pdf viewer in c# windows application : How to copy an image from a pdf in Library SDK class asp.net .net azure ajax SpeakerForTheDead21-part1435

And finally, just as the Speaker stepped up onto the platform, the rumor swept
the praqa: Bishop Peregrino was here. Not in his vestments, but in the simple
robes of a priest. Here himself, to hear the Speaker's blasphemy! Many a citizen
of Milagre felt a delicious thrill of anticipation. Would the Bishop rise up and
miraculously strike down Satan? Would there be a battle here such as had not
been seen outside the vision of the Apocalypse of St. John?
Then the Speaker stood before the microphone and waited for them to be still.
He was fairly tall, youngish still, but his white skin made him look sickly
compared to the thousand shades of brown of the Lusos. Ghostly. They fell silent,
and he began to Speak.
"He was known by three names. The official records have the first one: Marcos
Maria Ribeira. And his official data. Born 1929. Died 1970. Worked in the steel
foundry. Perfect safety record. Never arrested. A wife, six children. A model
citizen, because he never did anything bad enough to go on the public record. "
Many who were listening felt a vague disquiet. They had expected oration.
Instead the Speaker's voice was nothing remarkable. And his words had none of
the formality of religious speech. Plain, simple, almost conversational. Only a few
of them noticed that its very simplicity made his voice, his speech utterly
believable. He wasn't telling the Truth, with trumpets; he was telling the truth,
the story that you wouldn't think to doubt because it's taken for granted. Bishop
Peregrino was one who noticed, and it made him uneasy. This Speaker would be a
formidable enemy, one who could not be blasted down with fire from before the
altar.
"The second name he had was Marc o. Big Marcos. Because he was a giant of a
man. Reached his adult size early in his life. How old was he when he reached two
meters? Eleven? Definitely by the time he was twelve. His size and strength made
him valuable in the foundry, where the lots of steel are so small that much of the
work is controlled directly by hand, and strength matters. People's lives
depended on Marc o's strength."
In the praqa the men from the foundry nodded. They had all bragged to each
other that they'd never talk to the framling atheist. Obviously one of them had,
but now it felt good that the Speaker got it right, that he understood what they
remembered of Marc o. Every one of them wished that he had been the one to tell
about Marc o to the Speaker. They did not guess that the Speaker had not even
tried to talk to them. After all these years, there were many things that Andrew
Wiggin knew without asking.
"His third name was C o. Dog."
Ah, yes, thought the Lusos. This is what we've heard about Speakers for the
Dead. They have no respect for the dead, no sense of decorum.
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
How to copy an image from a pdf in - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
paste image in pdf preview; how to cut picture from pdf file
How to copy an image from a pdf in - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy pictures from a pdf document; how to paste picture on pdf
"That was the name you used for him when you heard that his wife, Novinha,
had another black eye, walked with a limp, had stitches in her lip. He was an
animal to do that to her."
How dare he say that? The man's dead! But under their anger the Lusos were
uncomfortable for an entirely different reason. Almost all of them remembered
saying or hearing exactly those words. The Speaker's indiscretion was in
repeating in public the words that they had used about Marc o when he was alive.
"Not that any of you liked Novinha. Not that cold woman who never gave any of
you good morning. But she was smaller than he was, and she was the mother of
his children, and when he beat her he deserved the name of C o."
They were embarrassed; they muttered to each other. Those sitting in the grass
near Novinha glanced at her and glanced away, eager to see how she was
reacting, painfully aware of the fact that the Speaker was right, that they didn't
like her, that they at once feared and pitied her.
"Tell me, is this the man you knew? Spent more hours in the bars than anybody,
and yet never made any friends there, never the camaraderie of alcohol for him.
You couldn't even tell how much he had been drinking. He was surly and short-
tempered before he had a drink, and surly and short-tempered just before he
passed out-- nobody could tell the difference. You never heard of him having a
friend, and none of you was ever glad to see him come into a room. That's the
man you knew, most of you. C o. Hardly a man at all."
Yes, they thought. That was the man. Now the initial shock of his indecorum had
faded. They were accustomed to the fact that the Speaker meant to soften nothing
in his story. Yet they were still uncomfortable. For there was a note of irony, not
in his voice, but inherent in his words. "Hardly a man at all, " he had said, but of
course he was a man, and they were vaguely aware that while the Speaker
understood what they thought of Marc o, he didn't necessarily agree.
"A few others, the men from the foundry in Bairro das Fabricadoras, knew him
as a strong arm they could trust. They knew he never said he could do more than
he could do, and always did what he said he would do. You could count on him.
So within the walls of the foundry he had their respect. But when you walked out
the door you treated him like everybody else-- ignored him, thought little of him."
The irony was pronounced now. Though the Speaker gave no hint in his voice--
still the simple, plain speech he began with-- the men who worked with him felt it
wordlessly inside themselves: We should not have ignored him as we did. If he
had worth inside the foundry, then perhaps we should have valued him outside,
too.
"Some of you also know something else that you never talk about much. You
know that you gave him the name C o long before he earned it. You were ten,
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. List<PDFImage> allImages = PDFImageHandler. ExtractImages(page); C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
how to cut a picture out of a pdf; how to copy and paste image from pdf to word
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for
copy image from pdf preview; how to copy and paste a pdf image
eleven, twelve years old. Little boys. He grew so tall. It made you ashamed to be
near him. And afraid, because he made you feel helpless."
Dom Crist o murmured to his wife, "They came for gossip, and he gives them
responsibility."
"So you handled him the way human beings always handle things that are bigger
than they are," said the Speaker. "You banded together. Like hunters trying to
bring down a mastodon. Like bullfighters trying to weaken a giant bull to prepare
it for the kill. Pokes, taunts, teases. Keep him turning around. He can't guess
where the next blow is coming from. Prick him with barbs that stay under his
skin. Weaken him with pain. Madden him. Because big as he is, you can make
him do things. You can make him yell. You can make him run. You can make him
cry. See? He's weaker than you after all."
Ela was angry. She had meant him to accuse Marc o, not excuse him. Just
because he had a tough childhood didn't give him the right to knock Mother
down whenever he felt like it.
"There's no blame in this. You were children then, and children are cruel
without knowing better. You wouldn't do that now. But now that I've reminded
you, you can easily see an answer. You called him a dog, and so he became one.
For the rest of his life. Hurting helpless people. Beating his wife. Speaking so
cruelly and abusively to his son Miro that he drove the boy out of his house. He
was acting out the way you treated him, becoming what you told him that he
was."
You're a fool, thought Bishop Peregrino. If people only react to the way that
others treat them, then nobody is responsible for anything. If your sins are not
your own to choose, then how can you repent?
As if he heard the Bishop's silent argument, the Speaker raised a hand and swept
away his own words. "But the easy answer isn't true. Your torments didn't make
him violent-- they made him sullen. And when you grew out of tormenting him,
he grew out of hating you. He wasn't one to bear a grudge. His anger cooled and
turned into suspicion. He knew you despised him; he learned to live without you.
In peace."
The Speaker paused a moment, and then gave voice to the question they silently
were asking. "So how did he become the cruel man you knew him to be? Think a
moment. Who was it who tasted his cruelty? His wife. His children. Some people
beat their wife and children because they lust for power, but are too weak or
stupid to win power in the world. A helpless wife and children, bound to such a
man by need and custom and, bitterly enough, love, are the only victims he is
strong enough to rule."
Yes, thought Ela, stealing a glance at her mother. This is what I wanted. This is
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into another PDF file. The
how to copy pdf image into word; how to cut an image out of a pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the point VB.NET: Clone a PDF Page. Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(filepath) ' Copy the first
paste image into pdf in preview; copy images from pdf file
why I asked him to Speak Father's death.
"There are men like that," said the Speaker, "but Marcos Ribeira wasn't one of
them. Think a moment. Did you ever hear of him striking any of his children?
Ever? You who worked with him-- did he ever try to force his will on you? Seem
resentful when things didn't go his way? Marc o was not a weak and evil man. He
was a strong man. He didn't want power. He wanted love. Not control. Loyalty."
Bishop Peregrino smiled grimly, the way a duelist might salute a worthy
opponent. You walk a twisted path, Speaker, circling around the truth, feinting at
it. And when you strike, your aim will be deadly. These people came for
entertainment, but they're your targets; you will pierce them to the heart.
"Some of you remember an incident," said the Speaker. "Marcos was maybe
thirteen, and so were you. Taunting him on the grassy hillside behind the school.
You attacked more viciously than usual. You threatened him with stones,
whipped him with capim blades. You bloodied him a little, but he bore it. Tried to
evade you. Asked you to stop. Then one of you struck him hard in the belly, and it
hurt him more than you ever imagined, because even then he was already sick
with the disease that finally killed him. He hadn't yet become accustomed to his
fragility and pain. It felt like death to him. He was cornered. You were killing him.
So he struck at you."
How did he know? thought half a dozen men. It was so long ago. Who told him
how it was? It was out of hand, that's all. We never meant anything, but when his
arm swung out, his huge fist, like the kick of a cabra-- he was going to hurt me--
"It could have been any one of you that fell to the ground. You knew then that he
was even stronger than you feared. What terrified you most, though, was that you
knew exactly the revenge that you deserved. So you called for help. And when the
teachers came, what did they see? One little boy on the ground, crying, bleeding.
One large man-sized child with a few scratches here and there, saying I'm sorry, I
didn't mean to. And a half-dozen others saying, He just hit him. Started killing
him for no reason. We tried to stop him but C o is so big. He's always picking on
the little kids."
Little Grego was caught up in the story. "Mentirosos!" he shouted. They were
lying! Several people nearby chuckled. Quara shushed him.
"So many witnesses," said the Speaker. "The teachers had no choice but to
believe the accusation. Until one girl stepped forward and coldly informed them
that she had seen it all. Marcos was acting to protect himself from a completely
unwarranted, vicious, painful attack by a pack of boys who were acting far more
like c es, like dogs, than Marcos Ribeira ever did. Her story was instantly
accepted as the truth. After all, she was the daughter of Os Venerados."
Grego looked at his mother with glowing eyes, then jumped up and announced
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Insert Image to PDF Page Using VB. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
cut picture pdf; how to copy a picture from a pdf file
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Best and professional C# image to PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. C#.NET Example: Convert One Image to PDF in Visual C# .NET Class.
extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste; how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf document
to the people around him, "A mamae o libertou!" Mama saved him! People
laughed, turned around and looked at Novinha. But she held her face
expressionless, refusing to acknowledge their momentary affection for her child.
They looked away again, offended.
"Novinha," said the Speaker. "Her cold manner and bright mind made her just
as much an outcast among you as Marc o. None of you could think of a time when
she had ever made a friendly gesture toward any of you. And here she was, saving
Marc o. Well, you knew the truth. She wasn't saving Marc o-- she was preventing
you from getting away with something."
They nodded and smiled knowingly, those people whose overtures of friendship
she had just rebuffed. That's Dona Novinha, the Biologista, too good for any of
the rest of us.
"Marcos didn't see it that way. He had been called an animal so often that he
almost believed it. Novinha showed him compassion, like a human being. A
pretty girl, a brilliant child, the daughter of the holy Venerados, always aloof as a
goddess, she had reached down and blessed him and granted his prayer. He
worshipped her. Six years later he married her. Isn't that a lovely story?"
Ela looked at Miro, who raised an eyebrow at her. "Almost makes you like the
old bastard, doesn't it?" said Miro dryly.
Suddenly, after a long pause, the Speaker's voice erupted, louder than ever
before. It startled them, awoke them. "Why did he come to hate her, to beat her,
to despise their children? And why did she endure it, this strong-willed, brilliant
woman? She could have stopped the marriage at any moment. The Church may
not allow divorce, but there's always desquite, and she wouldn't be the first
person in Milagre to quit her husband. She could have taken her suffering
children and left him. But she stayed. The Mayor and the Bishop both suggested
that she leave him. She told them they could go to hell."
Many of the Lusos laughed; they could imagine tight-lipped Novinha snapping
at the Bishop himself, facing down Bosquinha. They might not like Novinha
much, but she was just about the only person in Milagre who could get away with
thumbing her nose at authority.
The Bishop remembered the scene in his chambers more than a decade ago. She
had not used exactly the words the Speaker quoted, but the effect was much the
same. Yet he had been alone. He had told no one. Who was this Speaker, and how
did he know so much about things he could not possibly have known?
When the laughter died, the Speaker went on. "There was a tie that bound them
together in a marriage they hated. That tie was Marc o's disease."
His voice was softer now. The Lusos strained to hear.
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
how to paste a picture into a pdf; copying images from pdf files
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Replace Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL.
how to copy pictures from pdf; how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf
"It shaped his life from the moment he was conceived. The genes his parents
gave him combined in such a way that from the moment puberty began, the cells
of his glands began a steady, relentless transformation into fatty tissues. Dr.
Navio can tell you how it progresses better than I can. Marc o knew from
childhood that he had this condition; his parents knew it before they died in the
Descolada; Gusto and Cida knew it from their genetic examinations of all the
humans of Lusitania. They were all dead. Only one other person knew it, the one
who had inherited the xenobiological files. Novinha."
Dr. Navio was puzzled. If she knew this before they married, she surely knew
that most people who had his condition were sterile. Why would she have
married him when for all she knew he had no chance of fathering children? Then
he realized what he should have known before, that Marc o was not a rare
exception to the pattern of the disease. There were no exceptions. Navio's face
reddened. What the Speaker was about to tell them was unspeakable.
"Novinha knew that Marc o was dying," said the Speaker. "She also knew before
she married him that he was absolutely and completely sterile."
It took a moment for the meaning of this to sink in. Ela felt as if her organs were
melting inside her body. She saw without turning her head that Miro had gone
rigid, that his cheeks had paled.
Speaker went on despite the rising whispers from the audience. "I saw the
genetic scans. Marcos Maria Ribeira never fathered a child. His wife had
children, but they were not his, and he knew it, and she knew he knew it. It was
part of the bargain that they made when they got married."
The murmurs turned to muttering, the grumbles to complaints, and as the noise
reached a climax, Quim leaped to his feet and shouted, screamed at the Speaker,
"My mother is not an adulteress! I'll kill you for calling her a whore!"
His last word hung in the silence. The Speaker did not answer. He only waited,
not letting his gaze drop from Quim's burning face. Until finally Quim realized
that it was he, not the Speaker, whose voice had said the word that kept ringing in
his ears. He faltered. He looked at his mother sitting beside him on the ground,
but not rigidly now, slumped a little now, looking at her hands as they trembled
in her lap. "Tell them, Mother," Quim said. His voice sounded more pleading
than he had intended.
She didn't answer. Didn't say a word, didn't look at him. If he didn't know
better, he would think her trembling hands were a confession, that she was
ashamed, as if what the Speaker said was the truth that God himself would tell if
Quim were to ask him. He remembered Father Mateu explaining the tortures of
hell: God spits on adulterers, they mock the power of creation that he shared with
them, they haven't enough goodness in them to be anything better than amoebas.
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Quim tasted bile in his mouth. What the Speaker said was true.
"Mamae," he said loudly, mockingly. "Quem fode p'ra fazer-me?"
People gasped. Olhado jumped to his feet at once, his hands doubled in fists.
Only then did Novinha react, reaching out a hand as if to restrain Olhado from
hitting his brother. Quim hardly noticed that Olhado had leapt to Mother's
defense; all he could think of was the fact that Miro had not. Miro also knew that
it was true.
Quim breathed deeply, then turned around, looking lost for a moment; then he
threaded his way through the crowd. No one spoke to him, though everyone
watched him go. If Novinha had denied the charge, they would have believed her,
would have mobbed the Speaker for accusing Os Venerados' daughter of such a
sin. But she had not denied it. She had listened to her own son accuse her
obscenely, and she said nothing. It was true. And now they listened in
fascination. Few of them had any real concern. They just wanted to learn who had
fathered Novinha's children.
The Speaker quietly resumed his tale. "After her parents died and before her
children were born, Novinha loved only two people. Pipo was her second father.
Novinha anchored her life in him; for a few short years she had a taste of what it
meant to have a family. Then he died, and Novinha believed that she had killed
him."
People sitting near Novinha's family saw Quara kneel in front of Ela and ask her,
"Why is Quim so angry?"
Ela answered softly. "Because Papai was not really our father."
"Oh," said Quara. "Is the Speaker our father now?" She sounded hopeful. Ela
shushed her.
"The night Pipo died," said the Speaker, "Novinha showed him something that
she had discovered, something to do with the Descolada and the way it works
with the plants and animals of Lusitania. Pipo saw more in her work than she did
herself. He rushed to the forest where the piggies waited. Perhaps he told them
what he had discovered. Perhaps they only guessed. But Novinha blamed herself
for showing him a secret that the piggies would kill to keep.
"It was too late to undo what she had done. But she could keep it from
happening again. So she sealed up all the files that had anything to do with the
Descolada and what she had shown to Pipo that night. She knew who would want
to see the files. It was Libo, the new Zenador. If Pipo had been her father, Libo
had been her brother, and more than a brother. Hard as it was to bear Pipo's
death, Libo's would be worse.
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
He asked for the files. He demanded to see them. She told him she would never
let him see them.
"They both knew exactly what that meant. If he ever married her, he could strip
away the protection on those files. They loved each other desperately, they
needed each other more than ever, but Novinha could never marry him. He
would never promise not to read the files, and even if he made such a promise, he
couldn't keep it. He would surely see what his father saw. He would die.
"It was one thing to refuse to marry him. It was another thing to live without
him. So she didn't live without him. She made her bargain with Marc o. She
would marry him under the law, but her real husband and the father of all her
children would be, was, Libo."
Bruxinha, Libo's widow, rose shakily to her feet, tears streaming down her face,
and wailed, "Mentira, mentira." Lies, lies. But her weeping was not anger, it was
grief. She was mourning the loss of her husband all over again. Three of her
daughters helped her leave the praqa.
Softly the Speaker continued while she left. "Libo knew that he was hurting his
wife Bruxinha and their four daughters. He hated himself for what he had done.
He tried to stay away. For months, sometimes years, he succeeded. Novinha also
tried. She refused to see him, even to speak to him. She forbade her children to
mention him. Then Libo would think that he was strong enough to see her
without falling back into the old way. Novinha would be so lonely with her
husband who could never measure up to Libo. They never pretended there was
anything good about what they were doing. They just couldn't live for long
without it."
Bruxinha heard this as she was led away. It was little comfort to her now, of
course, but as Bishop Peregrino watched her go, he recognized that the Speaker
was giving her a gift. She was the most innocent victim of his cruel truth, but he
didn't leave her with nothing but ashes. He was giving her a way to live with the
knowledge of what her husband did. It was not your fault, he was telling her.
Nothing you did could have prevented it. Your husband was the one who failed,
not you. Blessed Virgin, prayed the Bishop silently, let Bruxinha hear what he
says and believe it.
Libo's widow was not the only one who cried. Many hundreds of the eyes that
watched her go were also filled with tears. To discover Novinha was an adulteress
was shocking but delicious: the steel-hearted woman had a flaw that made her no
better than anyone else. But there was no pleasure in finding the same flaw in
Libo. Everyone had loved him. His generosity, his kindness, his wisdom that they
so admired, they didn't want to know that it was all a mask.
So they were surprised when the Speaker reminded them that it was not Libo
whose death he Spoke today. "Why did Marcos Ribeira consent to this? Novinha
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
thought it was because he wanted a wife and the illusion that he had children, to
take away his shame in the community. It was partly that. Most of all, though, he
married her because he loved her. He never really hoped that she would love him
the way he loved her, because he worshipped her, she was a goddess, and he
knew that he was diseased, filthy, an animal to be despised. He knew she could
not worship him, or even love him. He hoped that she might someday feel some
affection. That she might feel some-- loyalty."
The Speaker bowed his head a moment. The Lusos heard the words that he did
not have to say: She never did.
"Each child that came," said the Speaker, "was another proof to Marcos that he
had failed. That the goddess still found him unworthy. Why? He was loyal. He
had never hinted to any of his children that they were not his own. He never
broke his promise to Novinha. Didn't he deserve something from her? At times it
was more than he could bear. He refused to accept her judgment. She was no
goddess. Her children were all bastards. This is what he told himself when he
lashed out at her, when he shouted at Miro."
Miro heard his own name, but didn't recognize it as anything to do with him.
His connection with reality was more fragile than he ever had supposed, and
today had given him too many shocks. The impossible magic with the piggies and
the trees. Mother and Libo, lovers. Ouanda suddenly torn from being as close to
him as his own body, his own self, she was now set back at one remove, like Ela,
like Quara, another sister. His eyes did not focus on the grass; the Speaker's voice
was pure sound, he didn't hear meanings in the words, only the terrible sound.
Miro had called for that voice, had wanted it to Speak Libo's death. How could he
have known that instead of a benevolent priest of a humanist religion he would
get the original Speaker himself, with his penetrating mind and far too perfect
understanding? He could not have known that beneath that empathic mask
would be hiding Ender the destroyer, the mythic Lucifer of mankind's greatest
crime, determined to live up to his name, making a mockery of the life work of
Pipo, Libo, Ouanda, and Miro himself by seeing in a single hour with the piggies
what all the others had failed in almost fifty years to see, and then riving Ouanda
from him with a single, merciless stroke from the blade of truth; that was the
voice that Miro heard, the only certainty left to him, that relentless terrible voice.
Miro clung to the sound of it, trying to hate it, yet failing, because he knew, could
not deceive himself, he knew that Ender was a destroyer, but what he destroyed
was illusion, and the illusion had to die. The truth about the piggies, the truth
about ourselves. Somehow this ancient man is able to see the truth and it doesn't
blind his eyes or drive him mad. I must listen to this voice and let its power come
to me so I, too, can stare at the light and not die.
"Novinha knew what she was. An adulteress, a hypocrite. She knew she was
hurting Marc o, Libo, her children, Bruxinha. She knew she had killed Pipo. So
she endured, even invited Marc o's punishment. It was her penance. It was never
penance enough. No matter how much Marc o might hate her, she hated herself
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
much more."
The Bishop nodded slowly. The Speaker had done a monstrous thing, to lay
these secrets before the whole community. They should have been spoken in the
confessional. Yet Peregrino had felt the power of it, the way the whole community
was forced to discover these people that they thought they knew, and then
discover them again, and then again; and each revision of the story forced them
all to reconceive themselves as well, for they had been part of this story, too, had
been touched by all the people a hundred, a thousand times, never understanding
until now who it was they touched. It was a painful, fearful thing to go through,
but in the end it had a curiously calming effect. The Bishop leaned to his secretary
and whispered, "At least the gossips will get nothing from this-- there aren't any
secrets left to tell."
"All the people in this story suffered pain," the Speaker said. "All of them
sacrificed for the people they loved. All of them caused terrible pain to the people
who loved them. And you-- listening to me here today, you also caused pain. But
remember this: Marc o's life was tragic and cruel, but he could have ended his
bargain with Novinha at any time. He chose to stay. He must have found some
joy in it. And Novinha: She broke the laws of God that bind this community
together. She has also borne her punishment. The Church asks for no penance as
terrible as the one she imposed on herself. And if you're inclined to think she
might deserve some petty cruelty at your hands, keep this in mind: She suffered
everything, did all this for one purpose: to keep the piggies from killing Libo."
The words left ashes in their hearts.
Olhado stood and walked to his mother, knelt by her, put an arm around her
shoulder. Ela sat beside her, but she was folded to the ground, weeping. Quara
came and stood in front of her mother, staring at her with awe. And Grego buried
his face in Novinha's lap and wept. Those who were near enough could hear him
crying, "Todo papai ‚ morto. Nao tenho nem papai." All my papas are dead. I
don't have any papa.
Ouanda stood in the mouth of the alley where she had gone with her mother just
before the Speaking ended. She looked for Miro, but he was already gone.
Ender stood behind the platform, looking at Novinha's family, wishing he could
do something to ease their pain. There was always pain after a Speaking, because
a Speaker for the Dead did nothing to soften the truth. But only rarely had people
lived such lives of deceit as Marc o, Libo, and Novinha; rarely were there so many
shocks, so many bits of information that forced people to revise their conception
of the people that they knew, the people that they loved. Ender knew from the
faces that looked up at him as he spoke that he had caused great pain today. He
had felt it all himself, as if they had passed their suffering to him. Bruxinha had
been most surprised, but Ender knew she was not worst injured. That distinction
belonged to Miro and Ouanda, who had thought they knew what the future would
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested