blank. 
SI COHERENT DERIVED UNITS WITH SPECIAL NAMES AND SYMBOLS 
(Explanation of Graphic on Back Cover)
Derived units are defined as products of powers of the base units. When the product of powers includes no 
numerical factor other than one, the derived units are called “coherent derived” units. The base and coherent derived 
units of the SI form a coherent set, designated the set of “coherent SI units.”  The word coherent is used here in the 
following sense:  when coherent units are used, equations between the numerical values of quantities take exactly 
the same form as the equations between the quantities themselves. Thus, if only units from a coherent set are used, 
conversion factors between units are never required. 
The diagram on the back page of SP811 shows graphically how the 22 SI coherent derived units with special 
names and symbols are related to the seven SI base units.  
1.
In the first column, the symbols of the SI base units are shown in rectangles, with the name of the unit 
shown toward the upper left of the rectangle and the name of the associated base quantity shown in 
italic type below the rectangle.  
2.
In the second column are shown those additional coherent derived units without special names  that 
are necessary for the derivation of the coherent derived units with special names [the cubic meter (m
3
excepted]. In  the diagram, the  derivation of each coherent derived unit is indicated by  arrows that 
bring  in  units  in  the  numerator  (solid  lines)  and  units  in  the  denominator  (broken  lines),  as 
appropriate. 
3.
In the third column the symbols of the 22 SI coherent derived units with special names are shown in 
solid circles, with the name of the unit shown toward the upper left of the circle, the name of the 
associated derived quantity shown in italic type below the circle, and an expression for the derived 
unit in terms of other units shown toward the upper right in parenthesis.  
Two  SI coherent derived units  with  special names  and symbols, the radian, symbol  rad, and the  steradian, 
symbol sr (bottom-right of the third column of the diagram), are shown without any connections to SI base units – 
either direct or through other SI derived units. The reason is that in the SI, the quantities plane angle and solid angle 
are defined in such a way that their dimension is one – they are so-called dimensionless quantities. This means that 
the coherent SI derived unit for each of these quantities is the number one, symbol 1. That is, because plane angle is 
expressed as the ratio  of two  lengths,  and solid  angle  as the ratio of an  area and the  square  of a length, the SI 
coherent derived unit for plane angle is m/m = 1, and the SI coherent derived unit for solid angle is m
2
/m
2
= 1. To 
aid understanding, the special name “radian” with symbol rad is given to the number 1 for use in expressing values 
of plane angle; and the special name “steradian” with symbol sr is given to the number 1 for use in expressing values 
of solid angle. However, one has the option of using or not using these names and symbols in expressions for other 
SI derived units, as is convenient.   
The  unit  “degree  Celsius,”  which  is  equal  in  magnitude  to  the  unit  “kelvin,”  is  used  to  express  Celsius 
temperature t.  In this case, “degree Celsius’’ is a special name used in place of “kelvin.”  This equality is indicated 
in  the  diagram  by  the  symbol  K  in  parenthesis  toward  the  upper  right  of  the  °C  circle.    The  equation  below 
“CELSIUS  TEMPERATURE”  relates  Celsius  temperature  t  to  thermodynamic  temperature  T.  An  interval  or 
difference in temperature may be expressed equivalently in either kelvins or in degrees Celsius. 
°
°
Ω
Ω
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested