pdf viewer in mvc 4 : Paste jpg into pdf preview control application platform web page html .net web browser synhdbk4-part1623

37
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN
S/D AND R/D CONVERTERS
SYNCHRO
STANDARD
PEAK
SAMPLING
MODULE
STROBE
Vref
CHANNEL #1
INPUT MODULE
CHANNEL #2
INPUT MODULE
CHANNEL #3
INPUT MODULE
CHANNEL #4
INPUT MODULE
A
B
C
D
CENTRAL
CONVERTER
MSB
LSB
CB
to A
to B
to C
to D
SCOTT
T
DUAL
S/H
(SEE
FIG 2.9)
MUX
TO LAMP
DRIVERS
Figure 2.20. Test Configuration for Multiplexed S/D Converters.
nals, a synchro standard or a synchro with a vernier
dial, and a synchro angle indicator. Either a rotary
switch or individual toggle switches can be used to
select the channel. The delay one-shot (OS) insures
that  the  conversion  occurs  after  the  completion  of
sampling. It is recommended  that  the  displays  be
operated  from  a  separate  power supply to  prevent
overloading  of  the  test  power  supplies,  which  can
result in erratic behavior. (For example, surge cur-
rent  when  several  displays  are  turned  on  can  be
quite high, momentarily pulling the supply out of reg-
ulation.)  Testing is accomplished in the same man-
ner as for single-channel S/D converters. The syn-
chro standard is set to the  test angles, and values
corresponding to  the  lighted lamps are added  and
compared to the input.
Dynamic Testing
In  many  applications,  the  dynamic  performance  of
S/D or R/D converters is very important. Figure 2.21
illustrates a relatively simple method of verifying the
tracking capability of a S/D or R/D converter. A D/S
or D/R is used to drive the S/D or R/D because of its
ease of programming and fast response. The clock
drives  the  up-down  counter (up-down  for  direction
control) at various rates to cause the D/S or D/R con-
verter  output  to  simulate  a  rotating  synchro  or
5
10
15
20
25
30 35
40
45
50
55
60
65
70
80
75
85 90
MINUTES OF ERROR
SPEC LIMIT OVER TEMP.
SPEC LIMIT OVER TEMP.
5
-5
4
-4
3
-3
2
-2
1
-1
0
ANGULAR
DEGREES
Figure 2.19. Room Temperature Error Curve.
Paste jpg into pdf preview - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
cut picture pdf; how to paste a picture into pdf
Paste jpg into pdf preview - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy pictures from a pdf file; paste image into pdf reader
resolver. The output of the counter is then compared
with the output of the converter in a digital compara-
tor and the difference is displayed as the loop error.
Usually, to make observation easier, the comparator 
output has a freeze line to enable taking data on the
fly at random. This is called the "Monte Carlo" tech-
nique since  the  samples  are random and the  data
statistical. With units having position error outputs (e
or E), these can be monitored.
With the advent of converters with a high-quality ana-
log  velocity output  (VEL)  suitable  for  use  as  the
velocity feedback in a servo loop, it has become nec-
essary  for  manufacturers  to  test  this  parameter
under conditions dynamically similar to how they are
expected to be used. This is done by driving an up-
down counter with a precision variable clock which in
turn  drives  a  very  accurate  D/S  or  D/R  converter.
The  D/S  or  D/R converter  drives  the  S/D  or  R/D
under  test  and  the  velocity output  is  monitored
through a low-pass RC filter by a DVM. The up-down
counter is run at various rates in both directions and
the  input  rate  is  compared  with  the  output  of  the
DVM. Usually a PC is used to control the test and
compute  the  linearity,  voltage  scaling,  full-scale
accuracy,  zero  offset and  direction  reversal  error
(voltage gradient difference in clockwise and coun-
terclockwise  directions). This  is  shown  in  Figure
2.22.
Checking acceleration is a much more difficult task
since  a  steady-state  acceleration  is  not  practical.
The velocity soon builds up to unreasonable levels.
Generally  it  is  measured  indirectly  by  determining
the closed-loop small-signal response and deriving
the acceleration constant from them.
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN
S/D AND R/D CONVERTERS
38
UP-DOWN
COUNTER
PRECISION
CLOCK
PRECISION
D/S
S/D
UNDER
TEST
DVM
VEL
S1
S2
S3
PC
CONTROLLER
Figure 2.22. Analog Velocity Dynamic Test Diagram.
D/S
CONVERTER
S/D
CONVERTER
DIGITAL
COMPARATOR
0000
UP-DOWN
COUNTER
CLOCK
Figure 2.21. Dynamic Test Configuration for S/D Converters.
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif Insert images into PDF form field in VB.NET. NET framework component supports inserting image to PDF in preview
paste picture pdf; pasting image into pdf
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif Ability to put image into specified PDF page position and component supports inserting image to PDF in preview
how to copy and paste a pdf image into a word document; copy image from pdf
THEORY OF OPERATION OF 
SYNCHRO-TO-DC CONVERTERS
Theory of Operation of Synchro- or Resolver-to-
Linear DC Converters
A  synchro-to-DC  converter  accepts  3-wire synchro
input  signals (or  4-wire resolver  input  signals)  and
puts out a bipolar DC (analog) signal proportional to
the shaft angle. In general, then,
where K is the full-scale constant, typically 10 Volts,
so that +10 V = 180°, -10V = -180°, and 0V = 0°.
Any  of  the  synchro-to-digital  converters  described
earlier in this handbook could be converted to a syn-
chro-to-DC converter by feeding its digital output to a
D/A converter with appropriate input coding. This is
the recommended approach for synchro- or resolver-
to-DC conversion. A typical example is illustrated in
Figure 3.1.
By suitably inverting the various interface lines vari-
ous code formats for the D/A can be accommodated.
Additionally,  system  offsets  and  zeroing  can  be
implemented digitally with an adder between the two
converters.
Some of the advantages of this technique are:
Output DC not affected by variations in synchro
voltage or frequency. It is broadband.
Ease of scaling.
Vout (DC) = ±
180˚
No staleness due to sampling. Use of a tracking
S/D eliminates staleness.
High reliability due to minimal part count.
Relatively low cost.
Noise rejection characteristics of the tracking S/D
conversion.
The  circuit of Figure 3.2 shows an older technique
used before the advent of lower cost data converters.
This older method used the harmonic oscillator con-
verter  to  produce  a  DC  level  proportional  to  θ.
Reference  to  pages  29  to  30  and  Figure  2.11 will
show that the design of Figure 3.2 is essentially that
of  a sampling harmonic oscillator synchro-to-digital
converter except for the output circuit. In Figure 2.11,
the time  interval  t,  between  the  start  of  oscillation
and the positive-going zero crossing (Figure 2.12), is
used to control the number of clock pulses gated into
a binary counter. In Figure 3.2, a precisely scaled,
very  linear  voltage  ramp,  starting  at  -K
1
Volts,  is
allowed  to  rise  for  the  time  interval  t,  and  then
"frozen" at that value. Since the value of t is given by:
where  RC  is the  integrator  time  constant, and  the
ramp voltage is given by:
where -K1 is a constant that  determines  full  scale,
then
and K is proportioned conveniently ... usually, so that 
when | θ | = 360˚ | e       | = 20 Volts       
ramp
e       
ramp
1
K  RC
360˚
=
θ
e       = K  t
ramp
1
t =
θRC
360˚
39
SECTION III
S/D
D/A
DC
OUTPUT
S1
S2
S3
Figure 3.1.Recommended Method of Converting
Synchro or Resolver Data to DC.
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Support various formats image deletion, such as Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other bitmap images. Able to cut and paste image into another PDF file.
how to copy pictures from pdf to word; how to cut a picture out of a pdf file
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET in Visual Studio, such as Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif
copy picture to pdf; how to copy images from pdf
THEORY OF OPERATION OF 
SYNCHRO-TO-DC CONVERTERS
The "freezing" of the output is accomplished by sam-
pling the ramp at the end of the harmonic oscillator
period, and storing the output in a sample-hold circuit
(see page 28 for details), so that the output remains
essentially  constant  until  the  next  measurement  is
made. Since a complete conversion is made once in
each carrier cycle, the maximum possible staleness
error is the same for this synchro-to-DC converter as
it was for the circuit of Figure 2.11:
for constant velocity between samples.
Returning to the harmonic oscillator configuration of
Figure 3.2,  we  may  note  the following design  con-
straints of the harmonic oscillator approach:
The uncertainty of the zero-crossing detector is a
first-order error source.
Any  zero-offset  or  nonlinearity  in  the  ramp  is  a
first-order error source.
Any variation in "K", the constant determining the
slope of the ramp, is a first-order error source.
velocity error = 
velocity in degrees/second
carrier frequency
As  discussed  on  page  30,  only  converters  with
some  means  of  compensating  for  the  inevitable
drift in the integrator time constant are capable of
reasonable  accuracy. In the  converter of Figure
3.2,  this  is  accomplished  by  checking  (between
conversions) the value of a half-period of the har-
monic oscillator - which should bring the output to
zero (halfway between -10V and +10V). Any off-
set from zero is used to correct for time-constant
drift. Thus, the circuit is recalibrated before each
measurement.
Synchro/Resolver-to-Nonvariant DC Sine/Cosine
Converters
In many systems it  is  desirable to convert  synchro
data to DC sine and cosine that does not vary with
the  synchro  reference  amplitude. The  preferred
method is to use a tracking S/D and a DC coupled
D/R converter as shown in Figure 3.3. In this config-
uration the D/R converter reference can be the sys-
tem DC reference, which is far more stable than the
AC reference. The output  variations  are  now  only
dependent  on  the  DC  reference  and  the  synchro
angle. The prime source of errors in this method, as
in any DC system, are offsets. These must be care-
fully controlled to preserve  angular integrity. Don't
40
OUTPUT
RATE
SMOOTHING
SAMPLE
AND
HOLD
PRECISION
RAMP
GENERATOR
TIMING
&
CONTROL
ISOL.
XFMR
SYNCHRO
REF
SYNCHRO
INPUT
(θ)
SCOTT T
XFMR
ZERO
CROSSING
DETECTOR
V
1
R1
R1
R
1
R
2
S3A
S3B
S
2
S
1
V
2
C
1
C
2
HARMONIC OSC
-V
2
Figure 3.2.Older Method of Synchro-to-DC Conversion
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
for creating PDF from multiple image formats such as tiff, jpg, png, gif doc = PDFDocument.Create(2); // Save the new created PDF document into file doc
paste image into pdf; how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to JPEG in C#.NET
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg.
paste image into pdf preview; copy a picture from pdf to word
THEORY OF OPERATION OF 
SYNCHRO-TO-DC CONVERTERS
forget, at angles where the sine or cosine are at zero
volts the impact of the offset will be maximized. The
transfer function of the S/D converter is given on the
data sheet for the particular product used while for
system  purposes  the  transfer  function  of  the  D/R
converter is unity (to three decimal places).
Using this technique all the circuitry needed to com-
pensate for temperature, aging of components and
staleness can be eliminated thereby reducing parts
count, increasing reliability and reducing cost.
Prior to the general availability  of  DC-coupled  D/R
converters, the  most  common method of  achieving
synchro-to-nonvariant  DC  sine/cosine  conversion
was  the  sampling  harmonic  oscillator converter
shown in Figure 3.4 - a configuration that accepts 3-
wire  synchro  data  (or  4-wire  resolver-format  data)
and puts out two analog DC levels proportional to the
sine  and  cosine  of  the  shaft angle  sampled.
Although no longer used in new designs, it is exam-
ined  here  for  its  historical  merit. The  relationship
between the outputs and are:
where K is the scale factor, typically, 10 Volts.
Before examining the behavior of Figure 3.4, it would
be useful to consider the fact that the sampled and
   (1) = Ksin θ 
out
e    (2) = Kcos θ 
out
41
S/D
DC-
COUPLED
D/R
DC
OUTPUT
S1
S2
S3
DC REFERENCE
SIN
COS
-V2
R3
R3
R1
R2
S2A
S2
S1
ZERO
CROSSING
DETECTOR
CLOCK
CONTROL LOGIC
UP-DOWN COUNTER
S1
S2
S3
S/H
S/H
K sin θ
K cos θ
S2B
C1
C2
B
A
SCOTT
T
XFMR
Vx
Vy
Eref
(Establishes K)
SWITCH CONTROL LINES
S3
+
Figure 3.3 Preferred Synchro-to-Nonvariant DC Sine/Cosine Converter.
Figure 3.4 Older Method of Synchro-to-Nonvariant DC Sine/Cosine Converter.
C# Word - Convert Word to JPEG in C#.NET
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg.
how to cut and paste image from pdf; how to copy pictures from a pdf to word
C# Word - Insert Image to Word Page in C#.NET
C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET the reference RasterEdge.XImage.Raster. dll into your project. image = new REImage(@"C:\logo2.jpg"); page.AddImage
cut and paste image from pdf; paste jpg into pdf
THEORY OF OPERATION OF 
SYNCHRO-TO-DC CONVERTERS
held  resolver-format  signals  (at  points  A  and  B  in
Figure 3.4) are  already  DC  signals proportional  to
sinθ and cosθ. Unfortunately, these signals are also
proportional to  the reference excitation, which  can,
and  does,  vary over  as  wide  a  range  as  ±10%  in
practical systems.
Furthermore, the rotor-to-stator transfer coefficient in
the synchro or resolver itself varies from unit to unit.
In  another  possible  "short-cut"  approach,  the
resolver-format  signals  may  be  demodulated  in
phase-sensitive detectors to produce DC sine/cosine
outputs; but this configuration, while essentially free
of speed-voltage is still entirely vulnerable to varia-
tions in reference excitation.
The  circuit  of  Figure  3.4  produces  nonvariant
sine/cosine outputs - i.e., outputs in which the scale
factor, K, is held constant within very narrow limits,
and is essentially independent of the reference exci-
tation.
Once again, it would be well to review pages 29 to
30, and Figure 2.11, to recall how the sampling har-
monic  oscillator synchro-to-digital  converter  works.
The circuit of Figure 3.4  differs from that of Figure
2.11 in three important ways:
The digital counter is an up-down counter.
The output is not a digital word derived from the
counter state (at the end of the time interval t), but
is derived by sampling the levels at points A and B
in  the  circuit,  and  holding  them  for  one  carrier
cycle  until  the  next  (updated)  measurement  is
made.
Additional programming logic is provided to imple-
ment the up-down count behavior described below.
The first phase of the conversion process is identical
to that described on pages 29 to 30, with the results
indicated  in  Figure  2.12. This  phase  involves:
strobed sampling and holding of the resolver-format
sine/cosine  signals; setting  the  integrators  to  zero;
applying the sampled data as initial conditions to the
integrators; unclamping the loop; and allowing it (and
the clock-pulse counter) to run until the positive zero-
crossing is reached. At the end of this phase, note
that  point  A is at zero  (which  is  the  condition  that
stopped  the  counter),  and  point  B  is  at  maximum
(cosine of zero degrees=one). Note that the actual
magnitude of the voltage at B is proportional to the
reference  excitation  that  generated  the  samples
used to set the initial conditions.
The second phase of the conversion, begins by set-
ting point B to a new level that is independent of the
rotor excitation, or any other source of scale factor
uncertainty. This new level is an accurately calibrat-
ed  and  stabilized  voltage  that  will  establish  the
desired scale factor, K, in the final output. Now hav-
ing established this new set of initial conditions, the
loop is unclamped, and allowed to run for exactly the
same time interval as it ran in first phase ... a time
interval generated by allowing the counter to count
down, at the same clock-pulse rate, to zero. At this
point, the loop is again clamped, and points A and B
are  sampled  and  held,
to yield outputs that are
scaled correctly, and are proportional to the sine and
cosine of 
θ... non-variant sine/cosine outputs.
Here  again,  as  before,  the  clock-pulse  generator
must be phase-locked to compensate for integrator-
RC drift, and there is a maximum staleness error of
one carrier cycle.
These then are a few of the techniques used to con-
vert synchro data to nonvariant DC sine/cosine data.
There is, of course, the method gaining in popularity,
of using a microprocessor, a sine/cosine ROM and
two  D/A  converters  to  achieve  the  same  result.
Where the microprocessor is not fully utilized this is
a good approach but for designers not wishing to fur-
ther burden it the S/D and DC-coupled D/R method
is recommended.
Refer  to  Figure  11.26  for  an  illustration  of  a  syn-
chro/resolver-to-DC  converter  using  a  DDC  model
RDC-19220  series  converter  and  the  Burr  Brown
DAC 703 digital-to-analog converter.
42
C# Excel - Convert Excel to JPEG in C#.NET
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg.
how to copy a picture from a pdf file; how to copy an image from a pdf to word
43
THEORY OF MODERN 
RVDT/LVDT-TO-DIGITAL CONVERTERS 
SECTION IV
Rotary and Linear Variable Differential
Transformers
The  Rotary  and  Linear  Variable  Differential
Transformers (RVDT/LVDT) shown in Figure 4.1, are
electromechanical  transducers  that  provide  an  AC
analog  output  that  is  proportional  to  the  displace-
ment of a separate movable magnetic core. Almost
unknown  45  years  ago,  it  is  widely  used  today
because  of  its  extremely  accurate  and  repeatable
null position, even in extreme environments.
Also known  as reluctance  transducers, they use  the
ratio of the reluctance of the magnetic flux path of two
coils. Since  it  is  a  ratiometric  device  it  is  relatively
insensitive  to  temperature  effects. Figure  4.2  is  a
schematic  presentation  of  a  typical  RVDT/LVDT. It
consists  of  a  primary  coil  and  two  secondary  coils
symmetrically spaced on either a cylindrical or rotary
form.A separate movable magnetic core inside the coil
assembly provides a path for the flux linking the coils.
When the primary  coil is  excited with an  AC refer-
ence,  voltages are  induced in the secondary coils.
With the core placed symmetrically the flux paths to
the two secondary  coils have  the  same reluctance
and the induced voltages are equal in magnitude. By
connecting the coils in series the opposing output will
be at a null. When the core moves from null the flux
paths  will  have  different  reluctance  and  the  output
voltages will be different. The coil toward which the
core moved will have a lower voltage. The differen-
tial  output  is  linearly  proportional  to  the  displace-
ment. The phase of the output abruptly changes 180
degrees as the core moves through null.
The RVDT/LVDT-to-Digital Converter operates very
much like an R/D converter except it operates in a
linear fashion as opposed to a sin/cos trigonometric
fashion. DDC  converters  use  the  same  custom  IC
with  pin  programming  to  switch  between  the  two
modes of operation.
The DTC-19300 block diagram shown in Figure 4.3
consists of four main parts: signal input conditioning,
a feedback loop (whose elements are the high accu-
racy bridge, demodulator, error processor, VCO and
up-down  counter),  a  power  oscillator  to  excite  the
RVDT/LVDT, and digital interface circuitry (including
various latches and buffers).
Figure 4.1.Rotary and Linear Variable Differential Transformers.
THEORY OF MODERN 
RVDT/LVDT-TO-DIGITAL CONVERTERS 
44
The converter receives the difference and sum volt-
ages at its inputs  and  internally  produces a digital
position σ which tracks the differential position λ.
A high accuracy bridge is used to compute  λ – σ,
where:
λ= the RVDT/LVDTs core position
σ = the digital position contained in the converter's
up-down counter.
The tracking process consists of continually adjust-
ing σ to make λ – σ approach zero so that σ will rep-
resent the core's position, λ.
The ratios bridge output is fed to a demodulator whose
output  is  an  analog  DC  level  proportional  to 
λ– σ. The error processor receives its input from the
demodulator  and  integrates  the  error  signal  λ –  σ
which then drives a voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO).
Figure 4.2.LVDT Schematic.(also see Figure 1.6)
50 ns DELAY
C1
+
LVDT
14 BIT BRIDGE
TRANSPARENT
LATCH
14 BIT
U-D COUNTER
3 STATE
TTL BUFFER
3 STATE
TTL BUFFER
FULL
SCALE
R2
PHASE
COMP
C2
ZERO SET
TIMING
REFERENCE
CONDITIONER
BIT
DETECT
DEMOD
ERROR
PROCESSOR
VCO
1 LSB ANTILITTER
FEEDBACK
U
T
DTC-19300
INHIBIT
TRANSPARENT
LATCH
POWER
SUPPLY
CONDITIONER
INTERNAL
DC REF (11V)
14 BIT OUTPUT
TRANSPARENT
LATCH
POWER
OSCILLATOR 
HIGH
ACCURACY
RATIO BRIDGE
ERROR
AMP
10k
R1
10k
R5
35
SO
29
SJ
34 SG -
+
DIFF
SIG
REF
SUM
(REF)
DIF
GAIN
S
R
33
32
25
31
36 RI
RO
V
19 OSC
21
FREQ
R4
22
AMPL
R3
RM
20
1
EM
BITS 1-6
BITS 7-14
EL
16
23
A
17
INH
30
+5 V
+15 V
27
24
e
VEL
26
BIT
18
U
T
U/D
INH
Q
PROG
GAIN
AMP
Figure 4.3.RVDT/LVDT-to-Digital Converter Block Diagram.
Functionally, the up-down counter is an incremental
integrator. Therefore, there are  two stages  of inte-
gration which make the converter a type II tracking
servo. In type II servo, the VCO always settles to the
counting  rate  which  makes  the  dλ/dt  equal  dσ/dt
without lag. The output data will always be fresh and
available as long as the maximum tracking rate of the
converter is not exceeded.
Modern  RVDT/LVDT converters  have  output  trans-
parent  latches  and  tri-state  buffers  for  easy  data
THEORY OF MODERN 
RVDT/LVDT-TO-DIGITAL CONVERTERS 
transfer and interfacing to µP buses with the appro-
priate inhibits and enables. Built-in Test (BIT) circuits
are  included  which  will  toggle  when  the  error
exceeds about 65 LSBs.
Historically,  it  has  been  difficult  to  provide
RVDT/LVDT-to-digital  conversion  without  serious
data lag whose root cause was the phase shift vari-
ation with position off null. This necessitated a half
wave  or  full  wave  rectification  with  filter  and  A/D
approach which introduced the data lag. DDC's new
tracking  type  converters  have  eliminated  this  con-
cern by using  a synthesized reference to  drive  the
demodulator. The  reference  drive  is  derived  from
and is in phase with the RVDT/LVDT signal thereby
virtually  eliminating  errors  due  to  the  transducers
phase shift variations.
Dynamic performance and characteristics are  the
same as their closely related R/D converters. Figure
4.4  shows  the  control loop  block  diagram  and  the
transfer function, and the open-loop Bode plot is
shown in Figure 4.5. Bandwidth can be determined
by the following formula:
The variables can be found on the data sheet of the
specific converter.
=
2A
BW
Since RVDT/LVDTs are not standardized in their char-
acteristics, as are synchros and resolvers, the convert-
ers will have to be adjusted for input gain to accommo-
date the full-scale voltage of the particular type trans-
ducer. Similarly, the phase shift will have to be com-
pensated for. This usually requires a simple resistor
and  capacitor trim done once with exact procedures
given  on  the  converter  data  sheet. As in  their  R/D
counterparts,  DDC's  RVDT/LVDT  converters  have  a
velocity (VEL) output for stabilizing the velocity loop of
a servo, thereby eliminating the need for a tachometer.
The  converter  is  a  ratiometric  device  which  com-
pares the difference and the sum if the signal inputs
on the ±S and ±C.The RDC-19220 Series requires a
signal input conditioner (see Figure 4.6) whereas the
the DTC-19300 contains a signal input conditioner,
and is designed for phase shift compensation. When
using  the  RDC-19220,  phase  and  amplitude  mis-
matches must be kept to a minimum. Adjust the gain
accordingly using the capacitors and resistors in the
amplifier (signal conditioner) input to the converter.
The DDC RDC-19220 series resolver-to-digital con-
verters can be made to operate as RVDT/LVDT-to-
digital  converters. By  connecting  the  Resolution
Control inputs A and B to "0", "1", or the -5 volt sup-
ply, the RDC-19220 functions as a ratiometric track-
ing  linear  converter. When  linear  ac  inputs  are
applied  from  a  LVDT,  the  converter  operates  over
one quarter of its range. This results in two less bits
45
ERROR PROCESSOR
RESOLVER
INPUT
(θ)
VELOCITY
OUT
DIGITAL
POSITION
OUT
VCO
CT
S
A         + 1
    
B
S
S           + 1
10B
H = 1
+
-
e
A
2
S
S
        + 1
B
S
          + 1
10B
2
2
Open-Loop Transfer Function =
Where A   = A   A  
2
2
1
FIGURE 4.4.Transfer Function Block Diagram.
FIGURE 4.5.Open loop Bode Plot.
B
A
BW
ω (rad/sec)
THEORY OF MODERN 
RVDT/LVDT-TO-DIGITAL CONVERTERS 
(the MSB and MSB -1) of resolution for LVDT mode
than are provided in resolver mode.
Some LVDT inputs will need to be scaled to be com-
patible with the converter input. Suggested compo-
nents for implementing the input scaling circuit are a
quad op  amp, such as a 4741  type,  and  precision
thin-film resistors of 0.1% tolerance.
The data output of the RDC-19220 Series is binary
coded in LVDT mode. The most negative stroke of
the  LVDT  is  represented  by  ALL  ZEROS  and  the
most positive stroke of the LVDT is represented by
ALL ONES. The  most  significant  2  bits (2  MSBs)
may be used as overrange indicators. Positive over-
range is indicated by code "01" and negative over-
range is indicated by code "11."  See Table 4.1.
46
FIGURE 4.6.RDC-19220 Series Input Signal Conditioning.
1
DIGITAL OUTPUT BIT
LVDT OUTPUT
+ Over Full Scale - LSB
+ Full Travel - LSB
+ 0.5 Travel
+ 1 LSB
Null
- 1 LSB
- 0.5 Travel
- Full Travel - LSB
- Over Full Travel - LSB
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
0
1
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Table 4.1.Digital Output Of The RDC-19220 Series In LVDT Mode
x = Don’t care.
R
i
S1
S3
+S
-S
SIN
R
f
R
i
R
R
i
S2
+C
-C
R /2
i      
COS
A GND
CONVERTER
R
i
 /   3
f               
 /   3
f               
-
+
-
+
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested