pdf viewer in mvc 4 : How to copy pictures from a pdf to word control application system web page azure asp.net console synhdbk5-part1624

47
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN 
DIGITAL-TO-SYNCHRO/RESOLVER CONVERTERS
The Programmed-Function Generator Digital-to-
Synchro/Resolver Converter 
Figure 5.1 is a general block diagram that will serve
to  introduce  the  many different  implementations of
both Digital-to-Synchro (D/S) and Digital-to-Resolver
(D/R) converters. As indicated, the input to a D/S or
D/R converter is a set of digitally coded “logic level”
(ONES and ZEROES) presenting the shaft angle, θ,
to some number of bits of resolution. As explained in
Section  I,  when  natural  binary  coding  is  used  the
most-significant  bits  of  this  input  “word” represent
respectively: 180°, 90°, 45°, etc. Thus, an input word
beginning 11....etc. designates an angle in the fourth
quadrant, a word beginning 10.....etc., designates an
angle  in  the  third  quadrant,  a  word  beginning
01.....etc. designates an angle in the second quad-
rant, and a word beginning 00.....etc. designates an
angle in the first quadrant. Clearly, then, the first two
most-significant bits of any pure binary-coded word
are the quadrant-designating bits. (The first three, by
similar reasoning, are the octant-designating bits.)
The  remaining  (less-significant)  bits  of  the  digital
word determine the angle precisely by adding (to the
cardinal quadrant value) some value between 0° (all
ZEROES) and 90° (all ONES). If we have set aside
the first three bits, for octant designation, the remain-
ing bits designate an angle between 0° and 45°. By
converting these bits into analog levels correspond-
ing to the sine and cosine of that angle (which lies,
as we have noted, between 0° and 90°), we may then
use  the  quadrant-designating  bits  to  establish  the
appropriate polarity for these analog levels, in accor-
dance with the following identities:
sin θ (2nd quadrant) = cos (θ-90°)
sin θ (3rd quadrant) = -sin (θ-180°)
sin θ (4th quadrant) = -cos (θ-270°)
cos θ (2nd quadrant) = -sin (θ-90°)
cos θ (3rd quadrant) = -cos (θ-180°)
cos θ (4th quadrant) = sin (θ-270°)
The application of these identities may be more read-
ily seen by examination of the following table:
If first two MSB’s
are:
Then polarity of
sinθ is:
and polarity of
cosθ is:
11
10
01
00
negative
negative
positive
positive
positive
negative
negative
positive
Table 5.1. Quadrant Designation
POWER
AMPLIFIER
(OPTIONAL)
SCOTT-T
XFMR
FUNCTION
GENERATION
QUADRANT
SELECTOR
MSB
DIGITAL
INPUT
WORD
LSB
Vref
sin θ
sin
cos θ
cos
RESOLVER FORMAT
OUTPUTS
SYNCHRO FORMAT
OUTPUTS
Figure 5.1. Basic Digital-to-Synchro/Resolver
Converter.
SECTION V
A very similar table may be made for octant-desig-
nation schemes, in which the first three MSB’s deter-
mine, not only the polarity of the analog level repre-
senting the sine and cosine of, but also which of two
available values shall be called the sine, and which
shall  be  called  the  cosine. This  need  to  select
between two available values arises from the trigono-
metric identity:
sin θ = cos (90°-θ) for θ in the first quadrant.
How to copy pictures from a pdf to word - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
paste image into preview pdf; paste jpeg into pdf
How to copy pictures from a pdf to word - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy an image from a pdf to powerpoint; how to copy picture from pdf to word
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN 
DIGITAL-TO-SYNCHRO/RESOLVER CONVERTERS
Thus,  if  we  have  translated  all  but  the  first  three
MSB’s into two analog voltages:
then the following table can be used to operate V
A
and V
B
so as to create the correct analog sine/cosine
polarities:
V  = sin θ (where 0 < θ < 45˚) 
A
and V  = cos θ (where 0 < θ < 45˚) 
B
equal  carrier  frequency  sine  waves  of  opposite
phase. After quadrant selection, they are fed to the
inputs  of  the  function  generators. (Note  that  by
appropriate phasing, both function  generators may
actually  be  sine multipliers -  but  it  will  be  simpler,
perhaps, to think of them as sine and cosine multi-
pliers, as in the discussions above.)
The  outputs  of  the  function  generators  are,  then,
accurate, resolver-format signals:
All that remains for D/R conversion is to provide suf-
ficient amplification (and,  if necessary, isolation) to
drive  a  resolver. These  power-output  stages  are
described later in this section.
For D/S conversion, an additional step is  required:
the  use  of  a  “reversed” Scott-T  transformer (see
Figure 5.1) to convert from 4-wire resolver format to
3-wire synchro format. As indicated in the diagram,
the power  amplifiers  are  interposed  between  the
Scott-T and the multipliers.
The  design  constraints  of  this  circuit  are  clearly
focused on  the  function  generators and  the  power
amplifiers,  since everything else in the  device is a
logic  circuit,  it  is  not  a  major  design  concern.
Subsequent discussions will cover these constraints.
Types of Function Generators
Figure 5.2 shows four types of circuits currently used
for multiplying a reference (carrier) signal by the sine
or cosine of a digital angle (θ):
• Figure 5.2a applies the reference carrier to a multi-
section,  multi-tapped ratio  transformer,  and  uses
electronic switches to select non-linear spaced taps
corresponding to the desired input/output ratio - i.e.,
the ratio that corresponds to the sine (or cosine) of
the  digitally  coded  angle. This  is  a  precise  and
extremely stable way of obtaining sine/cosine D/A
V  = K cos θ sin ωt 
x
 = K sin θ sin ωt 
y
where K sin ωt is the carrier envelope 
48
First 3 MSB’s 
Sin θ
Cos θ
111
110
101
100
011
010
001
000
-V
A
-V
B
-V
B
-V
A
+V
A
+V
B
+V
B
+V
A
+V
A
+V
A
-V
A
-V
B
-V
B
-V
A
+V
A
+V
B
Table 5.2. Octant Designation
Clearly, then, by routing the first two (or first three)
most significant bits to a simple set of polarity/signal
selector logic circuits, we may reduce our problem to
trigonometric  D/A  conversion  in  only one  quadrant
(or octant). That is what we have done in Figure 5.1,
in which the first two MSB’s are diverted to a quad-
rant selector circuit, and the remaining bits are used
to program 0°-90° sine and cosine function genera-
tors. These generators may be described as nonlin-
ear, bipolar, multiplying D/A converters, in which the
reference input signal is the carrier wave (Eref), and
the transfer function is either 
E
A
= E
ref
sinθ (sine function generator)
or E
B
= E
ref
cosθ (cosine function generator)
where θ is the angle represented by the digital input.
NOTE: the specific design of these function generators
is perhaps one of the most widely discussed topics in
the synchro conversion field, but we shall reserve dis-
cussion of that subject until later in this section.
The reference voltage supplied to the D/S converter
is generally  buffer-isolated,  and  converted  into  two
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
application. In addition, texts, pictures and font formatting of source PDF file are accurately retained in converted Word document file.
how to copy an image from a pdf in; how to cut a picture from a pdf document
VB Imaging - VB Code 93 Generator Tutorial
pictures on PDF documents, multi-page TIFF, Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Please create a Windows application or ASP.NET web form and copy the
pdf cut and paste image; how to paste a picture into a pdf
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN 
DIGITAL-TO-SYNCHRO/RESOLVER CONVERTERS
multiplication,  but  it  is  also  the  most  expensive,
largest, and heaviest. It is most likely undesirable to
produce  switching  transients,  and  second  order
errors due to reference harmonics.
• Figure 5.2b is a variation of the tapped-ratio-trans-
former technique of Figure 5.2a, but with resistor
ratio  sets  substituted  for  the  transformer(s)  that
synthesize  less-significant-bit  increments  which
are less critical as to both accuracy and stability.
This circuit is less precise and somewhat less sta-
ble,  but  also  somewhat  lower  in cost,  size,  and
weight compared to the all-transformer approach
of figure 5.2a. It retains its sensitivity to error pro-
duced by reference harmonics.
• Figure 5.2c applies the reference signal to a resis-
tor-ratio  network,  electronically  switched  in
response to the digitally coded input. The resis-
tors are “weighted” in exactly the same way as the
taps in the tapped-transformer function generator
of Figure 5.2a, so as to create the sine (or cosine)
function. This technique can be made to approach
the precision of the tapped-transformer design by
using  modern  nichrome-film  or  (non-inductive)
wire-wound resistors, and has entirely satisfactory
accuracy and stability for one minute or even more
demanding applications...at a small fraction of the
49
Vref
INPUT
DIGITAL INPUT
OUTPUT
Figure 5.2a. Tapped-Ratio-Transformer Function Generator (greatly simplified).
Vref
INPUT
DIGITAL INPUT
OUTPUT
Figure 5.2b. Hybrid (Transformer/Resistor Network)
Function Generator (greatly simplified).
Vref
INPUT
DIGITAL INPUT
OUTPUT
Figure 5.2c. Weighted Resistor-Network Function
Generator (simplified).
Vref
INPUT
DIGITAL INPUT
OUTPUT
etc.
Figure 5.2d. Linear/Selectively-Loaded Resistor-
Network Function Generator (simplified).
C# Imaging - C# Code 93 Generator Tutorial
pictures on PDF documents, multi-page TIFF, Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Please create a Windows application or ASP.NET web form and copy the
how to cut a picture out of a pdf; how to copy text from pdf image
C#: Use OCR SDK Library to Get Image and Document Text
color image recognition for scanned documents and pictures in C#. text content from whole PDF file, single PDF page and You can directly copy demos to your .NET
copy images from pdf; copy picture from pdf to powerpoint
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN 
DIGITAL-TO-SYNCHRO/RESOLVER CONVERTERS
cost, size, and weight. Reference-harmonic effects
are negligible.
• Figure 5.2d is by far the most economical, small-
est, lightest, and simplest means of generating the
sine/cosine  D/A  multiplication. It  uses  a  linear
resistor  network,  but  achieves its  sine or  cosine
function non-linearity by selective  loading  of  the
output of the ratio divider. For two  minute long-
term accuracy over wide temperature ranges, this
approach  has  proved  to  be  the  logical  choice,
because of its simplicity and economy. In the past,
this approach was optimized for angular accuracy
and as such had one characteristic that restricted
its usefulness in some applications. It exhibited a
scale factor variation as it  generated the sine or
cosine function. Since the angle information is the
ratio of the sine/cosine outputs, and the scale fac-
tor variations of the two function generators track
each other, no appreciable angular error is intro-
duced. However,  the absolute  amplitudes  varied
and some corrective measure, or some alternate
approach, was required for applications like vector
(polar-coordinate) plotting.
The Stored-Table-Look-up Digital-To-Synchro or
Digital-To-Resolver Converter
An  alternative  approach  to  generating  synchro  or
resolver analog  signals  is  to  use  a  ROM look-up
table  with sine/cosine  functions. The output of the
ROM  can then  be  fed  to  two  appropriately  scaled
four-quadrant  multiplying  D/A  converters  using  the
AC reference for the analog channel input.
The  major disadvantages  of  this approach  are  the
burden  on  the  µP  and  the  number  of components
needed  to  implement  it  compared  to  a  dedicated
D/S. Modern  D/S  hybrids  have  double-buffered
inputs and fully protected outputs of up to 5 VA.
Output Circuits for D/S and D/R Converters
The resolver-format (sine/cosine) outputs produced
by all of the foregoing D/S and D/R converters are
low-energy, relatively low-voltage signals. The ampli-
fiers required to increase the power and voltage lev-
els of these signals must have the following charac-
teristics:
• Relatively low output impedance - low enough to
drive  either  a  resolver  winding  or  a  “reversed”
Scott-T reflecting the load of a synchro, efficiently
and  rapidly,  without  significant  distortion,  and  in
the presence of reactive loading.
• High  linearity -  under  the  load  conditions
described  above,  to  prevent  the  introduction  of
harmonics.
• High Efficiency.
• Minimum  (and  closely  controlled)  phase  shift  -
again, under the load conditions described above,
so that angular error is not introduced. Note that it
is not necessary to achieve negligible phase shift,
but  merely  to  make  the  phase  shifts  of  the  two
power amplifiers  (sine and  cosine)  identical. In
other words, any differential phase shift between
the two channels must be minimized.
• The ability to absorb (and dissipate) energy over
that part of the voltage-output cycle in which the
reactive  nature  of  the  load  pumps  energy  back
into the amplifier.
• Short-circuit  protection  and  output  over-voltage
protection.
The Scott-T  transformer used in D/S  converters to
change resolver-format  signals  into  synchro-format
signals at high power levels must be capable of han-
dling  the  relatively  high  input  voltage  swings,  at
those power levels, without saturation or significant
distortion. Its phase shift should be low, and (even
more important) it must be balanced, so that differ-
ential phase shifts do not create significant angular
errors. For best performance, then, this transformer
should have low leakage reactance, and low prima-
ry-to-secondary  stray  capacitance. For  efficiency,
the core and copper losses should be minimized.
The transfer function, for system considerations, of
modern D/S or D/R converters is unity.
50
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Codes to Load Images from File / Stream in .
Now you can freely copy the VB.NET sample this VB.NET imaging library with pictures of your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to copy a picture from a pdf to a word document; how to paste a picture in a pdf
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Create Watermark on Images in .NET
and whether to burn it to the pictures to make Please feel free to copy them to your program provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
copy pdf picture to powerpoint; how to copy image from pdf to word
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN 
DIGITAL-TO-SYNCHRO/RESOLVER CONVERTERS
Some System Considerations
• Power surge at turn-on - When power is initially
applied, the output power stages can go fully on
before all the supplies stabilize. Current limiting
prevents damage, but when multiple D/S convert-
ers with substantial loads are present, the heavy
load can cause the power supply to have difficulty
coming up and indeed may even shut down. It is
best then  to be sure  the  supply  can  handle  the
turn-on surge or  to  stagger the  D/S  turn-ons  so
that the supply can handle it. Typically, the surge
will be twice the maximum rated draw of the con-
verter.
• Torque load management - When multiple torque
loads (TR) are being driven the above problems are
exacerbated by the high power levels involved and
power  supply  fold  back  problems  are  common
unless the stagger technique  is used. Also  allow
time for the loads to stabilize. On turn-on it is not
likely that  all  the output loads will be at the same
angle as the D/S output. As the angular difference
increases so does the power draw until the differ-
ence is 180 degrees. At this point, the load imped-
ance drops to Zss and current draw is at maximum.
• Pulsating power supplies - The new generation
of D/S and D/R converters has been designed to
operate their  output  power  stages with pulsating
power  to  reduce  power  dissipation  and  power
demand from regulated supplies. Figures 5.3 and
5.4 illustrate this technique. Essentially the power
output stage is only supplied with enough instan-
taneous  voltage  to be able to  drive  the required
instantaneous signal level. Since the output signal
is required to be in phase with the AC reference,
the  AC  reference  can  be  full-wave  rectified  and
applied to the push-pull type output drivers. The
supply voltage will then be just a few volts more
than the signal being output, and internal power
dissipation is minimized.
Thermal Considerations
Power dissipation in D/S and D/R circuits are depen-
dent on the load whether active (TR) or passive (CT
or CDX), and the power supply, whether DC or pul-
sating. With inductive loads we must bear in mind
that virtually all the power consumed will have to be
dissipated in the output amplifiers. This sometimes
requires considerable care in heat sinking.
For  illustrative  purposes,  let’s  examine  a  typical
hybrid power D/S, DDC’s DSC-10510, capable of 5
VA drive.
Let  us  take  the  simplest  case  first: Passive
Inductive Load and ±15 Volt DC power stage sup-
plies (as shown in figure 5.3). The power dissipat-
51
+v
- v
+DC SUPPLY LEVEL
-DC SUPPLY LEVEL
POSITIVE PULSATING
SUPPLY VOLTAGE
NEGATIVE PULSATING
SUPPLY VOLTAGE
AMPLIFIER OUTPUT
VOLTAGE ENVELOPE
Figure 5.4. Pulsating Power Supply Waveforms.
REFERENCE
SOURCE
26V rms 400Hz
1
2
3
4
6
7
3.4V rms
21.6V rms
C.T.
D1
D2
D3
D4
C1
C2
+
+
RL' RH'
+V
GND
-V
S1
S2
S3
DIGITAL
INPUT
±15VDC
DSC10510
S1
S1'
S2
S2'
S3
S3'
T1
42359
NOTES:
PARTS LIST FOR 400Hz
D1, D2, D3, D4 = 1N4245
C1 AND C2 = 47µF, 35V DC CAPACITOR 
Figure 5.3. Typical Connection Diagram Utilizing
Pulsating Power Source.
C# Imaging - C# MSI Plessey Barcode Tutorial
Create high-quality MSI Plessey bar code pictures for almost Copy C#.NET code below to print an MSI a document file, like Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF and TIFF
how to copy pdf image to powerpoint; copy pictures from pdf to word
C# Imaging - Scan RM4SCC Barcode in C#.NET
detect & decode RM4SCC barcode from scanned documents and pictures in your Decode RM4SCC from documents (PDF, Word, Excel and PPT) and extract barcode value as
copy and paste image from pdf to pdf; cut and paste pdf image
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN 
DIGITAL-TO-SYNCHRO/RESOLVER CONVERTERS
ed in the power stage can be calculated by taking the
integral of the instantaneous current multiplied by the
voltage difference from the DC supply that supplies
the  current  and  the  instantaneous  output  voltage
over  one  cycle of  the  reference. For  an  inductive
load this is a rather tedious calculation. Instead let
us take the difference between the power input from
the  DC  supplies  minus the  power  delivered  to  the
load. A real synchro load is highly inductive with a Q
of 4-6; therefore, let’s assume that it is purely reac-
tive. The power  out, then, is 0 Watts. As a worst
case we will also assume the load is the full 5.0 VA,
the converter’ s rated load. The VA delivered to the
load  is  independent  of  the  angle  but  the  voltage
across the synchro varies with the angle from a high
of 11.8 Volts line-to-line (L-L) to a low of 10.2 V L-L.
The maximum current therefore is:
The  output is L-L push-pull, that is, all  the  current
flows  from  the  positive  supply out to the load  and
back to the negative supply. The power input is the
DC voltage times the average current or:
The  power dissipated  by the output driver  stage  is
over 13 Watts shared  by the six power transistors.
Since one synchro line supplies all the current while
the other two share it equally, one will dissipate 2/3
of  the power and the  other  two  will each dissipate
1/3. There are two transistors  per power stage so
each  of  the  two  transistors  dissipates  1/3  of  the
power and each of the other transistors dissipates
1/6 of the power. This results in a maximum power in
any one transistor of:
• 13.24 W = 4.41 Watts
1
3
= 13.24 Watts
.707
0.49 A • 0.635
avg
rms
[             ] [    ]
30 V •
= 0.49 A rms
10.2 V
5 VA
The heat rise from the junction to the outside of the
package,  assuming  a  thermal impedance  of  4
degrees C per watt, is:
At  an  operating  case  temperature  of  +125°C  the
maximum junction temperature will be 142.65°C.
The other extreme condition to consider is when the
output voltage is 11.8. The current then will be .42 A
and the power will be 
A similar calculation will show the maximum power
per transistor to be 2.3 Watts. Much less than the
other extreme.
For Pulsating Supplies, the analysis is much more
difficult. Theoretical calculations, for a purely reac-
tive load with DC supplies equal to the output voltage
peak  vs. pulsating  supplies  with  a  supply  voltage
equal to the output voltage yield an exact halving of
the  power  dissipated. The  practical  circuit  also
results  in  halving  of  the  power  dissipated. At  light
loads  the  pulsating  supplies  approximate  DC  sup-
plies and at heavy loads, which is the worst case, they
approximate a pulsating supply as shown in figure 5.5.
Advantages of the pulsating supply technique are:
• Reduced load on the regulated ±15 VDC supplies.
• Halving of the total power.
• Simplified power dissipation management.
30 • 
[
0.42 A •          
]
= 11.32 Watts
0.635
0.707
4.41 W • 4˚C / W = 17.65˚C
52
+15VDC
-15VDC
LIGHT LOAD
HEAVY LOAD
Figure 5.5. Loaded Waveforms.
C# Imaging - Scan ISBN Barcode in C#.NET
which can be used to track images, pictures and documents BarcodeType.ISBN); // read barcode from PDF page Barcode from PowerPoint slide, you can copy demo code
paste image on pdf preview; how to copy picture from pdf file
VB.NET Image: Easy to Create Ellipse Annotation with VB.NET
ellipse annotation to document files, like PDF & Word ellipse annotation on documents, images & pictures using VB in Visual Studio, you can copy the following
copying a pdf image to word; paste image in pdf preview
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN 
DIGITAL-TO-SYNCHRO/RESOLVER CONVERTERS
Active Load - that is torque receivers - make it more
difficult to calculate power dissipation. The load is
composed  of  an  active  part  and  a  passive  part.
Figure 5.6 illustrates the equivalent two-wire circuit.
At null, when the torque receiver’s shaft rotates to the
angle that minimizes the current in R2, the power dis-
sipated is lowest. The typical ratio of Zso/Zss=4.3.
For the maximum specified load of Zss=2 ohms, the
Zso=2  x  4.3=8.6  ohms. Also  the  typical  ratio  of
R2/R1=2. In all synchro systems (torque transmitter
driving a torque receiver) the actual line impedances
are as shown in Figure 5.7. The torque transmitter
and torque receiver are electrically identical, hence
the total line impedance is double that of Figure 5.6.
The torque system is designed to operate that way.
The higher the total line impedances, the lower the cur-
rent flow at null and the lower the power dissipation. It
is recommended that with torque loads, discrete resis-
tors be used as shown in Figure 5.8 and 5.9.
A  torque  load  is  usually  at  null. Once  the  torque
receiver nulls at power turn on, the digital commands
to the D/S are usually in small angular steps, so the
torque system is always at or near null. Large digital
steps, load disturbances, a stuck torque receiver or
one synchro line open causes an off null condition.
Theoretically, at null the load current could be zero
(see Figure 5.10). If Vac = Vbc, both in magnitude
and phase, then, when “a” was connected to “b”, no
current  would  flow. Pick C1  and  C2 to  match  the
phase lead of R1-Zso. In practice this ideal situation
is  not  realized. The  input-to-output  transformation
ratio of torque receivers are specified at 2% and the
turns ratio at 0.4%. The in-phase current flow due to
this nominal output voltage (10.2 V) multiplied by the
% error (2.4/100) divided by total resistance (4 ohms)
= 61 mA. A phase lead mismatch between the torque
receiver and the converter of 1 degree results in a
quadrature current of:
Total current is the phaser sum:
Since  this  is a light  load  condition, even  pulsating
supplies would be approximating DC supplies.
The off null condition is a different story. Real syn-
chros have no current limiting, so that the current that
would flow would be the current that the circuit con-
ditions demanded. The worst case would be for a
180  degree  error  between  the  two  synchros  as
shown  in  Figure  5.11. For  this  condition  the  two
equivalent voltage sources would be 10.2 V oppos-
ing. The current would be 
= 5.1 A in phase
10.2 • 2
4
30 Vdc • 75.5 mA • 0.9 (avg/rms) = 2.04 Watts
Power dissipation is:
61 + 44.5 mA = 75.5 mA
10.2 V •             = 44.5 mA
sin 1˚
4 ohms
53
REF IN
D/S
R2=1 1/3Ω
R1=2/3Ω
REF
≈ ZSO=8.6Ω
NOTES: 
R1 + R2 ≈  ZSS     
3-WIRE SYNCHRO
2-WIRE REF
ACTIVE LOAD
Figure 5.6. Equivalent Two-Wire Circuit.
R1
R2
R1
R2
REF
REF
TORQUE TRANSMITTER
TORQUE RECEIVER
Figure 5.7. Torque System.
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN 
DIGITAL-TO-SYNCHRO/RESOLVER CONVERTERS
The power dissipated in the converter is the power
supplied by the ±15 VDC supplies minus the power
delivered to the load.
This would require  a  large  power supply and  high
wattage  resistors. The  converter  output  current  is
usually limited (in the case of the DSC-10510, to 0.8 A
peak).This limits the power supply to more reasonable
values  but introduces  another  problem  -  the  torque
receiver can become disoriented and confused, hang-
ing up in a continuous current limited condition at a
false stable null. Fortunately the DSC-10510 has spe-
(30 V • 5.1 A • 0.9) – (10.2 V • 5.1 A)
= 85.7 Watts for DC supplies
cial circuits  that  sense this continuous  current over-
load condition and sends a momentary 45° “kick” to
the torque receiver thus knocking it off the false null.
The  torque  receiver  will  then  swing  to  the  correct
angle and properly null. If the torque receiver is stuck
it will not be able to eliminate the over-current condi-
tion. In this case, the converter will send a BIT signal
when the case exceeds 140°C. This BIT signal can be
used to shut down the output power stage.
An  additional  advantage  of  using  pulsating  power
supplies is  that  the  loss of  reference  when driving
torque loads is fail safe. The load will pump up the
±V voltages through the power stage clamp diodes
and the loss of the reference detector will disable the
power  stage. The  power  stage  will,  therefore,  be
54
REF IN
RH
RL
D/S
2Ω
1 1/3Ω
2/3Ω
ZSO=8.6Ω
REF
TORQUE LOAD WITH DISCRETE EXTERNAL RESISTOR
Figure 5.8. D/S Equivalent.
1.33Ω
1.33Ω
1.33Ω
S1
S2
S3
RH
RL
S1
S2
S3
D/S
TR
REF IN
REF
Figure 5.9. D/S Actual Hook-up.
2Ω
RH
RL
A
D/S
1 1/3Ω
2/3Ω
REF
Zso=8.6Ω
B
C
REF IN
C1
C2
R1
Figure 5.10. Ideal Null Condition.
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN 
DIGITAL-TO-SYNCHRO/RESOLVER CONVERTERS
turned off with  the  needed  power  supply  voltages.
The  pulsating  power  supply  diodes  will  isolate  the
pumped up pulsating supplies from the reference. If
the DC power supplies are to be used for the power
stage and  there is a  possibility  of the  DC supplies
being off while the reference to the torque receiver is
on, then the protection circuitry shown in Figure 5.12
is highly recommended.
 note  should  be  made  here  about  the  ability  of
DDC’s  synchro booster  amplifiers to  drive  active
loads with impedance well below that implied by their
VA  rating. A  case  in  point  being  the  SBA-25000
series  amplifiers. Rated  at 25 VA  these  units  are
able to drive active loads as low as 6 Ohms at 90 V
L-L. On the surface this seems to be inconsistent. In
actuality it is not. When a torque receiver or another
active load device is at null the impedance is much
higher than the Zss. It is only in the off-null condition
that Zss can be as low as 6 Ohms. The off-null con-
dition is normally a transient condition, only existing
for a second or so. During this time the amplifier out-
put operates in a non-linear manner; it goes into cur-
rent limiting. At this current-limited output level it will
produce sufficient power to drive the torque receiver
to null but not enough to damage itself. As the torque
receiver  comes  into  null  it’s  impedance  increases
and the amplifier will come out of current limiting and
operate normally. Should the load remain at a low
level and the amplifier be forced to remain in current
limiting  for  more  than  4  seconds  or  so  the  SBA-
25000  will  introduce  a  1/2  second  angle  change
(120°) to try to free the torque receiver. Should the
load persist the output driver temperature will rise to
+125°C at which point the thermal cut-out will disable
the output drivers.
The remote sense feature is incorporated in DDC’s
newest hybrid digital-to-synchro  converters. Rated
at 5 VA, the DSC-10510 offers accuracies to ±2 min-
55
2Ω
D/S
2Ω
10.2V
+15V
10.2V
- 15V
Figure 5.11. Worst Case 180° Error.
D/S
+V
-V
+
-V
+15VDC
-15VDC
Figure 5.12. Protection Circuitry.
D/R
D/R
PA
PA
REF
OUT
OUT
WITHOUT XFMR
WITH XFMR
STABILIZING
NETWORK
PRECISION
XFORMER
POWER
XFORMER
REF
Figure 5.13. Feedback Transformer.
THEORY OF OPERATION OF MODERN 
DIGITAL-TO-SYNCHRO/RESOLVER CONVERTERS
utes of arc at the load. This remote sense feature
operates just as other precision sources do. A sepa-
rate line is run to each leg of the synchro (in addition
to  the  drive  line)  to  sense  the  voltage  actually
appearing on the load. This is then used to regulate
the  output based  on  load voltage  rather  than  con-
verter output voltage. This feature is very useful in
driving heavy passive loads in precision systems.
Another  technique  sometimes  used  to  reduce  the
size and cost of the output isolation transformers is
to incorporate an additional output feedback trans-
former (as shown in Figure 5.13) to feed the output
back to the output drivers in such a way that the out-
put  power transformer  is  inside  the  feedback  loop,
thus  allowing  the  transformer  parameters  to  vary
considerably  without  degrading  accuracy  or  drive
capability. Thus the output power transformers are
simple power transformers, not large precision trans-
formers,  and only  the  small  feedback transformers
need  be  precise. This  technique  requires  careful
design since there are now two transformers within
the loop where before there were none.
Tuning The Load
Figure 5.14 shows how to accommodate a D/S con-
verter to low impedance loads - such as several syn-
chro  control  transformers  (CT)  in  parallel  -  even
though the converter is not designed to drive such a
low impedance. Since  the  synchro  CT  presents a
highly inductive impedance, of moderately high Q, it
is possible to resonate each winding, with a parallel
capacitor of suitable current rating, and thereby raise
the equivalent impedance by a factor approaching Q.
NOTE: capacitor tolerance and drift, as well as the
tolerance and drift of the inductance of the winding,
make it impractical to attain or maintain perfect reso-
nance; therefore,  it  is  wise  to  estimate  no  greater
impedance rise than about 0.8 Q, even using rela-
tively stable capacitors.
Computing Value of Capacitor for Tuning
Synchro Stator Windings
Where:
C=Tuning capacitor in farads in delta connection.
X’
LSO
=Reactive component of impedance of one sta-
tor winding leg with rotor open circuit.
f=Frequency in Hz
R’
SO
=Resistive component of impedance of one sta-
tor winding leg with rotor open circuit.
Z'     =      ( Z     )
SO
2
3
SO
Z      = Stator winding impedance
with rotor open circuit.
SO
Z'      = per leg winding impedance
with rotor open circuit.
SO
Note:
C = 
X'
LSO
6 π f [(R'    )  + (X'      )  ]
SO
LSO
2
2
56
Figure 5.14. Resonating Paralled or other Low-Impedance Loads, to Raise Drive Capabilities of a D/S (or
D/R) Converter.
CT
CT
CT
C
C
C
D/S
CONVERTER
(INCLUDING
REQ'D
AMPLIFIERS)
FOR "N" PARALLEL CT'S,
C ≈         WHERE ω = 2π (carrier frequency) 
N
ω2L
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested