pdf viewer in mvc 4 : How to cut image from pdf control software platform web page html wpf web browser synhdbk0-part1617

i
SYNCHRO/RESOLVER
CONVERSION
HANDBOOK
FFOOUURRTTHH EEDDIITTIIOONN
ELECTRONIC VVERSION
105 Wilbur Place, Bohemia, New York 11716-2482
Tel:(631) 567-5600 
World Wide Web - http://www.ddc-web.com
How to cut image from pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
copy pdf picture; paste picture pdf
How to cut image from pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to paste a picture in a pdf; how to cut a picture out of a pdf file
ii
Synchro/Resolver Conversion Handbook
First Edition................1973
First Printing........10,000 (1973)
Second Printing...10,000 (1979)
Third Printing.......10,000 (1982)
Fourth Printing ....10,000 (1985)
..............................5,000 (1986)
Second Edition...........1988
First Printing........10,000 (1988)
Third Edition...............1990
First Printing........15,000 (1990)
Fourth Edition ............1994
First Printing..........8,000 (1994)
The information in this publication is believed to be accurate; however, no responsibility is assumed by Data
Device Corporation for its use, and no license or rights are granted by implication or otherwise in connection
therewith. Specifications are subject to change without notice.
Library of Congress Catalog Number: 74-77038
Copyright 1974, 1999 Data Device Corporation
DATA DEVICE CORPORATION
REGISTERED TO ISO 9001
FILE NO. A5976
R
E
G
I
S
T
E
R
E
D
F
I
R
M
®
U
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
copy a picture from pdf; paste image into pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Insert Image to PDF Page Using VB. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
paste image into pdf form; how to copy pictures from pdf to powerpoint
iii
PREFACE
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. List<PDFImage> allImages = PDFImageHandler. ExtractImages(page); C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
how to copy image from pdf file; cut and paste pdf images
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for
copy image from pdf to word; copy images from pdf to word
iv
THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. If using x86, the platform target should be x86. C#.NET Sample Code: Clone a PDF Page Using C#.NET.
copy images from pdf; how to copy text from pdf image to word
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
example that you can use it to extract all images from PDF document. ' Get page 3 from the document. Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the
how to copy images from pdf file; copy picture from pdf
1
FUNDAMENTALS
SECTION I
Angle-Sensing Transducers    
The measurement of shaft angle is one of the most
prevalent requirements in the modern control, instru-
mentation,  and  computing  technologies. Almost
every machine, process, and monitoring system has
a rotating shaft somewhere in its mechanism...or can
be so  equipped. Mechanisms for converting  shaft
rotation to translation (linear motion) further extend
the usefulness of shaft-angle sensing.
Shaft angle is used in the measurement and control
of position, velocity, and acceleration, in one, two, or
three  spatial  dimensions; and,  in  many  systems,
many  different  sets  of  these  parameters  must  be
sensed and/or controlled. Thus, shaft-angle trans-
ducers are extremely important elements in modern
engineering.
Over the years, many different forms of shaft-angle
transducers have been developed. Among them, the
following are worth consideration:
Potentiometers (single or multiturn - see Figure 1.1)
Brush encoders (see Figure 1.2)
Optical encoders (see Figure 1.3)
Synchros (see Figure 1.4)
Resolvers (see Figure 1.5)
Rotary  Variable  Differential Transformers  (RVDTs)/
Linear  Variable  Differential  Transformers  (LVDTs) 
(see Figure 1.6)
Let us now compare these types of transducers with
respect to the most important design parameters.
Reliability and Functional Stability
The probability of catastrophic failure, and the prob-
ability  of  failure  to  meet  specifications  are  related
SHAFT
B0
B1
B2
B3
PIERCED CODED DISC
PHOTO
DETECTOR
LIGHT SOURCE
"N"
LIGHT
SOURCES
"N"
PHOTO
DETECTOR
Figure 1.1.Potentiometers.
Figure 1.2.Brush Encoder.
B0, B1, B2, B3, show brush positions.
Figure 1.3.Optical Shaft Encoder.
In this type of encoder, the disk is pierced with a
pattern analogous to the disk shown in Figure 1.2.
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Best and professional C# image to PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. C#.NET Example: Convert One Image to PDF in Visual C# .NET Class.
copy images from pdf file; copy paste image pdf
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
document page. Able to cut and paste image into another PDF file. Export high quality image from PDF document in .NET program. Remove
how to cut pdf image; cut picture pdf
FUNDAMENTALS
parameters. In most applications, either kind of fail-
ure is intolerable. In both respects, synchro, resolver
and RVDT/LVDT sensors are unchallenged. They do
not depend on moving electrical contacts for signal
integrity (e.g., brushes)*; they do not exhibit appre-
ciable aging or wear. They do not drift with time, and
even extreme temperature changes have negligible
effect on their performance. Next in order of reliabil-
ity,  but  significantly  less  dependable  are  optical
encoders,  which  exhibit  significant  temperature
dependence, and  appreciable  vulnerability to  elec-
tromagnetic and electrostatic fields. Following them,
in decreasing order of reliability, are the moving-con-
tact devices: potentiometers and brush transducers.
Cost
In  comparing  costs,  it  is  necessary  to  include  the
associated  electronics  required  to  produce  data  in
the form acceptable for modern control and monitor-
ing  systems  -  digital  data. Thus  potentiometers,
which are analog components, must be excited by a
well-regulated  reference  voltage,  and  their  output
signals must be digitized. Similar circuit implemen-
tation must be provided for all of the types of trans-
ducers under consideration, with the brush encoder
type  requiring  the  least. The  costs  can  only  be
meaningfully compared at a given level of resolution
(e.g., at 0.01% of 360° full scale), but assuming rela-
tively high precision, the order of decreasing cost is:
optical  encoder; synchro/resolver; RVDT/LVDT;
potentiometer; and brush encoder.
Attainable Performance
The  resolution capability,  absolute accuracy,  long-
term  reliability,  temperature  stability,  and  dynamic
response characteristics of these devices vary from
type to  type. It  is  generally  accepted  that  both  the
synchro/resolver  and  optical  types  are  capable  of
equal state-of-the-art performance (10-50 PPM total
uncertainty), under optimum conditions. Though the
brush  encoder  can  theoretically  attain  equivalent
performance,  its  useful  operating  life,  at  very  high
resolutions, is severely limited by noise and position-
2
Figure 1.6.RVDT/LVDT.
Figure 1.5.Resolver.
SINE
OUTPUT
COSINE
OUTPUT
TWO WINDINGS
ON ROTOR
REF. INPUT
STATOR
ROTOR
ANGLE
ROTOR
ANGLE
SINE
OUTPUT
COSINE
OUTPUT
COIL
CORE
LVDT
RVDT
*Synchro and Resolver brushes ride on slip rings, not segmented surfaces; furthermore, contact resistance changes do not introduce
significant data errors.
Figure 1.4.Synchro.
STATOR
ROTOR
FUNDAMENTALS
al uncertainty, due to brush wear, and dimensional
uncertainty  under  normal  vibration  stress.
Potentiometers (including the so-called “infinite reso-
lution” film types) are even more severely limited by
wear  and  other  mechanical  and  electrical  noise
uncertainties. RVDTs and LVDTs, because of their
unique properties, occupy a niche all to themselves
and do not really compete with the other transducers.
Many LVDTs have virtually no friction, excellent null
stability and operate in both extremes of the temper-
ature spectrum.
Static and Dynamic Mechanical Loading
All shaft angle transducers, except the LVDT, present
some small amount of static and dynamic friction to
the shaft measured. In the case of the RVDT, syn-
chro/resolver, and optical-sensor types, the friction is
usually  negligible  -  particularly  since  high-quality
bearings  are  used. Another  dynamic  loading  ele-
ment to consider is the moment of inertia added to
the shaft. In this respect, miniature synchro/resolver
and RVDT/LVDT designs are ideal. They are superi-
or to the large diameter encoders required for high
resolution. The static and dynamic loading present-
ed  by  both  potentiometers  and  brush  sensors  are
significantly  higher  than  those  presented  by  either
synchro/resolvers, RVDT/LVDTs or optical encoders.
Environmental Sensitivity
Environmental  considerations  include: temperature,
humidity, vibration, shock,  and  power  supply  varia-
tions. Under  extreme  environmental  conditions  the
synchro/resolver  or  RVDT/LVDT with  solid-state
electronics is the most dependable and stable of all
shaft-angle  instrumentation  configurations. The
other types perform in the descending order of merit:
optical-sensor; potentiometer; brush-sensor. The
RVDT/LVDTs in particular have excellent null stabili-
ty and can be constructed to operate in very extreme
environments.
Angle-Data Conversion Devices
All of the transducers considered above require exci-
tation by AC or DC analog  reference signals. The
disc encoders produce parallel digital outputs at all
times  (although  monotonicity
1
tends  to  be  poor  at
major-carry  transitions from  quadrant to quadrant),
but require  signal  conditioning electronics: filtering,
common-mode  rejection
2
to  preserve  accuracy
despite  ground-loops  and  induced  low-frequency
noise, and buffer amplification. Synchronous clock-
ing  and  parallel-serial  conversion  may  also  be
required. Figure 1.7 shows typical interface electron-
ics between a disc encoder and a computer data link.
3
Figure 1.7.Typical Interface (simplified) between Disk Encoder and Computer.
FILTER
FILTER
FILTER
DELAY 
LATCH
SAMPLING
LOGIC
STROBE
R
E
G
I
S
T
E
R
RESET
CLOCK
COMPUTER
I/O BUS
COMMON
Bn1
B1
B0
BUFFER
BUFFER
BUFFER
1. See Section VII for definitions and discussions of these error factors.
2. See Section IX for definitions and discussions of these error factors.
FUNDAMENTALS
4
The  analog-output  devices  -  potentiometers,  syn-
chros,  and  resolvers  -  require  reference  excitation
(always  AC  for  the  synchros,  resolvers,  and
RVDT/LVDTs),  and  analog-to-digital  conversion.
Potentiometers also require the same amount of sig-
nal conditioning electronics as do the disc encoders.
In  rare  instances,  synchros  and  resolvers  do  not
require  signal  conditioning,  because  they  are  low
impedance  devices,  self-isolated  from  ground-loop
induced noise, and capable of driving the S/D or R/D
converter  directly,  as  shown  in  Figure  1.8.
RVDT/LVDTs, although similar to a resolver, require
a few additional parts to match the transducer output
to the converter. An example is shown in Figure 1.9.
When considering performance, reliability, cost and
application  convenience,  the  synchro/resolver  con-
verter combination of Figure 1.8 is the logical choice
for angle-data measurement.
The remainder of this handbook is devoted to the elec-
tronic circuits used to convert and process shaft-angle
data developed by synchros and resolvers. There is a
separate  chapter  describing  RVDT/LVDTs  and their
converters as a specialized version of an R/D. The
devices considered will include both synchro/resolver-
to-digital and digital-to-synchro/resolver types.
Fundamental Mathematical Relationships in
Synchro/Resolver Equipment
Before proceeding to study converter design, it will
be necessary to review the nature of the signals pro-
duced by, or accepted by, synchro and resolver com-
ponents. First, let us list the most common types of
synchro and resolver components, each of which is
illustrated in Figure 1.10.
• Synchro Control Transmitter (Figure 1.10a)
Accepts AC reference excitation at rotor terminals
(R1 and R2), and develops, at its stator terminals
(S1, S2, and S3), a 3-wire AC output at the refer-
ence (or “carrier”) frequency. The amplitude ratios
of the line-to-line voltages of this 3-wire output rep-
resent an explicit mathematical relationship to the
angular  position  of  the  shaft  (θ degrees),  with
respect  to  some  reference  shaft position,  called
Figure 1.8.Synchros and Resolvers generally do
not require signal conditioning.
Figure 1.9.RVDT/LVDT Interconnect to Converter.
Figure 1.10a.Symbol for Control Transmitters and
Receivers.
COMPUTER
I/O BUS
S/D
CONVERTER
DTC-193000
PHASE
COMP
FULL
SCALE
R2
C2
R5
10k
10k
R1
SJ
TO V
(PIN 25)
SO
SG
S
R
V
RO
RI
C1
OSC
RF1
RF2
FREQ
R4
29
35
34
33
32
25
31
36
19
21
22
20
24
e
23
A
18
BIT
RM
AMPL
R3
TO V
(PIN 25)
LVDT
+
DATA
S1
S2
S3
V1-2
V2-3
V1-3
SHAFT INPUT 
θ
ROTOR IS PRIMARY
R1
R2
FUNDAMENTALS
5
zero degrees of rotation. In synchro language, a
control transmitter is called a “CX.”
• Synchro Control Transformer (Figure 1.10b)
Accepts, at its 3-wire stator terminals (S1, S2, and
S3), a set of carrier-frequency signals of the type
produced by a synchro control 
transmitter
(or CX),
corresponding electrically to some shaft angle θ. It
produces,  at  its  rotor  terminals  (R1  and  R2), 
a carrier-frequency signal proportional to the sine
of  the  angular 
difference
between  the  electrical
input angle, θ, and the mechanical angular posi-
tion of  its  shaft,  φ ... in other words, the voltage
induced into the rotor is proportional to sin (θ - φ),
where  φ is  measured  from  some  reference 
shaft  position,  called  zero  degrees  of  rotation.
The synchro shorthand for this component is “CT.”
• Control Differential Transmitter (Figure 1.10c)
Accepts,  at  its  3-wire  stator  terminals,  a  set  of 
carrier-frequency signals of the type produced by
 CX,  the  line-to-line  amplitude  ratios  of  which
(S1,  S2,  and  S3)  correspond  to  some  (remote)
shaft angle θ. Produces, at its 3 rotor terminals
(R1, R2, and R3), a 3-wire set of carrier-frequen-
cy  signals  whose  line-to-line  amplitude  ratios 
represent  the  difference  between  the  input 
angle θ and the mechanical angular position of its
shaft  ... in  other  words,  the  line-to-line  voltage
ratios induced into the rotor represent the angle (θ
- φ),  where  φ is measured from some  reference
shaft  position,  called  zero  degrees  rotation. In
synchro language, the symbol for this component
is “CDX.”
• Resolver (Figure 1.10d)
Accepts at its 2-wire rotor terminals (R1 and R2),
an  AC  reference  excitation  and  produces,  at
a pair of 2-wire output terminals (connected to iso-
lated stator windings, a pair of voltages that are at
the carrier frequency, and with amplitudes that are
proportional, respectively, to the sine (S1 and S3)
and cosine (S2 and S4) of the angular position of
the shaft ... in other words, the voltages induced
into the stator winding will be K sinθ sinω(t) and K
cosθ sinω(t), where K is the transformation ratio,
θis the shaft rotation from some reference zero-
Figure 1.10b.Symbol for Control Transformer.
Figure 1.10d.Symbol for Resolver.
Figure 1.10c.Symbol for Differential Transmitters
and Differential Receivers.
S1
S2
S3
SHAFT INPUT 
φ
STATOR IS PRIMARY
R1
R2
θ
SIN 
(θ − φ)
SHAFT INPUT 
φ
STATOR IS PRIMARY
R1
R2
R3
S1
S2
S3
θ
SHAFT INPUT 
θ
EITHER ROTOR OR STATOR
MAY BE THE PRIMARY
S2
S1
S3
S4
R1
R2
Cos 
θ
Sin 
θ
FUNDAMENTALS
6
degree  position,  and  ω  =  2πf  carrier  frequency.
The symbol for this component is “RS.”
• Transolver (Figure 1.10e)
A  bidirectional  device  (i.e.,  either  rotor  or  stator
may be used as input) in which the rotor windings
are  in  3-wire  synchro  format  (R1,  R2,  R3)  but
whose stator windings are in 4-wire resolver for-
mat (S1, S2, S3, S4). It can convert signals from
synchro to resolver format, can be used as a CT
(ignoring one stator winding) or as a CX (ignoring
the other stator winding). By rotating the shaft, the
device can rotate the reference axis (i.e., add to or
subtract from) of the angle that is being converted
from synchro to resolver (or resolver to synchro)
format. The symbol for this component is “TY.”
• The Scott-T Transformer (Figure 1.10f)
Although this is not a rotary device, but merely two
interconnected static transformers, it is included in
this list of synchro/resolver components because it
performs the same function as a transolver set at
zero shaft position. It will  transform signals from
synchro to resolver format, or vice versa. A solid
state equivalent of the Scott-T transformer can be
implemented as shown in Figure 1.10g. It is com-
monly used in hybrid synchro converters as either
the input or output stage.
Torque Components
Although torque elements are not, strictly speaking,
transducers, they are used in some control systems
to  move  indicators,  position  other  synchros  (e.g.,
Transmitters
Transolvers
Resolvers
Torque Receiver Transmitters
Torque Differential Receivers
Control Transformers
Torque Receivers
Differential Transmitters
UNIT FUNCTION
TX
TRX
TDR
TR
TDX
TORQUE
CX
TY
RS
CT
CDX
CONTROL
Table 1.1
Torque and Control Components
SHAFT INPUT 
θ
EITHER ROTOR OR STATOR MAY BE THE PRIMARY
S4
S1
S2
S3
R1
R2
R3
Figure 1.10e.Symbol for Transolver.
SYNCHRO
RESOLVER
1:1
S4
S1
S3
S3
S2
COS 
θ
SIN 
θ
S1
S2
Figure 1.10f.Scott-T Transformer.
S1
S3
S2
_
+ SIN
+ COS
+
+
_
WHERE: SIN ~ S3 - S1
COS ~ S2 - 
(
)
S1 + S3
2
2
3
Figure 1.10g.Solid-State Scott-T Transformer.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested