pdf viewer library c# : How to copy pictures from a pdf document control SDK platform web page winforms wpf web browser text12-part1765

CHA PTER 2
WHERE ARE COMM ODI TY E XPORTERS H EADE D? OU TPUT GROWTH  I N THE AFT ERMATH  O F TH E COMMO DIT Y BOO M  
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
101
sense that the estimation of output gaps for 2002–07 
incorporates information on the actual behavior of 
output, inflation, and unemployment in the after-
math of the period. Disentangling the cyclical versus 
structural components of output is more challenging 
in real time.3 Available real-time estimates of output 
gaps in the September 2007 World Economic Outlook 
3Grigoli and others (2015) document the wide range of 
uncertainty surrounding real-time estimates of the output gap. 
周ey find that initial assessments of an economy’s cyclical posi-
database are lower than the multivariate-filter-based 
estimates obtained with data through 2014, suggesting 
that the structural component of output was overesti-
mated in real time (Figure 2.4.3).4
tion tend to overestimate the amount of slack in the economy, 
especially during recessions.
4For advanced economies, the World Economic Outlook 
database contains estimates and projections of output gaps from 
1991 onward. For emerging market and developing economies, 
estimates start in 2008. 
Box 2.4 (continued)
Source: IMF staff calculations.
Note: The definition of the commodity terms of trade is given 
in Annex 2.1. The trend line is estimated by regressing the 
change in the output gap during 2002–07 on the change in 
the terms of trade over the same period.
Figure 2.4.2. Changes in the Output Gap and 
Terms of Trade
0
1
2
3
4
5
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
Change in output gap
(percentage points)
Change in terms of trade (percent)
Russia
Chile
Canada
Peru
Australia
Norway
–0.5
5
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
Australia
Canada
Norway
Source: IMF staff calculations.
Note: Real-time estimates of output gaps are from the 
September 2007 
World Economic Outlook
database.
Figure 2.4.3. Real-Time and Multivariate-
-
Filter Estimates of the 2007 Output Gaps
(Percent)
Real-time estimate
te
Multivariate-filter estimate
te
0
1
2
3
4
5
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
Change in output gap
(percentage points)
Change in terms of trade (percent)
Russia
Chile
Canada
Peru
Australia
Norway
Figure 2.4.2. Changes in the Output Gap and 
Terms of Trade
Source: IMF staff calculations.
Note: The definition of the commodity terms of trade is 
given in Annex 2.1. The trend line is estimated by 
regressing the change in the output gap during 2002–07 
on the change in the terms of trade over the same period.
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
Australia
Canada
Norway
Real-time estimate
Multivariate-filter estimate
Figure 2.4.3. Real-Time and Multivariate- 
Filter Estimates of 2007 Output Gaps
(Percent)
Source: IMF staff calculations.
Note: Real-time estimates of output gaps are from the 
September 2007 World Economic Outlook database.
How to copy pictures from a pdf document - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy text from pdf image to word; how to copy pictures from pdf to powerpoint
How to copy pictures from a pdf document - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
cut and paste pdf images; copy pdf picture to word
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
102 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
References
Adler, Gustavo, and Nicolás E. Magud. 2015. “Four Decades 
of Terms-of-Trade Booms: A Metric of Income Windfall.” 
Journal of International Money and Finance55:162–92.
Albino-War, Maria A., Svetlana Cerovic, Francesco Grigoli, Juan 
Carlos Flores, Javier Kapsoli, Haonan Qu, Yahia Said, Bah-
rom Shukurov, Martin Sommer, and SeokHyun Yoon. 2014. 
“Making the Most of Public Investment in MENA and CCA 
Oil-Exporting Countries.” IMF Staff Discussion Note 14/10, 
International Monetary Fund, Washington.
Aravena, Claudio, Juan Fernández, André Hofman, and Matilde 
Mas. 2014. Structural Change in Four Latin American 
Countries: An International Perspective. Macroeconomics of 
Development Series No. 150. Santiago: Economic Commis-
sion for Latin America and the Caribbean.
Arezki, Rabah, and Kareem Ismail. 2013. “Boom-Bust Cycle, 
Asymmetrical Fiscal Response and the Dutch Disease.” Jour-
nal of Development Economics 101: 256–67.
Baldwin, John R., Wulong Gu, Ryan Macdonald, and Beiling 
Yan. 2014. “Productivity: What Is It? How Is It Measured? 
What Has Canada’s Performance Been over the Period 1961 
to 2012?” Canadian Productivity Review 38.
Barro, Robert, and Jong-Wha Lee. 2010.“A New Data Set of 
Educational Attainment in the World, 1950–2010.”Journal 
of Development Economics 104: 184–98.
Benigno, Gianluca, and Luca Fornaro. 2014. “周e Financial 
Resource Curse.” Scandinavian Journal of Economics 116 (1): 
58–86.
Berg, Andrew, Edward F. Buffie, Catherine Pattillo, Rafael Porti-
llo, Andrea Presbitero, and Luis-Felipe Zanna. Forthcoming. 
“Some Misconceptions about Public Investment Efficiency 
and Growth.” IMF Working Paper, International Monetary 
Fund, Washington.
Berg, Andrew, Rafael Portillo, Shu-Chun S. Yang, and Luis-Felipe 
Zanna. 2013. “Government Investment in Resource-Abundant 
Developing Countries.” IMF Economic Review 61: 92–129.
Bjørnland, Hilde Christiane. 1998. “周e Economic Effects of 
North Sea Oil on the Manufacturing Sector.” Scottish Journal 
of Political Economy 45 (5): 553–85.
———, and Leif A. 周orsrud. Forthcoming. “Boom or Gloom? 
Examining the Dutch Disease in Two-Speed Economies.” 
Economic Journal.
Blagrave, Patrick, Roberto Garcia-Saltos, Douglas Laxton, and 
Fan Zhang. 2015. “A Simple Multivariate Filter for Estimat-
ing Potential Output.” IMF Working Paper 15/79, Interna-
tional Monetary Fund, Washington.
Cashin, Paul, Luis Felipe Céspedes, and Ratna Sahay. 2004. 
“Commodity Currencies and the Real Exchange Rate.” Jour-
nal of Development Economics 75 (1): 239–68.
Céspedes, Luis Felipe, and Andrés Velasco. 2012. “Macroeco-
nomic Performance during Commodity Price Booms and 
Busts.” IMF Economic Review 60 (4): 570–99.
Chen, Yu-chin, and Kenneth Rogoff. 2003. “Commodity Cur-
rencies.” Journal of International Economics 60 (1): 133–60.
Collier, Paul, Rick van der Ploeg, Michael Spence, and Anthony 
J. Venables.2010. “Managing Resource Revenues in Develop-
ing Economies.” IMF Staff Papers 57 (1): 84–118. 
Corden, Walter M. 1981. “周e Exchange Rate, Monetary Policy 
and North Sea Oil: 周e Economic 周eory of the Squeeze on 
Tradeables.” Oxford Economic Papers 33: 23–46.
———, and J. Peter Neary. 1982. “Booming Sector and 
De-industrialisation in a Small Open Economy.” Economic 
Journal 92 (368): 825–48.
Dabla-Norris, Era, Si Guo, Vikram Haksar, Minsuk Kim, 
Kalpana Kochhar, Kevin Wiseman, and Aleksandra Zdzien-
icka. 2015. “周e New Normal: A Sector-Level Perspective 
on Productivity Trends in Advanced Economies.” IMF Staff 
Discussion Note 15/03, International Monetary Fund, 
Washington.
De Gregorio, José. 2015. “From Rapid Recovery to Slowdown: 
Why Recent Economic Growth in Latin America Has Been 
Slow.” Policy Briefs PB15-6, Peterson Institute for Interna-
tional Economics, Washington.
Deaton, Angus, and Ronald Miller. 1996. “International Com-
modity Prices, Macroeconomic Performance and Politics 
in Sub-Saharan Africa.” Journal of African Economies 5 (3): 
99–191.
Dehn, Jan. 2000. “周e Effects on Growth of Commodity Price 
Uncertainty and Shocks.” Policy Research Working Paper 
2455, World Bank, Washington.
Eichengreen, Barry. 2008. “周e Real Exchange Rate and Eco-
nomic Growth.” Commission on Growth and Development 
Working Paper 4, World Bank, Washington.
Erten, Bilge, and Jose Antonio Ocampo. 2012. “Super-cycles 
of Commodity Prices since the Mid-Nineteenth Century.” 
DESA Working Paper No. 110, United Nations Department 
of Economic and Social Affairs, New York.
Fornero, Jorge, Markus Kirchner, and Andrés Yany. 2014. 
“Terms of Trade Shocks and Investment in Commodity-
Exporting Economies.” Paper presented at “Commodity 
Prices and Macroeconomic Policy,” 18th Annual Conference 
of the Central Bank of Chile, Santiago, October 23. 
Foster, Vivien, and Cecilia Briceño-Garmendia, eds.2010. 
Africa’s Infrastructure: A Time for Transformation. Washington: 
Agence Française de Développement and World Bank.
Francis, Michael. 2008. “Adjusting to the Commodity-Price 
Boom: 周e Experiences of Four Industrialized Countries.” 
Bank of Canada Review (Autumn): 29–41.
Frankel, Jeffrey A. 2012. “周e Natural Resource Curse: A Survey 
of Diagnoses and Some Prescriptions.” In Commodity Price 
Volatility and Inclusive Growth in Low-Income Countries, 
edited by Rabah Arezki, Catherine A. Patillo, Marc Quintyn, 
and Min Zhu. Washington: International Monetary Fund.
Gelb, Alan, and Associates.1988. Oil Windfalls: Blessing or 
Curse? New York: Oxford University Press.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
application. In addition, texts, pictures and font formatting of source PDF file are accurately retained in converted Word document file.
how to copy a picture from a pdf; how to copy an image from a pdf to powerpoint
VB Imaging - VB Code 93 Generator Tutorial
for developers to create and write Code 93 linear barcode pictures on PDF documents, multi create a Windows application or ASP.NET web form and copy the VB
copy paste picture pdf; how to copy pictures from pdf file
CHA PTER 2
WHERE ARE COMM ODI TY E XPORTERS H EADE D? OU TPUT GROWTH  I N THE AFT ERMATH  O F TH E COMMO DIT Y BOO M  
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
103
Grigoli, Francesco, Alexander Herman, Andrew Swiston, and 
Gabriel Di Bella. 2015. “Output Gap Uncertainty and 
Real-Time Monetary Policy.” IMF Working Paper 15/14, 
International Monetary Fund, Washington.
Gruss, Bertrand.2014. “After the Boom—Commodity Prices 
and Economic Growth in Latin America and the Caribbean.” 
IMF Working Paper 14/154, International Monetary Fund, 
Washington.
Gupta, Pranav, Bin Grace Li, and Jiangyan Yu.2015. “From 
Natural Resource Boom to Sustainable Economic Growth: 
Lessons for Mongolia.” IMF Working Paper 15/90, Interna-
tional Monetary Fund, Washington. 
Gupta, Sanjeev, Alvar Kangur, Chris Papageorgiou, and Abdoul 
Wane.2014. “Efficiency-Adjusted Public Capital and 
Growth.” World Development 57: 164–78.
Gylfason, 周orvaldur.2001. “Natural Resources, Education 
and Economic Development.” European Economic Review 45 
(4–6): 847–59.
Harding, Don, and Adrian Pagan.2002. “Dissecting the Cycle: 
A Methodological Investigation.” Journal of Monetary Econom-
ics 49 (2): 365–81.
Harding, Torfinn, and Anthony J. Venables. 2013. “周e Implica-
tions of Natural Resource Exports for Non-resource Trade.” 
OxCarre Research Paper 103, Department of Economics, 
Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, 
Oxford, United Kingdom.
Hofman, André, Matilde Mas, Claudio Aravena, and Juan 
Fernandez de Guevara. 2015. “LA KLEMS: Economic 
Growth and Productivity in Latin America.” In 周e World 
Economy: Growth or Stagnation? edited by Dale W. Jorgenson, 
Kyoji Fukao, and Marcel P. Timmer. Cambridge: Cambridge 
University Press. 
Husain, Aasim M., Kamilya Tazhibayeva, and Anna Ter-
Martirosyan. 2008. “Fiscal Policy and Economic Cycles in 
Oil-Exporting Countries.” IMF Working Paper 08/253, Inter-
national Monetary Fund, Washington.
International Monetary Fund (IMF). 2006. “Methodology 
for CGER Exchange Rate Assessments.” Unpublished, 
Washington. 
———. 2012. “Macroeconomic Policy Frameworks for 
Resource-Rich Developing Countries.” Washington. https://
www.imf.org/external/np/pp/eng/2012/082412.pdf.
———. 2015. “Making Public Investment More Efficient.” Staff 
Report, Washington.
Ismail, Kareem. 2010. “周e Structural Manifestation of the 
‘Dutch Disease’: 周e Case of Oil Exporting Countries.” 
IMF Working Paper 10/103, International Monetary Fund, 
Washington.
Jordà, Òscar. 2005. “Estimation and Inference of Impulse 
Responses by Local Projections.” American Economic Review 
95 (1): 161–82.
Kalemli-Özcan, Şebnem, Harl E. Ryder, and David N. 
Weil.2000. “Mortality Decline, Human Capital Investment, 
and Economic Growth.” Journal of Development Economics 62 
(1): 1–23.
Kilian, Lutz. 2009. “Not All Oil Price Shocks Are Alike: 
Disentangling Demand and Supply Shocks in the Crude Oil 
Market.” American Economic Review 99 (3): 1053–69.
Kohli, Ulrich. 2004. “Real GDP, Real Domestic Income, and 
Terms-of-Trade Changes.” Journal of International Economics 
62 (1): 83–106.
Krugman, Paul. 1987. “周e Narrow Moving Band, the Dutch 
Disease, and the Competitive Consequences of Mrs. 
周atcher: Notes on Trade in the Presence of Dynamic Scale 
Economies.” Journal of Development Economics 27 (1–2): 
41–55.
Lalonde, René, and Dirk Muir. 2007. “周e Bank of Canada’s 
Version of the Global Economy Model (BoC-GEM).” Bank 
of Canada Technical Report 98, Bank of Canada, Ottawa.
Lane, Philip R., and Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti. 2007. “周e 
External Wealth of Nations Mark II: Revised and Extended 
Estimates of Foreign Assets and Liabilities, 1970–2004.” 
Journal of International Economics 73 (2): 223–50. 
Magud, Nicolás, and Sebastián Sosa. 2013. “When and Why 
Worry about Real Exchange Rate Appreciation? 周e Missing 
Link between Dutch Disease and Growth.” Journal of Interna-
tional Commerce, Economics, and Politics 4 (2): 1–27.
Matsuyama, Kiminori. 1992. “Agricultural Productivity, 
Comparative Advantage, and Economic Growth.” Journal of 
Economic 周eory 58 (2): 317–34.
McMahon, Gary, and Susana Moreira.2014. “周e Contribu-
tion of the Mining Sector to Socioeconomic and Human 
Development.” Extractive Industries for Development Series 
30, World Bank, Washington.
Melina, Giovanni, Shu-Chun S. Yang, and Luis-Felipe Zanna. 
2014. “Debt Sustainability, Public Investment, and Natural 
Resources in Developing Countries: 周e DIGNAR Model.” 
IMF Working Paper 14/50, International Monetary Fund, 
Washington.
Mendoza, Enrique G. 1995. “周e Terms of Trade, the Real 
Exchange Rate, and Economic Fluctuations.” International 
Economic Review 36 (1): 101–37.
Oster, Emily, Ira Shoulson, and E. Ray Dorsey.2013. “Limited 
Life Expectancy, Human Capital and Health Investments.” 
American Economic Review 103 (5):1977–2002.
Parham, Dean. 2012. “Australia’s Productivity Growth Slump: Signs 
of Crisis, Adjustment or Both?” Visiting Researcher Paper, Aus-
tralian Government, Productivity Commission, Melbourne.
Pesenti, Paolo. 2008. “周e Global Economy Model: 周eoretical 
Framework.” IMF Staff Papers 55 (2): 243–84.
Reinhart, Carmen M., and Kenneth S. Rogoff. 2004. “周e 
Modern History of Exchange Rate Arrangements: A Reinter-
pretation.” Quarterly Journal of Economics 119 (1): 1–48.
Roache, Shaun K. 2012. “China’s Impact on World Commodity 
Markets.” IMF Working Paper 12/115, International Mon-
etary Fund, Washington.
C#: Use OCR SDK Library to Get Image and Document Text
color image recognition for scanned documents and pictures in C#. text content from whole PDF file, single PDF page and You can directly copy demos to your .NET
copy images from pdf; how to cut image from pdf
C# Imaging - C# Code 93 Generator Tutorial
for developers to create and write Code 93 linear barcode pictures on PDF documents, multi create a Windows application or ASP.NET web form and copy the C#
copy and paste image from pdf; copying image from pdf to word
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
104 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
Rodrik, Dani. 2008. “周e Real Exchange Rate and Economic 
Growth.” Brookings Papers on Economic Activity 39 (2): 
365–439.
———. 2015. “Premature Deindustrialization.” NBER Working 
Paper 20935, National Bureau of Economic Research, Cam-
bridge, Massachusetts.
Rosenbaum, Paul R., and Donald B. Rubin.1983. “周e Central 
Role of the Propensity Score in Observational Studies for 
Causal Effects” Biometrika 70 (1): 41–55.
Sala-i-Martin, Xavier, and Arvind Subramanian. 2003. “Address-
ing the Natural Resource Curse: An Illustration from Nige-
ria.” IMF Working Paper 03/139, International Monetary 
Fund, Washington.
Schmitt-Grohé, Stephanie, and Martín Uribe. 2015. “How 
Important Are Terms of Trade Shocks?” NBER Working 
Paper 21253, National Bureau of Economic Research, Cam-
bridge, Massachusetts.
Spatafora, Nikola, and Irina Tytell. 2009. “Commodity Terms 
of Trade: 周e History of Booms and Busts.” IMF Working 
Paper 09/205, International Monetary Fund, Washington.
Spatafora, Nikola, and Andrew Warner. 1995. “Macroeconomic 
Effects of Terms-of-Trade Shocks.” Policy Research Working 
Paper 1410, World Bank, Washington.
Steenkamp, Daan. 2014. “Structural Adjustment in New 
Zealand since the Commodity Boom.” Reserve Bank of New 
Zealand Analytical Note AN 2014/2, Reserve Bank of New 
Zealand, Wellington.
Teulings, Coen N., and Nikolay Zubanov. 2014. “Is Economic 
Recovery a Myth? Robust Estimation of Impulse Responses.” 
Journal of Applied Econometrics 29 (3): 497–514.
van der Ploeg, Frederick. 2011. “Natural Resources: Curse or 
Blessing?” Journal of Economic Literature 49 (2): 366–420.
van Wijnbergen, Sweder J. G. 1984a. “周e ‘Dutch Disease’: A 
Disease after All?” Economic Journal 94 (373): 41–55.
———. 1984b. “Inflation, Employment, and the Dutch Disease 
in Oil-Exporting Countries: A Short-Run Disequilibrium 
Analysis.” Quarterly Journal of Economics 99 (2): 233–50.
Warner, Andrew M. 2014. “Public Investment as an Engine of 
Growth.” IMF Working Paper 14/148, International Mon-
etary Fund, Washington.
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Codes to Load Images from File / Stream in .
Now you can freely copy the VB.NET sample this VB.NET imaging library with pictures of your own powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
how to copy pdf image to powerpoint; copy images from pdf file
C# Imaging - Scan RM4SCC Barcode in C#.NET
& accurately detect and read RM4SCC barcode from (scanned) images, pictures & photos control can also work along with C#.NET PDF document processing library to
how to copy picture from pdf; copy a picture from pdf
1
CHAPTER
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
105
3
CHAPTER
EXCHANGE RATES AND TRADE FLOWS: DISCONNEC TED? 
Recent exchange rate movements have been unusually 
large, triggering a debate regarding their likely effects on 
trade. Historical experience in advanced and emerging 
market and developing economies suggests that exchange 
rate movements typically have sizable effects on export 
and import volumes. A 10 percent real effective deprecia-
tion in an economy’s currency is associated with a rise in 
real net exports of, on average, 1.5 percent of GDP, with 
substantial cross-country variation around this average. 
Although these effects fully materialize over a number 
of years, much of the adjustment occurs in the first year. 
The boost to exports associated with currency depreciation 
is found to be largest in countries with initial economic 
slack and with domestic financial systems that are operat-
ing normally. Some evidence suggests that the rise of 
global value chains has weakened the relationship between 
exchange rates and trade in intermediate products used as 
inputs into other economies’ exports. However, the bulk 
of global trade still consists of conventional trade, and 
there is little evidence of a general trend toward disconnect 
between exchange rates and total exports and imports. 
Introduction
Recent exchange rate movements have been unusu-
ally large. 周  e U.S. dollar has appreciated by more 
than 10 percent in real eff ective terms since mid-2014. 
周  e euro has depreciated by more than 10 percent 
since early 2014 and the yen by more than 30 per-
cent since mid-2012 (Figure 3.1).1 Such movements, 
although not unprecedented, are well outside these 
currencies’ normal fl uctuation ranges. Even for emerg-
ing market and developing economies, whose curren-
cies typically fl uctuate more than those of advanced 
economies, the recent movements have been unusually 
large. 
周  e authors of this chapter are Daniel Leigh (team lead), 
Weicheng Lian, Marcos Poplawski-Ribeiro, and Viktor Tsyrennikov, 
with support from Olivia Ma, Rachel Szymanski, and Hong Yang.
1Based on consumer price index–based real eff ective exchange rate 
data ending in June 2015.
–40
–30
–20
–10
0
10
20
30
40
0
10
20
36
–40
–30
–20
–10
0
10
20
30
40
0
10
20
36
–40
–30
–20
–10
0
10
20
30
40
0
10
20
36
–40
–30
–20
–10
0
10
20
30
40
0
10
20
36
–40
–30
–20
–10
0
10
20
30
40
0
10
20
36
–40
–30
–20
–10
0
10
20
30
40
0
10
20
36
1.  United States
(July 2014)
2.  Japan
(August 2012)
3.  Euro Area
(April 2014)
Current episode
25th/75th percentile
10th/90th percentile
4.  Brazil
(August 2014)
5.  China
(May 2014)
6.  India
(February 2014)
Major currencies have seen large movements in recent years in real effective terms 
that are unusual compared with historical experience.
Figure 3.1.  Recent Exchange Rate Movements in Historical 
Perspective
(Percent; months on x-axis)
Source: IMF, Information Notice System.
Note: Figure reports historical fluctuation bands for level of consumer price 
index–based real effective exchange rate based on all 36-month-long evolutions 
since January 1980. Confidence band at month t is based on all historical 
evolutions up to month t. Blue lines indicate most recent exchange rate paths of 
appreciation or depreciation that have no interruptions of more than three 
months. Dates in parentheses mark the starting point for the current episode in 
each panel. Last observation reported is June 2015.
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Create Watermark on Images in .NET
and whether to burn it to the pictures to make Please feel free to copy them to your program powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
copy pictures from pdf to word; how to copy a pdf image into a word document
C# Imaging - C# MSI Plessey Barcode Tutorial
Create high-quality MSI Plessey bar code pictures for almost Copy C#.NET code below to print an MSI a document file, like Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF and TIFF
how to copy and paste image from pdf to word; copy pdf picture to powerpoint
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
106 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
周ere is little consensus, however, on the likely 
effects of these large exchange rate movements on 
trade––exports and imports––and, therefore, on 
economic activity. Some have predicted strong effects, 
based on conventional economic models (Krug-
man2015, for example). Others have pointed to the 
limited changes in trade balances in some economies 
following recent exchange rate movements—in Japan, 
in particular—implying an apparent disconnect 
between exchange rates and trade. It has also been 
suggested that the increasing participation of firms 
in global value chains has reduced the relevance of 
exchange rate movements for trade flows, as in recent 
studies conducted at the Organisation for Economic 
Co-operation and Development (Ollivaud, Rusticelli, 
and Schwellnus2015) and the World Bank (Ahmed, 
Appendino, and Ruta 2015).2
周is is not the first time that the conventional 
wisdom regarding the link between exchange rates 
and trade has been questioned. In the late 1980s, for 
example, the U.S. dollar depreciated, and the yen 
appreciated sharply after the 1985 Plaza Accord, but 
trade volumes were slow to adjust, leading some com-
mentators to suggest a disconnect between exchange 
rates and trade. By the early 1990s, however, U.S. and 
Japanese trade balances had adjusted, after some lags, 
largely in line with the predictions of conventional 
models.3 A key question is whether this time is differ-
ent, reflecting the changing structure of world trade 
since the 1990s, or whether, once lags have played out, 
the apparent disconnect between exchange rates and 
trade will once again dissipate. 
A disconnect between exchange rates and trade 
would have profound policy implications. It could, in 
particular, weaken a key channel for the transmission 
of monetary policy by reducing the boost to exports 
that comes with exchange rate depreciation when mon-
etary policy eases. It could also complicate the resolu-
tion of trade imbalances (that is, when exports exceed 
imports, or vice versa) via the adjustment of relative 
trade prices. 
To contribute to the debate on the likely effects of 
recent currency movements and to assess whether trade 
flows are becoming disconnected from exchange rates, 
this chapter focuses on the following questions:
2As explained in the discussion that follows, during the past 
several decades, international trade has increasingly been organized 
within so-called global value chains, with different stages of produc-
tion located across different economies.
3See Krugman 1991 for a discussion of this episode. 
• Based on historical experience, how does trade 
typically evolve following real exchange rate move-
ments? In particular, to what extent do exchange 
rate changes pass through to the relative prices of 
exports and imports, and how strongly do trade 
flows respond following these trade price changes? 
How quickly do the adjustments occur?
• Is there evidence of a disconnect between exchange 
rates and trade over time? In particular, has the 
changing structure of global trade, with increas-
ing participation in global value chains, weakened 
the relationship between exchange rates and trade? 
Have either the long-term effects or the speed of 
transmission of exchange rate movements declined 
over time, making them less relevant for overall 
trade?
To address these questions, the chapter starts by 
investigating the relationship between exchange rate 
changes and trade in advanced and emerging mar-
ket and developing economies over the past three 
decades. 周e growing importance of emerging market 
and developing economies in world trade warrants 
this broad coverage, which goes beyond the group of 
economies typically examined in related studies.4 周e 
approach employs both standard trade equations and 
an analysis of historical cases of large exchange rate 
movements. 周e chapter then assesses whether the rise 
of global value chains, also referred to as the inter-
national fragmentation of production, has weakened 
the link between exchange rates and trade. Finally, it 
investigates more generally whether there is evidence 
of disconnect over time by estimating the relationship 
between exchange rates and trade in different historical 
periods. 
周e analysis focuses narrowly on the direct effect 
of exchange rate changes on trade. Although the trade 
channel is a critical channel for the transmission of 
exchange rate changes to an economy, this partial 
equilibrium focus on direct effects has limitations. By 
definition, it ignores the general equilibrium effects 
of exchange rate changes on overall economic activ-
ity, which involve not just the effects on trade, but 
also those operating through other variables, includ-
ing inflation expectations, interest rates, and domes-
4Much of the related literature focuses on advanced economies, 
with a number of exceptions, including Bussière, Delle Chiaie, and 
Peltonen 2014, which estimates trade price equations for 40 econo-
mies, and Morin and Schwellnus 2014.
C# Imaging - Scan ISBN Barcode in C#.NET
which can be used to track images, pictures and documents BarcodeType.ISBN); // read barcode from PDF page Barcode from PowerPoint slide, you can copy demo code
how to paste a picture into pdf; how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf document
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
the issue of how to draw pictures or write Copy the demo codes and run your project to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff files
how to copy text from pdf image; paste image into pdf acrobat
CHA PTER 3
EXCH ANG E RATES AND T RA DE FLO WS : D ISC ONNEC TED? 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
107
tic demand.5 周rough the effects on these variables, 
trade is also affected indirectly. 周e narrow focus also 
abstracts from the fact that the underlying drivers of 
an exchange rate change also matter for trade and 
economic activity outcomes. 周e main reason that 
these outcomes can differ is that the indirect effects 
of exchange rate changes can differ, depending on 
the driver. Consider, for example, the exchange rate 
changes during the past year or so. As discussed in the 
April 2015 World Economic Outlook (WEO), these 
changes have been partly driven by surprises in the 
relative strength of domestic demand, with countries 
with stronger domestic demand experiencing apprecia-
tion. Compare this with another example, in which 
the exchange rate change is not driven by domestic 
demand, but reflects an unexpected shift in investor 
preferences for U.S.-dollar-denominated assets. 周e 
behavior of domestic demand in the two examples 
would clearly be different, with implications for the 
overall outcome for trade.
周e chapter’s main findings are as follows:
• Trade tends to respond strongly to exchange rate 
movements. A depreciation in an economy’s cur-
rency is typically associated with lower export prices 
paid by foreigners and higher domestic import 
prices, and these price changes, in turn, lead to a 
rise in exports and a decline in imports.6 Reflecting 
these channels, a 10 percent real effective exchange 
rate depreciation implies, on average, a 1.5 percent 
of GDP increase in real net exports. The figures 
around this average response vary widely across 
economies (from 0.5 percent to 3.1 percent). It 
takes a number of years for the effects to fully 
materialize, but much of the adjustment occurs in 
the first year. The export increase associated with 
currency depreciation is typically stronger when the 
domestic economy is experiencing more slack, but 
weaker when a country’s financial system is weak, as 
in the context of a banking crisis.
• The rise of global value chains has weakened the 
relationship between exchange rates and trade for 
5For an example of a general equilibrium assessment of the effects 
of exchange rate movements, see Scenario Box 2 in the April 2015 
World Economic Outlook, which uses the IMF’s G20 Model to 
explore the potential macroeconomic impact of real exchange rate 
changes from August 2014 to February 2015 based on shocks that 
represent changes in investor preferences for U.S.-dollar-denomi-
nated assets.
6周ere is little evidence of asymmetry—exchange rate apprecia-
tions and depreciations tend to have opposite effects, but of a similar 
absolute size. 
some economies and products, but little evidence 
shows that it has led to a disconnect between 
exchange rates and trade in general. In particular, for 
economies that have become more deeply involved 
in global value chains, trade in intermediate prod-
ucts used as inputs into other economies’ exports 
has become less responsive to exchange rate changes. 
However, the relative pace of expansion of global-
value-chain-related trade has decelerated in recent 
years, and the bulk of global trade still consists of 
conventional trade.
• More generally, the notion of a disconnect between 
exchange rates, trade prices, and gross export and 
import volumes finds little support in the data. The 
estimated links have not generally weakened over 
time. A key exception to this pattern is Japan, which 
displays some evidence of disconnect, with weaker-
than-expected export growth despite substantial 
exchange rate depreciation, although this weak 
export growth reflects a number of Japan-specific 
factors.7 
From Exchange Rates to Trade: 
Historical Evidence
A natural benchmark for assessing the implications 
of recent exchange rate movements is the histori-
cal relationship between exchange rates and trade. 
Standard theoretical models predict that currency 
depreciation will reduce the prices of exports in foreign 
currency and increase the prices of imports in domes-
tic currency, which will lead to more exports and 
less imports.8 周ese theoretical predictions guide the 
statistical analysis in this chapter.
周is section starts by examining the historical evi-
dence on the connection between exchange rates, trade 
prices, and trade volumes for a large group of econo-
mies. It estimates export and import price and volume 
equations for 60 individual economies––23 advanced 
and 37 emerging market and developing economies––
for the past three decades. 周is is a broader sample of 
economies than is typically covered in related studies.9
7周ese factors include, in particular, the acceleration in production 
offshoring since the global financial crisis and the 2011 earthquake.
8周e response of trade volumes to relative trade prices relates to 
the expenditure-switching effect discussed, for example, in Obstfeld 
and Rogoff 2007.
9Related studies also tend to focus on either the effect of exchange 
rates on relative trade prices or the effect of relative trade prices on 
volumes. In contrast, the analysis here focuses on both parts of the 
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
108 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
To contribute more directly to the debate on the 
recent large exchange rate changes, the section also 
presents evidence on trade dynamics following unusu-
ally large exchange rate movements. 周e focus is on the 
evolution of export prices and volumes following large 
and sudden currency depreciations in both advanced 
and emerging market and developing economies.
Revisiting Trade Elasticities
To inform the assessment of the likely impact of the 
recent large exchange rate movements on trade, this 
subsection estimates standard trade elasticities (that is, 
how responsive trade variables are to changes in other 
variables) for both advanced and emerging market 
and developing economies. In particular, it focuses on 
estimating four elasticities: the relationship between 
exchange rate movements and export and import 
prices, respectively (exchange rate pass-through), and 
the relationship between these export and import 
prices and trade volumes (price elasticity), based on 
standard trade equations. 周e emphasis is on long-
term effects of exchange rate movements, although the 
discussion also touches on how much of these long-
term effects materialize in the near term. 
周e theoretical framework underlying the analy-
sis comes from the pricing-to-market literature, as 
described in Krugman 1986, Feenstra, Gagnon, and 
Knetter 1996, Campa and Goldberg 2005, Burstein 
and Gopinath 2014, and others. In this framework, 
exporting firms maximize profits by choosing export 
prices subject to the demand for their products in 
foreign markets, taking into account their competi-
tors’ prices.10 Product demand depends on the prices 
of exports relative to the prices of competing products 
as well as on overall demand conditions in destination 
markets. Based on these assumptions, export prices 
relative to foreign prices depend on the real exchange 
rate and real production costs, while export quantities 
depend on these relative export prices as well as on 
foreign aggregate demand. 周e determinants of import 
prices and quantities can be derived analogously based 
on the observation that the price of each economy’s 
exchange rate transmission process, thus providing a more compre-
hensive assessment.
10周is literature assumes market segmentation between domestic 
and foreign purchasers.
imports is the price of its trading partners’ exports 
multiplied by the bilateral exchange rate.11
周e analysis estimates the four trade elasticities at 
the individual-economy level using annual data for 
60 economies. Depending on data availability and 
the economy in question, the sample starts between 
1980 and 1989 and ends in 2014. To permit the 
long-term relationship between exchange rate changes 
and trade to be estimated, the sample is restricted to 
economies for which at least 25 years of annual data 
are available.12 周e analysis focuses on gross exports 
and imports, which include both goods and services 
(Annex 3.1 reports the sources of the data used). 周e 
econometric specifications employed are standard and 
yield estimates of the relationship between exchange 
rates and trade prices and between trade prices and 
trade volumes.13
11In this framework, the export price equation reflects opti-
mal pricing decisions of suppliers and can be written as ePX/P* = 
S(ULC/P, eP/P*), in which e is the nominal exchange rate, PX is the 
price of exports in domestic currency, P* is the foreign price level, 
P is the domestic price level, ULC/P denotes the real unit labor 
cost, and eP/P* denotes the real effective exchange rate. 周e export 
volume equation represents the demand side of the market and can 
be written as X = D(ePX/P*, Y*), in which ePX/P* is the relative 
export price in foreign currency already mentioned and Y* denotes 
foreign aggregate demand. On the import side, the relative prices of 
imports are a function of the real exchange rate and domestic aggre-
gate demand, PM/P = S(eP*/P, Y ), in which Y denotes domestic 
aggregate demand, and import volumes are a function of this relative 
price and domestic aggregate demand, M = D(PM/P, Y ). 
12周e sample excludes a number of advanced economies with 
special circumstances, including Hong Kong SAR and Singapore, 
given these economies’ significant entrepôt activity, and Ireland, 
given its special treatment of export sales (April 2015 WEO). To 
avoid unduly influencing the estimation results with developments 
in small or very low-income economies, it also excludes economies 
with fewer than 1 million inhabitants as of 2010 or with an average 
per capita income (at purchasing-power parity) of less than $3,000 
in 2014 prices.
13周e analysis is based on log-linear specifications for the four 
trade equations. For each equation, the analysis checks whether the 
variables included are cointegrated based on a Dickey-Fuller test, in 
which case the equations are estimated in levels. For example, for 
export prices, the specification estimated in levels for each economy 
is
ePX 
eP 
ULC
ln
—–
t
= a + b ln
t
+ g ln
——
t
+ e
t
,
P* 
P* 
P
ePX
in which the subscript t denotes the tth year; 
—–
denotes the rela-
P*
tive price of exports in foreign currency (e is the nominal effective 
exchange rate; PX is the price of exports in domestic currency; and 
P* is the foreign, trade-weighted producer price index [PPI]); and 
eP
—–
is the PPI-based real effective exchange rate. 周e PPI repre-
P*
sents the relative price of goods and services produced at home and 
abroad more precisely than does the consumer price index (CPI). 
Nevertheless, as reported later, the results are similar when all the 
CHA PTER 3
EXCH ANG E RATES AND T RA DE FLO WS : D ISC ONNEC TED? 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
109
A number of issues complicate the estimation of 
trade elasticities and can bias the analysis against find-
ing any effect of exchange rate movements on trade. 
Different economic developments can lead to differ-
ent joint evolutions of trade prices and quantities, 
complicating the estimation of the causal effects of 
trade prices on quantities. 周e main potential source 
of this simultaneity problem is the movement in either 
domestic or foreign demand. For example, a contrac-
tion in foreign demand can cause a simultaneous 
decline in both the quantity and the price of exports, 
obscuring the conventional positive effect of a drop in 
export prices on export demand. And when domestic 
demand growth is weak, reducing imports, the price of 
imports may also fall, obscuring the positive effect of 
lower import prices on imports. 周e analysis addresses 
this source of endogeneity by controlling for foreign 
and domestic output.14 周is leaves shifts in the compo-
sition of demand or in the propensity to import for a 
given composition of demand. 周e analysis attempts to 
control for shifts in composition by including nonex-
ports and exports together in the import equation, but 
controlling for shifts in import propensities is chal-
lenging. Overall, because of these remaining sources of 
bias, weak or perversely signed estimation results could 
still arise, although they do not necessarily imply that 
trade is unresponsive to changes in trade prices.15
P and P* terms in the equation are replaced with the domestic and 
foreign CPI. 周e estimate for b provides the long-term effect of the 
exchange rate on export prices. Short-term effects are obtained by 
estimating, in a second step, the equation in error correction form, 
as explained in Annex 3.2. 周e equations for estimating the other 
elasticities are set up analogously, as also explained in Annex 3.2.
14Moreover, all equations also include a time trend to account for 
secular trends in the variables and a dummy variable (which equals 
1 during 2008–09) to account for the global financial crisis and 
the interaction of this crisis dummy with the measure of foreign 
output in the export volume equation and with the measure of 
domestic output in the import volume equation, respectively. 周ese 
interaction terms address the notion that trade responded unusually 
strongly to demand during the crisis (see, for example, Bussière and 
others 2013). In addition, to control for shifts in global commod-
ity prices, which can affect exporting firms’ costs, the equations for 
export and import prices control for the (log) indices of interna-
tional fuel and nonfuel commodity prices. To ensure the results are 
not driven by periods of high inflation (such episodes can be caused 
by factors that have an independent effect on trade), the sample 
excludes years in which CPI inflation exceeds 30 percent. As a 
further precaution against outliers, observations with Cook’s distance 
greater than 4/N, where N is the sample size, are discarded.
15A large literature that goes back to Orcutt (1950) explains how 
simultaneity and omitted-variable issues can lead to considerable 
underestimation of trade price elasticities. Another issue that biases 
the analysis against finding a strong effect of trade price changes 
on trade is that of heterogeneous elasticities across different goods. 
Results: From Exchange Rates to Trade Prices
周e analysis suggests that exchange rate movements 
typically have substantial effects on trade prices, with 
the estimates of long-term pass-through elasticities 
having the expected sign for virtually all the economies 
considered (Figure 3.2). 周e estimates of exchange rate 
pass-through typically lie, as would be expected, in the 
0–1 interval. 周e results imply that, on average, a 10 
percent real effective currency depreciation increases 
import prices by 6.1 percent and reduces export prices 
Different goods have different price elasticities, but movements in 
aggregate trade prices may be dominated by movements in the rela-
tive prices of price-inelastic goods. 周is dominance would dampen 
estimated price effects on trade flows. In fact, micro-level estimates 
of trade elasticities tend to be somewhat larger than those based on 
aggregate data, as discussed by Feenstra and others (2014) and Imbs 
and Mejean (2015).
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
–1.5
–1.0
–0.5
0.0
Exchange rate pass-through to
export prices
Exchange rate pass-through to import prices
–2.5
–2.0
–1.5
–1.0
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
–1.5
–1.0
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
Price elasticity of export volumes
Price elasticity of import volumes
1. Exchange Rate Pass-Through
2. Price Elasticities 
Individual-economy estimates
Average
The estimated effects of exchange rate movements on trade prices and volumes 
have the expected sign for most of the economies considered.
Figure 3.2. Long-Term Exchange Rate Pass-Through and Price 
Elasticities
Source: IMF staff estimates.
Note: Estimates based on annual data for 60 advanced and emerging market and 
developing economies from 1980 to 2014. Boxes indicate the expected sign and, 
in the case of exchange rate pass-through, the expected size of the estimates.
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
110 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
in foreign currency by 5.5 percent (Table 3.1).16 周e 
estimation results are broadly in line with existing 
studies for major economies.17 It is interesting to note 
that economies with stronger exchange rate pass-
through to export prices in foreign currency tend to 
have weaker pass-through to domestic import prices, a 
pattern that also emerges from the findings of Bussière, 
Delle Chiaie, and Peltonen (2014). 周e results also 
indicate that most of the long-term effects on trade 
prices materialize within one year.18 
16周e corresponding response of export prices in domestic currency 
to a real effective currency depreciation of 10 percent would be a rise 
of 4.5 percent (–10 × (0.552 – 1)).
17For example, the results are strongly correlated with those 
reported in a recent study by Bussière, Delle Chiaie, and Peltonen 
(2014), who report pass-through elasticities for 40 economies 
(Annex Figure 3.2.1).
18周e estimates of pass-through to trade prices also have implica-
tions for the estimated effect of a change in the exchange rate on 
the terms of trade (the price of exports relative to imports), which 
have implications for domestic demand. 周e baseline long-term 
pass-through estimates reported in Table 3.1 are 0.55 for export 
prices in foreign currency and −0.61 for import prices in domestic 
currency. So a 1 percent appreciation in a country’s currency lowers 
the domestic prices of its imports by 0.61 percent and raises the 
foreign-currency price of exports by 0.55 percent. 周is means that 
the domestic-currency price of exports falls by 0.45 percent (0.55 − 
1) and the terms of trade improve by 0.16 percent (−0.45 − (−0.61)) 
following a 1 percent appreciation. 周is is well below the full pass-
through case in which a 1 percent appreciation translates into a 1 
percent improvement in the terms of trade.
Results: From Trade Prices to Trade Volumes
周e analysis suggests that trade price movements 
typically have the expected effects on export and import 
volumes, with most individual-economy estimates hav-
ing the conventional (negative) sign (Figure 3.2, panel 
2). On average, the estimated price elasticities of vol-
umes suggest that a 10 percent rise in export and import 
prices reduces the level of both export and import 
volumes by about 3 percent in the long term (Table 
3.1). 周e results also indicate that most of the long-term 
effects on trade volumes materialize within one year. 
At the same time, numerous individual-economy 
estimates have counterintuitive (positive) signs. Given 
the challenges already mentioned of identifying the 
effects of trade prices on volumes, these exceptions 
are not surprising, and the true effects are likely to be 
stronger than suggested by the cross-country aver-
ages reported in Table 3.1. Also, the sample includes a 
range of economies, including some for whom fuel and 
nonfuel primary products constitute the main source 
of export earnings (exceeding 50 percent of total 
exports). To investigate whether these primary-product 
exporters have a strong influence on the estimation 
results, the analysis is repeated while excluding them 
from the sample. 周e results are similar to the baseline, 
suggesting that these economies are not driving the 
results (Table 3.1).
Meanwhile, the effects of shifts in foreign and 
domestic aggregate demand on export and import vol-
umes have the expected positive sign for all economies 
Table 3.1. Exchange Rate Pass-Through and Price Elasticities
Exchange Rate Pass-Through
Price Elasticity of Volumes
Marshall-Lerner  
Condition Satisfied?1
Export Prices
Import Prices
Exports
Imports
Based on Producer Price Index2
Long-Term
0.552
–0.605
–0.321
–0.298
Yes
One-Year Effect
0.625
–0.580
–0.260
–0.258
Yes
Based on Consumer Price Index3
Long-Term
0.457
–0.608
–0.328
–0.333
Yes
One-Year Effect
0.599
–0.546
–0.200
–0.200
Yes
Memorandum
Noncommodity Exporters4
Long-Term Elasticity2
0.571
–0.582
–0.461
–0.272
Yes
Source: IMF staff estimates.
Note: Table reports simple average of individual-economy estimates for 60 economies during 1980–2014.
1The formula for the Marshall-Lerner condition adjusted for imperfect pass-through is (–ERPT of P X)(1 + price elasticity of X) + (ERPT of P M)(1 + price elastic-
ity of M) + 1 > 0, in which X denotes exports, M denotes imports, and PX and PM denote the prices of exports and imports, respectively (Annex 3.3).
2Estimates based on producer price index–based real effective exchange rate and export and import prices relative to foreign and domestic producer prices, 
respectively.
3Estimates based on consumer price index–based real effective exchange rate and export and import prices relative to foreign and domestic consumer prices, 
respectively.
4Excludes economies for which primary products constitute the main source of export earnings, exceeding 50 percent of total exports, on average, between 
2009 and 2013.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested