pdf viewer in mvc 4 : Copy a picture from pdf application software utility azure windows web page visual studio Survey_Guide1-part1616

S
URVEY 
G
UIDE
11 
To measure occurrence, ask for number of times per day/week/month, rather 
than asking respondents to select a category (several times a week, once a 
week, once a month). However, if the event in question is difficult to count or 
estimate, response categories (zero times, 1-3 times, 4 or more times) may help 
respondents provide an answer. 
D
ESIGN OF 
S
ELF
-A
DMINISTERED 
Q
UESTIONNAIRES
A self-administered questionnaire is a survey that collects data without the use 
of a telephone or in-person interviewer It can be either a paper or web-based 
instrument. In both cases, the design of the questionnaire is crucial to reducing 
non-responses and measurement error.   
With self-administered questionnaires, it is especially valuable to provide a 
context for the survey as a whole 
how the data will be used, whether 
responses are anonymous, etc. The earlier and more effectively this is done, the 
less likely people will be to dismiss the survey before they even start 
responding. The introductory email or letter or the front cover of a paper survey 
are appropriate places to provide the context.   
Important design considerations include: 
Physical format of a paper instrument (how pages are oriented, stapled, 
folded, etc.) is simple for the respondent to work with and for data entry 
staff to process 
Launching and moving through a web-based survey is intuitive and works 
with multiple browsers 
Order of questions is polite and logical to the respondent 
Begin with questions that reflect the announced subject of the study, 
catch the respondent’s attention, and are easy to answer
Ask people to recall things in the order in which they happened 
Ask about topic details before asking for an overall assessment 
Group items that are similar in topic, then group items within the topic 
that have similar response options 
Place personal and demographic questions at the end of the survey 
Visual layout is clean, simple, and consistent 
Distinguish question text, answer choices and instructions and be 
consistent in how you do this 
Limit the number of variations in type or font, the use of white type on 
black background, and the use of all capital letters 
Use indentation and white space to make it easy to navigate through 
sections of the survey and to identify the next question 
On a paper survey, provide lines for answering open-ended questions 
(the more lines, the more respondents will write) 
Copy a picture from pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to cut an image out of a pdf; copy images from pdf to powerpoint
Copy a picture from pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy images from pdf to word; how to copy pictures from a pdf
S
URVEY 
G
UIDE
12 
On an electronic survey, the response space should be expandable or 
accommodate an ample number of words 
Desired first and last impressions are created by the front and back 
covers on a paper survey and by the email and web page headers on an 
electronic survey  
Include the o
rganization’s name and logo (or an engaging but neutral 
graphic) and the title of the survey on the cover or header 
Provide instructions for returning the completed questionnaire and a 
number to call with questions on the back cover (or at the end of an 
electronic survey), along with a note of thanks for responding. 
C
HECKLIST FOR 
E
FFECTIVE 
Q
UESTIONNAIRES
The following table summarizes the key “dos and don’ts” for 
writing and 
formatting your survey questionnaire. 
Do: 
Do Not: 
Give clear instructions 
Keep question structure simple 
Ask one question at a time 
Maintain a parallel structure for all 
questions 
Define terms before asking the question 
Be explicit about the period of time being 
referenced by the question 
Provide a list of acceptable responses to 
closed questions 
Ensure that response categories are both 
exhaustive and mutually exclusive  
Label response categories with words 
rather than numbers 
Ask for number of occurrences, rather 
than providing response categories such 
as often, seldom, never 
Save personal and demographic 
questions for the end of the survey 
Use jargon or complex phrases 
Frame questions in the negative 
Use abbreviations, contractions or 
symbols 
Mix different words for the same 
concept 
Use “loaded” words or phrases
Combine multiple response 
dimensions in the same question 
Give the impression that you are 
expecting a certain response 
Bounce around between topics or 
time periods 
Insert unnecessary graphics or 
mix many font styles and sizes 
Forget to provide instructions for 
returning the completed survey! 
T
EST AND 
T
RAIN
Writing survey questions is an iterative process. Review, test, and revise the 
questions and introductory scripts 
maybe more than once!   
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
how to copy picture from pdf file; paste jpg into pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
how to copy and paste image from pdf to word; how to copy pictures from a pdf to word
S
URVEY 
G
UIDE
13 
Even if you’ve used the same questions before or copied them from a 
governmen
t repository, you’ll want others to check your survey for spelling and 
grammatical errors, readability and flow, and consistency with the current 
survey’s goals.
If the topic is sensitive or your results will be used to make high 
stakes decisions, consulting an expert (e.g., the UW Survey Center) to review 
your survey is a wise investment. You may also need to get final approval from 
others in your unit or beyond.   
Once your survey has passed muster internally, it’s time to “field test” it with a 
sample of potential respondents to verify that your process is smooth and 
completely understandable to your target population. Do people understand the 
terms? Or are adjustments needed? Do people complete the survey as 
intended? Or do they drop out before completing it? Are certain questions 
regularly skipped? If the survey is electronic, does it launch properly and work 
as expected with different browsers? The purpose of the field test is to get 
estimates of the survey’s reliability and validity and to identify an
y final changes 
that might be needed to ensure success. 
Those involved in contacting potential respondents, conducting interviews, and 
analyzing survey responses need to be briefed on the purpose of the study and 
provided with training tailored to their role in the project. The goal is to have 
everyone following a consistent process so that as little variation as possible is 
introduced into the process.   
If interviewers are administering the survey in person or by phone, develop a 
script for them to follow so that the survey is presented in exactly the same way 
to every respondent. Interviewers will also need to be trained to behave in 
neutral ways to control their influence on the answer, and they need actual 
practice reading the questions and script. For mail surveys, the mail and data 
entry staff needs instruction in how the study will be mailed out and how the data 
will be coded and entered. 
A common question is whether those who participate in the field test can later be 
respondents. The answer depends on how the pretest respondents were drawn 
and whether the instrument has changed, and how much time has passed 
between the field test and the main study. A good way to identify pretest 
respondents is to draw a miniature sample like that to be used in the main study.  
This approach allows field procedures to be tested as well as the instrument.  
When this method is used, pretest respondents can sometimes be combined 
with respondents from the main study. 
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
Copy the demo codes and run your project to see New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf document; how to copy an image from a pdf
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
first! VB.NET Image & Picture Cropping Application. Do you need to save a copy of certain part of an image file in a programming way?
copying image from pdf to word; copying image from pdf to powerpoint
S
URVEY 
G
UIDE
14 
C
OLLECT 
D
ATA
R
ESPONSE 
R
ATE
The whole point of conducting a survey is to obtain useful, reliable, and valid 
data in a format that makes it possible to analyze and draw conclusions about 
the total target population. Although there is no agreed-upon minimum response 
rate (Fowler, 2002), the more responses you receive, the more likely it is that 
you will be able to draw statistically significant conclusions about the target 
population. 
Every component of your survey process 
everything you do or don’t do –
will 
affect the response rate, so seemingly simple decisions like whether to use a 
mailed survey or a web survey should not be taken lightly. The UW Survey 
Center normally receives a 60-70% rate of response to mailed surveys.  For web 
surveys, a 30-40% response rate is common, even with populations that are 
young and have easy access to the web.   
From your very first contact with potential respondents to obtain cooperation, 
you have the opportunity to affect the response rate. How can you interest 
potential respondents so that they are more likely to respond? People like to 
know the purpose of the survey and what you will do with the results. Studies 
show it helps if the initial communication is personalized and presents an 
altruistic purpose for participation. Clear identification of the source and authority 
of the organization conducting the survey and assurances about confidentiality 
are also extremely important (Odom, 1979).    
Incentives are often used to maximize the response rate.  Mailed surveys or 
advance letters are often accompanied by a crisp bill. When it is provided before 
the survey is taken, even a small denomination encourages the respondent to 
complete and return the survey. Prize drawings for a gift certificate are popular 
incentives for completing a web survey, however the evidence about their 
potential effectiveness in gaining participation is mixed at best.   
Calculating response rates can be quite complicated. The American Association 
for Public Opinion Research (AAPOR) has developed 
a set of “Standard 
Definitions” that are used by mo
st social research organizations. See 
http://www.aapor.org/Standard_Definitions/1818.htm
F
OLLOW
-
UP 
P
ROCEDURES
Advising potential respondents of a deadline for completing the survey helps 
make it a priority. CustomInsight (2010) suggests giving a window of 7 to 10 
days, with a follow-up reminder sent a few days before the end date. 
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we code demo, which you can directly copy to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
copy pictures from pdf to word; copy image from pdf to powerpoint
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor. dll. Open RasterEdge_MVC3 DemoProject, copy following content to your project:
copy picture from pdf to powerpoint; copy image from pdf to
S
URVEY 
G
UIDE
15 
Depending upon how the survey is being administered, popular means of 
prompting potential respondents to complete the survey include email, 
telephone, or a mailed postcard. A reminder that includes a duplicate copy of the 
survey may yield the best response. 
Investigators often want to survey the same population on a regular basis. A 
simple but timely thank you 
note is helpful in retaining people’s interest in 
participating in your future surveys. If you can share some of the survey findings, 
it will engage a feeling of responsibility for the results, which in turn will increase 
their commitment to future surveys. Whatever you have promised respondents 
in the way of incentives and/or post-survey follow-up, be sure you deliver!   
W
EB 
S
URVEY 
C
HALLENGES
Web surveys are an increasingly popular mechanism for collecting data, but 
come with their own set of issues and are
n’t appropriate for every use. 
Web 
surveys eliminate the need for data entry, but not the need to verify accuracy 
and account for missing data. 
An obvious drawback is that the samples in web surveys are skewed to Internet 
users, and the target population may or may not be skilled in or have access to 
the necessary technology. Reliability is at risk because the survey may appear 
differently to different respondents, depending upon browser and computer 
platform. People also differ in how and when they read email, and spam filters 
can wreak havoc with your delivery schedule.  
Unless the survey has only a couple questions and the number of potential 
respondents is very limited, simply putting the survey in the body of an email will 
not suffice (Couper, 2008). Commercial web survey tools are available 
(Zoomerang and SurveyMonkey are two examples) as well as a UW-Madison 
tool called Qualtrics (see 
http://survey.wisc.edu/
). The UW Survey Center also 
conducts Internet web surveys. These tools provide assurance about anonymity, 
templates for laying out the survey, and assistance with compiling responses 
that go far beyond the capabilities of an email. 
A
NALYZE 
D
ATA
C
ODING AND 
A
NALYZING 
D
ATA
Thoughtful decisions made during the planning phase about what data are 
needed and the format in which it will be collected will pay dividends when it 
comes time to analyze the data. A consistent process for organizing and 
analyzing survey data should be established and clearly documented well ahead 
of receiving the first responses, with everyone involved receiving ample training.   
How will incomplete surveys and missing data be handled?   
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned or all image objects from PDF document in
paste jpeg into pdf; how to paste a picture into pdf
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo remove multiple or all images from PDF document.
how to copy image from pdf to word document; copy a picture from pdf to word
S
URVEY 
G
UIDE
16 
What checks will be conducted to find errors in coding or data entry?   
Will some questions be weighted more heavily than others? 
Scaled responses (e.g., dissatisfied, somewhat dissatisfied, neutral, somewhat 
satisfied, satisfied) are usually converted to numerical values (1, 2, 3, 4, 5) for 
easier analysis. Use of a template or mask can help coders convert the data 
more quickly and accurately.   
Careful thought needs to be given to coding responses to open-ended items.  
The process usually involves examining some preliminary data to identify 
potential categories, and then testing to ascertain how consistently the 
categories are assigned by various coders.   
To analyze responses to open-ended questions, you can copy the comments 
onto individual cards and then group similar comments together. This will give 
you a sense of the most frequent ideas. Alternatively, there are software 
packages that help in analyzing responses to open-ended questions.  
ThemeSeekr (
http://themeseekr.com/
) was developed to aid in processing the 
thousands of comments received during the UW-Madison 2009 reaccreditation 
self-
study, and uses “word clouds” as a visual analysis tool to show the relative 
frequency of the themes into which responses have been categorized. 
D
RAWING 
C
ONCLUSIONS
Visual displays can be helpful in understanding the data. For responses to 
multiple choice questions, you might: 
Create a frequency histogram of the responses for each question to 
demonstrate the variation in the responses 
Use a bar chart to display the percent of respondents selecting 
particular responses 
A
DDITIONAL 
C
ONSIDERATIONS
H
UMAN 
S
UBJECTS 
P
ROTECTION
If the results of your survey will be written for publication, you may need to 
receive advance
approval from an Institutional Review Board (IRB). Contact the 
Graduate School for assistance with identifying the appropriate board (see 
http://www.grad.wisc.edu/research/hrpp/irblinks.html
).   
The UW Survey Center notes that survey work frequently raises issues of 
interest to the IRB, including:  
What is the consent process and need it be written? 
How will confidentiality be protected? 
How will people be sampled or recruited? 
S
URVEY 
G
UIDE
17 
Will incentives be offered? 
Will HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) 
privacy rules be applicable?  
Since IRB approval cannot be granted after the fact, it is extremely important to 
follow the appropriate protocol prior to conducting your survey, if there is even a 
remote chance that you will someday want to publish the results of your 
research.   
A
W
ORD 
A
BOUT 
C
LIMATE 
S
URVEYS
Frequently initiated by a school or college’s Equity and Diversity Committee, 
climate surveys can be a useful way to gather data on job satisfaction, the quality 
of interactions within the workplace, and potential issues requiring intervention.   
It is always a good idea to find out what other climate assessment may have 
been conducted with your target population.  For example, on the UW-Madison 
campus, the Women in Science and Engineering Leadership Institute (WISELI) 
has been studying the quality of work life for faculty since 2003, and makes the 
survey data available at the school/college level.   
WISELI has also developed extensive materials for enhancing department 
climate (see 
http://wiseli.engr.wisc.edu/climate.php
), including a template climate 
survey for individual departments. 
So You Want to Run a Climate Survey?! (Frehill, 2006) offers numerous tips and 
design considerations specific to climate surveys.  
G
ETTING 
H
ELP WITH 
Y
OUR 
S
URVEY
The University of Wisconsin Survey Center (see 
www.uwsc.wisc.edu
) offers a 
complete range of survey research capabilities and serves a wide variety of 
clients including faculty, staff, and administration at the University of Wisconsin; 
faculty and staff at other universities; federal, state, and local governmental 
agencies; and not-for-profit organizations.  
The Survey Center can consult with you at one or more points in the survey 
process or Survey Center staff can take the lead role in designing and 
implementing your survey. Specific tasks on which it can be helpful to get 
assistance include: 
Developing protocols that yield high response rates 
Reviewing the instrument and refining questions 
Sampling 
Developing cost proposals 
Foreign language and international work 
S
URVEY 
G
UIDE
18 
T
ERMINOLOGY
Instrument:  The survey questionnaire or booklet. 
Institutional Review Board (IRB):  Campus governance bodies responsible for 
ensuring the protection of human subjects participating in research studies, 
including surveys. 
Mode:  The combination of how sample members/participants are contacted, 
questions are administered, and responses are recorded. 
Preamble:  An introductory statement that provides definitions and instructions 
for completing a section or question in the survey. 
Reference period:  The time frame the respondent is being asked to consider 
when answering a question (e.g., August 1 through August 15, 2009). 
Reliability:  The extent to which repeatedly measuring the same property 
produces the same result. 
Respondent:  An individual providing answers to survey questions. 
Response dimension:  The scale or descriptor that a survey question asks the 
respondent to use to describe their observations, actions, attitude, evaluation or 
judgment about an event or behavior. 
Response rate:  The number of completed surveys divided by the number of 
eligible potential respondents contacted. 
Sample:  A list of people drawn from the group from which information is 
needed. 
Self-administered questionnaire:  A paper or web-based survey that collects 
data without the use of a telephone or in-person interviewer.   
Target population:  The group of people whose activities, beliefs or attitudes 
are being studied. 
Validity:  The extent to which a survey question accurately measures the 
property it is supposed to measure. 
S
URVEY 
G
UIDE
19 
R
EFERENCES AND 
A
DDITIONAL 
R
ESOURCES
W
ORKS 
C
ITED
Couper, Mick P. 2008. Designing Effective Web Surveys. Cambridge: 
Cambridge University Press. 
"Customer Satisfaction Surveys: Maximizing Survey Responses." 
CustomInsight. Web. <custominsight.com>; 24 Nov. 2010. 
Fowler FJ. Survey Research Methods. 3rd ed. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage 
Publications; 2002. 
Frehill, Lisa; Elena Batista; Sheila Edwards-Lange; Cecily Jeser-Cannavale; Jan 
Malley; Jennifer Sheridan; Kim Sullivan; and Helena Sviglin. 
“So You Want to 
Run a Climate Survey?!” 
(pp. 29-35) Using Program Evaluation to Ensure the 
Success of Your ADVANCE Program. May 2006. 
http://wiseli.engr.wisc.edu/docs/Report_Toolkit2_2006.pdf
Odom, John G. "Validation of Techniques Utilized to Maximize Survey 
Response Rates." Tech. ERIC document reproduction service no. ED169966. 
Education Resource Information Center. Web. <
http://eric.ed.gov
>. (09 April 1979).  
A
DDITIONAL 
R
ESOURCES
Department Climate Surveys: 
http://wiseli.engr.wisc.edu/climate.php
IRB Contacts: University of Wisconsin-Madison Graduate School,  
http://grad.wisc.edu/research/hrpp/irblinks.html
Online Survey Tools: 
UW-Madison Survey Hosting Service, 
http://survey.wisc.edu/
ThemeSeekr, 
http://themeseekr.com
Question Comprehensibility Testing: 
http://mnemosyne.csl.psyc.memphis.edu/QUAID/quaidindex.html
Reference Materials List: Compiled by Nora Cate Schaeffer, UW Survey Center,  
http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cde/faculty/schaeffe.htm
Response Rates: Standard Definitions, American Association for Public Opinion 
Research, 
http://www.aapor.org/Standard_Definitions/1818.htm
S
URVEY 
G
UIDE
20 
Survey Methodology: 
Dillman, Don A., Jolene D. Smyth, and Leah M. Christian. 2009. Internet, 
Mail, and Mixed-Mode Surveys: The Tailored Design Method, Third 
Edition. New York: John Wiley & Sons. 
Groves, Robert M., Floyd J. Fowler, Mick P. Couper, James M. 
Lepkowski, Eleanor Singer, and Roger Tourangeau. 2004. Survey 
Methodology. Hoboken, New Jersey: Wiley. 
Journal of Survey Research Methodology (surveymethods.org),  
http://w4.ub.uni-konstanz.de/srm/
Training Interviewers: 
http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/training/interviewer/index.htm
Usability Guidelines for Web Design: 
http://www.usability.gov/guidelines/guidelines_book.pdf
Writing Good Questions 
Aday, Lu A. and Llewellyn J. Cornelius. 2006. Designing and Conducting 
Health Surveys: A Comprehensive Guide, 3rd Edition. New York: Wiley. 
Fowler Jr., Floyd J. and Carol Cosenza. 2008. "Writing Effective 
Questions." Pp. 136-60 in International Handbook of Survey 
Methodology, edited by Edith D. de Leeuw, Joop J. Hox, and Don A. 
Dillman. Lawrence Erlbaum. 
Schaeffer, Nora Cate and Stanley Presser. 2003. 
“The Science of Asking 
Questions.” 
Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 29: 65-88 
http://www.annualreviews.org/eprint/rU4UOoizjrXROhijkRIS/full/10.1146/annure
v.soc.29.110702.110112
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested