pdf viewer in mvc 4 : How to copy image from pdf to word Library control component asp.net web page winforms mvc PoythressVernInTheBeginningWasTheWord19-part18

191
Chapter  23: Genre
Communication in language contains what has been called “redundancy.” Char-
lo瑴e can guess the contents of a word or a sentence that she does not completely 
hear, because its contribution overlaps with the contributions of the portions that 
she does hear. We can see similar processes when we look at God’s communica-
tion to us in the Bible. An obvious redundancy occurs when two different parts 
of the Bible teach the same thing. 周e two parts may use nearly the same words 
(1 Sam. 22 and Ps. 18; Ps. 14 and Ps. 53), but o晴en use somewhat different words. 
周e four Gospels, taken together, have much overlap or “redundancy” among 
them. A reader who misses the point made in one Gospel may nevertheless hear 
the same point later when he reads another Gospel.
周e different genres of the Bible offer still other kinds of overlap. For example, 
much basic theology about God and man can be inferred from the Psalms. Or it 
can be inferred from more didactic portions of the Bible like the New Testament 
le瑴ers. 周e Psalms, because of their genre as songs, o晴en affect us more in our 
emotions. 周e New Testament le瑴ers may sometimes affect us first of all in our 
mental beliefs. But the Psalms can also form our theological convictions and beliefs. 
God can work profound personal effects in helping us to absorb the truths on a 
deeper level. 周e reader absorbs knowledge of God not only from the didactic 
portions that have more overt teaching about God but also from the Psalms that 
drive home the personal effects. 周e two reinforce each other. 周e human reader 
does not need to know exhaustively either the genre or the content of the Psalms 
or the Le瑴er to the Romans in order to use both to grow in knowing God.
Individual books of the Bible, and even individual sentences, also have overlap 
or “redundancies.” If we were to delete or cover up a single word within a sentence, 
context would o晴en allow a reasonable guess as to what the missing word is. 周at 
is because the rest of the sentence overlaps in function with the contribution of 
the single word.
“Redundancy” is not a terribly good label for this phenomenon, because it 
suggests that a good deal is superfluous, and this is far from true. 周e richness 
produced by reinforcements in meaning helps us in areas where we are dull, or slow 
to understand, or where we accidentally miss some detail, or where some detail of 
meaning is not easily available because of subtle changes in cultural context from 
then to now. God designed language to allow communication between himself 
and man, even in the situation where man is dull, or is resisting the truth. Having 
multiple means of communication is one way of overcoming dullness.
God made it so in order that we, in our finiteness, even when we are recovering 
from sin and rebellion, might have communion with him, in spirit and in truth. 
In this sense, the so-called “redundancies” are not redundant or superfluous, but 
a blessing according to God’s design.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   191
5/14/09   4:46:29 PM
How to copy image from pdf to word - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy picture from pdf; copy images from pdf to powerpoint
How to copy image from pdf to word - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy text from pdf image to word; how to copy pictures from pdf
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   192
5/14/09   4:46:29 PM
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. List<PDFImage> allImages = PDFImageHandler. ExtractImages(page); C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
copy image from pdf preview; how to cut a picture out of a pdf file
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for
how to copy pictures from pdf to powerpoint; copy paste picture pdf
P a
r
 
4
i
Stories
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   193
5/14/09   4:46:29 PM
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into The portable document format, known as PDF document, is a they are using different types of word processors.
copying image from pdf to powerpoint; how to cut and paste image from pdf
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Convert PDF to Word (.docx) Document in VB.NET. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Convert PDF to Word Document in VB.NET Demo Code.
how to paste picture on pdf; copy pdf picture to powerpoint
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   194
5/14/09   4:46:29 PM
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the point VB.NET: Clone a PDF Page. Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(filepath) ' Copy the first
paste picture to pdf; copy image from pdf acrobat
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
A convenient C#.NET control able to turn all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting. Convert
copy image from pdf to pdf; copy picture to pdf
195
C
H
A
P
T
E
 
24
-
Story telling
“Be fruitful and multiply and fill  the earth and subdue it and have  
dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the heavens  
and over every living thing that moves on the earth.”
—Genesis 1:28
We will not hide them from their children,
but tell to the coming generation
the glorious deeds of the Lord, and his might,
and the wonders that he has done.
—Psalm 78:4
S
torytelling is one particular genre, a common genre in many cultures.
1
周ere 
are many reasons for its popularity, and it is difficult to plumb them all. People 
enjoy stories, even made-up stories. 周ey want information about what other 
people are doing or have done. 周ey also identify with characters like themselves, 
and vicariously experience the disappointments or triumphs of these characters. 
周ey may enjoy imagining fantasy worlds, where the limits for personal action 
within the real world are stretched or bent, but in a way that may still indirectly 
1. In fact, narrative discourse in a broad sense is a linguistic universal, characteristic of all human 
language. See Robert E. Longacre, 周e Grammar of Discourse (New York/London: Plenum, 1983), 3. 
But from the standpoint of an insider observer within a particular culture, there will be genres whose 
exact texture belongs with that particular culture and that language.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   195
5/14/09   4:46:29 PM
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
key. Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and bookmark to Word without losing format. Powerful components
copy and paste image from pdf to word; preview paste image into pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Insert Image to PDF Page Using VB. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
copying images from pdf files; how to paste a picture into a pdf
196
Part  4: Stories
illumine their own personhood. 周ey enjoy stories of the past, which may have 
instances of bravery or ignominy, and may help to explain the present.
Stories have some profound relations to God. We will take time to explore 
some of them.
Storytelling encapsulates a large amount of human action. 周e action may 
be spread across days or months or years. 周e story compresses this action 
into a few minutes or a few hours.
2
周e story gives a view of human life, the 
life of personal action. In that respect, it offers a form of transcendence. Sto-
rytelling is for human beings made in the image of God. We can step back 
and look at ourselves, and reflect about ourselves, in a form of transcendence 
that images or reflects the transcendence of God. We talk about ourselves. We 
perform a verbal action that refers to other complex actions. We summarize, 
arrange, structure, and evaluate, elucidating the significance of human beings 
and their actions.
Insiders’ and Outsiders’ Views in Stories
As a genre, storytelling will vary in some ways from language to language. 周ere 
will also be subgenres, like novels, science fiction, historical reporting, epic sto-
ries, fairy tales, detective stories. But there are also commonalities to human 
nature, and commonalities also to human action in time.
3
It is on these that we 
will focus, since we cannot possibly exhaust the multiplicity of stories in the 
multiplicity of cultures.
The final context for human action is God’s action. God has a “story,” 
namely, world history. God has purposes from the beginning, and these are 
executed in time. At the center of world history God has the climactic history 
of redemption brought about in the life of Christ. Because human beings are 
made in the image of God, they have purposes, and they endeavor to bring 
about those purposes in time. So human stories are naturally analogous to 
God’s world history. Human stories represent within language the nature of 
human action.
Plot
God’s story has a beginning, a middle, and an end. In the beginning God cre-
ated the world. Shortly a晴er the beginning of the human race, the fall disrupted 
2. In the terminology of chapter 11, this encapsulation is a form of backlooping.
3. 周e particular genres in a particular culture are “emic” categories, in the terminology of 
chapter 19. 周e commonalities shared by different cultures are “etic.” On “etic” and “emic,” see 
Kenneth L. Pike, Language in Relation to a Unified 周eory of the Structure of Human Behavior, 2nd 
ed. (周e Hague: Mouton, 1967), 37–72.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   196
5/14/09   4:46:29 PM
197
Chapter  24: Storytelling
the original harmony. God then acts in the middle of history to redeem human 
beings. 周e end comes with the consummation, the new heaven and the new 
earth (Rev. 21:1).
God’s actions exceed what human beings can do. And yet there are still simi-
larities. We may re-label God’s history as a story consisting in commission, work, 
and reward. Using this more general labeling, we can see similarities with human 
action. Human beings imitate God’s purposes on smaller scales. Purposeful human 
action has an action “plan” of sorts; it has purposes. It also involves a concrete 
action and its result (fig. 24.1).
周is pa瑴ern occurs both in real human actions in history and in fictional 
stories.
Story plots, as accounts of human action, therefore o晴en show similar features. 
Stories may begin with a normal situation. But a problem or a disruption soon 
surfaces. Let me illustrate with a generic form of a fairy tale.
“Once upon a time, there was a good and faithful king who had a lovely daugh-
ter, the princess. But one day the princess was kidnapped by a dragon.” 周e kid-
napping represents a disruption of the normal situation. 周e disruption already 
suggests a task to undertake to remedy the disruption. 周e remedy will be a 
small-scale analogue of redemption. 周e princess must be rescued. 周at is the 
action plan; that is the purpose.
周e introduction of tension and the resolution of tension lead to the possibil-
ity of drawing a “plot” of the tension at each point in the narrative. 周e tension 
goes up when difficulties increase; the tension goes down when the difficulties 
are resolved. 周e resulting plot has the shape consisting of a hump in the middle 
and valleys at the two ends. It is what has been called the “bell curve” for plot-
ting tension in a narrative. 周e tension is introduced, rises to a climax, and then 
falls during the resolution and the period of reward (or failure, in a tragic plot). 
See fig. 24.2.
Plot
F
igure
24.1
Beginning
Middle
End
Purpose
Action
Result
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   197
5/14/09   4:46:29 PM
198
Part  4: Stories
Tension
F
igure
24.2
Level of tension
Normal
world
Climax
Resolution
John Beekman,
4
building on the observations of many literary analysts, and 
based on experience with multiple languages, has produced a set of labels for 
the various main elements in a narrative episode, which are tied into the rise 
and fall of tension. We paraphrase Beekman’s work in the following summary 
(see also fig. 24.3).
Pieces of a Narrative Episode
Se瑴ing is composed of statements about static facts, location, time, circumstances, 
or movement in location. Usually such information comes at the very beginning 
of a new episode.
4. John Beekman, “Toward an Understanding of Narrative Structure” (Dallas: Summer Institute 
of Linguistics, 1978), 7–8. In what follows, I have introduced additional clarifications.
Plot Elements
F
igure
24.3
TENSION
Occasioning 
Incident
Preliminary 
Incident
Additional 
Incident
Climax
Resolution
Complication
Setting
Commentary
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   198
5/14/09   4:46:30 PM
199
Chapter  24: Storytelling
Preliminary incidents are events (not descriptions of static states of affairs) rel-
evant to what follows, but before the problem or tension has been introduced 
into the episode.
周e occasioning incident is the event that introduces notable conflict or tension. 
In the nature of the case, there is seldom more than one such incident.
Complication is an event increasing tension, making a solution (apparently) more 
difficult. 周ere can be more than one paragraph devoted to complications of 
various kinds. (Unlike the “occasioning incident,” “complication” can and o晴en 
does occur more than once in a single episode.)
Climax is the incident of maximum conflict or tension. It is where, in a melodrama, 
we would expect the music to play the loudest.
Resolution is the event or events that solve the problem, release the tension, and 
unravel the tangles—or at least they contribute toward the solution.
Additional incidents are further events that are consequences of the climax or 
resolution, but are not significant parts of the climax or resolution itself.
A commentary contains the narrator’s comments on, evaluation of, or moral for 
the story. Unlike “additional incidents,” it does not contain events continuing the 
straight line of the narrative.
All of these elements except the first and the last—“se瑴ing” and “commentary”—
represent an elaboration of the basic structure of human action consisting of three 
steps: (1) formulation of purpose; (2) action; and (3) result. 周e se瑴ing and the 
commentary are additional explanatory remarks that the narrator uses to situate 
the episode for the benefit of the reader.
5
Roles
周e plot can be elaborated by the introduction of participants who execute par-
ticular phases in the plot. 周e king offers a reward for the rescue of the princess. 
周is step is the beginning of the commissioning. 周e hero steps forward, and 
may be formally commissioned to execute the plan.
周e hero then goes out, in the “work” phase of the plot. He may encounter 
various obstacles. 周ere may be subplots in which he confronts obstacles along the 
5. Commentary can also occur as an introduction to the story itself; it may supply reasons 
why the story is interesting.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   199
5/14/09   4:46:30 PM
200
Part  4: Stories
way and overcomes them. 周e road is long. Finally, he confronts the dragon, the 
villain. 周e dragon, it may be noted, is the small-scale stand-in for the opponent 
of God’s plan, namely, Satan (Rev. 12:9). Are we right in thinking so? Remember 
that man, made in the image of God, inevitably imitates God’s action. So, yes, it 
makes sense that stories about human action should show analogies to the big 
story, the macrostory, concerning God’s action.
But let us continue with our small, made-up story of the hero and the dragon. 
周e hero defeats the dragon. 周at is the end of the “work” phase.
周e king then rewards the hero by offering the princess in marriage. 周is is 
the blessing phase, or reward, and is an offer of communion with the source of 
blessing, the king, and subordinately with the princess. 周e princess, let it be 
noted, is the small-scale stand-in for the church, the bride of Christ, who is one 
part of Christ’s reward for the accomplishment of his work. 周e macrocosmic 
hero is Christ, for which the fairy-tale hero is a small-scale stand-in.
Actor Categories
In this stereotyped story there are certain important character roles: the hero, 
the villain, the sought-for person or object (in this case, the princess), the com-
missioner (the king), and the reward-giver. In this case the commissioner, the 
king, is the same person as the rewarder. And so it is with the macrocosmic 
story, with God the Father as both commissioner and rewarder. But the roles 
are distinguishable, and so in some human stories the roles may be occupied by 
distinct human beings. 周ere may also be stories where there is confusion. 周e 
person who appears to be the hero, or sometimes the person who is the hero’s 
helper, turns traitor, and must be replaced by another (in the story of the gospel, 
Judas is a traitor; and in a certain respect Adam became a traitor). 周ere may also 
be subplots. In one subplot, a person who seems at first to be an opponent, or 
minor villain, turns out to be a helper.
周ere is a history to twentieth-century analysis of such stories. In 1928 Vladi-
mir Propp published Morphology of the Folktale in Russian. It was translated into 
English in 1958, with a second edition dated 1968.
6
On the basis of analysis of a 
corpus of about a hundred Russian folktales, Propp found a regular structure both 
in the plot and in the roles of characters. Propp found eight roles: the “villain,” the 
“donor” (who gives the hero a helpful object), the “helper” (who helps the hero 
on his quest), the “princess” (more generally, the sought-for person), “her father” 
(more generally, rewarder, punisher, tester), the “dispatcher” (who sends the hero 
6. Vladimir Propp, Morphology of the Folktale, trans. Laurence Sco瑴, 2nd ed. (Austin/London: 
University of Texas Press, 1968).
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   200
5/14/09   4:46:30 PM
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested