pdf viewer library c# : How to copy images from pdf file control SDK system web page wpf html console text10-part1763

CHA PTER 2
WHERE ARE COMM ODI TY E XPORTERS H EADE D? OU TPUT GROWTH  I N THE AFT ERMATH  O F TH E COMMO DIT Y BOO M  
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
81
ment as a share of GDP rose strongly in all three cases, 
surpassing the change in savings as a share of GDP. 
Did Capital and Labor Reallocate toward the Commodity 
and Nontradables Sectors?
In all three countries, there was a clear pickup in the 
growth rates of both capital and labor in the extractive 
sector during the boom period.36 Higher investment 
in the sector accounted for the bulk of the increase in 
economy-wide investment in Australia and Chile. But 
the broader changes in investment and employment 
growth across the commodity, manufacturing, and 
nontradables sectors did not always conform to the 
model-based predictions. Contrary to those predic-
tions, in Australia the pace of capital accumulation 
in manufacturing picked up during the boom period, 
reflecting in part strong demand from export markets 
(mainly east Asia), while it declined in the nontrad-
ables sector.37 In Chile, manufacturing employment 
growth increased during the boom, while capital accu-
mulation slowed in nontradables. Canada is the only 
case among the three countries in which the sectoral 
factor accumulation patterns consistently favored the 
extractive and nontradables sectors: both the pace of 
capital accumulation and employment levels fell in 
the Canadian manufacturing sector during the boom, 
while those in the extractive and nontradables sectors 
increased (Figure2.14).
Were the Shifts between Manufacturing and Nontradables 
Different from Those in Commodity Importers?
周e reallocation of activity from manufacturing 
toward nontradables in the2000s was not unique to 
36To analyze sectoral shifts arising from the commodity boom, 
the economy is disaggregated into three sectors: extractive industries 
(fuels and mining), manufacturing, and nontradables. Agriculture is 
omitted for simplicity—it accounts for 2 to 4 percent of aggregate 
value added in the three countries studied. 
37In the 2000s, manufacturing exports to east Asia accounted for 
more than one-third of total manufacturing exports in Australia, 
about 15 percent in Chile, and about 5 percent in Canada. 
Table 2.1. Commodity Exports
Period
Australia
Canada
Chile
Share of Total
1990–2000
44.3
24.3
52.1
2000–10
47.1
27.8
56.6
Share of GDP
1990–2000
7.3
7.9
13.3
2000–10
8.8
9.5
21.1
Source: IMF staff calculations.
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Preboom
Boom
Preboom
Boom
Preboom
Boom
50
100
150
200
1990
95
2000
05
10
14
1. Net Commodity Terms of
Trade
(Index, 2000 = 100)
Australia
Canada
Chile
50
100
150
200
1990
95
2000
05
10
14
2. Real Effective Exchange
Rate
(Index, 2000 = 100)
15
18
21
24
27
30
Preboom
Boom
Preboom
Boom
Preboom
Boom
Australia
Canada
Chile
Australia
Canada
Chile
3. Real Income, Output, and Domestic Demand
(Percent change)
Income
Output
Domestic demand
Investment
Saving
4. Investment and Saving
(Percent of GDP)
Figure 2.13. Commodity Booms and Macroeconomic 
Indicators in Australia, Canada, and Chile
Source: IMF staff calculations.
Note: Preboom is 1990–2000; boom is 2000–10. In panel 3, bars show annualized 
average growth rates during the specified periods. In panel 4, bars are annual 
averages over the specified periods.
Australia, Canada, and Chile experienced commodity terms-of-trade booms in the 
first decade of the 2000s. In that period, the three countries differed in the extent 
of their real currency appreciation, but in all three, real incomes grew faster than 
real output, and investment picked up strongly.
How to copy images from pdf file - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf; how to copy an image from a pdf
How to copy images from pdf file - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy pictures from pdf in; how to copy picture from pdf to word
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
82 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
the commodity-exporting economies; many advanced 
economies have experienced a similar shift during the 
past three decades. 周us, to draw definitive conclusions 
on whether the boom of the2000s accelerated the 
reallocation of activity toward nontradables in com-
modity exporters, it is useful to examine whether the 
shift was stronger than in commodity importers. 周e 
data indeed suggest that the three commodity export-
ers considered here saw a faster reallocation of output 
shares toward nontradables during the boom relative to 
importers (Figure2.15, panel 1). But only in Canada 
did this represent a change relative to the preboom 
years; in Australia and Chile, the faster reallocation 
toward nontradables represented a continuation of a 
preexisting trend. Data on factors of production paint 
an even more mixed picture: only in the case of labor 
in Canada is there a steepening in the trend relative to 
importers during the boom period (Figure2.15, panels 
2 and 3). In sum, benchmarking against the experi-
ence of commodity importers suggests little evidence 
of a faster shift from manufacturing toward nontrad-
ables activities during the boom among the three 
countries studied, except in Canada. 周e evolution of 
house prices offers a slightly different view: in all three 
countries, especially Canada, real house prices rose 
faster than the average real house price in commodity 
importers, providing some evidence of relative strength 
in nontradables activities during the boom period 
(Figure2.15, panel 4). 
周e different patterns of sectoral reallocation across 
the three countries can be attributed in part to the 
destination of their export manufacturing products. 
Among the countries, Australia—which saw a pickup in 
manufacturing investment during the boom period—
sent a relatively larger share of its manufacturing exports 
to east Asia, particularly China, on the eve of the boom. 
In contrast, the majority of Canada’s manufacturing 
exports went to the United States, where manufacturing 
output growth slowed in the2000s. As highlighted in 
Box 2.1, to the extent that booms in commodity prices 
coincide with strong global activity, Dutch disease effects 
in commodity exporters could be offset, especially if the 
manufacturing sector has trade linkages with the faster-
growing regions. 
Did the Reallocation of Activity Hamper Aggregate TFP 
Growth?  
周e evidence on sectoral growth rates of output, 
capital, and labor points to unambiguous shifts toward 
–4
–2
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
Ext.
Manuf.
Nontrad.
–4
–2
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
Ext.
Manuf. Nontrad.
–4
–2
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
Ext.
Manuf.
Nontrad.
–4
–2
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
Ext.
Manuf. Nontrad.
–4
–2
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
Ext.
Manuf.
Nontrad.
1. Australia, Capital Stock
2. Australia, Labor
–4
–2
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
Ext.
Manuf. Nontrad.
Ext. (preboom)
Manuf. (preboom)
Nontrad. (preboom)
Ext. (boom)
Manuf. (boom)
Nontrad. (boom)
3. Canada, Capital Stock
4. Canada, Labor
5. Chile, Capital Stock
6. Chile, Labor
–0.6
–0.3
0.0
0.3
0.6
0.9
1.2
Australia Canada
Chile
–0.6
–0.3
0.0
0.3
0.6
0.9
1.2
Australia Canada
Chile
Sectoral Contributions to the Change in Growth
(Relative to the Preboom Period)
1
Extractive
Manufacturing
Nontradables
7. Capital Stock
8. Labor
Growth of Capital and Labor
Figure 2.14.  Growth of Capital and Labor by Sector: Boom 
versus Preboom Periods
(Average annual percent change)
Sources: Hofman and others 2015; Latin America KLEMS; World KLEMS; and IMF 
staff calculations.
Note: Preboom is 1990–2000; boom is 2000–10. The contributions of the 
agriculture sector are small and not shown. Ext. = extractive; Manuf. = 
manufacturing; Nontrad. = nontradables.
1The change in the growth of capital and labor relative to the preboom period is 
decomposed into sectoral contributions. A sector's contribution to the change in 
growth is calculated as the annual growth of capital or labor multiplied by the 
weight of that sector in the total capital and labor stock and averaged across the 
10-year period. 
In Australia, Canada, and Chile, the 2000–10 commodity boom period coincided 
with a clear increase in both capital and labor in the extractive sector; in Australia 
and Chile, that sector accounted for the bulk of economy-wide capital 
accumulation in the period. Labor and capital in the three countries did not shift 
notably into the nontradables sector.
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
code in your VB.NET application to copy pages from a PDF As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" newDoc.Save VB.NET: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
how to copy a picture from a pdf file; how to copy pictures from a pdf to word
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Extract multiple types of image from PDF file in VB.NET Scan high quality image to PDF, tiff and various image Able to extract images from PDF in both .NET
how to copy an image from a pdf in; paste picture pdf
CHA PTER 2
WHERE ARE COMM ODI TY E XPORTERS H EADE D? OU TPUT GROWTH  I N THE AFT ERMATH  O F TH E COMMO DIT Y BOO M  
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
83
the commodity sector as well as shifts—though not as 
consistent—toward nontradables activities. To examine 
whether these changes had an impact on economy-
wide TFP growth, the latter is decomposed into 
within-sector and between-sector effects, applying the 
decomposition in Dabla-Norris and others 2015.38 
Data from Latin America KLEMS and World 
KLEMS indicate that aggregate TFP growth declined 
in all three case study countries during the commodity 
boom relative to the previous decade and even turned 
negative in Australia and Chile. 周e decomposition 
indicates that this decline was entirely due to the 
within-sector effect (Figure2.16, panels 1, 3, and 5). 
周e between-sector effect in fact attenuated the decline 
in TFP. 周is finding of a negative contribution from 
the within-sector effect holds more broadly for Latin 
American economies (Aravena and others2014; Hof-
man and others2015).
Declining TFP growth in extractive industries and 
manufacturing appears to be a common factor behind 
the weak within-sector TFP performance in all three 
cases (Figure2.16, panels 2, 4, and 6). A marked 
decline in TFP growth in nontradables was also a key 
driver in Australia and Chile. 周e weak TFP growth 
in the extractive sectors during the boom is likely to 
have resulted from the time-to-build associated with 
large-scale mining investments and the tapping of less 
efficient mines (Figure2.17) (see Francis 2008). 周e 
remoteness of extractive production sites may have 
contributed to higher marginal costs in the supporting 
nontradables service industries.
In summary, the case studies point to substantial 
heterogeneity across countries in terms of sectoral 
reallocation patterns during commodity booms. While 
all three countries under study experienced a flow of 
factors of production into the commodity sector, they 
experienced varying degrees of reallocation between the 
manufacturing and nontradables sectors. 周e fact that 
the countries were exposed to different manufacturing 
export destinations (that were experiencing different 
38周e decomposition is based on the following specification:  
tfp
t
– tfp
t–1
= ∑
i
ω
i,t–1
(tfp
i,t
– tfp
i,t–1
) + ∑
i
tfp
i,t
i,t
– ω
i,t–1
),
in which i refers to the sectors of the economy (here, extractive 
commodities, manufacturing, and nontradables); tfp
t
and tfp
i,t
refer 
to economy-wide and sectoral TFP, respectively; and ω
i,t
is the share 
of real value added of sector i. 周e first term on the right side is 
the within-sector effect given by the weighted sum of TFP growth 
in each sector. 周e second term is the between-sector effect, which 
captures the effect of the sectoral reallocation of real value added on 
aggregate TFP growth.  
0.6
0.8
1.0
1.2
1.4
1990
93
96
99
2002
05
07
1. Ratio of Nontradables Output to Manufacturing Output,
Relative to That of Commodity Importers
(Index, 2000 = 1)
Australia
Canada
Chile
0.6
0.8
1.0
1.2
1.4
1990
93
96
99
2002
05
07
2. Ratio of Nontradables Capital Stock to Manufacturing
Capital Stock, Relative to That of Commodity Importers
(Index, 2000 = 1)
0.6
0.8
1.0
1.2
1.4
1990
93
96
99
2002
05
07
0.6
0.8
1.0
1.2
1.4
1.6
1990
93
96
99
2002
05
08
11
3. Ratio of Nontradables Labor to Manufacturing Labor,
Relative to That of Commodity Importers
(Index, 2000 = 1)
4. Real House Prices, Relative to Those of Commodity Importers
(Index, 2004 = 1)
Figure 2.15.  Evolution of Activity in Nontradables Relative to 
Manufacturing, Commodity Exporters Relative to Commodity 
Importers
Sources: Haver Analytics; Hofman and others 2015; Latin America KLEMS; 
national authorities; World KLEMS; and IMF staff calculations.
Note: Panels 1–3 show the evolution in commodity exporters of the ratios of 
output, capital, and labor in nontradables to those in manufacturing, scaled by the 
average ratio across a sample of commodity importers in the same year. An 
increase in the trend of a ratio beginning in 2000 relative to the pre-2000 trend 
indicates that the reallocation from manufacturing to nontradables in commodity 
exporters intensified relative to that in importers during the commodity boom. 
Panel 4 shows the evolution of real house prices in commodity exporters scaled 
by the average real house prices across commodity importers. The sample of 
commodity importers comprises Denmark, Finland, Germany, Japan, Sweden, the 
United Kingdom, and the United States.
In Australia and Chile, the 2000–10 commodity boom did not accelerate the shift 
of output, capital, and labor shares from manufacturing into nontradables. House 
prices, however, grew more strongly in Australia, Canada, and Chile than in their 
commodity-importing peers.
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program.
copy paste picture pdf; how to copy picture from pdf
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Extract various types of image from PDF file, like XObject Image and other high quality image files from PDF document. Able to extract vector images from PDF.
how to copy a pdf image into a word document; paste picture into pdf
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
84 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
rates of expansion) seems to have been a factor behind 
the varying intensity of sectoral reallocation; countries 
with trading linkages to faster-growing countries had 
more limited Dutch disease symptoms. Decomposi-
tions of economy-wide TFP growth do not suggest 
that sectoral reallocation hindered TFP growth during 
the commodity boom of the2000s but instead point 
to a marked decline in productivity growth within sec-
tors. Understanding the mechanisms behind the drop 
in TFP growth in these economies is an important area 
for future research.39 
Conclusions
周e evidence presented in this chapter suggests 
that fluctuations in international commodity prices, 
through their impact on domestic spending, can lead 
to sizable output fluctuations in commodity export-
ers. In exporters of energy and metals, the comove-
ment between output and the commodity terms of 
trade tends to be particularly strong. It is also stronger 
in countries with lower levels of financial develop-
39Studies of this issue include Parham 2012 for Australia and 
Baldwin and others 2014 for Canada. 
–1.0
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
1990–2000
2000–10
1. Australia
–1.0
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
1990–2000
2000–10
2. Australia
Aggregate TFP growth
Contribution of within-sector effect
Contribution of between-sector effect
Within- and Between-Sector
Effects
Sectoral Contributions to
Aggregate TFP Growth
1
Extractive sector
Manufacturing
Nontradables
–0.50
–0.25
0.00
0.25
0.50
1990–2000
2000–10
3. Canada
–0.50
–0.25
0.00
0.25
0.50
1990–2000
2000–10
4. Canada
–1.6
–1.2
–0.8
–0.4
0.0
0.4
0.8
1.2
1.6
1990–2000
2000–10
5. Chile
–1.6
–1.2
–0.8
–0.4
0.0
0.4
0.8
1.2
1.6
1990–2000
2000–10
6. Chile
Figure 2.16.  Total Factor Productivity Growth 
Decompositions
(Percent)
Sources: Hofman and others 2015; Latin America KLEMS; World KLEMS; and IMF 
staff calculations.
Note: The within-sector effect captures the contribution of TFP growth within the 
subsectors (extractive, manufacturing, and nontradables). The between-sector 
effect captures the contribution of sectoral reallocation.
1
The contributions of the agriculture sector are small and not shown.
Economy-wide total factor productivity (TFP) growth slowed in Australia, Canada, 
and Chile during the 2000–10 commodity boom, with weak TFP growth in the 
extractive sector a common contributor to the economy-wide decline.
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
–15
–10
–5
0
5
10
Lagged investment-to-GDP ratio
Total factor productivity growth
Energy exporters
Metal exporters
Figure 2.17.  Investment and Total Factor Productivity Growth
(Percent)
Sources: Penn World Table 8.1; and IMF staff calculations.
Note: Sample of 18 commodity-exporting emerging market and developing 
economies. The data are Winsorized at the 1 percent level to reduce the influence 
of outliers. The correlation between the lagged investment-to-GDP ratio and total 
factor productivity growth is statistically significant at the 5 percent level.
In exporters of energy and metals, large increases in the investment-to-GDP ratio 
tend to be followed by weaker total factor productivity growth. This correlation is 
likely to partly reflect underutilized capital during the gradual buildup of large- 
scale projects in extractive industries.
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively.
how to copy pictures from a pdf file; how to copy text from pdf image to word
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
VB.NET Components to combine various scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp, etc. Append one PDF file to the end of another one in VB.NET.
how to copy and paste image from pdf to word; preview paste image into pdf
CHA PTER 2
WHERE ARE COMM ODI TY E XPORTERS H EADE D? OU TPUT GROWTH  I N THE AFT ERMATH  O F TH E COMMO DIT Y BOO M  
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
85
ment, more procyclical fiscal policies, and less flexible 
exchange rates. 
周e strong investment response to changes in the 
commodity terms of trade means that the latter affect 
not only actual output, but also potential output. As a 
result, the growth of potential output can be expected 
to decline during downswings in commodity prices. 
周e change in the cyclical component of output is, 
however, about twice the size of the change in poten-
tial output, the structural component. 
Against the backdrop of the recent declines in the 
commodity prices, the findings of this chapter suggest 
that the growth slowdown in commodity exporters 
mirrors experiences during earlier downswings. 周e 
slowdown could even be larger than those experienced 
in past episodes, since the terms-of-trade upswings 
that many exporters experienced in the first decade 
of the 2000s were much larger than earlier ones. As a 
result, they may have led to much larger increases in 
actual and potential output growth than in the past 
upswings analyzed in the chapter. If the terms-of-trade 
downswings are now also larger, the declines in growth 
would likely be correspondingly larger as well. 
周e chapter’s regression-based analysis indeed 
suggests that the recent commodity price declines, 
together with the weak commodity price outlook, 
could subtract about 1 percentage point on aver-
age from the growth rate of commodity exporters in 
2015–17 relative to2012–14. For energy exporters, 
the reduction in growth could be even larger—about 
2¼ percentage points on average. 周e projected drag 
on the growth of potential output is about ⅓ percent-
age point on average for commodity exporters and ⅔ 
percentage point on average for energy exporters. 
At the same time, many commodity exporters have 
moved toward policy frameworks and structural char-
acteristics that are more conducive to smoothing the 
macroeconomic effects of terms-of-trade fluctuations—
less procyclical fiscal policies, more flexible exchange 
rates, and deeper financial systems. 周ese changes 
could mitigate some of the growth impact of commod-
ity price downswings. 
周e analysis in the chapter suggests that policymak-
ers must avoid overestimating output gaps and the 
scope for expansionary macroeconomic policies to sup-
port demand. As commodity-exporting economies are 
likely to overheat toward the end of a prolonged surge 
in commodity prices, the growth slowdown in the 
immediate aftermath of the boom most likely reflects a 
cooling of output toward potential, which may itself be 
growing at a reduced pace, given a slowdown in invest-
ment. If indicators of slack show few signs of output 
having fallen below potential, expansionary monetary 
and fiscal policies are more likely to raise inflation than 
to sustainably raise investment and employment. 
In countries where output has fallen below poten-
tial, supportive domestic demand policies could help 
avoid a costly underutilization of resources. But two 
considerations suggest that the drop in the commod-
ity terms of trade may itself limit the scope to ease 
macroeconomic policies. First, in economies with some 
exchange rate flexibility, currency depreciation may 
have led to an easing of monetary conditions without 
a change in the stance of monetary policy; thus, any 
easing in the stance could risk further depreciation and 
unwelcome increases in inflation. In other economies, 
declining resource-based fiscal revenues may call for 
fiscal adjustment to secure debt sustainability. As also 
emphasized in Chapter 1 of the October 2015 Fiscal 
Monitor, these trade-offs highlight the need, during 
upswings, to build fiscal buffers that will help support 
the economy during downswings. 
Although the comovement of potential output 
with the commodity terms of trade tends to be less 
pronounced than that of actual output, the analysis in 
this chapter suggests that declining growth of poten-
tial output exacerbates the postboom slowdowns. 周e 
challenge for policymakers in commodity exporters, 
therefore, is to implement targeted structural reforms 
to alleviate the most binding supply-side bottlenecks 
and restore stronger growth potential.
Annex 2.1. Data Sources, Index 
Construction, and Country Groupings
Variables and Sources 
周e primary data sources for this chapter are the IMF’s 
World Economic Outlook database, Haver Analytics, 
Penn World Table 8.1, UN Comtrade International 
Trade Statistics, the United Nations Industrial Develop-
ment Organization, the World Bank’s World Development 
Indicators, the IMF’s International Financial Statistics, 
Latin America KLEMS, and World KLEMS. Sources for 
specific data series are listed in Annex Table 2.1.1.
Construction of Commodity Terms-of-Trade Indices
For each country, commodity terms-of-trade 
indices are constructed, following Gruss 2014, as a 
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Reduce image resources: Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively.
copy image from pdf to powerpoint; how to copy pdf image into word
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Combine scanned images to PDF, such as tiff, jpg, png, gif, bmp, etc. Merge Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint data to PDF form. Append one PDF file to
how to cut an image out of a pdf file; paste image into pdf in preview
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
86 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
Annex Table 2.1.1. Data Sources
Variable
Source
Cross-Country Variables
Capital Stock
Penn World Table 8.1
Commodity Export Prices
Gruss 2014; IMF, Primary Commodity Price System; U.S. Energy Information 
Administration; World Bank, Global Economic Monitor database
Commodity Export Weights
UN Comtrade; IMF, World Economic Outlook database
Conflict
Correlates of War Project, New Correlates of War Data, 1816–2007, v4.0 (2011)
Consumer Price Index
IMF, International Financial Statistics database; IMF, World Economic Outlook database
Consumption
Penn World Table 8.1; IMF, World Economic Outlook database
Credit to the Private Sector
IMF, International Financial Statistics database; IMF, World Economic Outlook database
Current Account
Penn World Table 8.1; IMF, World Economic Outlook database
EMBI Global Spread
Thomson Reuters Datastream
Employment
Penn World Table 8.1; IMF, World Economic Outlook database
Exchange Rate Classifications
Reinhart and Rogoff 2004
Government Expenditure
IMF, Fiscal Monitor database; IMF, World Economic Outlook database
House Price Index
Haver Analytics
Human Development Indicators
Barro and Lee 2010, April 2013 update; United Nations Development Programme; 
United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Statistics Division
Infant Mortality (0–1 Year) per 1,000 Live Births
United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Statistics Division, UNdata
Investment (Private and Public)
Haver Analytics; IMF, Fiscal Monitor database; Organisation for Economic Co-operation 
and Development; IMF, World Economic Outlook database
Life Expectancy
World Bank, World Development Indicators database
Manufacturing Exports
UN Comtrade
National Saving
Penn World Table 8.1; IMF, World Economic Outlook database
Net Financial Assets
External Wealth of Nations Mark II data set (Lane and Milesi-Ferretti 2007 and updates 
thereafter)
Net Financial Flows
IMF, Balance of Payments Statistics database (sum of net foreign direct investment, 
portfolio equity, and other investment flows)
Real and Nominal GDP
Penn World Table 8.1; IMF, World Economic Outlook database
Real Domestic Demand
Penn World Table 8.1; IMF, World Economic Outlook database
Real Domestic Income
Nominal gross domestic output deflated by the consumer price index, both from the 
IMF's World Economic Outlook database
Real Effective Exchange Rate (CPI Based) 
IMF, International Financial Statistics; IMF staff calculations based on the April 2010 
World Economic Outlook, Chapter 4
Regime Transition 
Polity IV Project, Political Regime Characteristics and Transitions, 1800–2013
Secondary School Attainment
Barro and Lee 2010, April 2013 update
Total Factor Productivity
Penn World Table 8.1; IMF, World Economic Outlook database; IMF staff calculations 
(Solow residual)
Trading-Partner Country Output Growth 
IMF, World Economic Outlook database
Case Studies
Capital Stock
Haver Analytics; Hofman and others 2015; Latin America KLEMS; national authorities; 
World KLEMS
Employment
Haver Analytics; Hofman and others 2015; Latin America KLEMS; national authorities; 
World KLEMS
Total Factor Productivity
Haver Analytics; Hofman and others 2015; Latin America KLEMS; national authorities; 
World KLEMS; IMF staff calculations (Solow residual)
Value Added
Haver Analytics; Hofman and others 2015; Latin America KLEMS; national authorities; 
World KLEMS
Source: IMF staff compilation.
Note: CPI = consumer price index; EMBI = J.P. Morgan Emerging Markets Bond Index.
CHA PTER 2
WHERE ARE COMM ODI TY E XPORTERS H EADE D? OU TPUT GROWTH  I N THE AFT ERMATH  O F TH E COMMO DIT Y BOO M  
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
87
trade-weighted average of the prices of imported and 
exported commodities. 周e annual change in country 
i’s terms-of-trade index (CTOT ) in year t is given by
∆logCTOT
i,t
= ∑J
j=1
∆log P
j,t
τ
i,j,t
,
in which P
j,t
is the relative price of commodity j at 
time t (in U.S. dollars and divided by the IMF’s unit 
value index for manufactured exports) and ∆ denotes 
the first difference. Country i’s weights for each com-
modity price, τ
i,j,t
, are given by
x
i,j,t–1
– m
i,j,t–1
τ
i,j,t
= —————————–,
J
j=1
x
i,j,t–1
+ ∑J
j=1
m
i,j,t–1
in which x
i,j,t–1
(m
i,j,t–1
) denote the average export 
(import) value of commodity j by country i between 
t – 1 and t – 5 (in U.S. dollars). 周is average value 
of net exports is divided by total commodity trade 
(exports plus imports of all commodities). 
周e commodity price series start in 1960. Prices 
of 41 commodities are used, sorted into four broad 
categories:
1.  Energy: coal, crude oil, and natural gas
2.  Metals: aluminum, copper, iron ore, lead, nickel, 
tin, and zinc
3.  Food: bananas, barley, beef, cocoa, coconut oil, 
coffee, corn, fish, fish meal, groundnuts, lamb, 
oranges, palm oil, poultry, rice, shrimp, soybean 
meal, soybean oil, soybeans, sugar, sunflower oil, 
tea, and wheat
4.  Raw materials: cotton, hardwood logs and sawn 
wood, hides, rubber, softwood logs and sawn wood, 
soybean meal, and wool
周e price of crude oil is the simple average of three 
spot prices: Dated Brent, West Texas Intermediate, 
and Dubai Fateh. 周e World Bank’s Global Eco-
nomic Monitor database has been used to extend 
the price series of barley, iron ore, and natural gas 
from the IMF’s Primary Commodity Price System 
back to 1960. 周e price of coal is the Australian 
coal price, extended back to 1960 using the World 
Bank’s Global Economic Monitor database and U.S. 
coal price data from the U.S. Energy Information 
Administration.
Forecasts of the country-specific commodity terms 
of trade are constructed in the same manner, using the 
prices of commodities futures for the 41 commodities, 
where available, through 2020.
Commodity-Exporting Country Groupings 
A country is classified as a commodity exporter if it 
meets the following two conditions:
• Commodities constituted at least 35 percent of the 
country’s total exports, on average, between 1962 
and 2014.
• Net commodity exports accounted for at least 5 
percent of its gross trade (exports plus imports), on 
average, between 1962 and 2014.
Among emerging market and developing economies, 
52 satisfy these criteria, 20 of which are low-income 
developing countries (according to the classification in 
the World Economic Outlook’s Statistical Appendix). For 
a list of the 52 economies and their shares of commod-
ity exports, see Annex Table 2.1.2.
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
88 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
Annex 2.2. Methodology for Dating 
Commodity Price Cycles 
Cycles in country-specific commodity terms-of-
trade indices are identified using the Bry-Boschan 
Quarterly algorithm, which is standard in the busi-
ness cycle literature (Harding and Pagan 2002). 周e 
algorithm as used here differs from the standard 
version in two ways: (1) it is applied to a smoothed 
(five-year centered moving-average) version of the 
price index because the underlying series are choppy, 
making it difficult for standard algorithms to identify 
meaningful cycles, and (2) it allows for asymmetry 
between upswings and downswings, as the focus here 
is on cycles in which the upswing was at least five 
years long, even if the subsequent downswing was 
sudden. 
周e algorithm identifies 115 cycles since 1960 
(78 with peaks before 2000 and 37 with peaks after 
2000). 周ere are approximately two cycles a country. 
Upswings are slightly longer than downswings, with a 
mean (median) of seven (six) years for upswings and 
six (five) years for downswings (Annex Figure 2.2.1, 
panel 1). 周e duration of phases and the amplitude of 
price movements are correlated (Annex Figure 2.2.1, 
panels 3 and 4). Most peaks were in the 1980s and the 
most recent years, particularly for extractive commodi-
ties (Annex Figure 2.2.1, panel 2). 
Upswings are defined trough to peak (excluding the 
trough year, but including the peak year); downswings 
are defined peak to trough (excluding the peak year, 
but including the trough year).
Annex 2.3. Stylized Facts and Event Studies 
周e event studies presented in the chapter use the 
following definitions:
Annex Table 2.1.2. Commodity-Exporting Emerging Market and Developing Economies 
Commodity Exports (percent of total exports)
Net Commodity Exports 
(percent of total 
exports-plus-imports)
Total 
Commodities
Extractive
Nonextractive
Energy
Metals
Food
Raw Materials
Emerging Markets
Algeria
89.2
87.9
0.7
0.5
0.2
37.6
Angola
81.1
47.8
5.5
26.2
3.2
34.6
Argentina
49.8
5.7
1.5
30.0
12.7
20.1
Azerbaijan
76.7
73.2
0.7
0.8
1.9
35.9
Bahrain
60.4
35.5
24.1
0.7
0.1
12.4
Brazil
45.3
3.3
9.5
23.5
8.9
8.3
Brunei Darussalam
90.0
89.9
0.0
0.1
0.0
55.5
Chile
61.2
0.8
48.0
7.0
5.5
20.9
Colombia
58.5
21.7
0.3
34.7
1.9
20.8
Costa Rica
36.2
0.4
0.4
34.9
0.5
8.4
Ecuador
79.0
40.1
0.2
38.8
0.7
32.6
Gabon
78.4
66.3
1.2
0.5
10.8
44.4
Guatemala
45.4
2.4
0.3
36.6
6.1
8.1
Guyana
66.3
0.0
21.5
41.9
2.9
14.4
Indonesia
64.4
40.8
5.0
8.5
10.1
24.9
Iran
81.5
78.9
0.6
0.4
1.6
41.4
Kazakhstan
70.5
53.3
11.7
4.3
1.3
35.5
Kuwait
72.2
71.7
0.1
0.4
0.1
42.4
Libya
96.8
96.7
0.0
0.1
0.0
58.2
Malaysia
45.0
12.7
6.3
8.2
17.8
15.3
Oman
79.8
77.8
1.4
1.0
0.0
42.3
Paraguay
65.4
0.2
0.4
36.6
28.5
12.4
Peru
60.6
7.4
32.8
18.0
2.3
17.5
Qatar
82.5
82.4
0.0
0.1
0.0
49.2
Russia
60.5
50.3
6.6
1.0
2.5
34.0
Saudi Arabia
85.8
85.5
0.1
0.1
0.1
47.3
Syria
54.3
45.8
0.1
2.7
6.2
8.2
Trinidad and Tobago
64.2
60.9
1.2
2.0
0.2
19.8
Turkmenistan
58.9
45.5
0.4
0.2
12.8
19.7
United Arab Emirates
49.6
36.8
13.4
2.4
0.1
12.6
Uruguay
37.0
0.6
0.2
22.5
13.7
5.5
Venezuela
87.1
82.1
4.1
0.8
0.1
46.6
CHA PTER 2
WHERE ARE COMM ODI TY E XPORTERS H EADE D? OU TPUT GROWTH  I N THE AFT ERMATH  O F TH E COMMO DIT Y BOO M  
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
89
• Growth rates: Average growth rates over upswings 
(downswings) are computed by first averaging for a 
given country over all upswing (downswing) years, 
then taking simple averages of these across countries. 
Samples are fully balanced, that is, they include the 
same country cycles for upswings and downswings.
• Exchange rate regimes: Exchange rate regimes are 
categorized as fixed or flexible according to the clas-
sification set out by Reinhart and Rogoff (2004). 
Regimes of countries in their coarse categories 1 and 
2 are classified as fixed, and those in their coarse cat-
egories 3 and 4 are categorized as flexible. Countries 
in categories 1 and 2 have no separate legal tender 
or variously use currency boards, pegs, horizontal 
bands, crawling pegs, and narrow crawling bands. 
Countries in categories 3 and 4 variously have 
wider crawling bands, moving bands, and managed 
floating or freely floating arrangements. As very few 
countries maintain the same regime over an entire 
cycle, the exchange rate regime in the peak year is 
used to classify the cycle. The sample includes 34 
cycles with fixed exchange rates but only 8 cycles 
with flexible exchange rates. Regimes classified as 
free-falling are dropped.
• Type of fiscal policy: Cycles are classified as being 
subject to either a high or low degree of fiscal policy 
procyclicality. The classification depends on whether 
the correlation between real spending growth and 
the change in the smoothed commodity terms-of-
trade series is above or below the median for the 
overall sample during the cycle. 
• Cycles and credit ratio: Cycles are classified as having 
a high (low) ratio of credit to GDP depending on 
whether average domestic credit to the private sec-
tor as a share of GDP during the upswing is above 
(below) the sample median.
Annex Table 2.1.2. Commodity-Exporting Emerging Market and Developing Economies (continued)
Commodity Exports (percent of total exports)
Net Commodity Exports 
(percent of total 
exports-plus-imports)
Total 
Commodities
Extractive
Nonextractive
Energy
Metals
Food
Raw Materials
Low-Income Developing Countries
Bolivia
65.9
25.3
27.7
6.0
6.8
28.4
Cameroon
71.3
16.1
6.6
34.7
13.9
22.6
Chad
91.6
4.5
0.0
15.6
71.5
8.6
Republic of Congo
61.3
52.6
0.2
1.8
6.7
30.6
Côte d'Ivoire
70.9
11.9
0.2
44.7
14.0
26.7
Ghana
66.0
5.4
7.0
50.2
3.3
12.3
Guinea
67.3
0.5
61.4
3.9
1.5
9.3
Honduras
66.6
1.3
2.8
60.0
2.5
14.1
Mauritania
75.9
9.2
47.2
23.8
0.0
12.2
Mongolia
59.2
4.6
35.6
1.9
17.2
12.4
Mozambique
46.1
4.7
26.7
10.9
3.9
5.1
Myanmar
52.8
36.1
0.7
6.1
9.8
24.4
Nicaragua
55.9
0.6
0.5
42.7
12.2
7.2
Niger
65.8
2.1
38.0
23.2
2.5
10.2
Nigeria
88.4
79.5
0.7
6.2
2.0
46.8
Papua New Guinea
58.0
6.7
24.5
20.7
6.1
15.7
Sudan
69.4
56.5
0.3
11.8
9.8
11.3
Tajikistan
63.4
0.0
51.6
0.2
11.6
21.5
Yemen
82.5
79.6
0.2
2.4
0.4
20.8
Zambia
77.0
0.4
72.4
2.7
1.6
30.4
Memorandum
Number of Economies
52
52
52
52
52
52
Maximum
96.8
96.7
72.4
60.0
71.5
58.2
Mean
67.1
34.6
11.6
14.5
6.7
24.2
Median
65.9
30.4
1.3
6.2
2.7
20.8
Standard Deviation
14.5
32.6
18.2
16.5
11.0
14.5
Sources: UN Comtrade; and IMF staff calculations.
Note: Countries listed are those for which gross commodity exports as a share of total exports were greater than 35 percent and net commodity exports as a share of 
total trade (exports plus imports) were greater than 5 percent, on average, between 1962 and 2014. Commodity intensities are determined using a breakdown of the first 
criterion into the four main commodity categories: energy, food, metals, and raw materials.
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
90 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
Among the commodity-exporting countries, emerging 
market economies can be differentiated from low-
income developing countries along four key dimensions: 
commodity intensity, exchange rate regime, credit ratio, 
and fiscal procyclicality (Annex Figure 2.3.1). Emerg-
ing markets tend to have a greater degree of commodity 
intensity (GDP share of gross commodity exports). A 
greater share of low-income developing countries oper-
ate fixed exchange rates. Emerging markets tend to have 
greater financial depth, as captured by higher credit-to-
GDP ratios. And emerging markets tend to have a more 
procyclical fiscal stance.
周e comovement between the commodity terms-
of-trade cycle and investment (and hence capital) is 
particularly marked in extractive commodity exporters 
(Annex Figure 2.3.2, panels 1 and 2), in line with the 
longer, more pronounced cycles in their terms of trade.  
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
350
400
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
Trough-to-peak increase in
commodity price index (percent)
Duration of upswings (years)
–20
–10
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17 18
1. Frequency of Upswings and Downswings of Given Durations
(Percent; years on x-axis)
Upswings
Downswings
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
1960
65
70
75
80
85
90
95 2000 05
10 14
2. Number of Peaks in Each Year, by Commodity Type
–100
–80
–60
–40
–20
0
20
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
Peak-to-trough decrease in
commodity price index (percent)
Duration of downswings (years)
Energy
Food
Metals
Raw materials
3. Price Increases by Duration of Upswing
4. Price Decreases by Duration of Downswing
Annex Figure 2.2.1. Characteristics, Amplitudes, and 
Durations of Cycles
Sources: Gruss 2014; IMF, Primary Commodity Price System; U.S. Energy 
Information Administration; World Bank, Global Economic Monitor database; and 
IMF staff calculations.
Note: The cycles shown are for the country-specific commodity terms-of-trade 
indices. See Annexes 2.1 and 2.2 for the data definitions and cycle-dating 
methodology.
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
EMs
LIDCs
EMs
LIDCs
EMs
LIDCs
EMs
LIDCs
Fixed exchange
rate regime2
Credit-to-GDP
ratio3
Fiscal
procyclicality4
Commodity
intensity1
Annex Figure 2.3.1. Commodity Intensity, Policy Frameworks, 
and Financial Depth: Commodity-Exporting Emerging Markets 
versus Low-Income Developing Countries
(Percent)
Sources: IMF, Fiscal Monitor database; IMF, International Financial Statistics 
database; World Bank, World Development Indicators; and IMF staff calculations.
Note: Figures are the averages of data for all available years across all commodity 
exporters within each group. EM = emerging market; LIDC = low-income 
developing country.
1Average of commodity exports as a share of GDP.
2Share of commodity-exporting emerging markets and low-income developing 
countries with a fixed exchange rate regime as defined in Annex 2.3.
3Average of bank credit to the private sector as a share of GDP.
4Determined by whether the correlation between real spending growth and the 
change in the smoothed commodity terms of trade is greater or less than the 
sample median.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested