pdf viewer in mvc c# : How to copy pdf image to word document control software platform web page winforms .net web browser taxi-private-hire-licensing-guide0-part1652

TAXI AND PRIVATE HIRE VEHICLE LICENSING: 
BEST PRACTICE GUIDANCE  
March 2010 
How to copy pdf image to word document - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
preview paste image into pdf; copy pictures from pdf to word
How to copy pdf image to word document - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy image from pdf to word document; cut and paste pdf images
TAXI AND PRIVATE HIRE VEHICLE LICENSING: BEST PRACTICE GUIDANCE  
Table of contents 
Introduction 
The role of taxis and PHVs 
The role of licensing: policy justification       
Scope of the guidance         
Consultation at the local level      
Accessibility 
Vehicles 
Quantity restrictions of taxi licences 
Taxi fares 
Drivers 
PHV operators 
Repeal of the PHV contract exemption 
Enforcement 
Taxi Zones 
Flexible transport services           
Local transport plans 
Para Nos 
1-5 
6-7 
8-10 
11 
12 
13-25 
26-44 
45-51 
52-54 
55-76 
77-81 
82-83 
84-88 
89-91 
92-95 
96-97 
Annex A -  Useful questions when assessing quantity controls 
Annex B -  Sample notice between taxi/PHV driver and passenger  
Annex C –   Assessing applicants for a taxi or PHV driver licence in accordance 
with C1 standard  
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. Support PDF on. Able to edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF document image. Extract
how to cut and paste image from pdf; how to copy pictures from pdf file
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF Image Extraction from a Page, a Region on a Page, and PDF Document in VB.NET Project.
copy picture from pdf reader; copy images from pdf to word
INTRODUCTION 
1. 
The Department first issued Best Practice Guidance in October 2006 to assist 
those local authorities in England and Wales that have responsibility for the regulation of 
the taxi and private hire vehicle (PHV) trades. 
2. 
It is clear that many licensing authorities considered their licensing policies in the 
context of the Guidance. That is most encouraging.  
3. 
However, in order to keep our Guidance relevant and up to date, we embarked on 
a revision. We took account of feedback from the initial version and we consulted 
stakeholders in producing this revised version. 
4. 
The key premise remains the same - it is for individual licensing authorities to 
reach their own decisions both on overall policies and on individual licensing matters, in 
the light of their own views of the relevant considerations. This Guidance is intended to 
assist licensing authorities but it is only guidance and decisions on any matters remain a 
matter for the authority concerned. 
5. 
We have not introduced changes simply for the sake of it. Accordingly, the bulk of 
the Guidance is unchanged. What we have done is focus on issues involving a new policy 
(for example trailing the introduction of the Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups legislation); 
or where we consider that the advice could be elaborated (eg enforcement); or where 
progress has been made since October 2006 (eg the stretched limousine guidance note 
has now been published). 
THE ROLE OF TAXIS AND PHVs 
6. 
Taxis (more formally known as hackney carriages) and PHVs (or minicabs as 
some of them are known) play an important part in local transport.  In 2008, the average 
person made 11 trips in taxis or private hire vehicles. Taxis and PHVs are used by all 
social groups; low-income young women (amongst whom car ownership is low) are one 
of the largest groups of users. 
7. 
Taxis and PHVs are also increasingly used in innovative ways - for example as 
taxi-buses - to provide innovative local transport services (see paras 92-95) 
THE ROLE OF LICENSING: POLICY JUSTIFICATION 
8. 
The aim of local authority licensing of the taxi and PHV trades is to protect the 
public. Local licensing authorities will also be aware that the public should have 
reasonable access to taxi and PHV services, because of the part they play in local 
transport provision. Licensing requirements which are unduly stringent will tend 
unreasonably to restrict the supply of taxi and PHV services, by putting up the cost of 
operation or otherwise restricting entry to the trade.  Local licensing authorities should 
recognise that too restrictive an approach can work against the public interest – and can, 
indeed, have safety implications. 
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into The portable document format, known as PDF document, is a they are using different types of word processors.
copying image from pdf to powerpoint; paste image in pdf file
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the point VB.NET: Clone a PDF Page. Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(filepath) ' Copy the first
paste picture into pdf; paste image into pdf acrobat
9. 
For example, it is clearly important that somebody using a taxi or PHV to go home 
alone late at night should be confident that the driver does not have a criminal record for 
assault and that the vehicle is safe. But on the other hand, if the supply of taxis or PHVs 
has been unduly constrained by onerous licensing conditions, then that person’s safety 
might be put at risk by having to wait on late-night streets for a taxi or PHV to arrive; he or 
she might even be tempted to enter an unlicensed vehicle with an unlicensed driver 
illegally plying for hire. 
10.  Local licensing authorities will, therefore, want to be sure that each of their various 
licensing requirements is in proportion to the risk it aims to address; or, to put it another 
way, whether the cost of a requirement in terms of its effect on the availability of transport 
to the public is at least matched by the benefit to the public, for example through 
increased safety.  This is not to propose that a detailed, quantitative, cost-benefit 
assessment should be made in each case; but it is to urge local licensing authorities to 
look carefully at the costs – financial or otherwise – imposed by each of their licensing 
policies.  It is suggested they should ask themselves whether those costs are really 
commensurate with the benefits a policy is meant to achieve.  
SCOPE OF THE GUIDANCE 
11.  This guidance deliberately does not seek to cover the whole range of possible 
licensing requirements.  Instead it seeks to concentrate only on those issues that have 
caused difficulty in the past or that seem of particular significance.  Nor for the most part 
does the guidance seek to set out the law on taxi and PHV licensing, which for England 
and Wales contains many complexities. Local licensing authorities will appreciate that it is 
for them to seek their own legal advice.  
CONSULTATION AT THE LOCAL LEVEL 
12.  It is good practice for local authorities to consult about any significant proposed 
changes in licensing rules.  Such consultation should include not only the taxi and PHV 
trades but also groups likely to be the trades’ customers. Examples are groups 
representing disabled people, or Chambers of Commerce, organisations with a wider 
transport interest (eg the Campaign for Better Transport and other transport providers), 
womens’ groups or local traders. 
ACCESSIBILITY 
13.  The Minister of State for Transport has now announced the way forward on 
accessibility for taxis and PHVs. His statement can be viewed on the Department’s web-
site at: http://www.dft.gov.uk/press/speechesstatements/statements/accesstotaxis. The 
Department will be taking forward demonstration schemes in three local authority areas to 
research the needs of people with disabilities in order to produce guidance about the 
most appropriate provision. In the meantime, the Department recognises that some local 
licensing authorities will want to make progress on enhancing accessible taxi provision 
and the guidance outlined below constitutes the Department’s advice on how this might 
be achieved in advance of the comprehensive and dedicated guidance which will arise 
from the demonstration schemes. 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
It's 100% managed .NET solution that supports converting each PDF page to Word document file by VB.NET code. Convert PDF to Word Document in VB.NET Demo Code.
how to copy images from pdf; how to copy pdf image to word
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Additionally, this PDF document image inserting toolkit in VB.NET still offers users the capabilities of burning and merging the added image with source PDF
copy a picture from pdf to word; how to copy picture from pdf to powerpoint
14.  Different accessibility considerations apply between taxis and PHVs. Taxis can be 
hired on the spot, in the street or at a rank, by the customer dealing directly with a driver.  
PHVs can only be booked through an operator. It is important that a disabled person 
should be able to hire a taxi on the spot with the minimum delay or inconvenience, and 
having accessible taxis available helps to make that possible.  For PHVs, it may be more 
appropriate for a local authority to license any type of saloon car, noting that some PHV 
operators offer accessible vehicles in their fleet.  The Department has produced a leaflet 
on the ergonomic requirements for accessible taxis that is available from: 
http://www.dft.gov.uk/transportforyou/access/taxis/pubs/research 
15.  The Department is aware that, in some cases, taxi drivers are reluctant to pick up 
disabled people. This may be because drivers are unsure about how to deal with 
disabled people, they believe it will take longer for disabled people to get in and out of the 
taxi and so they may lose other fares, or they are unsure about insurance arrangements if 
anything goes wrong. It should be remembered that this is no excuse for refusing to pick 
up disabled people and that the taxi industry has a duty to provide a service to disabled 
people in the same way as it provides a service to any other passenger. Licensing 
authorities should do what they can to work with operators, drivers and trade bodies in 
their area to improve drivers’ awareness of the needs of disabled people, encourage them 
to overcome any reluctance or bad practice, and to improve their abilities and confidence. 
Local licensing authorities should also encourage their drivers to undertake disability 
awareness training, perhaps as part of the course mentioned in the training section of this 
guidance that is available through Go-Skills. 
16.  In relation to enforcement, licensing authorities will know that section 36 of the 
Disability Discrimination Act 1995 (DDA) was partially commenced by enactment of the 
Local Transport Act 2008. The duties contained in this section of the DDA apply only to 
those vehicles deemed accessible by the local authority being used on “taxibus” services. 
This applies to both hackney carriages and private hire vehicles.  
17.  Section 36 imposes certain duties on drivers of “taxibuses” to provide assistance to 
people in wheelchairs, to carry them in safety and not to charge extra for doing so.  
Failure to abide by these duties could lead to prosecution through a Magistrates’ court 
and a maximum fine of £1,000. 
18.  Local authorities can take action against non-taxibus drivers who do not abide by 
their duties under section 36 of the DDA (see below).  This could involve for example 
using licence conditions to implement training requirements or, ultimately, powers to 
suspend or revoke licences.  Some local authorities use points systems and will take 
certain enforcement actions should drivers accumulate a certain number of points 
19.  There are plans to modify section 36 of the DDA. The Local Transport Act 2008 
applied the duties to assist disabled passengers to drivers of taxis and PHVs whilst being 
used to provide local services. The Equality Bill which is currently on its passage through 
Parliament would extend the duties to drivers of taxis and PHVs whilst operating 
conventional services using wheelchair accessible vehicles. Licensing authorities will be 
informed if the change is enacted and Regulations will have to be made to deal with 
exemptions from the duties for drivers who are unable, on medical grounds to fulfil the 
duties. 
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Evaluation Library for converting PDF to Word in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET Quick to remove watermark and save PDF text, image, table, hyperlink and
how to paste a picture in a pdf; paste image into pdf reader
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
A convenient C#.NET control able to turn all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without losing formatting.
copying image from pdf to word; how to copy an image from a pdf to word
Duties to carry assistance dogs 
20.  Since 31 March 2001, licensed taxi drivers in England and Wales have been under 
a duty (under section 37 of the DDA) to carry guide, hearing and other prescribed 
assistance dogs in their taxis without additional charge. Drivers who have a medical 
condition that is aggravated by exposure to dogs may apply to their licensing authority for 
an exemption from the duty on medical grounds. Any other driver who fails to comply with 
the duty could be prosecuted through a Magistrates’ court and is liable to a fine of up to 
£1,000. Similar duties covering PHV operators and drivers have been in force since 31 
March 2004. 
21.  Enforcement of this duty is the responsibility of local licensing authorities. It is 
therefore for authorities to decide whether breaches should be pursued through the courts 
or considered as part of the licensing enforcement regime, having regard to guidance 
issued by the Department. 
http://www.dft.gov.uk/transportforyou/access/taxis/pubs/taxis/carriageofassistancedogsint 
a6154?page=2 
Duties under the Part 3 of the DDA 
22.  The Disability Discrimination Act 2005 amended the DDA 1995 and lifted the 
exemption in Part 3 of that Act for operators of transport vehicles. Regulations applying 
Part 3 to vehicles used to provide public transport services, including taxis and PHVs, hire 
services and breakdown services came into force on 4 December 2006.  Taxi drivers now 
have a duty to ensure disabled people are not discriminated against or treated less 
favourably. In order to meet these new duties, licensing authorities are required to review 
any practices, policies and procedures that make it impossible or unreasonably difficult for 
a disabled person to use their services. 
23.  The Disability Rights Commission, before it was incorporated into the Equality and 
Human Rights Commission, produced a Code of Practice to explain the Part 3 duties for 
the transport industry; this is available at 
http://www.equalityhumanrights.com/uploaded_files/code_of_practice_provision_and_use 
_of_transport_vehicles_dda.pdf. There is an expectation that Part 3 duties also now 
demand new skills and training; this is available through GoSkills, the sector skills council 
for road passenger transport. Go-Skills has also produced a DVD about assisting 
disabled passengers. Further details are provided in the training section of this guidance. 
24.  Local Authorities may wish to consider how to use available courses to reinforce 
the duties drivers are required to discharge under section 3 of DDA, and also to promote 
customer service standards for example through GoSkills. 
25.  In addition recognition has been made of a requirement of basic skills prior to 
undertaking any formal training. On-line tools are available to assess this requirement 
prior to undertaking formal training. 
VEHICLES 
Specification Of Vehicle Types That May Be Licensed 
26.  The legislation gives local authorities a wide range of discretion over the types of 
vehicle that they can license as taxis or PHVs. Some authorities specify conditions that in 
practice can only be met by purpose-built vehicles but the majority license a range of 
vehicles. 
27.  Normally, the best practice is for local licensing authorities to adopt the principle of 
specifying as many different types of vehicle as possible.  Indeed, local authorities might 
usefully set down a range of general criteria, leaving it open to the taxi and PHV trades to 
put forward vehicles of their own choice which can be shown to meet those criteria. In 
that way there can be flexibility for new vehicle types to be readily taken into account. 
28.  It is suggested that local licensing authorities should give very careful 
consideration to a policy which automatically rules out particular types of vehicle or 
prescribes only one type or a small number of types of vehicle. For example, the 
Department believes authorities should be particularly cautious about specifying only 
purpose-built taxis, with the strict constraint on supply that that implies. But of course the 
purpose-built vehicles are amongst those which a local authority could be expected to 
license. Similarly, it may be too restrictive to automatically rule out considering Multi-
Purpose Vehicles, or to license them for fewer passengers than their seating capacity 
(provided of course that the capacity of the vehicle is not more than eight passengers).  
29.  The owners and drivers of vehicles may want to make appropriate adaptations to 
their vehicles to help improve the personal security of the drivers. Licensing authorities 
should look favourably on such adaptations, but, as mentioned in paragraph 35 below, 
they may wish to ensure that modifications are present when the vehicle is tested and not 
made after the testing stage. 
Tinted windows 
30.  The minimum light transmission for glass in front of, and to the side of, the driver is 
70%. Vehicles may be manufactured with glass that is darker than this fitted to windows 
rearward of the driver, especially in estate and people carrier style vehicles. When 
licensing vehicles, authorities should be mindful of this as well as the large costs and 
inconvenience associated with changing glass that conforms to both Type Approval and 
Construction and Use Regulations. 
Imported vehicles: type approval (see also “stretched limousines”, paras 40-44 
below) 
31.  It may be that from time to time a local authority will be asked to license as a taxi or 
PHV a vehicle that has been imported independently (that is, by somebody other than the 
manufacturer). Such a vehicle might meet the local authority’s criteria for licensing, but 
the local authority may nonetheless be uncertain about the wider rules for foreign vehicles 
being used in the UK. Such vehicles will be subject to the ‘type approval’ rules. For 
passenger cars up to 10 years old at the time of first GB registration, this means meeting 
the technical standards of either: 
- a European Whole Vehicle Type approval; 
-a British National Type approval; or 
- a Individual Vehicle Approval. 
Most registration certificates issued since late 1998 should indicate the approval status of 
the vehicle. The technical standards applied (and the safety and environmental risks 
covered) under each of the above are proportionate to the number of vehicles entering 
service. Further information about these requirements and the procedures for licensing 
and registering imported vehicles can be seen at  
www.businesslink.gov.uk/vehicleapprovalschemes 
Vehicle Testing 
32.  There is considerable variation between local licensing authorities on vehicle 
testing, including the related question of age limits.  The following can be regarded as 
best practice: 
   Frequency Of Tests.  The legal requirement is that all taxis should be subject to an 
MOT test or its equivalent once a year. For PHVs the requirement is for an annual 
test after the vehicle is three years old. An annual test for licensed vehicles of 
whatever age (that is, including vehicles that are less than three years old) seems 
appropriate in most cases, unless local conditions suggest that more frequent tests 
are necessary. However, more frequent tests may be appropriate for older 
vehicles (see ‘age limits’ below). Local licensing authorities may wish to note that a 
review carried out by the National Society for Cleaner Air in 2005 found that taxis 
were more likely than other vehicles to fail an emissions test. This finding, perhaps 
suggests that emissions testing should be carried out on ad hoc basis and more 
frequently than the full vehicle test. 
   Criteria For Tests. Similarly, for mechanical matters it seems appropriate to apply 
the same criteria as those for the MOT test to taxis and PHVs*.  The MOT test on 
vehicles first used after 31 March 1987 includes checking of all seat belts. 
However, taxis and PHVs provide a service to the public, so it is also appropriate 
to set criteria for the internal condition of the vehicle, though these should not be 
unreasonably onerous. 
*A manual outlining the method of testing and reasons for failure of all MOT tested items 
can be obtained from the Stationary Office see 
http:www.tsoshop.co.uk/bookstore.asp?FO=1159966&Action=Book&From=SearchResults 
&ProductID=0115525726 
Age Limits. It is perfectly possible for an older vehicle to be in good condition. So 
the setting of an age limit beyond which a local authority will not license vehicles 
may be arbitrary and inappropriate.  But a greater frequency of testing may be 
appropriate for older vehicles - for example, twice-yearly tests for vehicles more 
than five years old. 
   Number Of Testing Stations. There is sometimes criticism that local authorities 
provide only one testing centre for their area (which may be geographically 
extensive). So it is good practice for local authorities to consider having more than 
one testing station. There could be an advantage in contracting out the testing 
work, and to different garages. In that way the licensing authority can benefit from 
competition in costs. (The Vehicle Operators and Standards Agency – VOSA – 
may be able to assist where there are local difficulties in provision of testing 
stations.) 
33.  The Technical Officer Group of the Public Authority Transport Network has 
produced Best Practice Guidance which focuses on national inspection standards for 
taxis and PHVs. Local licensing authorities might find it helpful to refer to the testing 
standards set out in this guidance in carrying out their licensing responsibilities. The 
PATN can be accessed via the Freight Transport Association. 
Personal security 
34.  The personal security of taxi and PHV drivers and staff needs to be considered. 
The Crime and Disorder Act 1998 requires local authorities and others to consider crime 
and disorder reduction while exercising all of their duties. Crime and Disorder Reduction 
Partnerships are also required to invite public transport providers and operators to 
participate in the partnerships. Research has shown that anti-social behaviour and crime 
affects taxi and PHV drivers and control centre staff. It is therefore important that the 
personal security of these people is considered. 
35.  The owners and drivers of vehicles will often want to install security measures to 
protect the driver. Local licensing authorities may not want to insist on such measures, on 
the grounds that they are best left to the judgement of the owners and drivers themselves. 
But it is good practice for licensing authorities to look sympathetically on - or actively to 
encourage - their installation. They could include a screen between driver and 
passengers, or CCTV. Care however should be taken that security measures within the 
vehicle do not impede a disabled passenger's ability to communicate with the driver. In 
addition, licensing authorities may wish to ensure that such modifications are present 
when the vehicle is tested and not made after the testing stage. 
36.  There is extensive information on the use of CCTV, including as part of measures 
to reduce crime, on the Home Office website (e.g. 
http://scienceandresearch.homeoffice.gov.uk/hosdb/cctv-imaging-technology/CCTV-and-
imaging-publications) and on the Information Commission’s Office website 
(www.ico.gov.uk). CCTV can be both a deterrent to would-be trouble makers and be a 
source of evidence in the case of disputes between drivers and passengers and other 
incidents. There is a variety of funding sources being used for the implementation of 
security measures for example, from community safety partnerships, local authorities and 
drivers themselves. 
37.  Other security measures include guidance, talks by the local police and conflict 
avoidance training. The Department has recently issued guidance for taxi and PHV 
drivers to help them improve their personal security. These can be accessed on the 
Department’s website at: http://www.dft.gov.uk/pgr/crime/taxiphv/
In order to emphasise the reciprocal aspect of the taxi/PHV service, licensing authorities 
might consider drawing up signs or notices which set out not only what passengers can 
expect from drivers, but also what drivers can expect from passengers who use their 
service. Annex B contains two samples which are included for illustrative purposes but 
local authorities are encouraged to formulate their own, in the light of local conditions and 
circumstances. Licensing authorities may want to encourage the taxi and PHV trades to 
build good links with the local police force, including participation in any Crime and 
Disorder Reduction Partnerships. 
Vehicle Identification 
38.  Members of the public can often confuse PHVs with taxis, failing to realise that 
PHVs are not available for immediate hire and that a PHV driver cannot be hailed.  So it is 
important to distinguish between the two types of vehicle. Possible approaches might be: 
   a licence condition that prohibits PHVs from displaying any identification at all apart 
from the local authority licence plate or disc. The licence plate is a helpful indicator 
of licensed status and, as such, it helps identification if licence plates are displayed 
on the front as well as the rear of vehicles. However, requiring some additional 
clearer form of identification can be seen as best practice.  This is for two reasons: 
firstly, to ensure a more positive statement that the vehicle cannot be hired 
immediately through the driver; and secondly because it is quite reasonable, and in 
the interests of the travelling public, for a PHV operator to be able to state on the 
vehicle the contact details for hiring; 
   a licence condition which requires a sign on the vehicle in a specified form. This 
will often be a sign of a specified size and shape which identifies the operator (with 
a telephone number for bookings) and the local licensing authority, and which also 
has some words such as ‘pre-booked only’. This approach seems the best 
practice; it identifies the vehicle as private hire and helps to avoid confusion with a 
taxi, but also gives useful information to the public wishing to make a booking. It is 
good practice for vehicle identification for PHVs to include the contact details of the 
operator. 
   Another approach, possibly in conjunction with the previous option, is a 
requirement for a roof-mounted, permanently illuminated sign with words such as 
‘pre-booked only’. But it can be argued that any roof-mounted sign, however 
unambiguous its words, is liable to create confusion with a taxi.  So roof-mounted 
signs on PHVs are not seen as best practice. 
Environmental Considerations 
39.  Local licensing authorities, in discussion with those responsible for environmental 
health issues, will wish to consider how far their vehicle licensing policies can and should 
support any local environmental policies that the local authority may have adopted. This 
will be of particular importance in designated Air Quality Management Areas (AQMAs), 
Local authorities may, for example, wish to consider setting vehicle emissions standards 
for taxis and PHVs. However, local authorities would need to carefully and thoroughly 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested