pdf viewer in c# windows application : How to copy pdf image to word document control SDK platform web page winforms asp.net web browser SpeakerForTheDead2-part1433

large beasts that grazed in herds on the prairie. Pipo couldn't even tell if Rooter
was angry or happy.
"You are cabras! You decide!" He pointed at Libo and then at Pipo. "Your
women don't choose your honor, you do! Just like in battle, but all the time!"
Pipo had no idea what Rooter was talking about, but he could see that all the
pequeninos were motionless as stumps, waiting for him-- or Libo-- to answer. It
was plain Libo was too frightened by Rooter's strange behavior to dare any
response at all. In this case, Pipo could see no point but to tell the truth; it was,
after all, a relatively obvious and trivial bit of information about human society. It
was against the rules that the Starways Congress had established for him, but
failing to answer would be even more damaging, and so Pipo went ahead.
"Women and men decide together, or they decide for themselves," said Pipo.
"One doesn't decide for the other."
It was apparently what all the piggies had been waiting for. "Cabras," they said,
over and over; they ran to Rooter, hooting and whistling. They picked him up and
rushed him off into the woods. Pipo tried to follow, but two of the piggies stopped
him and shook their heads. It was a human gesture they had learned long before,
but it held stronger meaning for the piggies. It was absolutely forbidden for Pipo
to follow. They were going to the women, and that was the one place the piggies
had told them they could never go.
On the way home, Libo reported how the difficulty began.
"Do you know what Rooter said? He said our women were weak and stupid."
"That's because he's never met Mayor Bosquinha. Or your mother, for that
matter."
Libo laughed, because his mother, Conceicao, ruled the archives as if it were an
ancient estacao in the wild mato-- if you entered her domain, you were utterly
subject to her law. As he laughed, he felt something slip away, some idea that was
important-- what were we talking about? The conversation went on; Libo had
forgotten, and soon he even forgot that he had forgotten.
That night they heard the drumming sound that Pipo and Libo believed was part
of some sort of celebration. It didn't happen all that often, like beating on great
drums with heavy sticks. Tonight, though, the celebration seemed to go on
forever. Pipo and Libo speculated that perhaps the human example of sexual
equality had somehow given the male pequeninos some hope of liberation. "I
think this may qualify as a serious modification of piggy behavior," Pipo said
gravely. "If we find that we've caused real change, I'm going to have to report it,
and Congress will probably direct that human contact with piggies be cut off for a
while. Years, perhaps." It was a sobering thought-- that doing their job faithfully
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
How to copy pdf image to word document - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
copy a picture from pdf; how to copy pdf image into powerpoint
How to copy pdf image to word document - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy an image from a pdf; how to copy image from pdf file
might lead Starways Congress to forbid them to do their job at all.
In the morning Novinha walked with them to the gate in the high fence that
separated the human city from the slopes leading up to the forest hills where the
piggies lived. Because Pipo and Libo were still trying to reassure each other that
neither of them could have done any differently, Novinha walked on ahead and
got to the gate first. When the others arrived, she pointed to a patch of freshly
cleared red earth only thirty meters or so up the hill from the gate. "That's new,"
she said. "And there's something in it."
Pipo opened the gate, and Libo, being younger, ran on ahead to investigate. He
stopped at the edge of the cleared patch and went completely rigid, staring down
at whatever lay there. Pipo, seeing him, also stopped, and Novinha, suddenly
frightened for Libo, ignored the regulation and ran through the gate. Libo's head
rocked backward and he dropped to his knees; he clutched his tight-curled hair
and cried out in terrible remorse.
Rooter lay spread-eagled in the cleared dirt. He had been eviscerated, and not
carelessly: Each organ had been cleanly separated, and the strands and filaments
of his limbs had also been pulled out and spread in a symmetrical pattern on the
drying soil. Everything still had some connection to the body-- nothing had been
completely severed.
Libo's agonized crying was almost hysterical. Novinha knelt by him and held
him, rocked him, tried to soothe him. Pipo methodically took out his small
camera and took pictures from every angle so the computer could analyze it in
detail later.
"He was still alive when they did this," Libo said, when he had calmed enough to
speak. Even so, he had to say the words slowly, carefully, as if he were a foreigner
just learning to speak. "There's so much blood on the ground, spattered so far--
his heart had to be beating when they opened him up."
"We'll discuss it later," said Pipo.
Now the thing Libo had forgotten yesterday came back to him with cruel clarity.
"It's what Rooter said about the women. They decide when the men should die.
He told me that, and I--" He stopped himself. Of course he did nothing. The law
required him to do nothing. And at that moment he decided that he hated the
law. If the law meant allowing this to be done to Rooter, then the law had no
understanding. Rooter was a person. You don't stand by and let this happen to a
person just because you're studying him.
"They didn't dishonor him," said Novinha. "If there's one thing that's certain, it's
the love that they have for trees. See?" Out of the center of his chest cavity, which
was otherwise empty now, a very small seedling sprouted. "They planted a tree to
mark his burial spot."
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF on. Able to edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF document image. Extract
how to copy pdf image to powerpoint; how to copy images from pdf file
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
how to paste a picture into pdf; copy picture to pdf
"Now we know why they name all their trees," said Libo bitterly. "They planted
them as grave markers for the piggies they tortured to death."
"This is a very large forest," Pipo said calmly. "Please confine your hypotheses to
what is at least remotely possible." They were calmed by his quiet, reasoned tone,
his insistence that even now they behave as scientists.
"What should we do?" asked Novinha.
"We should get you back inside the perimeter immediately, " said Pipo. "It's
forbidden for you to come out here."
"But I meant-- with the body-- what should we do?"
"Nothing," said Pipo. "The piggies have done what piggies do, for whatever
reason piggies do it." He helped Libo to his feet.
Libo had trouble standing for a moment; he leaned on both of them for his first
few steps. "What did I say?" he whispered. "I don't even know what it is I said
that killed him."
"It wasn't you," said Pipo. "It was me."
"What, do you think you own them?" demanded Novinha. "Do you think their
world revolves around you? The piggies did it, for whatever reason they have. It's
plain enough this isn't the first time-- they were too deft at the vivisection for this
to be the first time."
Pipo took it with black humor. "We're losing our wits, Libo. Novinha isn't
supposed to know anything about xenology."
"You're right," said Libo. "Whatever may have triggered this, it's something
they've done before. A custom." He was trying to sound calm.
"But that's even worse, isn't it?" said Novinha. "It's their custom to gut each
other alive. " She looked at the other trees of the forest that began at the top of
the hill and wondered how many of them were rooted in blood.
***
Pipo sent his report on the ansible, and the computer didn't give him any
trouble about the priority level. He left it up to the oversight committee to decide
whether contact with the piggies should be stopped. The committee could not
identify any fatal error. "It is impossible to conceal the relationship between our
sexes, since someday a woman may be xenologer," said the report, "and we can
find no point at which you did not act reasonably and prudently. Our tentative
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into The portable document format, known as PDF document, is a they are using different types of word processors.
how to paste a picture into a pdf document; pasting image into pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the point VB.NET: Clone a PDF Page. Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(filepath) ' Copy the first
how to cut an image out of a pdf file; how to copy images from pdf to word
conclusion is that you were unwitting participants in some sort of power struggle,
which was decided against Rooter, and that you should continue your contact
with all reasonable prudence."
It was complete vindication, but it still wasn't easy to take. Libo had grown up
knowing the piggies, or at least hearing about them from his father. He knew
Rooter better than he knew any human being besides his family and Novinha. It
took days for Libo to come back to the Zenador's Station, weeks before he would
go back out into the forest. The piggies gave no sign that anything had changed; if
anything, they were more open and friendly than before. No one ever spoke of
Rooter, least of all Pipo and Libo. There were changes on the human side,
however. Pipo and Libo never got more than a few steps away from each other
when they were among them.
The pain and remorse of that day drew Libo and Novinha to rely on each other
even more, as though darkness bound them closer than light. The piggies now
seemed dangerous and uncertain, just as human company had always been, and
between Pipo and Libo there now hung the question of who was at fault, no
matter how often each tried to reassure the other. So the only good and reliable
thing in Libo's life was Novinha, and in Novinha's life, Libo.
Even though Libo had a mother and siblings, and Pipo and Libo always went
home to them, Novinha and Libo behaved as if the Zenador's Station were an
island, with Pipo a loving but ever remote Prospero. Pipo wondered: Are the
piggies like Ariel, leading the young lovers to happiness, or are they little
Calibans, scarcely under control and chafing to do murder?
After a few months, Rooter's death faded into memory, and their laughter
returned, though it was never quite as carefree as before. By the time they were
seventeen, Libo and Novinha were so sure of each other that they routinely talked
of what they would do together five, ten, twenty years later. Pipo never bothered
to ask them about their marriage plans. After all, he thought, they studied biology
from morning to night. Eventually it would occur to them to explore stable and
socially acceptable reproductive strategies. In the meantime, it was enough that
they puzzled endlessly over when and how the piggies mated, considering that
the males had no discernable reproductive organ. Their speculations on how the
piggies combined genetic material invariably ended in jokes so lewd that it took
all of Pipo's self-control to pretend not to find them amusing.
So the Zenador's Station for those few short years was a place of true
companionship for two brilliant young people who otherwise would have been
condemned to cold solitude. It did not occur to any of them that the idyll would
end abruptly, and forever, and under circumstances that would send a tremor
throughout the Hundred Worlds.
It was all so simple, so commonplace. Novinha was analyzing the genetic
structure of the fly-infested reeds along the river, and realized that the same
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
It's 100% managed .NET solution that supports converting each PDF page to Word document file by VB.NET code. Convert PDF to Word Document in VB.NET Demo Code.
copy and paste image into pdf; copy image from pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Additionally, this PDF document image inserting toolkit in VB.NET still offers users the capabilities of burning and merging the added image with source PDF
how to copy pdf image to word document; copy images from pdf
subcellular body that had caused the Descolada was present in the cells of the
reed. She brought several other cell structures into the air over the computer
terminal and rotated them. They all contained the Descolada agent.
She called to Pipo, who was running through transcriptions of yesterday's visit
to the piggies. The computer ran comparisons of every cell she had samples of.
Regardless of cell function, regardless of the species it was taken from, every alien
cell contained the Descolada body, and the computer declared them absolutely
identical in chemical proportions.
Novinha expected Pipo to nod, tell her it looked interesting, maybe come up
with a hypothesis. Instead he sat down and ran the same test over, asking her
questions about how the computer comparison operated, and then what the
Descolada body actually did.
"Mother and Father never figured out what triggered it, but the Descolada body
releases this little protein-- well, pseudo-protein, I suppose-- and it attacks the
genetic molecules, starting at one end and unzipping the two strands of the
molecule right down the middle. That's why they called it the descolador-- it
unglues the DNA in humans, too."
"Show me what it does in alien cells."
Novinha put the simulation in motion.
"No, not just the genetic molecule-- the whole environment of the cell."
"It's just in the nucleus," she said. She widened the field to include more
variables. The computer took it more slowly, since it was considering millions of
random arrangements of nuclear material every second. In the reed cell, as a
genetic molecule came unglued, several large ambient proteins affixed
themselves to the open strands. "In humans, the DNA tries to recombine, but
random proteins insert themselves so that cell after cell goes crazy. Sometimes
they go into mitosis, like cancer, and sometimes they die. What's most important
is that in humans the Descolada bodies themselves reproduce like crazy, passing
from cell to cell. Of course, every alien creature already has them."
But Pipo wasn't interested in what she said. When the descolador had finished
with the genetic molecules of the reed, he looked from one cell to another. "It's
not just significant, it's the same," he said. "It's the same thing!"
Novinha didn't see at once what he had noticed. What was the same as what?
Nor did she have time to ask. Pipo was already out of the chair, grabbing his coat,
heading for the door. It was drizzling outside. Pipo paused only to call out to her,
"Tell Libo not to bother coming, just show him that simulation and see if he can
figure it out before I get back. He'll know-- it's the answer to the big one. The
answer to everything."
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Evaluation Library for converting PDF to Word in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and
copying image from pdf to word; how to copy images from pdf
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
A convenient C#.NET control able to turn all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting.
how to copy a picture from a pdf to a word document; how to copy and paste an image from a pdf
"Tell me!"
He laughed. "Don't cheat. Libo will tell you, if you can't see it."
"Where are you going?"
"To ask the piggies if I'm right, of course! But I know I am, even if they lie about
it. If I'm not back in an hour, I slipped in the rain and broke my leg."
Libo did not get to see the simulations. The meeting of the planning committee
went way over time in an argument about extending the cattle range, and after
the meeting Libo still had to pick up the week's groceries. By the time he got back,
Pipo had been out for four hours, it was getting on toward dark, and the drizzle
was turning to snow. They went out at once to look for him, afraid that it might
take hours to find him in the woods.
They found him all too soon. His body was already cooling in the snow. The
piggies hadn't even planted a tree in him.
Chapter 2 -- Trondheim
I'm deeply sorry that I could not act upon your request for more detail
concerning the courtship and marriage customs of the aboriginal Lusitanians.
This must be causing you unimaginable distress, or else you would never have
petitioned the Xenological Society to censure me for failure to cooperate with
your researches.
When would-be xenologers complain that I am not getting the right sort of data
from my observations of the pequeninos, I always urge them to reread the
limitations placed upon me by law. I am permitted to bring no more than one
assistant on field visits; I may not ask questions that might reveal human
expectations, lest they try to imitate us; I may not volunteer information to elicit
a parallel response; I may not stay with them more than four hours at a time;
except for my clothing, I may not use any products of technology in their
presence, which includes cameras, recorders, computers, or even a manufactured
pen to write on manufactured paper: I may not even observe them unawares.
In short: I cannot tell you how the pequeninos reproduce because they have not
chosen to do it in front of me.
Of course your research is crippled! Of course our conclusions about the piggies
are absurd! If we had to observe your university under the same limitations that
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
bind us in our observation of the Lusitanian aborigines, we would no doubt
conclude that humans do not reproduce, do not form kinship groups, and devote
their entire life cycle to the metamorphosis of the larval student into the adult
professor. We might even suppose that professors exercise noticeable power in
human society. A competent investigation would quickly reveal the inaccuracy of
such conclusions-- but in the case of the piggies, no competent investigation is
permitted or even contemplated.
Anthropology is never an exact science; the observer never experiences the same
culture as the participant. But these are natural limitations inherent to the
science. It is the artificial limitations that hamper us-- and, through us, you. At
the present rate of progress we might as well be mailing questionnaires to the
pequeninos and waiting for them to dash off scholarly papers in reply.
-- Joao Figueira Alvarez, reply to Pietro Guataninni of the University of Sicily,
Milano Campus, Etruria, published posthumously in Xenological Studies,
22:4:49:193
The news of Pipo's death was not of merely local importance. It was transmitted
instantaneously, by ansible, to all the Hundred Worlds. The first aliens
discovered since Ender's Xenocide had tortured to death the one human who was
designated to observe them. Within hours, scholars, scientists, politicians, and
journalists began to strike their poses.
A consensus soon emerged. One incident, under baffling circumstances, does
not prove the failure of Starways Council policy toward the piggies. On the
contrary, the fact that only one man died seems to prove the wisdom of the
present policy of near inaction. We should, therefore, do nothing except continue
to observe at a slightly less intense pace. Pipo's successor was instructed to visit
the piggies no more often than every other day, and never for longer than an
hour. He was not to push the piggies to answer questions concerning their
treatment of Pipo. It was a reinforcement of the old policy of inaction.
There was also much concern about the morale of the people of Lusitania. They
were sent many new entertainment programs by ansible, despite the expense, to
help take their minds off the grisly murder.
And then, having done the little that could be done by framlings, who were, after
all, lightyears away from Lusitania, the people of the Hundred Worlds returned to
their local concerns.
Outside Lusitania, only one man among the half-trillion human beings in the
Hundred Worlds felt the death of Jodo Figueira Alvarez, called Pipo, as a great
change in the shape of his own life. Andrew Wiggin was Speaker for the Dead in
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
the university city of Reykjavik, renowned as the conservator of Nordic culture,
perched on the steep slopes of a knifelike fjord that pierced the granite and ice of
the frozen world of Trondheim right at the equator. It was spring, so the snow
was in retreat, and fragile grass and flowers reached out for strength from the
glistering sun. Andrew sat on the brow of a priny hill, surrounded by a dozen
students who were studying the history of interstellar colonization. Andrew was
only half-listening to a fiery argument over whether the utter human victory in
the Bugger Wars had been a necessary prelude to human expansion. Such
arguments always degenerated quickly into a vilification of the human monster
Ender, who commanded the starfleet that committed the Xenocide of the
Buggers. Andrew tended to let his mind wander somewhat; the subject did not
exactly bore him, but he preferred not to let it engage his attention, either.
Then the small computer implant worn like a jewel in his ear told him of the
cruel death of Pipo, the xenologer on Lusitania, and instantly Andrew became
alert. He interrupted his students.
"What do you know of the piggies?" he asked.
"They are the only hope of our redemption," said one, who took Calvin rather
more seriously than Luther.
Andrew looked at once to the student Plikt, who he knew would not be able to
endure such mysticism. "They do not exist for any human purpose, not even
redemption," said Plikt with withering contempt. "They are true ramen, like the
buggers."
Andrew nodded, but frowned. "You use a word that is not yet common koine."
"It should be," said Plikt. "Everyone in Trondheim, every Nord in the Hundred
Worlds should have read Demosthenes' History of Wutan in Trondheim by now."
"We should but we haven't," sighed a student.
"Make her stop strutting, Speaker," said another. "Plikt is the only woman I
know who can strut sitting down."
Plikt closed her eyes. "The Nordic language recognizes four orders of
foreignness. The first is the otherlander, or utlanning, the stranger that we
recognize as being a human of our world, but of another city or country. The
second is the framling-- Demosthenes merely drops the accent from the Nordic
frimling. This is the stranger that we recognize as human, but of another world.
The third is the ramen, the stranger that we recognize as human, but of another
species. The fourth is the true alien, the varelse, which includes all the animals,
for with them no conversation is possible. They live, but we cannot guess what
purposes or causes make them act. They might be intelligent, they might be self-
aware, but we cannot know it."
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Andrew noticed that several students were annoyed. He called it to their
attention. "You think you're annoyed because of Plikt's arrogance, but that isn't
so. Plikt is not arrogant; she is merely precise. You are properly ashamed that you
have not yet read Demosthenes' history of your own people, and so in your shame
you are annoyed at Plikt because she is not guilty of your sin."
"I thought Speakers didn't believe in sin," said a sullen boy.
Andrew smiled. "You believe in sin, Styrka, and you do things because of that
belief. So sin is real in you, and knowing you, this Speaker must believe in sin."
Styrka refused to be defeated. "What does all this talk of utlannings and
framlings and ramen and varelse have to do with Ender's Xenocide?"
Andrew turned to Plikt. She thought for a moment. "This is relevant to the
stupid argument that we were just having. Through these Nordic layers of
foreignness we can see that Ender was not a true xenocide, for when he destroyed
the buggers, we knew them only as varelse; it was not until years later, when the
first Speaker for the Dead wrote the Hive Queen and the Hegemon, that
humankind first understood that the buggers were not varelse at all, but ramen;
until that time there had been no understanding between bugger and human."
"Xenocide is xenocide," said Styrka. "Just because Ender didn't know they were
ramen doesn't make them any less dead."
Andrew sighed at Styrka's unforgiving attitude; it was the fashion among
Calvinists at Reykjavik to deny any weight to human motive in judging the good
or evil of an act. Acts are good and evil in themselves, they said; and because
Speakers for the Dead held as their only doctrine that good or evil exist entirely in
human motive, and not at all in the act, it made students like Styrka quite hostile
to Andrew. Fortunately, Andrew did not resent it-- he understood the motive
behind it.
"Styrka, Plikt, let me put you another case. Suppose that the piggies, who have
learned to speak Stark, and whose languages some humans have also learned,
suppose that we learned that they had suddenly, without provocation or
explanation, tortured to death the xenologer sent to observe them."
Plikt jumped at the question immediately. "How could we know it was without
provocation? What seems innocent to us might be unbearable to them."
Andrew smiled. "Even so. But the xenologer has done them no harm, has said
very little, has cost them nothing-- by any standard we can think of, he is not
worthy of painful death. Doesn't the very fact of this incomprehensible murder
make the piggies varelse instead of ramen?"
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Now it was Styrka who spoke quickly. "Murder is murder. This talk of varelse
and ramen is nonsense. If the piggies murder, then they are evil, as the buggers
were evil. If the act is evil, then the actor is evil."
Andrew nodded. "There is our dilemma. There is the problem. Was the act evil,
or was it, somehow, to the piggies' understanding at least, good? Are the piggies
ramen or varelse? For the moment, Styrka, hold your tongue. I know all the
arguments of your Calvinism, but even John Calvin would call your doctrine
stupid."
"How do you know what Calvin would--"
"Because he's dead," roared Andrew, "and so I'm entitled to speak for him!"
The students laughed, and Styrka withdrew into stubborn silence. The boy was
bright, Andrew knew; his Calvinism would not outlast his undergraduate
education, though its excision would be long and painful.
"Talman, Speaker," said Plikt. "You spoke as if your hypothetical situation were
true, as if the piggies really had murdered the xenologer."
Andrew nodded gravely. "Yes, it's true."
It was disturbing; it awoke echoes of the ancient conflict between bugger and
human.
"Look in yourselves at this moment," said Andrew. "You will find that
underneath your hatred of Ender the Xenocide and your grief for the death of the
buggers, you also feel something much uglier: You're afraid of the stranger,
whether he's utlanning or framling. When you think of him killing a man that you
know of and value, then it doesn't matter what his shape is. He's varelse then, or
worse-- djur, the dire beast, that comes in the night with slavering jaws. If you
had the only gun in your village, and the beasts that had torn apart one of your
people were coming again, would you stop to ask if they also had a right to live, or
would you act to save your village, the people that you knew, the people who
depended on you?"
"By your argument we should kill the piggies now, primitive and helpless as they
are!" shouted Styrka.
"My argument? I asked a question. A question isn't an argument, unless you
think you know my answer, and I assure you, Styrka, that you do not. Think
about this. Class is dismissed."
"Will we talk about this tomorrow?" they demanded.
"If you want," said Andrew. But he knew that if they discussed it, it would be
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested