pdf viewer library c# : How to copy pictures from pdf in control application utility azure web page windows visual studio text11-part1764

CHA PTER 2
WHERE ARE COMM ODI TY E XPORTERS H EADE D? OU TPUT GROWTH  I N THE AFT ERMATH  O F TH E COMMO DIT Y BOO M  
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
91
As extractive commodity exporters represent almost 
three-fourths of the emerging market economies in 
the sample, but less than half of low-income develop-
ing countries, differences across commodity types thus 
also translate into distinctions across country groups 
(Annex Figure 2.3.2, panels 3 and 4). GDP, spending, 
and production factors as well as trend GDP are less 
procyclical (or even countercyclical) in low-income 
developing countries.
Annex 2.4. Local Projection Method
Methodology and Data
周e estimations of baseline impulse responses 
presented in the chapter follow the local projection 
method proposed by Jordà (2005) and developed 
further by Teulings and Zubanov (2014). 周is method 
provides a flexible alternative to traditional vector 
autoregression techniques and is robust to misspecifica-
tion of the data-generating process. Local projections 
use separate horizon-specific regressions of the variable 
of interest (for example, output, investment, capital) 
on the shock variable and a series of control variables. 
周e sequence of coefficient estimates for the various 
horizons provides a nonparametric estimate of the 
impulse response function.
周e estimated baseline specification is as follows:
y
i,t+h
– y
i,t–1
= α
i
h + g
t
h + b
1
h ∆s
i,t
+ ∑p
j=1
b
2
h ∆s
i,t–j
+ ∑
j
h–
=
1
1
b
3
h ∆s
i,t+h–j
+ ∑p
j=1
θ
1
h ∆y
i,t–j
+ ∑p
j=0
θ
2
h x
i,t–j
+ ∑
j=
h–
1
1 θ
3
h x
i,t+h–j
+ εh
i,t
,
in which the i subscripts index countries; the t sub-
scripts index years; the h superscripts index the hori-
zon of the projection after time t; p is the number of 
lags for each variable; y
i,t
is the natural logarithm of 
the variable of interest (for example, output); and s
i,t
is the natural logarithm of the commodity terms of 
trade, the shock variable of interest. 周e equation also 
includes controls for additional factors, x
i,t
, such as 
the trade-weighted output growth of trading part-
ners, political regime transition, and conflict in the 
domestic economy. Regressions include country fixed 
effects, α
i
h, and time fixed effects, g
t
h.
A balanced panel for the period 1960–2007 is used 
for the baseline regression (Annex Table 2.4.1). 周e 
period of the global financial crisis and its aftermath is 
thus omitted. However, because of differences in data 
availability, the number of economies included differs 
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
Capital
Employment
TFP
Trend GDP
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
GDP
Consumption
Private
investment
Public
investment
EMs (means)
LIDCs (means)
EMs (medians)
LIDCs (medians)
Emerging Markets and Low-Income Developing Countries
Extractive and Nonextractive Commodity Exporters
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
GDP
Consumption
Private
investment
Public
investment
–1.0
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
Capital
Employment
TFP
Trend GDP
Extractive (means)
Nonextractive (means)
Extractive (medians)
Nonextractive (medians)
3. Expenditure Side
4. Production Side
1. Expenditure Side
2. Production Side
Annex Figure 2.3.2.  Average Differences in Real Growth 
Rates between Upswings and Downswings
(Percentage points)
Sources: IMF, Fiscal Monitor database; Penn World Table 8.1; and IMF staff 
calculations.
Note: The bars show the average differences between growth rates during 
upswings and downswings. EM = emerging market; LIDC = low-income 
developing country; TFP = total factor productivity. 
How to copy pictures from pdf in - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
copy a picture from pdf to word; how to copy images from pdf file
How to copy pictures from pdf in - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
paste image into pdf preview; how to cut pdf image
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
92 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
by variable. For example, for real GDP, the sample 
spans 32 commodity-exporting emerging market and 
developing economies (Annex Table 2.4.2). However, 
the results are robust to the minimum sample of 
economies available for total factor productivity.
Robustness Tests
周e chapter’s baseline regression analysis focuses on 
the macroeconomic impact of terms-of-trade shocks 
and thus excludes economies for which data are not 
available until the 1970s. Repeating the analysis using 
data starting a decade later, in 1970, brings in 13 
additional commodity exporters, including the oil 
exporters of the Gulf region (Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, 
Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates). 周e findings 
are broadly robust to the addition of these econo-
mies. Furthermore, starting the estimation from 1980 
(thereby omitting the 1970s oil shocks) marginally 
boosts the GDP response in the outer years.
In addition, investment and consumption respond 
more strongly and with greater persistence to shocks 
that occur during a persistent commodity terms-of-trade 
cycle than to other shocks. 周is is consistent with the 
idea that successive commodity terms-of-trade gains 
can generate perceptions of a more persistent income 
windfall and therefore boost the incentive to invest (and 
consume), which in turn supports aggregate activity.
Annex Table 2.4.1. Sample of Commodity Exporters Used in the Local Projection Method Estimations, 
1960–2007
Emerging Markets
Low-Income Developing Countries
Argentina
Iran
Bolivia
Mongolia
Brazil
Libya
Cameroon
Mozambique
Chile
Malaysia
Chad
Niger
Colombia
Paraguay
Republic of Congo 
Nigeria
Costa Rica
Peru
Côte d'Ivoire
Zambia
Ecuador
Syria
Ghana
Gabon
Trinidad and Tobago
Guinea
Guatemala
Uruguay
Honduras
Indonesia
Venezuela
Mauritania
Sources: IMF, Fiscal Monitor database; Penn World Table 8.1; and IMF staff calculations.
Annex Table 2.4.2. Country Coverage for Key Macroeconomic Variables in the Local 
Projection Method Estimations
Variable
Commodity Exporters
Emerging Markets
Low-Income Developing 
Countries
Total
Real GDP
18
14
32
Real Consumption
16
14
30
Real Total Fixed Investment
17
16
33
Real Capital Stock
16
14
30
Employment
14
9
23
Real Total Factor Productivity
14
5
19
Sources: IMF, Fiscal Monitor database; Penn World Table 8.1; and IMF staff calculations.
Note: The sample length for all variables is 1960–2007.
VB Imaging - VB Code 93 Generator Tutorial
pictures on PDF documents, multi-page TIFF, Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Please create a Windows application or ASP.NET web form and copy the
how to copy and paste a pdf image; how to cut picture from pdf file
C# Imaging - C# Code 93 Generator Tutorial
pictures on PDF documents, multi-page TIFF, Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Please create a Windows application or ASP.NET web form and copy the
paste jpg into pdf preview; how to copy pdf image
CHA PTER 2
WHERE ARE COMM ODI TY E XPORTERS H EADE D? OU TPUT GROWTH  I N THE AFT ERMATH  O F TH E COMMO DIT Y BOO M  
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
93
In the “Dutch disease” phenomenon, a boom in 
the commodity-producing sector of an economy puts 
downward pressure on the output of the (noncom-
modity) tradable goods sector—essentially manufac-
turing. An extensive theoretical literature, starting with 
Corden 1981 and Corden and Neary 1982, examines 
the patterns and optimality of factor reallocation 
between sectors following booms in commodity pro-
duction (linked to the discovery of natural resources). 
周e models presented in these studies predict that an 
improvement in the commodity terms of trade and 
the subsequent spending of the income windfall in 
the domestic economy will drive up the real exchange 
rate and divert capital and labor from manufacturing 
toward the commodity and nontradables sectors.1
Despite some evidence of a positive association 
between the terms of trade and the real exchange 
rate of commodity exporters, empirical research on 
whether commodity booms hinder manufacturing 
performance has been mixed, even among studies that 
focus on the same countries or similar episodes:2 
•  No Dutch disease effects found: Studies of the 1970s 
oil price boom, such as Gelb and Associates 1988 
and Spatafora and Warner 1995, estimate that 
higher oil prices led to real exchange rate apprecia-
tions but had no adverse effect on manufacturing 
output in oil-exporting economies. Sala-i-Martin 
and Subramanian (2003) find both the real 
exchange rate and manufacturing activity to be 
insensitive to oil price movements in Nigeria, an oil 
exporter. Bjørnland (1998) argues that evidence of 
Dutch disease following the United Kingdom’s oil 
boom is weak and that manufacturing output in 
Norway actually benefited from oil discoveries and 
higher oil prices.
周e authors of this box are Aqib Aslam and Zsóka Kóczán.
1周ere are two effects at work: a “resource movement” effect, 
in which the favorable price shock in the commodity sector 
draws factors of production out of other activities, and a “spend-
ing effect,” which draws factors of production out of tradables 
(to be substituted with imports) into the nontradables sector.
2For instance, Chen and Rogoff (2003) show that the curren-
cies of three advanced economy commodity exporters—Australia, 
Canada, and New Zealand—have comoved strongly with their 
terms of trade. Cashin, Céspedes, and Sahay (2004) find a long-
run relationship between the real exchange rates and commod-
ity terms-of-trade indices in about one-third of a sample of 58 
commodity exporters. Arezki and Ismail(2013) argue that delays 
in the response of nontradables-intensive government spending 
to declines in commodity prices could weaken the empirical cor-
relation between the latter and the real exchange rate.
•  Support for Dutch disease effects: Studies that have 
found support for Dutch disease effects are more 
recent. Ismail(2010) uses disaggregated data for 
manufacturing subsectors for a sample of oil exporters 
for the 1977–2004 period and shows that manufac-
turing output was negatively associated with the oil 
price, especially in subsectors with a relatively higher 
degree of labor intensity in production. Harding and 
Venables(2013) use balance of payments data for a 
broad sample of commodity exporters for 1970–2006 
and find that an increase of $1 in commodity exports 
tends to be accompanied by a fall of about 75 cents 
in noncommodity exports and an increase of almost 
25cents in noncommodity imports. 
Some indirect evidence of the Dutch disease effect 
can be gleaned by looking at the evolution of country 
shares in global manufacturing exports, which tend 
to be lower on average for commodity exporters than 
for other emerging market and developing economies. 
Although both groups have increased their market 
shares over time (relative to advanced economies), 
commodity exporters have seen a smaller increase in 
their global manufacturing export shares than the 
others, and the gap between the average market shares 
of the two groups has widened since the early 1990s 
(Figure2.1.1, panel 1). 
Formal tests of whether terms-of-trade booms 
hurt manufacturing export performance yield varied 
results, however. 周e real exchange rate appreciates 
gradually following an increase in the commodity 
terms of trade (with the increase becoming statistically 
significant only after the fifth year), but the impact 
on manufacturing exports is not significant, which 
points to a wide range of experiences across episodes 
(Figure2.1.1, panels 2 and 3). 
Numerous explanations have been offered for the 
absence of major Dutch disease symptoms follow-
ing commodity terms-of-trade booms. 周ese include 
policy-induced production restraints in the oil sector 
(especially in the 1970s), the “enclave nature” of 
the commodity sector (that is, its limited participa-
tion in domestic factor markets), limited spending of 
the windfall on nontradables (with a ramping up of 
imports instead), and government protection of the 
manufacturing sector.3 
A further explanation could be linked to the pickup 
in global economic activity that, in some episodes, 
3See Ismail2010, Sala-i-Martin and Subramanian 2003, and 
Spatafora and Warner 1995. 
Box 2.1. The Not-So-Sick Patient: Commodity Booms and the Dutch Disease Phenomenon
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
application. In addition, texts, pictures and font formatting of source PDF file are accurately retained in converted Word document file.
copy image from pdf; copy image from pdf to pdf
C#: Use OCR SDK Library to Get Image and Document Text
color image recognition for scanned documents and pictures in C#. text content from whole PDF file, single PDF page and You can directly copy demos to your .NET
how to cut a picture out of a pdf; how to copy and paste an image from a pdf
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
94 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
could be contributing to the booms in world com-
modity prices. Stronger global activity could lead to 
stronger foreign demand for manufactured goods in all 
countries, commodity exporters included, and provide 
some offset to the loss of competitiveness associated 
with an appreciating real exchange rate. 周is explana-
tion seems consistent with the varying findings in the 
empirical literature. Dutch disease symptoms appear 
to be stronger in studies that examine the performance 
of the manufacturing sector over longer time periods, 
which would include episodes of resource discoveries 
and consequent increases in commodity production 
volumes. Such country-specific episodes would not 
necessarily be expected to coincide with episodes of 
strong growth in global demand. 
A question that has received much attention 
among policymakers is whether commodity boom 
effects on the manufacturing sector weigh on longer-
term growth. In principle, commodity booms could 
compromise the longer-term outlook for the economy 
if they weaken features of the manufacturing sector 
that support longer-term growth—such as increas-
ing returns to scale, learning by doing, and positive 
technological externalities.4
However, the evidence 
is inconclusive.5 One explanation for the lack of an 
apparent correlation between Dutch disease symptoms 
and longer-term growth could be that learning-by-
doing externalities are not necessarily exclusive to man-
ufacturing; the commodity sectors could also benefit 
from that effect (Frankel 2012). Another explanation 
proposes that a manufacturing sector that contracts 
and shifts toward greater capital intensity as a result of 
a commodity boom—and that, in turn, uses higher-
skilled labor—may generate more positive externalities 
for the economy than a larger manufacturing sector 
using low-skilled labor (Ismail 2010).
4周eoretical models that incorporate learning-by-doing 
externalities in the manufacturing sector include Matsuyama 
1992, van Wijnbergen 1984a, Krugman 1987, and Benigno 
and Fornaro 2014. Rodrik (2015) also argues that premature 
deindustrialization can reduce the economic growth potential of 
developing economies by stifling the formal manufacturing sec-
tor, which tends to be the most technologically dynamic sector.
5A comprehensive survey of the literature on this topic is in 
Magud and Sosa2013. Rodrik (2008) analyzes the effect of the 
real exchange rate on economic growth and the channels through 
which this link operates; he concludes that episodes of undervalua-
tion are associated with more rapid economic growth. Eichengreen 
(2008), however, notes that the evidence of a positive growth effect 
from a competitive real exchange rate is not overwhelming.
Box 2.1 (continued)
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.5
0.6
0.7
0.8
0
2
4
6
8
10
1975
80
85
90
95
2000
05
08
1. Average Market Share in Global
Manufacturing Exports, 1975–2008
(Percent, five-year moving average)
–1
0
1
2
4
5
6
7
8
–1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
2. Response of Real Effective Exchange Rate
to a Commodity Terms-of-Trade Shock
(Percentage points)
3. Response of Manufacturing Exports to a
Commodity Terms-of-Trade Shock
(Percentage points)
Commodity-exporting EMDEs
Other EMDEs
Advanced economies (right scale)
Figure 2.1.1. Manufacturing Export 
Performance
Sources: UN Comtrade; United Nations Industrial 
Development Organization; and IMF staff estimates.
Note: Impulse responses are estimated using the local 
projection method; t = 0 is year of the shock; solid lines 
denote response of variables to a 10 percentage point 
increase in the shock variable; dashed lines denote 90 
percent confidence bands. For panel 2, sample of 27 
commodity-exporting emerging market and developing 
economies (EMDEs) from 1970 through 2007. For panel 3, 
sample of 45 commodity-exporting EMDEs from 1970 
through 2007. See Annexes 2.1 and 2.4 for data definitions 
and estimation methodology.
–3
–2
–1
0
1
2
3
4
5
–1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Codes to Load Images from File / Stream in .
Now you can freely copy the VB.NET sample this VB.NET imaging library with pictures of your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
cut image from pdf online; how to copy image from pdf file
C# Imaging - C# MSI Plessey Barcode Tutorial
Create high-quality MSI Plessey bar code pictures for almost Copy C#.NET code below to print an MSI a document file, like Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF and TIFF
copy image from pdf to word; how to copy a picture from a pdf to a word document
CHA PTER 2
WHERE ARE COMM ODI TY E XPORTERS H EADE D? OU TPUT GROWTH  I N THE AFT ERMATH  O F TH E COMMO DIT Y BOO M  
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
95
A commodity resource windfall can support 
economic development in low-income developing 
countries where potential returns to public investment 
are high and access to international and domestic 
credit markets is limited. When managed well, invest-
ments in productivity-enhancing public capital, such 
as infrastructure, can help raise output and living 
standards over the long term (Collier and others2010; 
IMF2012, 2015).1
A model calibrated to a low-income developing 
country is presented here to illustrate how a com-
modity windfall can raise public investment and 
boost income levels over the long term if capital is 
scarce and credit is constrained.2 周e model captures 
the key trade-offs in public investment decisions.3 In 
particular, public investment in low-income devel-
oping countries has the potential for high returns 
but exhibits low levels of efficiency.4 周e long-term 
effects of the boom on the growth of output depend 
on the rate of return of public capital (relative to the 
cost of funding), the efficiency of public investment, 
and the response of private investment to the increase 
in public capital.
周e analysis examines the behavior of nonresource 
GDP in two scenarios—“no scaling up” (the base-
周e authors of this box are Rudolfs Bems and Bin Grace Li.
1For example, public investment can help close infrastructure 
gaps, which are an important impediment to trade integration 
and total factor productivity catch-up (see Chapter 3 of the April 
2015 Regional Economic Outlook: Sub-Saharan Africa).
2Berg and others (forthcoming) find that low levels of effi-
ciency may be correlated with high rates of return because the 
low efficiency implies very scarce public capital. In this situation, 
the rate of return to investment spending may not depend on 
the level of efficiency. Increasing efficiency would nonetheless 
increase the return to public investment spending. 
3周e model extends the work of Berg and others (2013) and 
Melina, Yang, and Zanna (2014). A detailed presentation of the 
model calibration is provided by Gupta, Li, and Yu (2015). 周e 
modeled economy features the same structure as the commodity 
exporter in the IMF’s Global Economy Model (GEM) used in 
the chapter, including three sectors: tradables, nontradables, and 
commodities. However, it excludes some of the real and nominal 
frictions featured in the GEM, which makes it more suitable 
for studying long-term effects rather than fluctuations over the 
commodity cycle. 周e calibration of the model pays particular 
attention to the lower levels of public investment efficiency and 
limited absorptive capacity in low-income countries.
4Albino-War and others 2014 and IMF 2015 discuss the defi-
nition and measurement of public investment efficiency. 周ese 
papers also highlight possible reforms that could help make 
public investments more efficient, such as steps to strengthen 
project appraisal, selection, and budget planning.
line) and “invest as you go”—both of which feature 
a20percent increase in commodity prices followed by 
a 15percent drop after year 10 (consistent with the 
scenario discussed in the chapter) (Figure2.2.1):
•  No scaling up: In the baseline case, the public invest-
ment ratio stays constant at 6percent of GDP.
•  Invest as you go: In the alternative scenario, all 
royalties from the commodity boom are spent on 
public investment, whose share of GDP increases 
1 percentage point, to 7percent, during the boom 
(the initial 10 years) and subsequently falls in 
tandem with the commodity price. Nevertheless, 
it stays elevated in the long term in line with the 
permanent gain in the commodity price.
Box 2.2. Commodity Booms and Public Investment
0
5
10
15
20
25
10
20
30
40
50
5.8
6.2
6.6
7.0
7.4
7.8
10
20
30
40
50
2. Public
Investment
(Percent of GDP)
1. Commodity
Price Index
No scaling up
Invest as you go
58
60
62
64
66
68
70
10
20
30
40
50
0.0
0.4
0.8
1.2
1.6
2.0
2.4
10
20
30
40
50
4. Nonresource
GDP
3. Public
Investment
Efficiency
(Percent)
Figure 2.2.1.  Long-Term Effects of Heightened 
Public Investment during Commodity Booms
(Percent deviation, unless noted otherwise; years on 
x-axis)
Source: IMF staff calculations.
Note: “Public investment efficiency” refers to the share of 
investment that ends up embedded in the capital stock.
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Create Watermark on Images in .NET
and whether to burn it to the pictures to make Please feel free to copy them to your program provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
copy and paste image into pdf; how to copy pictures from a pdf to word
C# Imaging - Scan RM4SCC Barcode in C#.NET
easily detect & decode RM4SCC barcode from scanned documents and pictures in your Decode RM4SCC from documents (PDF, Word, Excel and PPT) and extract barcode
how to copy pdf image to word; paste image into pdf
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
96 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
As in the model simulation shown in the chapter’s 
second section, nonresource GDP increases by 0.5per-
cent over the long term if the government maintains 
an unchanged investment ratio. Under invest as you 
go, the additional public investment increases long-
term nonresource output by about 2percent because 
of the direct impact of a higher stock of public capital 
and the crowding-in of private investment.5 周e 
magnitude of this positive impact on output is broadly 
consistent with the empirical findings for developing 
economies in Chapter 3 of the October2014 World 
Economic Outlook.
周e gains from higher public investment in low-
income developing countries depend crucially on 
efficiency levels, which vary across the two scenarios 
5While the increase in the long-term output under this 
alternative scenario might appear small, it should be considered 
against the relatively small size of the increase in public invest-
ment (1 percent of GDP at the peak). In comparison, Chapter 
3 of the October 2014 World Economic Outlook finds that in a 
typical public investment boom, the increase is about 7 percent-
age points of GDP. However, a large scaling up of public invest-
ment may also result in the implementation of inframarginal 
projects, lowering its impact (see Warner 2014).
(Figure 2.2.1). In the baseline case, 35percent of 
public investment is lost. In the alternative scenario, 
the ramping up of public investment reduces the 
efficiency level by about 6percentage points—about 
41 percent is lost. 周e decline in efficiency in the 
scenario highlights the trade-off between the need for 
public investment and investment efficiency, with the 
latter calibrated to match levels reported in empirical 
studies.6
In sum, a ramping up of public investment in 
response to a commodity boom can bring long-term 
benefits to commodity exporters. But considering 
the limited absorptive capacity of many developing 
economies, a more gradual investment profile can yield 
higher efficiency levels and lead to more favorable 
long-term outcomes. 周e more gradual pace can also 
curb the demand pressures during the boom phase of 
the commodity cycle.
6周ese levels are consistent with the cost overruns in low-
income developing countries in Africa, as reported by develop-
ment agencies (see Foster and Briceño-Garmendia 2010). Gupta 
and others (2014) document the decrease in public investment 
efficiency during the 2000–08 boom. 
Box 2.2 (continued)
C# Imaging - Scan ISBN Barcode in C#.NET
which can be used to track images, pictures and documents BarcodeType.ISBN); // read barcode from PDF page Barcode from PowerPoint slide, you can copy demo code
how to copy pdf image into word; how to copy a picture from a pdf file
VB.NET Image: Easy to Create Ellipse Annotation with VB.NET
ellipse annotation to document files, like PDF & Word ellipse annotation on documents, images & pictures using VB in Visual Studio, you can copy the following
how to copy pdf image to jpg; how to copy pdf image into powerpoint
CHA PTER 2
WHERE ARE COMM ODI TY E XPORTERS H EADE D? OU TPUT GROWTH  I N THE AFT ERMATH  O F TH E COMMO DIT Y BOO M  
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
97
Improvements in education and health help a coun-
try increase its economic potential over time by build-
ing larger and more-skilled pools of human capital. 
Increasing their investments in human development 
is therefore one way in which commodity-exporting 
emerging market and developing economies can use 
commodity windfall gains to boost their longer-term 
living standards. 周e following discussion considers 
whether commodity exporters have had an advantage 
in boosting human development.1
Does Being a Commodity Exporter Matter for 
Human Development?
To set the stage, it is useful to investigate whether 
being a commodity exporter matters for the level and 
pace of improvement in human development. Examina-
tion of the average levels of key human development 
indicators over the past five decades reveals no clear 
pattern across exporters and others (Figure2.3.1).2 For 
instance, in terms of educational attainment at the sec-
ondary school level, commodity-exporting low-income 
developing countries have on average had better out-
comes than noncommodity exporters, while commodity-
exporting emerging market economies on average have 
had poorer outcomes than their noncommodity-export-
ing peers. For life expectancy and infant mortality, levels 
of indicators have been similar across the two different 
types of economies, but the relative pace of improvement 
has varied between the groups over time. 
Controlling for basic country characteristics—
including initial conditions, population size, GDP, 
and political variables—does not reveal statistically 
significant differences between commodity exporters 
and other similar emerging market and developing 
economies in terms of educational attainment, life 
expectancy, or infant mortality (Figure2.3.2).3
周e authors of this box are Aqib Aslam and Zsóka Kóczán.
1McMahon and Moreira (2014) find that in the 2000s, 
human development improved more rapidly in extractive com-
modity exporters than in countries that are not dependent on 
extractive industries. Gylfason (2001) suggests that educa-
tion levels were inversely related to resource abundance in the 
1980–97 period.
2周ese particular indicators of human development have 
been shown to have an impact on the quality of human capital 
(for example, Kalemli-Özcan, Ryder, and Weil 2000 and Oster, 
Shoulson, and Dorsey 2013). 
3周ese results are obtained using propensity score match-
ing (Rosenbaum and Rubin 1983). 周is estimation technique 
tests for statistically significant differences between commodity 
exporters and noncommodity exporters while ensuring that they 
Box 2.3. Getting By with a Little Help from a Boom: Do Commodity Windfalls Speed Up Human Development?
0
10
20
30
40
50
1960
65
70
75
80
85
90
95
2000
05
10
1. Educational Attainment at Secondary Level
(Percentage of population that has
completed secondary schooling)
Figure 2.3.1.  Human Development Indicators
Commodity-exporting EMs
Other EMs
Commodity-exporting LIDCs
Other LIDCs
40
45
50
55
60
65
70
75
1960
65
70
75
80
85
90
95
2000
05
10
2. Life Expectancy
(Years)
0
50
100
150
200
1960
65
70
75
80
85
90
95
2000
05
10
3. Infant Mortality
(Deaths per thousand births)
Sources: Barro and Lee 2010, April 2013 update; United 
Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, UNdata; 
United Nations Development Programme; World Bank, World 
Development Indicators; and IMF staff calculations.
Note: Simple averages are taken over balanced samples for 
each group. EM = emerging market; LIDC = low-income 
developing country.
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
98 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
Do Changes in the Commodity Terms of 
Trade Predict Changes in the Pace of Human 
Development?
Like the macroeconomic variables examined in the 
chapter, key human development indicators tend to 
are otherwise comparable in terms of key characteristics such 
as population, level of GDP, political factors (regime change, 
conflict), and lagged measures of human development. Figure 
2.3.2 illustrates how commodity exporters compare with 
noncommodity exporters in both an unmatched and a matched 
sample. 周e former provides a simple comparison across groups 
without controlling for any differences between them, whereas in 
the latter, commodity exporters are compared with (hypothetical) 
noncommodity exporters similar to them in regard to a number 
of key characteristics.
move in tandem with the commodity terms of trade. 
Educational attainment and life expectancy rise faster 
during commodity terms-of-trade upswings than dur-
ing downswings (Figure2.3.3). 周is comovement is 
not surprising, since education and health outcomes 
are likely to benefit from higher social spending 
by the public sector and a faster-growing economy 
during a commodity boom. However, the differences 
between average changes in educational attainment 
and life expectancy during upswings and downswings 
are not statistically significant, which is probably 
attributable to other contextual factors affecting these 
variables during these episodes.
Using the local projection method allows some 
contextual factors such as the output growth of 
trading partners, domestic conflict, and political 
Box 2.3 (continued)
0
20
40
60
80
Unmatched
Matched
Unmatched
Matched
Unmatched
Matched
Pre-2000 CEEMDEs
Pre-2000 OEMDEs
Post-2000 CEEMDEs
Post-2000 OEMDEs
Life expectancy
Infant mortality
Figure 2.3.2. Comparing the Performance of 
Commodity and Noncommodity Exporters
(Percent)
Sources: Barro and Lee 2010, April 2013 update; United 
Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, UNdata; 
United Nations Development Programme; World Bank, World 
Development Indicators; and IMF staff calculations.
Note: CEEMDEs = commodity-exporting emerging market 
and developing economies; OEMDEs = other emerging 
market and developing economies. None of the differences 
between matched samples are statistically significant at the 
10 percent level.
Educational
attainment at
secondary level
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
Pre-2000 upswings
Pre-2000 downswings
Pre-2000 upswings (median)
Pre-2000 downswings (median)
Educational attainment
at secondary level
Life expectancy
Figure 2.3.3.  Event Studies: Average Changes 
in Human Development Indicators during 
Upswings and Downswings
(Percent)
Sources: Barro and Lee 2010, April 2013 update; United 
Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, UNdata; 
United Nations Development Programme; World Bank, World 
Development Indicators; and IMF staff calculations.
Note: Sample includes only cycles with peaks before 2000. 
See Annex 2.2 for the cycle dating methodology. Infant 
mortality is omitted from the event studies because data are 
available only in five-year intervals and interpolation would 
confound the effects.
CHA PTER 2
WHERE ARE COMM ODI TY E XPORTERS H EADE D? OU TPUT GROWTH  I N THE AFT ERMATH  O F TH E COMMO DIT Y BOO M  
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
99
regime change to be controlled for. Estimates from 
that method show that the responses of educational 
attainment are barely statistically significant following 
changes in the net commodity terms of trade; those of 
life expectancy are not statistically significant. 
Infant mortality has a statistically significant nega-
tive response, but this result appears sensitive to the 
inclusion of data from the1970s and early1980s, 
when commodity windfalls allowed commodity 
exporters to catch up with their noncommodity-
exporting peers—infant mortality among commodity 
exporters fell by 30 to 50percent over that period. 
周e result weakened during later decades, when the 
pace of improvement slowed for both commodity 
exporters and noncommodity exporters. During those 
years upswings no longer brought statistically signifi-
cant reductions, as marginal improvements appear to 
have become progressively more difficult to achieve.
Box 2.3 (continued)
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
100 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
周e model simulations presented in this chapter 
predict that commodity booms will tend to be accom-
panied by overheating: if prices and wages adjust only 
slowly to higher demand, the volume of output will 
overreact and rise above its potential level (defined as 
the level of output consistent with stable inflation). 周e 
event studies presented in the chapter provide indirect 
evidence of overheating during booms, documenting 
that actual output tends to grow faster than trend out-
put during prolonged upswings in the commodity terms 
of trade (Figure 2.8, panel 4). Such a growth differential 
would be likely to push actual output above potential 
output over the duration of the boom. 
周e discussion here presents direct evidence of 
overheating in six net commodity exporters during 
the global commodity boom of the 2000s. Multivari-
ate filtering is used to estimate potential output and 
the output gap, both of which are unobserved. 周e 
technique combines information on the relationship 
between unemployment and inflation (Phillips curve) 
on the one hand, and between unemployment and the 
output gap (Okun’s law) on the other.1
It is based on 
the notion that a positive (negative) output gap will 
be correlated with excess demand (slack) in the labor 
market and lead to increases (decreases) in inflation. 
周e six net exporters of commodities are Australia, 
Canada, Chile, Norway, Peru, and Russia.2 周e infla-
tion process in these countries largely conforms to that 
predicted by economic theory, with a broadly stable 
relationship between inflation and unemployment. 
周e authors of this box are Oya Celasun, Douglas Laxton, 
Hou Wang, and Fan Zhang.
1Chapter 3 of the April 2015 World Economic Outlook uses the 
multivariate-filter methodology to estimate potential output for 16 
countries. A detailed description of the methodology can be found 
in Annex 3.2 of that report and in Blagrave and others 2015. 
2周e countries and time period chosen for the analysis reflect 
the data requirements. Reliable unemployment series are not 
available for a large number of commodity exporters, nor do 
many countries show a broadly stable relationship between infla-
tion and unemployment. To ensure a focus on the link between 
the terms of trade and the output gap, estimates are shown for 
the uninterrupted phase of the commodity boom prior to the 
2008–09 global financial crisis.  
周e discussion focuses on the period 2002–07: the 
uninterrupted phase of the boom in world commod-
ity prices ahead of the volatility associated with the 
2008–09 global financial crisis. 
周e analysis finds that the six economies moved into 
excess demand as the commodity boom progressed 
(Figure 2.4.1). 周e results are striking in that all six 
economies show positive output gaps toward the end of 
the prolonged commodity price boom. Moreover, the 
changes in the output gap exhibit a positive correla-
tion with the commodity terms of trade, even if the 
estimation does not incorporate information on the 
latter variable (Figure 2.4.2). 周at result underscores the 
important role of the commodity terms of trade in driv-
ing cyclical fluctuations in net commodity exporters. 
However, estimates of output gaps based on 
multivariate filtering benefit from hindsight, in the 
Box 2.4. Do Commodity Exporters’ Economies Overheat during Commodity Booms?
–2.0
–1.0
0.0
1.0
2.0
3.0
2002
03
04
05
06
07
Australia
Canada
Chile
Norway
Russia
Peru
Figure 2.4.1. Output Gaps in Six Commodity 
Exporters
(Percent)
Source: IMF staff calculations.
Note: Output gaps are estimated using the multivariate- 
filter technique.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested