pdf viewer in mvc 4 : Copying images from pdf files control Library platform web page asp.net azure web browser synhdbk8-part1627

MEASURING AND COMPUTING SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DIGITAL
AND SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DC CONVERTER PARAMETERS 
All converters should of course, be rated for "speed-
voltage susceptibility" ...usually in terms of the high-
est velocity at which a given synchro or resolver may
be driven without causing an increase in the conver-
sion uncertainty (decrease in accuracy from rated
value).
Let us consider the effects of speed voltage of the
tracking converter described on pages 19 to 22. The
normal data signal presented to the demodulator is:
K   sin θ cos φ sin ωt 
K   cos θ sin φ sin ωt,
x
y
which has been shown to be equal to
K sin(θ – φ)sin ωt
provided K  = K   = K
x
y
and, for small values of (θ – φ),
K sin(θ – φ) ≅  K (θ – φ) sin ωt
In the presence of speed voltage, the demodulator
receives another signal component, in quadrature:
If the demodulator has infinite quadrature rejection,
no speed-voltage error  would result; however, for
very large values of A, saturation might occur in the
demodulator, causing large errors. A well designed
demodulator should have wide dynamic range and
excellent quadrature rejection ...which points out the
advantage of using a synthesized reference as dis-
cussed on page 22. (See page 83 for calculation of
quadrature rejection.)
Resolution,Linearity,Monotonicity,and
Absolute Accuracy
These terms have the same meaning and impor-
tance  for  synchro/resolver-to-digital  converters  as
they do for conventional analog-to-digital converters.
The resolution of a converter is the weight of the
smallest change in its digital output or the weight of
the least-significant bit (LSB). Calculation of this
parameter was explained on page 9, but the basic
expression is repeated here, for convenience:
Where n is the number of bits in the conversion. For
most converters, full scale is 360°, so for a 16-bit
converter the LSB is:
Note that if noise introduced by either the external
circuit or the converter circuitry itself is larger than
±1/2  LSB  (peak),  the  usable resolution will  be
LSB =            =             ≅ 0.0055˚ 
360˚
2    
16
360˚
65536
LSB = 
full scale angle
2
n
AK sin(θ – φ) cos ωt ≅  AK (θ – φ) cos ωt
where A = 
revolutions/second
carrier frequency
77
10001
10000
01111
01110
01101
01100
IDEAL
CHARACTERISTICS
NON-MONOTONICITY
AT "MAJOR CARRY"
"MISSING CODE"
ANALOG INPUT
Figure 7.5.Nonmonotonic Behavior 
in an S/D Converter.
Copying images from pdf files - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy pictures from pdf in; how to copy pictures from a pdf document
Copying images from pdf files - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to paste a picture into a pdf; copy image from pdf preview
MEASURING AND COMPUTING SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DIGITAL
AND SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DC CONVERTER PARAMETERS 
reduced  by  making  it  impossible  to  depend  on
changes as small as 1 LSB.
The linearity of a converter is the measure of the
maximum deviation from the ideal transfer function
shown in Figure 7.4. These are two kinds of lineari-
ty:integral and differential.
Integral nonlinearity is defined as the maximum
deviation from a straight line drawn through the
ideal transfer function, and is usually expressed as
a percentage of the nominal full-scale value.
Differential linearity is a measure of the deviation
of the digital output from equal step-per-bit behav-
ior. The worst-case deviation of the smallest or
largest step (bit) from the theoretical (LSB) size.
The differential nonlinearity is expressed as a per-
centage of the theoretical LSB.
Monotonicity is the property of S/D, R/D and A/D
converters that ensure that an increase in the analog
input will never cause a corresponding decrease in
the  digital  output. In  some  kinds  of  converters
(notably, the kind that employ successiveapproxima-
tion or table-look-up  techniques),  nonmonotonicity
can occur at "major carry" transitions, as shown in
Figure 7.5, for the transition from 01111 to 10000.
The cause of the nonmonotonic behavior shown in
the transfer characteristic of Figure 7.5 is a small
error in the circuit that establishes the most-signifi-
cant ONE or an error pile-up in the circuitry for the
other, less significant bits, or both.
In either case, the effect is to associate a decrease
in  analog  signals  with  an  increase  in  the  digital
result. (If the analog signal changes by more than
one bit, but less than two bits, but the digital signal
fails to change [skipping to a two-bit or larger step
when the analog input changes even more] this is
called a "missing code." It may be considered to be
a special form of nonmonotonicity.)  Pulse-train-and-
counter forms of S/D or R/D converters, like the har-
monic  oscillator designs  described  in  Section  II,
have  inherently  perfect  monotonicity  since  they
always convert in uniform steps, and do not have cir-
cuitry  that  can  produce  major-carry  conversion
errors.
Accuracy is the most abused term in the entire field
of "specmanship."  Part of the abuse stems from
loose language and from differences between meth-
ods of measurement.
Absolute  accuracy must  be  measured  (and/or
specified) under a standard set of conditions, and
must include all of the variation in operating range,
environment, signal characteristics, and all parame-
ters  that  make  up  the  ratings  of  the  instrument.
Finally, these variations must be allowed for in the
78
ACCURACY (Note 1):±1 arc minute
RESOLUTION:16 bits
CODING:Natural Binary Angle
MAX.TRACKING VELOCITY:360°/sec
1 LSB ERROR
ACCELERATION:45°/sec/sec
NOTE 1:Accuracy applies over rated operat-
ing temperature range, 5% variation of power
supplies, 10% amplitude and frequency varia-
tion, and up to 10% harmonic distortion of
synchro and reference inputs.
Figure 7.6.Example of a Valid Accuracy Statement.
Figure 7.7.LED Driver Schematic.
INPUT
LED
+5V
C# PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Choose to offer PDF annotation and content extraction Enable or disable copying and form filling
how to paste picture on pdf; paste image in pdf file
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Redact Text Content. Redact Images. Redact Pages. Annotation & Drawing. Add Sticky XDoc.PDF allows you to easily move PDF document pages Copying and Pasting Pages
how to copy an image from a pdf to powerpoint; how to copy image from pdf to word
MEASURING AND COMPUTING SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DIGITAL
AND SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DC CONVERTER PARAMETERS 
worst possible combination of their effects on the
reading. Then, and only then, will the following defi-
nitions be valid:
Absolute accuracy is defined  as  the  maximum
deviation of any conversion (any reading, in the
case of instruments) from the rated transfer char-
acteristic, measured with reference to the absolute
under standard conditions, such as the National
Bureau of Standards (NBS) and over all rated
operating ranges. It is expressed (usually) as a
percentage of the rated full-scale value.
Relative accuracy is measured and expressed in
the same way, but is defined in terms of the actu-
al, rather than the rated, full-scale value. Note that
this means that Relative accuracy is merely anoth-
er way of defining Linearity!
An example of a valid Absolute accuracy statement
is given in Figure 7.6.
Static Errors and Instabilities
At times, the Absolute accuracy rating, or even the
Relative accuracy rating, of a converter is too harsh
a judgement in the sense that any application may
not impose the full range of rated variations on the
converter. For this reason, it is important to be able
to measure and predict all of the components of error
that contribute to the total worst-case uncertainty.
One group of these components of error, each sepa-
rately measurable, is the so-called "static" sources of
error.They do not arise from either signal dynamics
or signal characteristics. These include:
Input Offsets (voltage and current) in multiplexers,
sample/holds, and any DC-coupled circuitry inside
the  converter — These  may  be susceptible  to
external "trimming" (Zeroing), but, since they drift
with time, temperature, and power supply, such
adjustments are at best crude and temporary cor-
rections. The best equipment has inherently low
offsets, inherently high offset stability, is rated for
untrimmed service and all initial adjustment done
at the factory only. Low current offset is mandato-
ry for high-impedance sources.
Gainerrors and drifts— These result in calibration
(scale) errors, and may be trimmed out for any one
temperature and power-supply condition, at any
time, but will inevitably drift again. Here again, the
best plan is to select a design that has inherently
accurate and stable full-scale calibration, without
the trimming.
Measurement of static error components in S/D or
R/D converters is relatively straightforward and easy.
The converter is connected to its synchro or resolver
transducer, and operated at the typical values of tem-
perature and power supply (or line voltage, if self-
powered). The transducer is excited by the typical
sine wave reference carrier, and is aligned so that
electrical and mechanical zero coincide to an accu-
racy significantly higher than the converter resolu-
tion. If the converter has a zero-setting adjustment,
it  is  used  to  set  digital  output  to  zero  (e.g.,  all
ZEROES, in natural binary code). If the converter
has no zero adjustment, the digital output at zero
data input is a measure of zero offset. (NOTE:allow
a reasonable warm-up time, to ensure thermal equi-
librium. The manufacturer will recommend a warm-
up delay period, if one is required.)
Maintaining the above typical conditions, the zero
drift with time may then be observed by monitoring
the digital output. (Figure 7.7shows a useful display
circuit for monitoring each digital output terminal.)
Remember that all other parameters: temperature,
power-supply levels, reference-carrier amplitude, fre-
quency, and waveform, mustbe held constant during
the entire period of the test. Gain stability is mea-
sured by repeating all of the above steps for a full-
scale input (corresponding to a full-scale digital out-
put - i.e., all ONES  in natural binary  code),  and
observing the output variation with time.
Temperature effects may be observed by raising the
ambient temperature of the converter (only) to the
rated upper limit. Allow it to reach the new thermal
equilibrium, and then observing the output for both
zero and full-scale inputs. All other parameters must,
of course, be maintained at typical values. Repeat,
for an ambient temperature and at the rated lower
limit.
79
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
NET application. Online C# source code for extracting, copying and pasting PDF pages in C#.NET console class. Support .NET WinForms
copy and paste image into pdf; paste image on pdf preview
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
C# source code is available for copying and using PDF document, keeps the elements (like images, tables and this situation, you need to convert PDF document to
how to copy an image from a pdf to word; how to cut picture from pdf file
MEASURING AND COMPUTING SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DIGITAL
AND SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DC CONVERTER PARAMETERS 
Return the converter to thermal equilibrium at the
typical ambient temperature (i.e., 25°C), and raise
the power supply levels to the rated upper limits, and
observe the digital output at both zero and full-scale
data inputs. (Changing the power supply levels will
probably require waiting for a new thermal equilibri-
um,  since  the  internal  dissipation  will  change.)
Repeat the test with the power supply levels at the
rated lower limits.
Time-stability tests may also be run at various com-
binations of upper and lower temperature and power
supply limits, but these may not be any more signifi-
cant than the typical time-stability tests.
Maximum Tracking Rate
Regardless of the circuit approach used in a S/D or
R/D converter, there is an upper limit on the velocity
(the rate of change of θ) that it can measure without
exceeding its rated error. This is just as true for the
"true tracking" converters as it is for harmonic-oscil-
lator and successive approximation  designs; they
may have different upper limits of dθ/dt, but they all
have such a limit.
The  Type-II-loop  tracking  converter  described  on
pages 19 to 22 may have no velocity error when
dθ/dt implies a counting rate that is higher than that
provided by its VCO(pulse generator), then it cannot
track θ, and will exhibit a rapidly increasing error.
Similarly, in the successive approximation and har-
monic-oscillator  converters,  the  "staleness"  error
increases in direct proportion to dθ/dt. Since the
converter samples once on each carrier peak, the
staleness (difference between the digitized value of
the sampled data and the actual value of θ just
before the next sample) will exceed the allowable
system error when θ changes more than that allow-
able error limit in one carrier period.
Measuring the tracking rate limit of a Type II con-
verter requires special equipment. One method of
several in current use is described here:
Drive the synchro or resolver at a constant veloc-
ity well below the rated upper limit, and measure
the repetition rate of the MSB pulse on an electric
frequency meter (counter-timer).
Slowly  increase the velocity of  the  synchro or
resolver until the measured repetition rate of the
MSB pulse is no longer exactly proportioned to
the velocity. (Make several measurements of rep-
etition rate at each increment of velocity, to ensure
that  no  acceleration errors  are  present,  and
explore the velocity region near the apparent limit
carefully, to be sure that you have found the exact
velocity at which the repetition rate departs from
proportionality.)
Measurement of the tracking rate limit of sampling
converters  is  meaningless,  because  "staleness"
error is readily calculated (see page 28), and no
other limitation in the converter is significant.
80
PROBABILITY
DISTRIBUTION
OF NOISE
ENERGY
ANALOG VALUE
IDEAL TRANSFER
CHARACTERISTIC
EFFECTS OF
NOISE
DIGITAL VALUE
±1 LSB
Figure 7.8.Effect of Gaussian Distribution of Noise
on Performance of and S/D Converter.
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
VB.NET examples for splitting a PDF to two and four new PDF files are offered. PDF Page inserting. PDF Pages Extraction, Copying and Pasting.
how to copy a picture from a pdf; paste jpg into pdf preview
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Convert PDF to text; Convert PDF to Jpeg images; More about PDF Conversion ▶. Page File & Page Process. PDF page extraction, copying and pasting allow
how to copy picture from pdf to word; copy image from pdf acrobat
MEASURING AND COMPUTING SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DIGITAL
AND SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DC CONVERTER PARAMETERS 
"Skew" in Sampled Systems
As described on pages 30 to 33, multi-channel sys-
tems that employ a single multiplexed S/D or R/D
converter and a single sample-holdthat samples the
channel (sequentially  or randomly) on  successive
carrier peaks exhibit a skew error proportional to the
velocity. If θ can vary at a rate of:
then the maximum skew error, between the first and
N
th
channel sampled is:
Measurement  of  this  parameter  is  meaningless,
since it is readily calculable from the system charac-
teristics, and is unaffected by system performance -
assuming the system functions normally.
Quantization Uncertainty
We  have already  mentioned  the inevitability of  a
quantization uncertainty of ±1/2 LSB in synchro-to-
digital or resolver-to-digital conversion (page 20) and
we have also noted that noise (random or periodic)
can  enlarge  the  quantization-uncertainty  "band"
without limit. Figure 7.8 illustrates the relationship
between the Gaussian, "white" noise, distribution of
peak energy and the number of bits of uncertainty
one may observe, and demonstrates that it is not
necessarily correct to assume that the quantization
uncertainty is at its minimum value of ±1/2 LSB. Only
a test program that observes the last few LSB's, with
input set at full scale -1/2 LSB will verify that noise
has  not  broadened  the  quantization-uncertainty
"band."
E              = 
NV
max
skew
n=N
n=1
˚/sec
V
MAX
dθ 
dt 
max˚/sec
and the carrier frequency is:
f = 
ω
2π 
Hertz
Jitter Due to Hunting in Tracking Converters
As noted in our discussion of the tracking converter
(pages 19 to 22), the quantization uncertainty in the
digital output requires that inclusion of a hysteresis
threshold in the error-processor loop. This hysteresis
is made smaller than the LSB; but, as discussed
above, noise or other disturbances (such as very
rapid speed pulsation in the system) will cause the
output of the converter to hunt or jitter around some
average value. Again, only careful observation of
several of the least-significant bits, with a data input
of full-scale  -1/2 LSB will eliminate noise as  the
source of jitter. Jitter due to speed pulsations is a
normal and correct response to the acceleration -
deceleration cycles implicit in the input variation, and
can only be accepted or ignored by not using the bits
that represent the hunting "band."
LOS Circuit to Detect Loss of Signal
The loss of signal (LOS) output of the new genera-
tion of S/D or R/D converters is used for system safe-
ty and diagnostics. This circuit monitors the sine and
cosine  signals  at  the  input  of  the  converter  and
changes logic state if both signals are disconnected
at the same time. With disconnected inputs convert-
er performance and output are unpredictable, and if
in a motion control or monitoring system could cause
serious problems.
BIT Logic to Detect Malfunction
In some modern synchro-to-digital or resolver-to-dig-
ital converters, a Built-In-Test (BIT) capability is pro-
vided, to signal when the velocity limit of the con-
verter is exceeded, and/or when an internal malfunc-
tion has caused an erroneous digital output. One
implementation of this circuit takes advantage of the
fact that excessive velocity, as well as many gross
malfunctions that can occur in the converter, result in
an error-processor output that exceeds a predeter-
mined threshold for a sustained period. Once this
abnormal state is detected a one-bit signal is deliv-
ered to the BIT output terminal. In angle indicators,
this datum may be used to blank the display, or to
light a warning indicator.
81
VB.NET PDF File Permission Library: add, remove, update PDF file
Dicom Viewer, C# Online Jpeg images Viewer, C# HTML Choose to offer PDF annotation and content extraction Enable or disable copying and form filling functions.
how to copy pictures from pdf file; how to cut image from pdf
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Process TIFF, RasterEdge XDoc.Tiff for .
are: TIFF, JPEG, GIF, BMP, PNG, PDF, Word and compress, extract, and annotate TIFF images in C# component still supports rotating, resizing, copying and pasting
cut and paste pdf images; copy image from pdf to pdf
MEASURING AND COMPUTING SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DIGITAL
AND SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DC CONVERTER PARAMETERS 
Harmonic Errors
Even-order harmonics (2nd, 4th, 6th, etc.) in the data
signal  fed  to  a  tracking  converter  are  effectively
rejected by the phase-sensitive demodulator in the
error processor.(The degree of rejection will be dis-
cussed next). Odd harmonics - the 3rd, 5th, 7th, etc.
- do cause an error, and their effect on the output
must be considered. A safe approximation of their
effect, which assumes the worst possible phaserela-
tionship between the harmonic and the fundamental
is that the error (E
H
) due to a particular harmonic
component is:
Where  %THC  is  the  total  harmonic  content,
expressed as a percentage of the fundamental, and
n is the order of the harmonic in question.
The total error due to all(odd) harmonic components
is conservatively estimated by the summation:
If  all  odd  harmonics  are present,  the  expression
approaches a practical limit of:
In most sampling S/D or R/D converters, errors due
to odd harmonics are not attenuated by n, but rather
are felt fully and estimated by:
E   =                radians
(%THC) 
100
H
E   =                radians
(%THC) 
50
H
E   =                       radians
(%THC) 
100n
H
n=N
n=3
Σ
E   =                                           radians
(%THC) 
50
H
1
3
1
5
1
7
+
or
E   =               radians
(%THC) 
100n
H
Quadrature Errors
The  quadrature  rejection  of  an  ideal  balanced
phase-sensitive demodulator is theoretically infinite,
provided that the time-phase of the reference carrier
fed to it is the same as that of the in-phase compo-
nent of the data signal to be demodulated by it or, if
the time-phase difference between the quadrature
component and the reference carrier is exactly 90°.
Reference phase error (departure from the above)
yields some error output in response to quadrature
component, in accordance with the following approx-
imation.
where:E
Q
is the error due to the quadrature compo-
nent in radians;(%QC) is the quadrature component
of the input signal to the demodulator, expressed as
a percentage of the input data signal; and α is the
reference-to-data time-phase error in degrees.
It is clear from the above equation that the quadra-
ture rejection of an ideal phase-sensitive demodula-
tor may be estimated at:
Note that for α = 0, the rejection is infinite.
The speed-voltage error, E
VS
, of a converter may be
calculated from A, the ratioof speed voltage to data
voltage (see page 74):
Practical (as opposed to ideal) demodulators have a
finite rejection ratio for both even harmonics and
quadrature components, independent of the refer-
ence-time-phase errors  described  above. If  the
    =                         tan α radians
speed voltage
data voltage
VS
E     = A tan α radians
VS
Quadrature Rejection = 
1
tan α
E   =                tan α radians
(%QC) 
100
Q
82
MEASURING AND COMPUTING SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DIGITAL
AND SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DC CONVERTER PARAMETERS 
rejection coefficient at α = 0 is K
d
, then the above
equations must be modified to reflect this practical
limit. Thus, the preceding equation would become:
A typical value for K
d
is 200.
Amplitude Errors
In the most advanced synchro-to-digital or resolver-
to-digital converters, the only amplitude errors that
are significant are those that alter the ratio of the sine
and cosine data signals in the resolver format signal
set. These can result only from gain (transfer func-
tion) inequalities in any of the following elements of
the system:
The  synchro  or  resolver  (rotor-to-stator  gain
inequalities).
The isolation or Scott-T transformer.
Sample-Hold circuits.
Multiplexers (and buffer amplifiers associated with
them).
Unbalanced loading of the signal sources (and of
the  cabling  between  them  and  the  converter
inputs).
E     = A   tan α +          radians
VS
1
K
d
One additional source of sine/cosine ratio erroris the
inability of the converter to reject anomalous input
signals, such as:
Common-mode voltages at the carrier frequency 
(due to ground loop signal injection and/or stray
pickup  from  carrier-frequency  electromagnetic
and electrostatic fields).
Carrier-frequency ripple components in the power
supply voltages.
Interaction between adjacent channels in a multi-
channel system.
The magnitude of such errors may be estimated by
computing the affect on the converter of a change in
the sine/cosine ratio (δ):
The error in the measurement of θ, E
amp
, due to a
ratio error δ is, then
E      = tan   (δ) radians
–1
amp
and since for very small angles,
tan δ ≅ δ
E      = 57δ degrees
amp
K(1+ δ)V
KV
(1+ δ)sinθ
cosθ
x
y
=
= (1+δ) tan α
83
MEASURING AND COMPUTING SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DIGITAL
AND SYNCHRO/RESOLVER-TO-DC CONVERTER PARAMETERS 
84
THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
MEASURING AND COMPUTING DIGITAL-TO-SYNCHRO 
OR DIGITAL-TO-RESOLVER CONVERTER PARAMETERS 
Worst-Case Error Analyses of Typical Digital-to-
Synchro  (D/S)  or  Digital-to-Resolver  (D/R)
Converters
All of the error sources to be considered here have
already been mentioned in the preceding section for
the very simple reason that many Synchro-to-Digital
(S/D) or Resolver-to-Digital (R/D) converters incor-
porate a D/S or D/R converter. (Compare, for exam-
ple, Figure 2.5 and 5.1.)  By isolating the circuit ele-
ments specifically used in the D/S or D/R function,
we can develop insight into the error sources that
affect them only.
Of the many error sources listed and discussed in
Section VII, the following may be significant, in some
or all of the D/S or D/R configurations in common use:
External Influences:
Ambient-temperature changes
Power-supply changes
The passage of time
Environmental  effects: Humidity,  Altitude,
Corrosion, Shock, Vibration, etc.
Noise
Reference harmonics
InterfaceInfluences:
Asymmetrical or excessive loading of the convert-
er by the synchro or resolver
Inadequate drive (or level mismatch) at the data
input or reference-input interfaces
Internal Influences:
Nonmonotonicity
Nonlinearity
Calibration error (gain error)
Zero offset
Internally generated noise
Function-generation errors
The above list is relatively shorter than that for the
S/D  or  R/D converter; primarily  because there  is
much less circuitry in the D/S or D/R converter, but
also because the D/S or D/R converter does not have
to supply the critical synchro- or resolver-input inter-
face. The digital-input interface is much less critical
(because it is digital), and the synchro- or resolver-
output interface is inherently less demanding.
For a discussion of the various methods of combin-
ing the effects of these error sources, please refer
back to the similar discussion in Section VII.
Static Accuracy (Network) Errors
A primary concern in all D/S or D/R converters that
use function-generating networks (which means, of
course,  the  great  majority  of  converters)  is  the
integrity with which the output generates the required
sine or cosine function in response to the digital
input. Ignoring such serious limitations as high cost,
size, and weight, the ratio-transformer types of func-
tion generators (see pages 17 and 18) are inherent-
ly the most accurate.
Weighted resistor-ratio networks are subject to the
following uncertainties:
Initial tolerances on the ratios
Drift in ratio (failure to track) with respect to time
and temperature
Offset voltages and currents in the switch circuitry
85
SECTION VIII
MEASURING AND COMPUTING DIGITAL-TO-SYNCHRO 
OR DIGITAL-TO-RESOLVER CONVERTER PARAMETERS 
Drift in offset voltages and currents, with respect to
time, temperature, and power-supply levels
Transient errors at high speed - e.g., failure to set-
tle in a time consistent with the conversion rate,
inadequate slew rate, "glitches"
Inadequate bandwidth at the reference-carrier fre-
quency, in one or more regions of the ratio range
(This is rarely a significant error source, in a rea-
sonably well-designed network)
Selectively loaded resistor-ratio networksare subject
to all of the above error sources, plus the inevitable
approximations inherent in the loaded-linear-network
approach. On the other hand, the initial-tolerance
problem is less severe in constructing a linear net-
work, so the ultimate performance of this class of
networks (for applications requiring no greater than
1-minute long-term accuracy) is superior to many
weight-ratio designs).
Static testing of D/S or D/R networks (see Figure 8.1)
requires very little equipment: a set of switches for
applying the logic levels corresponding to various
digital  inputs; a  stable  reference-carrier  signal
source;a load and a four to five-digit angle indicator.
(A phase-sensitive digital voltmeter is practical, but
requires calculations.)  Dynamic testing is discussed
later in this section.
Effects of Settling Time and Maximum Slew Rate
The dynamic response parameters of the function-
generator network, the output amplifier, and the var-
ious logic circuits employed for quadrant selection
can all contribute constraints to the dynamic perfor-
mance  of  a  D/S or  D/R  converter. The  overall
dynamic performance parameters of interest are:
Settling Time, which in turn limits data throughput
rate
 i.e.,  the  number  of  accurate
conversions/second
SlewRate, which in turn limits dynamic range and
(indirectly) data throughput rate
"Glitch" energy, which imposes limits on both the
useful data throughput rate, and (indirectly) the
dynamic range
Figure 8.2 illustrates all three dynamic performance
factors listed above. Note that the glitch-area ener-
gy  (volt-seconds) may  be  much  larger  than  one
might infer from the ±1/2 LSB bandwidth shown as a
reference, provided that either one of the two com-
pensatory  system  accommodations  have  been
made:
1.
A delay has been imposed (e.g., by inhibit-gate
techniques) between the application of the digital
86
MSB
ONE
LEVEL
D/S OR D/R
CONVERTER
UNDER
TEST
Vref
CT LOAD
ANGLE
INDICATOR
OR
PAV
OUTPUT
STABLE
OSCILLATOR
+
Figure 8.1.Testing D/S (or D/R) Converters.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested