pdf viewer in c# windows application : How to cut pdf image SDK software API wpf windows asp.net sharepoint SpeakerForTheDead3-part1444

without him. For them, the issue of Ender the Xenocide was merely
philosophical. After all, the Bugger Wars were more than three thousand years
ago; it was now the year 1948 SC, counting from the year the Starways Code was
established, and Ender had destroyed the Buggers in the year 1180 BSC. But to
Andrew, the events were not so remote. He had done far more interstellar travel
than any of his students would dare to guess; since he was twenty-five he had,
until Trondheim, never stayed more than six months on any planet. Lightspeed
travel between worlds had let him skip like a stone over the surface of time. His
students had no idea that their Speaker for the Dead, who was surely no older
than thirty-five, had very clear memories of events 3000 years before, that in fact
those events seemed scarcely twenty years ago to him, only half his lifetime. They
had no idea how deeply the question of Ender's ancient guilt burned within him,
and how he had answered it in a thousand different unsatisfactory ways. They
knew their teacher only as Speaker for the Dead; they did not know that when he
was a mere infant, his older sister, Valentine, could not pronounce the name
Andrew, and so called him Ender, the name that he made infamous before he was
fifteen years old. So let unforgiving Styrka and analytical Plikt ponder the great
question of Ender's guilt; for Andrew Wiggin, Speaker for the Dead, the question
was not academic.
And now, walking along the damp, grassy hillside in the chill air, Ender--
Andrew, Speaker-- could think only of the piggies, who were already committing
inexplicable murders, just as the buggers had carelessly done when they first
visited humankind. Was it something unavoidable, when strangers met, that the
meeting had to be marked with blood? The buggers had casually killed human
beings, but only because they had a hive mind; to them, individual life was as
precious as nail parings, and killing a human or two was simply their way of
letting us know they were in the neighborhood. Could the piggies have such a
reason for killing, too?
But the voice in his ear had spoken of torture, a ritual murder similar to the
execution of one of the piggies' own. The piggies were not a hive mind, they were
not the buggers, and Ender Wiggin had to know why they had done what they
did.
"When did you hear about the death of the xenologer?"
Ender turned. It was Plikt. She had followed him instead of going back to the
Caves, where the students lived.
"Then, while we spoke." He touched his ear; implanted terminals were
expensive, but they were not all that rare.
"I checked the news just before class. There was nothing about it then. If a major
story had been coming in by ansible, there would have been an alert. Unless you
got the news straight from the ansible report."
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
How to cut pdf image - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
copy and paste image from pdf to word; cut picture pdf
How to cut pdf image - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
paste image into preview pdf; how to copy pictures from pdf to powerpoint
Plikt obviously thought she had a mystery on her hands. And, in fact, she did.
"Speakers have high priority access to public information," he said.
"Has someone asked you to Speak the death of the xenologer?"
He shook his head. "Lusitania is under a Catholic License."
"That's what I mean," she said. "They won't have a Speaker of their own there.
But they still have to let a Speaker come, if someone requests it. And Trondheim
is the closest world to Lusitania."
"Nobody's called for a Speaker."
Plikt tugged at his sleeve. "Why are you here?"
"You know why I came. I Spoke the death of Wutan."
"I know you came here with your sister, Valentine. She's a much more popular
teacher than you are-- she answers questions with answers; you just answer with
more questions."
"That's because she knows some answers."
"Speaker, you have to tell me. I tried to find out about you-- I was curious. Your
name, for one thing, where you came from. Everything's classified. Classified so
deep that I can't even find out what the access level is. God himself couldn't look
up your life story."
Ender took her by the shoulders, looked down into her eyes. "It's none of your
business, that's what the access level is."
"You are more important than anybody guesses, Speaker," she said. "The ansible
reports to you before it reports to anybody, doesn't it? And nobody can look up
information about you."
"Nobody has ever tried. Why you?"
"I want to be a Speaker," she said.
"Go ahead then. The computer will train you. It isn't like a religion-- you don't
have to memorize any catechism. Now leave me alone. " He let go of her with a
little shove. She staggered backward as he strode off.
"I want to Speak for you," she cried.
"I'm not dead yet!" he shouted back.
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. If using x86, the platform target should be x86. C#.NET Sample Code: Clone a PDF Page Using C#.NET.
how to copy pdf image to word; copy image from pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
example that you can use it to extract all images from PDF document. ' Get page 3 from the document. Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the
how to copy picture from pdf file; paste jpg into pdf preview
"I know you're going to Lusitania! I know you are!"
Then you know more than I do, said Ender silently. But he trembled as he
walked, even though the sun was shining and he wore three sweaters to keep out
the cold. He hadn't known Plikt had so much emotion in her. Obviously she had
come to identify with him. It frightened him to have this girl need something
from him so desperately. He had spent years now without making any real
connection with anyone but his sister Valentine-- her and, of course, the dead
that he Spoke. All the other people who had meant anything to him in his life
were dead. He and Valentine had passed them by centuries ago, worlds ago.
The idea of casting a root into the icy soil of Trondheim repelled him. What did
Plikt want from him? It didn't matter; he wouldn't give it. How dare she demand
things from him, as if he belonged to her? Ender Wiggin didn't belong to
anybody. If she knew who he really was, she would loathe him as the Xenocide; or
she would worship him as the Savior of Mankind-- Ender remembered what it
was like when people used to do that, too, and he didn't like it any better. Even
now they knew him only by his role, by the name Speaker, Talman, Falante,
Spieler, whatever they called the Speaker for the Dead in the language of their
city or nation or world.
He didn't want them to know him. He did not belong to them, to the human
race. He had another errand, he belonged to someone else. Not human beings.
Not the bloody piggies, either. Or so he thought.
Chapter 3 -- Libo
Observed Diet: Primarily macios, the shiny worms that live among merclona
vines on the bark of the trees. Sometimes they have been seen to chew capirn
blades. Sometimes-- accidently? --they ingest merclona leaves along with the
maclos.
We've never seen them eat anything else. Novinha analyzed all three foods--
macios, capim blades, and merclona leaves-- and the results were surprising.
Either the peclueninos don't need many different proteins, or they're hungry all
the time. Their diet is sehously lacking in many trace elements. And calcium
intake is so low, we wonder whether their bones use calcium the same way ours
do.
Pure speculation: Since we can't take tissue samples, our only knowledge of
piggy anatomy and physiology is what we were able to glean from our
photographs of the vivisected corpse of the piggy called Rooter. Still, there are
some obvious anomalies. The piggles' tongues, which are so fantastically agile
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
application, this VB.NET image cropper library SDK provides a professional and easy to use .NET solution for developers to crop / cut out image file in a short
copy picture from pdf reader; how to cut image from pdf file
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
document page. Able to cut and paste image into another PDF file. Export high quality image from PDF document in .NET program. Remove
copy images from pdf to powerpoint; copy picture from pdf to powerpoint
that they can produce any sound we make, and a lot we can't, must have evolved
for some purpose. Probing for insects in tree bark or in nests in the ground,
maybe. Whether an ancient ancestral piggy did that, they certainly don't do it
now. And the horny pads on their feet and inside their knees allow them to climb
trees and cling by their legs alone. Why did that evolve? To escape from some
predator? There is no predator on Lusitania large enough to harm them. To cling
to the tree while probing for insects in the bark? That fits in with their tongues,
but where are the insects? The only insects are the suckflies and the puladors, but
they don't bore into the bark and the piggies don't eat them anyway. The macios
are large, live on the bark's surface, and can easily be harvested by pulling down
the merclona vines; they really don't even have to climb the trees.
Libo's speculation: The tongue, the tree-climbing evolved in a different
environment, with a much more varied diet, including insects. But something--
an ice age? Migration? A disease? --caused the environment to change. No more
barkbugs, etc. Maybe all the big predators were wiped out then. It would explain
why there are so few species on Lusitania, despite the very favorable conditions.
The cataclysm might have been fairly recent-- half a million years ago? --so that
evolution hasn't had a chance to differentiate much yet.
It's a tempting hypothesis, since there's no obvious reason in the present
environment for piggles to have evolved at all. There's no competition for them,
The ecological niche they occupy could be filled by gophers. Why would
intelligence ever be an adaptive trait? But inventing a cataclysm to explain why
the piggies have such a boring, non-nutritious diet is probably overkill. Ockham's
razor cuts this to ribbons.
-- Joao Figueira Alvarez, Working Notes 4/14/1948 SC, published posthumously
in Philosophicol Roots of the Lusitanian Secession, 2010-33-4-1090:40
As soon as Mayor Bosquinha arrived at the Zenador's Station, matters slipped out
of Libo's and Novinha's control. Bosquinha was accustomed to taking command,
and her attitude did not leave much opportunity for protest, or even for
consideration. "You wait here," she said to Libo almost as soon as she had
grasped the situation. "As soon as I got your call, I sent the Arbiter to tell your
mother."
"We have to bring his body in," said Libo.
"I also called some of the men who live nearby to help with that," she said. "And
Bishop Peregrino is preparing a place for him in the Cathedral graveyard."
"I want to be there," insisted Libo.
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Converter control easy to create thumbnails from PDF pages. Selection for compressing to multiple image formats. Cut and paste any areas in PDF pages to images.
copy pdf picture to word; how to copy pictures from a pdf document
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document.
paste image into pdf; how to paste a picture into a pdf document
"You understand, Libo, we have to take pictures, in detail."
"I was the one who told you we have to do that, for the report to the Starways
Committee."
"But you should not be there, Libo." Bosquinha's voice was authoritative.
"Besides, we must have your report. We have to notify Starways as quickly as
possible. Are you up to writing it now, while it's fresh in your mind?"
She was right, of course. Only Libo and Novinha could write firsthand reports,
and the sooner they wrote them, the better. "I can do it," said Libo.
"And you, Novinha, your observations also. Write your reports separately,
without consultation. The Hundred Worlds are waiting."
The computer had already been alerted, and their reports went out by ansible
even as they wrote them, mistakes and corrections and all. On all the Hundred
Worlds the people most involved in xenology read each word as Libo or Novinha
typed it in. Many others were given instantaneous computer-written summaries
of what had happened. Twenty-two light-years away, Andrew Wiggin learned that
Xenologer Jodo Figueira "Pipo" Alvarez had been murdered by the piggies, and
told his students about it even before the men had brought Pipo's body through
the gate into Milagre.
His report done, Libo was at once surrounded by authority. Novinha watched
with increasing anguish as she saw the incapability of the leaders of Lusitania,
how they only intensified Libo's pain. Bishop Peregrino was the worst; his idea of
comfort was to tell Libo that in all likelihood, the piggies were actually animals,
without souls, and so his father had been torn apart by wild beasts, not
murdered. Novinha almost shouted at him, Does that mean that Pipo's life work
was nothing but studying beasts? And his death, instead of being murder, was an
act of God? But for Libo's sake she restrained herself; he sat in the Bishop's
presence, nodding and, in the end, getting rid of him by sufferance far more
quickly than Novinha could ever have done by argument.
Dom Crist o of the Monastery was more helpful, asking intelligent questions
about the events of the day, which let Libo and Novinha be analytical,
unemotional as they answered. However, Novinha soon withdrew from
answering. Most people were asking why the piggies had done such a thing; Dom
Crist o was asking what Pipo might have done recently to trigger his murder.
Novinha knew perfectly well what Pipo had done-- he had told the piggies the
secret he discovered in Novinha's simulation. But she did not speak of this, and
Libo seemed to have forgotten what she had hurriedly told him a few hours ago as
they were leaving to go searching for Pipo. He did not even glance toward the
simulation. Novinha was content with that; her greatest anxiety was that he
would remember.
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
how to copy an image from a pdf to powerpoint; how to copy pdf image
How to C#: Basic SDK Concept of XDoc.PDF for .NET
add, create, insert, delete, re-order, copy, paste, cut, rotate, and And PDF file text processing like text writing, extracting, searching, etc Image Process.
how to copy image from pdf to word; how to copy picture from pdf
Dom Crist o's questions were interrupted when the Mayor came back with
several of the men who had helped retrieve the corpse. They were soaked to the
skin despite their plastic raincoats, and spattered with mud; mercifully, any blood
must have been washed away by the rain. They all seemed vaguely apologetic and
even worshipful, nodding their heads to Libo, almost bowing. It occurred to
Novinha that their deference wasn't just the normal wariness people always show
toward those whom death had so closely touched.
One of the men said to Libo, "You're Zenador now, aren't you?" and there it was,
in words. The Zenador had no official authority in Milagre, but he had prestige--
his work was the whole reason for the colony's existence, wasn't it?
Libo was not a boy anymore; he had decisions to make, he had prestige, he had
moved from the fringe of the colony's life to its very center.
Novinha felt control of her life slip away. This is not how things are supposed to
be. I'm supposed to continue here for years ahead, learning from Pipo, with Libo
as my fellow student; that's the pattern of life. Since she was already the colony's
zenobiologista, she also had an honored adult niche to fill. She wasn't jealous of
Libo, she just wanted to remain a child with him for a while. Forever, in fact.
But Libo could not be her fellow student, could not be her fellow anything. She
saw with sudden clarity how everyone in the room focused on Libo, what he said,
how he felt, what he planned to do now. "We'll not harm the piggies," he said, "or
even call it murder. We don't know what Father did to provoke them, I'll try to
understand that later, what matters now is that whatever they did undoubtedly
seemed right to them. We're the strangers here, we must have violated some--
taboo, some law-- but Father was always prepared for this, he always knew it was
a possibility. Tell them that he died with the honor of a soldier in the field, a pilot
in his ship, he died doing his job."
Ah, Libo, you silent boy, you have found such eloquence now that you can't be a
mere boy anymore. Novinha felt a redoubling of her grief. She had to look away
from Libo, look anywhere. And where she looked was into the eyes of the only
other person in the room who was not watching Libo. The man was very tall, but
very young-- younger than she was, she realized, for she knew him: he had been a
student in the class below her. She had gone before Dona Crist  once, to defend
him. Marcos Ribeira, that was his name, but they had always called him Marc o,
because he was so big. Big and dumb, they said, calling him also simply C o, the
crude word for dog. She had seen the sullen anger in his eyes, and once she had
seen him, goaded beyond endurance, lash out and strike down one of his
tormentors. His victim was in a shoulder cast for much of a year.
Of course they accused Marc o of having done it without provocation-- that's the
way of torturers of every age, to put the blame on the victim, especially when he
strikes back. But Novinha didn't belong to the group of children-- she was as
isolated as Marc o, though not as helpless-- and so she had no loyalty to stop her
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
from telling the truth. It was part of her training to Speak for the piggies, she
thought. Marc o himself meant nothing to her. It never occurred to her that the
incident might have been important to him, that he might have remembered her
as the one person who ever stood up for him in his continuous war with the other
children. She hadn't seen or thought of him in the years since she became
xenobiologist.
Now here he was, stained with the mud of Pipo's death scene, his face looking
even more haunted and bestial than ever with his hair plastered by rain and
sweat over his face and ears. And what was he looking at? His eyes were only for
her, even as she frankly stared at him. Why are you watching me? she asked
silently. Because I'm hungry, said his animal eyes. But no, no, that was her fear,
that was her vision of the murderous piggies. Marc o is nothing to me, and no
matter what he might think, I am nothing to him.
Yet she had a flash of insight, just for a moment. Her action in defending Marc o
meant one thing to him and something quite different to her; it was so different
that it was not even the same event. Her mind connected this with the piggies'
murder of Pipo, and it seemed very important, it seemed to verge on explaining
what had happened, but then the thought slipped away in a flurry of conversation
and activity as the Bishop led the men off again, heading for the graveyard.
Coffins were not used for burial here, where for the piggies' sake it was forbidden
to cut trees. So Pipo's body was to be buried at once, though the graveside funeral
would be held no sooner than tomorrow, and probably later; many people would
want to gather for the Zenador's requiem mass. Marc o and the other men
trooped off into the storm, leaving Novinha and Libo to deal with all the people
who thought they had urgent business to attend to in the aftermath of Pipo's
death. Self-important strangers wandered in and out, making decisions that
Novinha did not understand and Libo did not seem to care about.
Until finally it was the Arbiter standing by Libo, his hand on the boy's shoulder.
"You will, of course, stay with us," said the Arbiter. "Tonight at least."
Why your house, Arbiter? thought Novinha. You're nobody to us, we've never
brought a case before you, who are you to decide this? Does Pipo's death mean
that we're suddenly little children who can't decide anything?
"I'll stay with my mother," said Libo.
The Arbiter looked at him in surprise-- the mere idea of a child resisting his will
seemed to be completely outside the realm of his experience. Novinha knew that
this was not so, of course. His daughter Cleopatra, several years younger than
Novinha, had worked hard to earn her nickname, Bruxinha-- little witch. So how
could he not know that children had minds of their own, and resisted taming?
But the surprise was not what Novinha had assumed. "I thought you realized
that your mother is also staying with my family for a time," said the Arbiter.
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
"These events have upset her, of course, and she should not have to think about
household duties, or be in a house that reminds her of who is not there with her.
She is with us, and your brothers and sisters, and they need you there. Your older
brother Jodo is with them, of course, but he has a wife and child of his own now,
so you're the one who can stay and be depended on."
Libo nodded gravely. The Arbiter was not bringing him into his protection; he
was asking Libo to become a protector.
The Arbiter turned to Novinha. "And I think you should go home," he said.
Only then did she understand that his invitation had not included her. Why
should it? Pipo had not been her father. She was just a friend who happened to be
with Libo when the body was discovered. What grief could she experience?
Home! What was home, if not this place? Was she supposed to go now to the
Biologista's Station, where her bed had not been slept in for more than a year,
except for catnaps during lab work? Was that supposed to be her home? She had
left it because it was so painfully empty of her parents; now the Zenador's Station
was empty, too: Pipo dead and Libo changed into an adult with duties that would
take him away from her. This place wasn't home, but neither was any other place.
The Arbiter led Libo away. His mother, Conceicao, was waiting for him in the
Arbiter's house. Novinha barely knew the woman, except as the librarian who
maintained the Lusitanian archive. Novinha had never spent time with Pipo's
wife or other children, she had not cared that they existed; only the work here,
the life here had been real. As Libo went to the door he seemed to grow smaller,
as if he were a much greater distance away, as if he were being borne up and off
by the wind, shrinking into the sky like a kite; the door closed behind him.
Now she felt the magnitude of Pipo's loss. The mutilated corpse on the hillside
was not his death, it was merely his death's debris. Death itself was the empty
place in her life. Pipo had been a rock in a storm, so solid and strong that she and
Libo, sheltered together in his lee, had not even known the storm existed. Now he
was gone, and the storm had them, would carry them whatever way it would.
Pipo, she cried out silently. Don't go! Don't leave us! But of course he was gone,
as deaf to her prayers as ever her parents had been.
The Zenador's Station was still busy; the Mayor herself, Bosquinha, was using a
terminal to transmit all of Pipo's data by ansible to the Hundred Worlds, where
experts were desperately trying to make sense of Pipo's death.
But Novinha knew that the key to his death was not in Pipo's files. It was her
data that had killed him, somehow. It was still there in the air above her terminal,
the holographic images of genetic molecules in the nuclei of piggy cells. She had
not wanted Libo to study it, but now she looked and looked, trying to see what
Pipo had seen, trying to understand what there was in the images that had made
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
him rush out to the piggies, to say or do something that had made them murder
him. She had inadvertently uncovered some secret that the piggies would kill to
keep, but what was it?
The more she studied the holos, the less she understood, and after a while she
didn't see them at all, except as a blur through her tears as she wept silently. She
had killed him, because without even meaning to she had found the pequeninos'
secret. If I had never come to this place, if I had not dreamed of being Speaker of
the piggies' story, you would still be alive, Pipo; Libo would have his father, and
be happy; this place would still be home. I carry the seeds of death within me and
plant them wherever I linger long enough to love. My parents died so others
could live; now I live, so others must die.
It was the Mayor who noticed her short, sharp breaths and realized, with
brusque compassion, that this girt was also shaken and grieving. Bosquinha left
others to continue the ansible reports and led Novinha out of the Zenador's
Station.
"I'm sorry, child," said the Mayor, "I knew you came here often, I should have
guessed that he was like a father to you, and here we treat you like a bystander,
not right or fair of me at all, come home with me--"
"No," said Novinha. Walking out into the cold, wet night air had shaken some of
the grief from her; she regained some clarity of thought. "No, I want to be alone,
please." Where? "In my own Station."
"You shouldn't be alone, on this of all nights," said Bosquinha.
But Novinha could not bear the prospect of company, of kindness, of people
trying to console her. I killed him, don't you see? I don't deserve consolation. I
want to suffer whatever pain might come. It's my penance, my restitution, and, if
possible, my absolution; how else will I clean the bloodstains from my hands?
But she hadn't the strength to resist, or even to argue. For ten minutes the
Mayor's car skimmed over the grassy roads.
"Here's my house," said the Mayor. "I don't have any children quite your age,
but you'll be comfortable enough, I think. Don't worry, no one will plague you,
but it isn't good to be alone."
"I'd rather." Novinha meant her voice to sound forceful, but it was weak and
faint.
"Please," said Bosquinha. "You're not yourself."
I wish I weren't.
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
She had no appetite, though Bosquinha's husband had a cafezinho for them
both. It was late, only a few hours left till dawn, and she let them put her to bed.
Then, when the house was still, she got up, dressed, and went downstairs to the
Mayor's home terminal. There she instructed the computer to cancel the display
that was still above the terminal at the Zenador's Station. Even though she had
not been able to decipher the secret that Pipo found there, someone else might,
and she would have no other death on her conscience.
Then she left the house and walked through the Centro, around the bight of the
river, through the Vila das Aguas, to the Biologista's Station. Her house.
It was cold, unheated in the living quarters-- she hadn't slept there in so long
that there was thick dust on her sheets. But of course the lab was warm, well-
used-- her work had never suffered because of her attachment to Pipo and Libo.
If only it had.
She was very systematic about it. Every sample, every slide, every culture she
had used in the discoveries that led to Pipo's death-- she threw them out, washed
everything clean, left no hint of the work she had done. She not only wanted it
gone, she wanted no sign that it had been destroyed.
Then she turned to her terminal. She would also destroy all the records of her
work in this area, all the records of her parents' work that had led to her own
discoveries. They would be gone. Even though it had been the focus of her life,
even though it had been her identity for many years, she would destroy it as she
herself should be punished, destroyed, obliterated.
The computer stopped her. "Working notes on xenobiological research may not
be erased," it reported. She couldn't have done it anyway. She had learned from
her parents, from their files which she had studied like scripture, like a roadmap
into herself: Nothing was to be destroyed, nothing forgotten. The sacredness of
knowledge was deeper in her soul than any catechism. She was caught in a
paradox. Knowledge had killed Pipo; to erase that knowledge would kill her
parents again, kill what they had left for her. She could not preserve it, she could
not destroy it. There were walls on either side, too high to climb, pressing slowly
inward, crushing her.
Novinha did the only thing she could: put on the files every layer of protection
and every barrier to access she knew of. No one would ever see them but her, as
long as she lived. Only when she died would her successor as xenobiologist be
able to see what she had hidden there. With one exception-- when she married,
her husband would also have access if he could show need to know. Well, she'd
never marry. It was that easy.
She saw her future ahead of her, bleak and unbearable and unavoidable. She
dared not die, and yet she would hardly be alive, unable to marry, unable even to
think about the subject herself, lest she discover the deadly secret and
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Click here to buy
A
B
B
Y
Y
P
D
F
T
ra
n
s
f
o
r
m
e
r
2
.
0
w
w
w
.
A
B
B
Y
Y
.
c
o
m
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested