pdf viewer in mvc 4 : Copy picture from pdf Library SDK component .net wpf azure mvc synhdbk2-part1621

FUNDAMENTALS
wave is exactly equal to (θ−α). If α, the time-phase
error caused by rotor-to-stator phase lead, is small
compared to θ, the time interval (t
θ
) between the zero
crossings of V
A
and V
ref
is a measure of θ. In Figure
1.22, a counter totals the number digital clock pulse
during the time interval t
θ
, and the clock frequency is
scaled appropriately, to make the count read directly
in digitally coded angle.
It is readily apparent that the only advantage of the
single-RC S/D or R/D converter is its simplicity. The
disadvantages of this approach are:
• The difficulty of maintaining ωRC=1 due to instabil-
ity in the capacitor with time and temperature.
• The difficulty of maintaining ωRC=1 due to varia-
tions in the carrier frequency. (These may be
eliminated, at 
considerable
expense, by 
generat-
ing
the carrier in the converter, preferably by divid-
ing down from the clock frequency.)
• The difficulty of maintaining negligible time-phase
error (α) in the reference wave. (Some relief is
obtained by compensating the reference input by
using a lag network, but αvaries with temperature,
θ, excitation, and from synchro to synchro.)
• Significant error due to noise, quadrature compo-
nents in V
x
and V
y
, and harmonics in V
x
and V
y
,
particularly around the zero (θ = 0°) and full scale
(θ = 360°).
• 
Staleness error
, due to the fact that only one con-
version is made per cycle.
• The circuit will only work at 
one specific carrier fre-
quency
.
The above list confines the single-RC phase-shift
converter to relatively low accuracy applications.
The  double-RC  phase-shift synchro-to-digital
converter shown in Figure 1.23 eliminates at least
two of the error sources that limit the performance of
the single-RC converter.In this approach, V
A
and V
B
have equal but opposite phase shifts with respect to
V
ref
. By measuring the time interval (t
) between
the zero crossing of V
A
and V
B
, and using it to gate
a clock pulse into the counter, the count may be
scaled to read directly in degrees of θ (i.e., at one-
half the clock-pulse frequency used in the single-RC
design). The disadvantages of this approach are the
same as those listed for the single-RC approach,
with the following exceptions:
The time-phaseerror (α) in the V
ref
is no longer an
error factor.
The reference carrier frequency need not be quite
as stable as before, but it is still a major error fac-
tor, and must still be internally generated, for even
moderate accuracy.
There is a partial improvement in effective RC sta-
bility, due to the tendency of the capacitors to track
each other with temperature.
There  is  an 
added
difficulty  in  the  double-RC
approach - a 180° anomaly that causes the same
reading at θand θ±180°. This requires special cir-
cuitry to prevent false readings.
All other error factors remain the same;nevertheless,
at considerable expense, the double-RC phase-shift
S/D or R/D converter can be made to perform at
moderate accuracies ...of the order of a worst-case
limit of errorof 10 minutes.
The  real-time  trigonometric  function-generator 
approach of Figure 1.24 takes many forms - one of
which, and perhaps the most advanced, is analyzed
in great detail in Section V. In this generalized dis-
cussion, however, we shall categorize it as follows:
the resolver-format signals V
x
and V
y
are applied to
trigonometric function generators (tangent bridges or
sine/cosine non-linear multipliers) and, by manipulat-
ing the resultant generator outputs in accordance
with trigonometric identities, an analog voltage pro-
portional to the difference between θ and the func-
tion-generator setting φ is developed. If the integral
of this voltage is digitized, and the digital value fed
back, as φ, to program the bridge so as to drive (θ-
φ) to null zero, the digital value of φ will equal the
17
Copy picture from pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
copy image from pdf to pdf; how to cut a picture from a pdf document
Copy picture from pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
copy picture from pdf reader; paste image into pdf in preview
FUNDAMENTALS
shaft angleθ. This scheme has the following advan-
tages over the two preceding approaches:
It is a real-time, continuous measurement of θ;
hence, there is no staleness error.
It is inherently a 
ratio
technique (V
y
/V
x
) - always
an advantage in maintaining accuracy.
It is independent of the carrier frequency - indeed
it  is  broadband,  and  will  work  over  several
decades of frequency, without special designs.
It makes it possible to reject quadrature compo-
nents.
It makes it possible to reject most noise compo-
nents.
It rejects most harmonic distortion, being responsive
only to differential harmonics between V
x
and V
y
.
It is relatively independent of reference time-phase
error, α.
There is no 180° anomaly.
Implementation of the real-time function-generator
approach was more expensive than either  of the
foregoing schemes, but mass-production techniques
and integrated circuits have erased the cost differ-
ences. The real-time function-generator approach
can achieve state-of-the-art performance - accura-
cies better than ±2 seconds.
Now, let us consider an approach that has some of
the advantages of Figure 1.24 but also a few disad-
vantages. In the past it offered a good price perfor-
mance compromise but with the recent introduction
of monolithic R/Ds it is no longer a viable approach
for new designs. It is discussed here only for histor-
ical purposes. This approach is called the ratio-
boundedharmonic oscillatorcircuitand is shown
in Figure 1.25. (This approach is analyzed in great
detail on pages 29 to 30.)  In this technique, a pair of
integrators are cascaded with a unity-gain inverter,
into a closed loop with positive feedback, so that
they will oscillate a frequency determined by their
RC time constants. (Note that the oscillation fre-
quency need have no special relationship to the ref-
erence carrier frequency, except that it is usually
high, for conversion speed.)  First, the integrators are
“bound” (i.e., presented with initial conditions) by
presetting their output voltages in the ratio V
x
/V
y
.
These voltages are obtained by simultaneous sam-
pling of V
x
and V
y
.Then, the loop is allowed to oscil-
late, and the ratio of the time interval between the
zero crossing of the signal at B in the positive going
direction to the total natural period of oscillation is
exactly proportional to θ. This ratio is digitized by
counting  clock  pulses,  as  in  earlier  schemes.
Indeed, the circuit of Figure 1.25 has some signifi-
cant disadvantages: It is 
not
a real-time measure-
ment, but is, instead, a periodic technique, like the
phase-shift converters, and therefore suffers from
staleness error and is costly to produce compared to
modern tracking S/D or R/D designs.
The Demodulation,A/D,and µP approachto syn-
chro/resolver conversionhas been used from time
to time but is now seldom used for new designs
because it burdens the µP, has significant staleness
errors, is susceptible to noise and cannot respond
adequately in a dynamic environment.
In this approach, shown in Figure 1.26, the sine and
cosine analog data is demodulated with the reference
to obtain DC sine and DC cosine. These are then
multiplexed into an A/D converter. The two data words
are then fed to the µP which determines the angle.
18
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
how to copy pictures from pdf to powerpoint; how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf document
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
how to cut an image out of a pdf; how to copy pdf image to jpg
19
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN
S/D AND R/D CONVERTERS
SECTION II
Figure 2.1.Block Diagram - Synchro-to-Digital Converter
The Tracking Converter
Figure 2.1 is a functional block diagram of a 16-bit
synchro-to-digital  tracking  converter. Three-wire
synchro angle data are presented to a solid-state
Scott-T (see page 6) which translates them into two
signals, the amplitude of one being proportional to
the sine of θ (the angle to be digitized), and the
amplitude  of  the  other  being  proportional  to  the
cosine  of  θ. (The  amplitudes  referred  to  are,  of
course, the carrier amplitudes at the reference fre-
quency - i.e., the cosine wave is actually cosθcosωt,
but the carrier term cosωt will be ignored in this dis-
cussion, because it will be removed in the demodu-
lator and, in theory, contains no data.)
A quadrant selector circuit contained in the control
transformer enables  selection  of  the  quadrant  in
which θ lies, and automatically sets the polarities of
the sinθand cosθsignals appropriately, for computa-
tional significance. The sinθ, cosθ outputs of the
quadrant selector are then fed to the sine and cosine
multipliers, also contained in the control transformer.
These multipliers are digitally programmed resistive
networks. The transfer function of each of these net-
works is determined by a digital input (which switch-
es in proportioned resistors), so that the instanta-
neous value of the output is the productof the instan-
taneous value of the analog input and the sine (or
cosine) of the digitally encoded angle φ. If the instan-
taneous value of the analog input to the sine multi-
plier is cosθ, and digitally encoded "word" presented
to the sine multiplier is φ, then the output is cosθsinφ.
CONTROL
TRANSFORMER
DATA
LATCH
GAIN
DEMODULATOR
16-BIT
UP/DOWN
COUNTER
HYSTERESIS
+REF -REF
BIT
R
1
VCO
&
TIMING
INH
EM DATA EL
CB
INTEGRATOR
VEL
INPUT OPTION
S1
S2
S3
S4
C
1
E
LOS
e
D
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
Copy the demo codes and run your project to see New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
copying images from pdf files; paste picture into pdf preview
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
first! VB.NET Image & Picture Cropping Application. Do you need to save a copy of certain part of an image file in a programming way?
cut and paste pdf images; how to copy and paste image from pdf to word
Thus the two outputs of the multipliers are:
from the sine multiplier, cosθsinφ
from the cosine multiplier sinθcosφ
These outputs are fed to an operational subtractor, at
the differencing junction shown, so that the input fed
to the demodulator is:
sinθ cosφ – cosθ sinφ=sin(θ-φ)
The right-hand side of this trigonometric identity indi-
cates that the differencing-junction output represents
a carrier-frequency sine wave with an amplitude pro-
portional to the sine of the difference between θ(the
angle to be digitized) and φ(the angle stored in digi-
tal form in the up-down counter). This point is AC
error and is sometimes brought out of the converter
as "e."
The demodulator is also presented with the refer-
ence voltage, which has been isolated from the ref-
erence source and appropriately scaled by the refer-
ence isolation transformer or buffer. The output of
the demodulator is, then, an analog DC level, pro-
portional to:sin (
θ
– 
φ
). In other words, the output of
the demodulator is the sine of the "error" between
the actual angular position of the synchro or resolver,
and the digitally encoded angle, θ, which is the out-
put of the counter. This point, the DC error, is also
sometimes brought out as "D" while the addition of a
threshold detector will give a Built-In-Test (BIT) flag.
Note that, for small errors, sin (error) ≅ (error). This
analog error signal is then fed to the circuit block
labeled "error processorand VCO."  This circuit con-
sists essentially of an analog integratorwhose output
(the time-integral of the error) controls the frequency
of a voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO). The VCO
produces "clock" pulses that are counted by the up-
down counter. The "sense" of the error (φtoo high or
φtoo low) is determined by the polarity of φ, and is
used to generate a counter control signal "U," which
determines whether the counter increments upward
or downward, with each successive clock pulse fed
to it. (For reasons discussed below, it is also conve-
nient to put a small "hysteresis" into the reaction of
this error processor.)  This direction line, (U), can be
used to tell the system which direction the synchro or
resolver is moving. The "clock" or "toggle" line is
brought out as the converter busy (CB) signal. The
carry signal of the last stage of the counter can be
used as a major carry (MC) in multiturn applications.
Note that the two most significant bits of the angle φ,
stored in the up-down counter, are used to control
quadrant selection (as explained on pages 9 and
47), and the remaining 14 bits are fed (in parallel) to
the digital inputs of both multipliers. (It is also inter-
esting to note that the fact that the first two bits of φ
have been "stripped off," for quadrant selection does
not invalidate the explanations given above since
their data merely represent four sets of data from
zero in 90° increments added to the sine/cosine cal-
culations of the function generators, which are strict-
ly one-quadrant full-scale devices).
Finally,  note  that  the  up-down  counter,  like  any
counter, is functionally an integrator- an incremental
integrator, but nevertheless an integrator. Therefore,
the tracking converter constitutes in itself a closed-
loop  servomechanism (continuously attempting to
nullthe error to zero) with two lags ...two integrators
in series. This is called a "Type II" servo loop, which
has very decided advantages over Type I or Type 0
loops, as we shall see.
To appreciate the value of the Type II servo behavior
of this tracking converter, consider first that the shaft
of the synchro or resolver is not moving. Ignoring
inaccuracies,  drifts,  and  the  inevitable  quantizing
error (e.g., ±1/2  LSB), the error  should  be  zero 
(θ = φ), and the digital output represents the true
shaft angle of the synchro or resolver.
Now, start the synchro or resolver shaft moving, and
allow it to accelerate uniformly, from dθ/dt = 0 to
dθ/dt = V. During the acceleration,  an error will
develop,  because  the  converter  cannot  instanta-
neously respond to the change of angular velocity.
However, since the VCOis controlled by an integra-
tor, the output of which is the integral of the error, the
greater the lag (between θand φ), the faster will the
counter be called upon to "catch up." So when the
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN
S/D AND R/D CONVERTERS
20
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we code demo, which you can directly copy to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to copy pdf image into powerpoint; copy and paste image from pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor. dll. Open RasterEdge_MVC3 DemoProject, copy following content to your project:
copying image from pdf to powerpoint; preview paste image into pdf
velocity becomes constant at V, the VCO will have
settled to a ratio of counting that exactly corresponds
to the rate of change in θ per unit time and instanta-
neously θ= φ.This means that dφ/dt will always equal
("track") dφ/dt without a velocityor position error. The
only errors, therefore, will be momentary (transient)
errors,  during  acceleration  or  deceleration.
Furthermore, the information produced by the track-
ing  converter is  always  "fresh,"  being  continually
updated, and always available, at the output of the
counter. Since dθ/dt tracks the input velocity it can
be brought out as a velocity (VEL) or tracking rate
signal which is of sufficient linearity in modern con-
verters to eliminate the need for a tachometer (tach-
o-generator) in many systems. Suitably scaled it can
be used as the velocity feedback signal to stabilize
the servo system or motor. A further discussion of
dynamic errors can be found in Section VII.
In older designs, use of the inhibit (INH) command
would lock the converter counter while data was trans-
ferred. This could introduce errors if the INH was
applied too long. If the counter was frozen for more
than a few updates the catch up or reacquisition time
could be significant. Modern designs now use latched
and buffered output configurations  which  eliminate
this problem and greatly simplify the interface.
Two additional features of this converter should be
mentioned before concluding this description. One
concerns the fact that the velocity range over which
the device will track perfectly (i.e., over which the
velocity errorwill be zero) is determined primarily by
the upper frequency limit of the VCO/counter combi-
nation. A typical high-performance 14-bit, 400 Hz
converter will track at 12 RPS (by no means the limit
of current technology), which corresponds to 12 x 2
14
counts/sec, or 196,608 counts/sec.
The other feature is indirectly related to tracking rate
also. To optimize recovery from velocity changes
(i.e., to minimize acceleration errors) the gain of the
error-processor integrator, and the sensitivity of the
VCO it drives, should both be high. This encourages
"hunting" or "jitter" around the null (zero-error) point,
due primarily to quantizing "noise."  It is for this rea-
son that a small (one bit) hysteresisthreshold is built
into the error processor. This threshold  is much
smaller than the rated angular error.
Several other functions generally incorporated into
modern S/D or R/D converters to make them more
versatile are loss of signal(LOS) and enable(EL and
EM). LOS is used for system safety and as a diag-
nostic testing point.It is generated by monitoring the
input signals. Loss of both the sine and cosine sig-
nals at the same time will trigger the LOS flag.The
enable (EL and EM) line(s) enable the output buffers,
usually in two 8-bit bytes for use with either 8- or 16-
bit buses.
Because  the  tracking  converter  configuration  of
Figure 2.1 is the most advanced and versatile device
of its kind in use today, we shall examine and analyze
its static and dynamic performance in more detail ...
principally in Section VII.
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN
S/D AND R/D CONVERTERS
21
RESOLUTION
Input Frequency
Tracking Rate
Bandwidth
Ka
A1
A2
A
B
acc-1 LSB lag
Settling Time
PARAMETER
BITS
Hertz
RPS min.
Hertz
1/sec2nominal
1/sec nominal
1/sec nominal
1/sec nominal
1/sec nominal
deg/sec2nominal
ms max.
UNITS
10
12
14
16
360  - 1000
160
40
10
2.5
220
220
54
54
81.2k
81.2k
12.5k
12.5k
2.0
2.0
0.31
0.31
40k
40k
40k
40k
285
285
112
112
52
52
52
52
28.4k
7.1k
275
69
160
160
300
800
400 HZ
10
12
14
16
47 - 1000
40
10
2.5
0.61
40
40
14
14
3k
3k
780
780
0.29
0.29
0.078
0.078
10k
10k
10k
10k
55
55
28
28
13
13
13
13
1k
264
17.2
4.3
350
550
1400
3400
60 HZ
BANDWIDTH
Table 2.1.Dynamic Characteristics
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned or all image objects from PDF document in
copy image from pdf reader; extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo remove multiple or all images from PDF document.
paste jpg into pdf preview; copy images from pdf file
22
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN
S/D AND R/D CONVERTERS
Briefly though, the dynamic performance of the
Type II tracking convertercan be determined from
its transfer functionblock diagram (shown in Figure
2.2) and open- and closed-loop Bode plots (shown
in Figures 2.3 and 2.4).
Table 2.1 lists the parameters and dynamic characteris-
tics relating to one of DDC's leadership converters, the
SDC-14560 series. The values of the variables in the
transfer function equation are given on the applicable
data sheet. All DDC's tracking synchro-to-digital or
resolver-to-digital converters are critically damped and
have a typical small signal step response (100 LSB
step) as shown  in  Figure  2.5. Large  signal step
responseis governed by the maximum tracking rate of
ERROR PROCESSOR
RESOLVER
INPUT
CONVERTER TRANSFER FUNCTION           G =
WHERE:
2
A   = A   A 
     2
VELOCITY
OUT
DIGITAL
POSITION
OUT
(φ)
VCO
CT
S
        + 1
1
B
S
          + 1
10B
H = 1
2
S
        + 1
B
2
S
S              + 1
10B
+
-
e
A
2
S
2A
  2 A
ω (rad/sec)
CLOSED LOOP BW (Hz) = 
2 A
π
-12 db/oct
4
B
A
2A
-6 db/oct
10B
ω (rad/sec)
Figure 2.2.Transfer FunctionBlock Diagram.
Figure 2.3.Open-Loop Bode Plot.
Figure 2.4.Closed-Loop Bode Plot.
the converter and the small signal settling time. A typi-
cal response is shown in Figure 2.6. In the newer
designs, such as the RDC-19220 series, bandwidthcan
be selected to suit the particular application. A good rule
to follow is to keep the carrier frequency four times the
bandwidth. As the bandwidth becomes a larger per-
centage of the carrier it will become progressively more
jittery until at the extreme it will attempt to follow the car-
rier rather than the carrier envelope.
Use of a "Synthesized" Reference
As the error analysis (see Sections VII and VIII) of
the  synchro-to-digital  converter of  Figure  2.1  will
show, one potentially significant source of error is
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN
S/D AND R/D CONVERTERS
23
0
100
10
20
30
40
50
Output (LSBs)
Time (ms)
LOW BANDWIDTH - 10-BIT MODE
0
100
10
20
30
40
50
Output (LSBs)
Time (ms)
LOW BANDWIDTH - 12-BIT MODE
0
100
10
20
30
40
50
Output (LSBs)
Time (ms)
LOW BANDWIDTH - 14-BIT MODE
0
100
10
20
30
40
50
Output (LSBs)
Time (ms)
LOW BANDWIDTH - 16-BIT MODE
Figure 2.5.Small Signal Step Response (100 LSB Step).
0
100
2
4
6
8
10
Output (LSBs)
Time (ms)
HIGH BANDWIDTH - 10-BIT MODE
0
100
4
8
12
16
20
Output (LSBs)
Time (ms)
HIGH BANDWIDTH - 12-BIT MODE
0
100
2
4
6
8
10
Output (LSBs)
Time (ms)
HIGH BANDWIDTH - 14-BIT MODE
0
100
20
40
60
80
100
Output (LSBs)
Time (ms)
HIGH BANDWIDTH - 16-BIT MODE
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN
S/D AND R/D CONVERTERS
24
0
60
120
180
10
20
30
40
50
Output Angle (degrees)
Time (ms)
LOW BANDWIDTH - 10-BIT MODE
0
60
120
180
10
20
30
40
50
Output Angle (degrees)
Time (ms)
LOW BANDWIDTH - 12-BIT MODE
0
60
120
180
20
40
60
80
100
Output Angle (degrees)
Time (ms)
LOW BANDWIDTH - 14-BIT MODE
0
60
120
180
20
40
60
80
100
Output Angle (degrees)
Time (ms)
LOW BANDWIDTH - 16-BIT MODE
0
60
120
180
1
2
3
4
5
Output Angle (degrees)
Time (ms)
HIGH BANDWIDTH - 10-BIT MODE
0
60
120
180
2
4
6
8
10
Output Angle (degrees)
Time (ms)
HIGH BANDWIDTH - 12-BIT MODE
0
60
120
180
10
20
30
40
50
Output Angle (degrees)
Time (ms)
HIGH BANDWIDTH - 14-BIT MODE
0
60
120
180
20
40
60
80
100
Output Angle (degrees)
Time (ms)
HIGH BANDWIDTH - 16-BIT MODE
Figure 2.6.Large Signal Step Response (179° Step).
time phase shift (typically, a phase lead between the
rotor excitation reference  signal and the  voltages
induced in the  stator  windings of  the synchro or
resolver). This can cause errors due to the fact that
the voltage applied to the rotor is also used as the
reference input to the phase-sensitive demodulator.
Any appreciable lag or lead between this reference
voltage and the modulated carrier will greatly reduce
the ability of the demodulator to reject quadrature of
the synchro-input signals. (The sources of quadra-
ture components are discussed Section VIII, but pri-
marily they comprise speed voltages induced into the
synchro or the resolver stator and differential static
phase shift from the rotor to each stator output.)
Although a first order correction can be made for
rotor/stator reference phase shift by introducing a
phase-advancing network (Figure 2.7) between the
reference input and the demodulator, this phase cor-
rection can only be approximate, since the nominal
phase lead of a particular synchro or resolver design
is not a tightly controlled parameter, and varies from
synchro to synchro, and also with temperature, load-
ing, etc. Trimming the phase-correction network for a
particular synchro is practical, if somewhat inconve-
nient. A much better solution to the problem of ref-
erence phase errors is the use of "synthesized refer-
ence." A synthesized reference is a reference volt-
age that is derived directly from the stator-generated
signals (or from their Scott-T-transformed resolver-
format resultants). This technique is illustrated in
Figure 2.8.
Before proceeding to a description of the reference
synthesizer it should be said that it is necessary to
generate a precise reference only in conversion sys-
tems  and  instruments  that  require  better  than  1
minute  accuracy  ... or  in  conversion  systems  or
instruments that must operate in several modes hav-
ing different phaseshifts.
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN
S/D AND R/D CONVERTERS
25
SCOTT T
TRANSFORMER
SYNCHRO
INPUT
B SIN θ COS (ωt + α)
B COS θ COS (ωt + α)
SYNTHESIZED
REFERENCE
K COS (ωt + α )
S1
S2
PHASE
COMPARATOR
REFERENCE GENERATOR
QUADRANT SELECTOR
EXTERNAL
REFERENCE
INPUT
A COS (ωt )
PHASE-LEAD
NETWORK
(+α)
REFERENCE
INPUT
TO
CONVERTER
f (cos ωt - α)
REFERENCE
VOLTAGE
FROM
SYSTEM
f (cos ωt)
Figure 2.8.Method of Synthesizing a Reference Carrier without PhaseError.
Figure 2.7.Phase-Advancing Network.
In Figure 2.8, we see a system in which a reference
synthesizer (or "reference generator," as it is some-
times called) receives three inputs:
1.The external reference, a carrier frequency signal
of essentially constant amplitude:A cos (ωt).
2.The sin θ output of the quadrant selector circuit
that is part of the tracking servo of Figure 2.1:
B sinθcos (ωt+α). Note that is the carrier phase-
lead error between the external reference signal
and the stator input signals.
3.The cosθoutput of the quadrant selector circuit of
Figure  2.1,  which  has  the  same  phase-lead
error:
B cosθ cos(ωt+α).
Inputs 2 and 3, which are always of opposite polari-
ty, are subtracted algebraically into a single carrier
signal, and amplitude leveled. This signal can be
shown  to  be  either  K  cos  (ωt+α)  or  K  cos
(ωt+α+180°), where K is a constant ...either in phase
or 180° out of phase with the desired reference, and
corrected for the carrier-phase-lead error. By com-
paring it with the external reference, in a "coarse"
phase  comparator  (which  merely  determines
whether or not it is within ±90° of the external refer-
ence), the logical decision is made between closing
S1 (using the leveled algebraic sum), or closing S2
(inverting the leveled algebraic sum). The output of
S1 or S2 is, then, the synthesized reference.
The time phase of the synthesized reference signal
can be dependably held to within ±5 minutes of the
sin (θ - φ) signal presented to the demodulator, since
phaseshifts in the multipliers and differencing circuit
are very small at the carrier frequency. This level of
time-phase coherence ensures optimum quadrature
rejection in the demodulator ..at least 200:1, and as
much as 2000:1 in special designs.
The error introduced by a nominal 5.7° phase shift
and 0.1% quadrature in a converter without a syn-
thesized reference is approximately:
While in a converter with a synthesized reference the
5.7° phase shift is effectively reduced to 5 minutes
(or 0.01°) and the error is approximately:
A very small number indeed.
The use of a synthesized reference allows an engi-
neer to use the same circuit card or system design in
various applications without being concerned about
the phase shifts of the various synchro or resolver
transducers used.
Sampling A/D Converters
The tracking converter described first in this section
is a very high-performance device, and is the logical
choice  for  many  applications; however,  there  are
other methods of digitizing the input data represent-
ing the angle θ, and at least two of them are worth
detailed study. Both take advantage of the fact that
all  the  data needed  to determine the angle θ is
known in the carrier-envelope amplitudes of the two
resolver-format inputsat one selected instant of time
during the carrier cycle, provided that they are mea-
sured simultaneously ... assuming appropriate scal-
ing. Thus,if the reference input is:
Vref = K
1
cos (ωt), after correction for rotor-stator
phase shift, and the two resolver-format inputs are:
Vx = K
2
sinθcos(ωt);
and Vy = K
cosθ cos(ωt),
then simultaneous samples of Vx and Vy will yield as
much information about sinθand cosθas would con-
tinuous observation.
The only essential requirement of this approach is to
read Vx and Vy simultaneously—we must measure
Eq  =         tan 0.01˚ = 0.006'
0.1
100
Eq  =         tan 5.7˚ = 0.34'
0.1
100
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN
S/D AND R/D CONVERTERS
26
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested