pdf viewer library c# : Pasting image into pdf application SDK tool html wpf web page online text13-part1766

CHA PTER 3
EXCH ANG E RATES AND T RA DE FLO WS : D ISC ONNEC TED? 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
111
in the sample (Annex Figure 3.2.2). On average, a 1 
percent increase in trading-partner aggregate demand 
is associated with a 2.3 percent increase in exports. A 
1 percent increase in domestic aggregate demand is 
associated with a 1.4 percent increase in imports.19 
周ese results confirm that shifts in relative demand 
have a strong bearing on trade, a link that has featured 
prominently in the policy debate on the postcrisis 
decline in global trade.20 
Overall Effect on Net Exports
What do the estimates for price and volume elas-
ticities imply for the overall effect of exchange rate 
movements on net exports? To answer this question, 
the analysis combines the average estimates for the 
four elasticities reported in Table 3.1, which are more 
reliable than the individual-economy estimates, with 
economy-specific shares of imports and exports in real 
GDP.21 周e results suggest that a 10 percent real effec-
tive depreciation in an economy’s currency is associated 
with a rise in real net exports of, on average, 1.5 per-
cent of GDP, with substantial cross-country variation 
around this average (Figure 3.3). Given the wide range 
of GDP shares of exports and imports across econo-
mies, this implied effect of a real effective deprecia-
tion of 10 percent ranges from 0.5 percent of GDP 
to 3.1 percent of GDP. Although it takes a number of 
years for these effects to fully materialize, much of the 
adjustment occurs in the first year, as mentioned.22 
19As mentioned, the equation estimated for import volumes 
decomposes the effects of aggregate demand into exports and domes-
tic demand for domestic goods. 周e estimated elasticities for these 
two components of aggregate demand are both 0.7, consistent with a 
combined aggregate demand elasticity of 1.4.
20For a broader discussion of the role of foreign and domestic 
output in driving trade, including during the postcrisis decline in 
global trade, see Chapter 4 of the October 2010 WEO and Hoek-
man 2015.
21周e effect of a real exchange rate movement on real net exports 
as a percentage of GDP is defined as ηPX ηX (X/Y) – ηPM ηM 
(M/Y), in which ηPX and ηX denote the exchange rate pass-through 
to export prices and the price elasticity of exports, respectively, and 
ηPM and ηM denote the exchange rate pass-through to import prices 
and the price elasticity of imports, respectively. Given the focus on 
the effects of exchange rate movements since 2012, the shares of 
exports and imports in GDP (X/Y and M/Y, respectively) as of 2012 
are used in the calculation. Combining the estimates in the first row 
of Table 3.1 with the sample averages for exports and imports in 
percent of GDP as of 2012 (42 and 41 percent of GDP, respectively) 
yields an estimated rise in net exports of 1.47 percent of GDP fol-
lowing a real effective depreciation of 10 percent.
22Similarly, the estimates indicate that the Marshall-Lerner condi-
tion holds, so that a currency depreciation improves the nominal 
trade balance. Note that, in the presence of imperfect pass-through, 
Insights from Large Exchange Rate Depreciation 
Episodes
To contribute more directly to the debate about 
the effects of the recent large exchange rate changes, 
this subsection presents evidence of the effects of 
large and sudden depreciations. In a number of cases, 
these episodes coincide with currency crisis episodes 
identified in the literature. A study of trade dynam-
ics following such relatively extreme events allows the 
analysis to provide better estimates of export elas-
ticities. (周e exercise is less able to identify import 
elasticities because various domestic developments 
that affect imports coincide with large exchange rate 
depreciations.) 周e analysis focuses on large exchange 
rate depreciation episodes not associated with bank-
ing crises, given that such crises can have additional 
confounding effects on trade. Overall, large exchange 
rate depreciation episodes are likely to include a larger 
exogenous component than more normal exchange rate 
the Marshall-Lerner condition is (–ERPT of PX) (1 + price elasticity 
of X ) + (ERPT of PM) (1 + price elasticity of M) + 1 > 0, in which 
ERPT denotes exchange rate pass-through, as explained in Annex 
3.3. 周e Marshall-Lerner condition computed here is based on 
the cross-country average of estimates reported in Table 3.1. 周e 
condition also holds for much—though not all—of the sample, 
when individual-economy elasticity estimates, rather than the sample 
averages, are used in the calculation.
0
5
10
15
0
1
2
3
4
Frequency
Increase in real net exports
A 10 percent real effective depreciation in an economy’s currency is 
associated with a rise in real net exports of, on average, 1.5 percent of GDP, 
with substantial cross-country variation around this average.
Figure 3.3.  Effect of a 10 Percent Real Effective Depreciation on 
Real Net Exports
(Percent of GDP)
Source: IMF staff calculations.
Note: Figure shows long-term effect on level of real net exports in percent of 
GDP based on country-specific import- and export-to-GDP ratios and the 
average producer price index–based trade elasticities reported in Table 3.1 for 
the 60 economies in the sample.
Pasting image into pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to cut image from pdf file; how to copy an image from a pdf to word
Pasting image into pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to cut and paste image from pdf; copy and paste image from pdf to pdf
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
112 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
fluctuations and are more appropriate for estimating 
the relationship between exchange rates and trade.23
Identifying Large Exchange Rate Depreciation Episodes
周e analysis identifies large exchange rate deprecia-
tion episodes using a statistical approach similar to those 
employed in the literature. 周e approach is based on 
two criteria. 周e first criterion identifies a large depre-
ciation as an unusually sharp nominal depreciation of 
the currency against the U.S. dollar. 周is identifica-
tion approach is based on a numerical threshold set 
at the 90th percentile of all annual depreciations in 
the sample.24 周e second criterion prevents the same 
large exchange rate depreciation episode from being 
captured more than once. It requires the change in the 
depreciation rate compared with the previous year to be 
unusually large (greater than the 90th percentile of all 
changes). Because exchange rates tend to be more vola-
tile in emerging market and developing economies than 
in advanced economies, both thresholds are defined 
separately for the two groups of economies. For the 
first criterion, the threshold for advanced economies is 
a depreciation of 13 percent against the dollar, whereas 
for emerging market and developing economies, the 
threshold is 20 percent. For the second criterion, both 
thresholds are about 13 percentage points. 
To ensure that the results are not unduly influenced 
by high-inflation episodes, the analysis considers only 
large exchange rate depreciations that occur when 
the inflation rate is less than 30 percent. In addition, 
the analysis focuses on episodes not associated with 
banking crises to avoid confounding factors associ-
ated with credit supply disruptions. In particular, large 
exchange rate depreciation episodes occurring within 
three years of a banking crisis based on Laeven and 
Valencia’s (2013) data set are discarded. 周e effects of 
large depreciations associated with banking crises are 
considered separately later in the chapter.
23Although this episode-based approach addresses some of the 
problems associated with the conventional approach of estimating 
the effects of exchange rates on trade, it is subject to the criticism 
that large depreciation episodes could be triggered by a policy 
response to unusually weak export performance in the context of an 
unsustainable balance of payments deficit. In that case, the episodes 
would tend to be associated with unusually weak export growth, 
biasing the analysis against finding that currency depreciation causes 
a rise in exports.
24周is approach of identifying large exchange rate depreciation 
episodes based on statistical thresholds is similar to that of Laeven 
and Valencia (2013), who in turn build on the approach of Frankel 
and Rose (1996).
Applying this strategy to all economies that have 
data on export volumes and prices during 1980–2014 
yields 66 large exchange rate depreciation episodes.25 
As reported in Annex Table 3.4.1, about one-quarter 
(17) of these large exchange rate depreciations occurred 
in advanced economies. 周ey include, for example, 
European economies affected by the 1992 European 
Exchange Rate Mechanism crisis. 周e remaining 
episodes occurred in emerging market and developing 
economies and include, for example, the devaluation of 
the Chinese yuan in 1994 and the large depreciation of 
the Venezuelan bolívar in 2002.26
What Happens to Exports after a Large Exchange 
Rate Depreciation?
Now that large exchange rate depreciation episodes 
have been identified, this subsection uses statistical 
techniques to assess the relationship between exchange 
rates and export prices and export volumes. 周e 
methodology is standard and follows Cerra and Saxena 
2008 and Romer and Romer 2010, among others. In 
particular, the average responses of export prices and 
export volumes to a large depreciation are estimated 
separately using panel data analysis.27 
25For the purpose of the panel estimation conducted in this 
subsection, the sample includes all economies that have data on 
export volumes and prices during 1980–2014. 周us, 158 economies 
are included in the sample. For a number of the 158 economies, no 
large exchange rate depreciation episodes are identified, and the data 
for these economies serve to estimate the dynamic structure of the 
equations. Note that, in contrast, for the individual-economy estimates 
reported earlier in the chapter, the sample includes only the 60 econo-
mies with at least 25 years of data on relative trade prices and volumes.
26A number of well-known large exchange rate depreciation 
episodes were associated with banking crises and are therefore not 
included in the baseline sample for analysis, for example, Mexico in 
1994, Russia in 1998, Argentina in 2002, and Finland and Sweden 
in the early 1990s.
27周e estimated equation makes use of an autoregressive distrib-
uted lags model in first differences. 周e estimated lagged impacts of 
an episode of large exchange rate depreciation are then cumulated to 
obtain the dynamic impact on the level of export prices and export 
volumes. For export prices, the estimated equation has the change 
in the log of export prices in foreign currency as the dependent vari-
able on the left-hand side. On the right-hand side, the explanatory 
variables are the current and lagged values of the dummy variable 
indicating an episode of large exchange rate depreciation. Includ-
ing lags allows for a delayed impact of a large depreciation. In 
addition, the approach controls for lags of the change in the log of 
export prices in foreign currency, to distinguish the effect of a large 
depreciation from that of normal dynamics. 周e equation estimated 
for export prices is
y
it
= a + ∑2
j=1
b
j
y
i,t–j
+ ∑2
s=0
b
s
S
i,t–s
+ m
i
+ l
t
+ υ
it
,
in which the subscript i denotes the ith country and the subscript t 
denotes the tth year; y is the log change in export prices in foreign 
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program. Free PDF document processing SDK supports PDF page extraction, copying and pasting in Visual
copy image from pdf to ppt; how to copy picture from pdf to powerpoint
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit Copying and Pasting Pages. also copy and paste pages from a PDF document into another PDF
copy images from pdf to word; how to copy and paste a pdf image into a word document
CHA PTER 3
EXCH ANG E RATES AND T RA DE FLO WS : D ISC ONNEC TED? 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
113
周e results suggest that large depreciations substan-
tially boost exports. By definition, the episodes studied 
are associated with large depreciations, and the results 
indicate that these depreciations average 25 percent in 
real effective terms over five years (Figure3.4). Export 
prices in foreign currency fall by about 10 percent, with 
much of the adjustment occurring in the first year. 周e 
implied pass-through elasticity of export prices relative 
to the real exchange rate is thus about 0.4, similar to the 
estimate based on trade equations already noted.
Export volumes rise more gradually, by about 10 
percent over five years.28 周is response indicates an 
average price elasticity of exports of about –0.7, which 
is stronger than the elasticity of –0.3 estimated using 
the traditional trade equations discussed earlier. 周is 
stronger estimated price elasticity could reflect the 
clearer identification strategy based on large exchange 
rate depreciation episodes. All the results are statisti-
cally significant at conventional levels.29 
Do Initial Economic Conditions Matter?
Do export dynamics following large depreciations 
differ depending on initial economic conditions? When 
there is more economic slack and a greater degree of 
spare capacity in the economy, there could be more 
scope for production and exports to expand following 
a rise in foreign demand associated with exchange rate 
depreciation. Intuitively, this is because the volume 
of exports sold depends not only on the strength of 
demand, but also on an economy’s ability to adjust pro-
duction in response to stronger demand. After all, while 
an individual firm can readily expand its export produc-
tion by purchasing more inputs, a national economy has 
to either utilize unemployed resources or move resources 
ePX
currency, y = D ln
—–
, in which P* is the foreign (trade-weighted) 
P*
consumer price index; and S is the dummy variable indicating the 
occurrence of a large depreciation. 周e approach includes a full 
set of country dummies (m
i
) to take into account differences in 
countries’ normal growth rates. 周e estimated equation also includes 
a full set of time dummies (l
t
) to take into account global shocks 
such as shifts in oil prices or global business cycles. For the real effec-
tive exchange rate (REER) and for export volumes, the dependent 
variable is replaced with y = D ln(REER) and y = D ln(X), respec-
tively. For the study of export volumes, the analysis also controls for 
changes in foreign demand, proxied by trading-partner GDP growth.
28Consistent with this result, Alessandria, Pratap, and Yue (2013) 
find that exports rise gradually following a large depreciation, based 
on data for 11 emerging market economies.
29周ese results are robust to the use of a number of alternative 
specifications and methodologies to estimate the impulse responses 
or to identify the large exchange rate movements, as explained in 
Annex 3.4.
from nontraded into traded goods production. Econo-
mies may vary in the speed of their ability to reallocate 
resources in this way, although this issue would be less 
salient in the presence of economic slack. 
To investigate this possibility, the analysis divides the 
66 identified episodes of depreciation in half according 
to the degree of economic slack in the year preceding 
–20
–10
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
–40
–30
–20
–10
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
–10
–5
0
5
10
15
20
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
Source: IMF staff estimates.
Note: Dashed lines denote 90 percent confidence intervals. 
1.  Real Effective Exchange Rate
2. Export Prices
3.  Export Volumes
Large exchange rate depreciations are associated with a substantial decline in 
export prices in foreign currency and a rise in export volumes.
Figure 3.4.  Export Dynamics Following Large Exchange Rate 
Depreciations
(Percent; years on x-axis)
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
created blank pages or image-only pages from an image source PDF Pages Extraction, Copying and Pasting. copy and paste pages from a PDF document into another PDF
copy picture from pdf to powerpoint; copy picture from pdf
.NET PDF SDK - Description of All PDF Processing Control Feastures
Merge, combine, and consolidate multiple PDF files into one PDF file. PDF page extraction, copying and pasting allow users to move PDF pages; PDF Image Process.
paste jpeg into pdf; paste picture into pdf preview
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
114 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
the exchange rate depreciation.30 周e results suggest 
that, for the subsample of episodes with less economic 
slack, the impact of the depreciation on exports is still 
positive but close to zero (Figure 3.5).31 By contrast, 
for the subsample with more initial slack in the econ-
omy, the export gain is larger than in the full-sample 
baseline (by an additional 7 percentage points after five 
years). While this result is not surprising from an ana-
lytical viewpoint, it has not been highlighted in related 
studies. 周e exchange rate also tends to depreciate by 
more and in a more persistent manner than in the 
baseline, arguably providing exporters with stronger 
incentives to cut export prices than in the baseline. 
Is the Behavior of Exports Different after Large 
Depreciations Associated with Banking Crises?
Does the boost to exports associated with a large 
exchange rate depreciation depend on the health of 
the exporting economy’s financial sector? In principle, 
banking crises can depress exports by reducing the 
availability of credit needed to expand export produc-
tion.32 周is drop in credit availability could offset the 
export gains due to the currency depreciation. 
To shed light on this question, the analysis in this 
subsection focuses on large exchange rate depreciation 
episodes associated with banking crises. In particu-
lar, it applies the same criteria used in the previ-
ous subsections, identifying 57 episodes in which a 
30周e degree of economic slack is defined here based on real 
GDP growth in the year preceding the episode of large exchange 
rate depreciation, as explained in Annex 3.4. 周e results are broadly 
similar when the definition of economic slack is based on the output 
gap in the year preceding the large exchange rate depreciation.
31To ease comparability of the estimation results for the two 
groups, the estimated impulse responses are scaled to ensure that the 
first-year impact on the real exchange rate is exactly the same. Such 
rescaling is performed in all later comparisons of large exchange rate 
depreciation episodes.
32Ronci (2004) analyzes the effect of constrained trade finance on 
trade flows in countries undergoing financial and balance of pay-
ments crises and concludes that constrained trade finance depresses 
both export and import volumes in the short term. Dell’Ariccia, 
Detragiache, and Rajan (2005) and Iacovone and Zavacka (2009) 
find that banking crises have a detrimental effect on real activity in 
sectors more dependent on external finance, which includes export-
oriented sectors. Kiendrebeogo (2013) investigates whether banking 
crises are associated with declines in bilateral exports, by estimat-
ing a gravity model using a sample of advanced economies and 
developing countries for the period 1988–2010. 周e results suggest 
that  banking-crisis-hit countries experience lower levels of bilateral 
exports, with exports of manufactured goods falling particularly 
strongly. More generally, for an analysis of the evolution of trade 
following large depreciations associated with financial crises, see 
Chapter 4 of the October 2010 WEO.
More slack
Less slack
Baseline
Source: IMF staff estimates.
Note: Dashed lines denote 90 percent confidence intervals. 
The export increase associated with large currency depreciations is typically 
stronger when there is more economic slack in the domestic economy. 
Figure 3.5.  Export Dynamics Following Large Exchange Rate 
Depreciations: The Role of Initial Economic Slack
(Percent; years on x-axis)
–40
–30
–20
–10
0
10
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
–50
–40
–30
–20
–10
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
–10
–5
0
5
10
15
20
25
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
1. Real Effective Exchange Rate
2. Export Prices
3. Export Volumes
VB.NET Image: Word to Image Converter SDK to Convert DOC/DOCX to
contrary, if you convert the Word page to image file, you can easily insert it into your PPT Word content can be easily copied by just copying and pasting).
how to copy pictures from pdf in; copy and paste images from pdf
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Process TIFF, RasterEdge XDoc.Tiff for .
document processing functions are divided into several categories Our supported image and document formats are rotating, resizing, copying and pasting TIFF page
paste picture into pdf; how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf
CHA PTER 3
EXCH ANG E RATES AND T RA DE FLO WS : D ISC ONNEC TED? 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
115
banking crisis (again, based on the data set of Laeven 
and Valencia 2013) occurred in the three-year period 
before or after the large exchange rate depreciation 
(see Annex Table 3.4.2). By definition, these 57 
episodes are not the same set as those included in the 
baseline analysis. 周ey include, for example, the large 
exchange rate depreciations in Finland and Sweden in 
1993; 周ailand and Korea in 1997 and 1998, respec-
tively; Russia in 1998; Brazil in 1999; and Argentina 
in 2002.
周e results suggest that the boost to exports is 
indeed weaker when an exchange rate depreciation 
is associated with a banking crisis (Figure 3.6). In 
particular, export prices decline by less, suggesting an 
average elasticity of export prices to the real effective 
exchange rate of 0.25, about half that observed in the 
baseline case. 周e response of real exports is near zero. 
周ese results are consistent with the view that the 
credit constraint exporting firms face when a country’s 
financial sector is weak limits their ability to borrow 
and increases their exporting capacity when the cur-
rency depreciates.33 
At the same time, banking crises result in a wide 
range of outcomes, as discussed in the literature (see 
Chapter 4 of the October 2009 WEO, for example). 
For a number of the episodes associated with banking 
crises analyzed here, exports outperformed the near-
zero average effect—for example, for the large depre-
ciations of Argentina (2002), Brazil (1999), Russia 
(1998), and Sweden (1993), for which the estimated 
effect on exports is positive.34
Overall, the results based on the analysis of tradi-
tional trade equations and large exchange rate deprecia-
tion episodes suggest that trade responds substantially 
to the exchange rate according to the historical evi-
dence and that the conventional expenditure- switching 
effects apply. 周e rise in exports associated with 
exchange rate depreciation is likely to be largest when 
there is slack in the economy and when the financial 
sector is operating normally. 
33周ese results are robust to controlling for the occurrence of 
banking crises in trading partners in the estimated equations.
34For additional analysis of the effects of the 2002 Argentina 
episode, see Calvo, Izquierdo, and Talvi 2006. For the 1998 Rus-
sia episode, see Chiodo and Owyang 2002. For the 1993 Sweden 
episode, see Jonung 2010.
–40
–30
–20
–10
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
–20
–10
0
10
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
–10
–5
0
5
10
15
20
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
Source: IMF staff estimates.
Note: Dashed lines denote 90 percent confidence intervals. 
1.  Real Effective Exchange Rate
2. Export Prices
3.  Export Volumes
With banking crisis
Baseline
The export increase associated with a large currency depreciation is typically 
smaller when a country's financial system is weak, as in the context of a 
banking crisis. 
Figure 3.6.  Export Dynamics Following Large Exchange Rate 
Depreciations Associated with Banking Crises
(Percent; years on x-axis)
C# Image: C# Tutorial to Scale Images in C# by Using Rasteredge .
you need to install our .NET Imaging SDK into your C# Crucial specific image editing functions are: basic image cropping, pasting, resizing, merging
pasting image into pdf; paste jpg into pdf
VB.NET Word: Word to JPEG Image Converter in .NET Application
on you can forget about copying and pasting the word Sample.docx" has been converted into an individual translate page to image 'save image REFile.SaveImageFile
how to cut an image out of a pdf file; how to paste picture on pdf
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
116 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
Disconnect or Stability?
周e analysis so far has assumed that the histori-
cal relationship between exchange rates and trade has 
been stable over time and thus provides an appropriate 
benchmark for assessing the implications of the recent 
exchange rate movements. 周is section investigates 
whether this assumption is warranted or whether trade 
and exchange rates have become disconnected. It starts 
by investigating the role of the rise of global value 
chains, with the associated international fragmentation 
of production, in reducing the links between exchange 
rates and trade—an issue that has featured promi-
nently in the recent policy debate on disconnect. It 
then investigates more generally whether the relation-
ship between exchange rates and trade flows—either 
measured using the traditional trade equations or based 
on large exchange rate depreciation episodes—has 
weakened. 
Disconnect and the Rise of Global Value Chains
Gross trade flows can be decomposed into trade 
related to global value chains (trade in intermedi-
ate goods that serve as inputs into other economies’ 
exports) and other trade. 周is section begins with a 
brief overview of the rise of global value chains during 
the past several decades. 周en it explains why trade 
related to global value chains could respond more 
weakly than traditional trade to exchange rate changes 
and assesses the evidence.35 
周e Rise of Global Value Chains
During the past several decades, international 
trade has been increasingly organized within so-called 
global value chains, with different stages of produc-
tion distributed across different economies. Production 
fragmentation has grown as economies increasingly 
specialize in adding value at some stage of production 
rather than producing entire final products. Exports 
of domestic value added have gradually declined as a 
fraction of gross exports, while the share of exports 
consisting of imported intermediate products, that is, 
foreign value added, has increased. At the same time, 
the share of intermediate goods in total exports is 
35周e extent to which the rise of global value chains matters for 
the relationship between exchange rates and trade depends on the 
share of the related trade in gross trade flows and on the degree 
to which the related trade responds differently to exchange rate 
fluctuations.
rising, while the share of final products is declining. 
As a result, export competitiveness is determined not 
only by the exchange rate and price level of the export 
destination economy, but also by the exchange rate and 
price level of the economy at the end of the produc-
tion chain.
Participation in global value chains is measured 
along two dimensions: backward (import) links with 
previous production stages and forward (export) links 
with subsequent production stages. 
• Backward participation. As global value chains have 
become more prevalent, the share of gross exports 
consisting of inputs imported from abroad has 
increased. Hence, the share of foreign value added 
in gross exports has gradually risen from a cross-
country average of about 15 percent of gross exports 
in the 1970s to about 25 percent in 2013 (Figure 
3.7). However, for some economies, such as Hun-
gary, Romania, Mexico, Thailand, and Ireland, the 
increase has been greater than 20 percentage points, 
substantially larger than the cross-country average. 
Some evidence indicates that the rise of global value 
chains measured along this dimension has slowed in 
recent years. Indeed, Constantinescu, Mattoo, and 
Ruta (2015) find that the slower pace of global value 
chain expansion has contributed to the global trade 
slowdown observed since the global financial crisis.
• Forward participation. With the rise of global value 
chains, the share of exports consisting of intermedi-
ate inputs used by trading partners for production of 
their exports has increased. The share has increased 
gradually, to 24 percent from 20 percent of gross 
exports, on average, during the period 1995–2009 
(Figure 3.7). Russia, Chile, Indonesia, Japan, and 
Korea have seen the largest rises.
周ese two measures could be used to assess a coun-
try’s relative position in global value chains. Economies 
toward the end (downstream) of production chains are 
more likely to have strong backward but weak forward 
links. 周ose closer to the origin (upstream) of produc-
tion chains are more likely to have strong forward but 
weak backward links. 
Global Value Chain Participation and Trade 
Elasticities
What effect does increased participation in global 
value chains have on the responsiveness of trade to 
exchange rates? 
• Exchange rate pass-through. If the share of for-
eign value added in exports is large, a currency 
CHA PTER 3
EXCH ANG E RATES AND T RA DE FLO WS : D ISC ONNEC TED? 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
117
depreciation can substantially increase the cost of an 
economy’s imported inputs if the input composition 
remains unchanged.36 This higher cost may then 
be passed on to the next production stage. Hence, 
foreign-currency export prices might not decline 
as much as in the conventional case of no foreign-
value-added content, implying a weaker exchange 
rate pass-through to export prices.37 The likely 
impact of the rise of global value chains on pass-
through to import prices is less clear.
• Price elasticities. Demand for an economy’s exports 
ultimately depends on the demand conditions and 
the price competitiveness of the finished product 
in the final destination market. With production 
increasingly fragmented across international borders, 
however, the final buyers at the end of an economy’s 
production chain may not be among the economy’s 
direct trading partners. This lack of direct connec-
tion complicates the estimation of the traditional 
trade relationship discussed earlier in the chapter. In 
particular, it could lead to “measurement error” in 
the sense that export prices become a weaker signal 
of true price competitiveness, and this measurement 
error could bias estimates of the effect of export 
prices on export demand toward zero. An analogous 
argument applies to the relationship between import 
prices and imports, since imports increasingly reflect 
developments in exports. An increase in import 
prices resulting from an exchange rate deprecia-
tion could coincide with lower export prices and 
stronger demand for exports and, therefore, a rise 
in import demand. The rise in the price of imports 
could then be associated with a perverse increase 
in imports despite higher import prices, counter to 
the traditional expenditure-switching logic. Overall, 
estimated export and import price elasticities could 
be smaller the more an economy participates in 
global value chains. The same reasoning also applies 
to the estimated effect of exchange rate movements 
on net exports.
36However, the composition of inputs might not remain 
unchanged, because foreign importers of intermediates can, at least 
in principle, substitute among a variety of suppliers to minimize 
production costs.
37At the same time a large fraction of trade in value added is 
within the same firm rather than between different firms. When a 
country’s currency depreciates and export profits increase, firms may 
change export prices to shift some of their profits to foreign affiliates. 
Such transfer pricing behavior could alter pass-through to export 
prices, thus confounding the effect on pass-through attributable to 
global value chains.
–30
–20
–10
0
10
20
30
NOR
EST
NZL
DNK
RUS
GBR
JPN
CHE
ISR
AUS
SVN
CZE
ZAF
FIN
ARG
BRA
GRC
IDN
ITA
NLD
POL
PRT
USA
BEL
CAN
CHL
FRA
SWE
SVK
ESP
AUT
DEU
KOR
CHN
IND
TUR
IRL
THA
MEX
ROU
HUN
1. Backward Participation1
(Percent of gross exports)
3. Change in Backward Participation
(Percent; year of first observation
to 2009)
3
–30
–20
–10
0
10
20
30
ZAF
SVK
FRA
CHN
FIN
SWE
DEU
MEX
ESP
HUN
GRC
NZL
TUR
NLD
POL
GBR
AUT
SVN
CZE
PRT
DNK
USA
ARG
BEL
CHE
ITA
BRA
CAN
IRL
EST
ISR
IND
THA
NOR
AUS
KOR
IDN
JPN
CHL
RUS
0
20
40
60
80
100
1970
1980
1990
2000
2010
0
20
40
60
80
100
1995
2000
2005
2010
Johnson and Noguera 2012
Duval and others 2014
4. Change in Forward Participation
(Percent; year of first observation
to 2009)
2. Forward Participation2
(Percent of gross exports)
Participation in global value chains has generally risen gradually, with 
substantial changes in some countries.
Sources: Duval and others 2014; Johnson and Noguera 2012; and Organisation 
for Economic Co-operation and Development.
Note: Data labels in the figure use International Organization for Standardization 
(ISO) country codes.
1
Share of foreign value added in gross exports. Solid lines denote the average. 
Dashed lines denote 25th and 75th percentiles.
2
Intermediate goods used by trading partners for production of their exports as a 
share of gross exports.
Based on Johnson and Noguera 2012.
Figure 3.7.  Evolution of Global Value Chains
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
118 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
In general, increased participation in global value 
chains could lower the effects of exchange movements 
on trade prices and of trade prices on trade volumes. 
At the same time, although trade related to global 
value chains has grown in recent decades, the bulk 
of global trade still consists of conventional trade. In 
addition, as already mentioned, the average increase 
in the share of foreign value added in exports has 
generally been gradual and has recently slowed. 周us, 
the rising share of foreign value added is unlikely 
to have dramatically reduced the responsiveness of 
gross exports and imports to exchange rates for most 
countries. 周e overall evidence regarding a rising 
disconnect between exchange rates and trade, which 
reflects not only the rise of global value chains but 
also other factors, is assessed later in the chapter. 周at 
analysis does not suggest a general weakening of the 
relationship between exchange rates, trade prices, and 
total trade volumes. 
However, beyond the implications of global value 
chains for the relationship between overall gross trade 
flows and exchange rates, increased participation in 
value chains may have a bearing on the relationship 
between exchange rates and trade in global-value-
chain-related goods. Box 3.1 assesses the evidence. In 
particular, it estimates the relationship between trade 
in global-value-chain-related goods and real effec-
tive exchange rates. It finds that a real appreciation 
of a country’s currency not only reduces its exports 
of domestic value added, but also lowers its imports 
of foreign value added (in contrast to the traditional 
rise in imports following currency appreciation). 周is 
latter result is consistent with the notion that global-
value-chain-related domestic and foreign value added 
are complements in production.38 So producing and 
exporting less domestic value added would also reduce 
the derived demand for imported foreign value added. 
In addition, the analysis finds that the magnitudes of 
import and export elasticities depend on the size of a 
country’s contribution to global value chains—smaller 
domestic contribution of value added tends to dampen 
the response to exchange rate changes (see Cheng 
38It is important to keep a macroeconomic perspective on this 
issue. Input substitution for product categories or some industries 
may rise. Generally, however, once a firm arranges production pro-
cesses with a foreign supplier, it may well continue working with the 
supplier for some time to recoup sunk costs of moving production 
abroad. A generally low degree of substitutability between domestic 
and foreign input suppliers could thus be expected.
and others, forthcoming; and IMF 2015a, 2015b, 
2015c).39 
Finally, the rise of global value chains has implications 
for competitiveness assessments. As already mentioned, 
in a value chain, the cost of producing an economy’s 
goods as well the demand for them can depend on 
the exchange rates of economies that are not among 
the economy’s direct trading partners. 周us, the real 
effective exchange rate relevant for competitiveness 
assessments not only needs to include the country’s 
direct trading partners but must also take into account 
all participants in the value chain, including the final 
consumers. Such a measure, the so-called value-added 
real effective exchange rate, is described in Box 3.2. 周is 
measure depends on the final destinations of exported 
domestic value added, and it accounts for product 
substitutability in demand and production. As Box 3.2 
reports, a number of economically important differences 
arise between value-added real effective exchange rates 
and conventional real effective exchange rates. However, 
overall, the two measures are strongly correlated, in part 
because the vast majority of trade does not consist of 
global-value-chain-related trade.40 
Overall, the evidence suggests that, for economies 
that have become more deeply involved in global value 
chains, trade in global-value-chain-related products 
has become less strongly responsive to exchange rate 
changes. At the same time, although global-value-
chain-related trade has gradually increased through 
the decades, the relative pace of its expansion appears 
to have decelerated in recent years, and the bulk of 
global trade still consists of conventional trade. 周e 
rise of global value chains is thus unlikely to have 
39Consistent with this result, Ahmed, Appendino, and Ruta (2015) 
find that the response of gross exports of manufactured goods to real 
exchange rate movements is weaker in economies with a higher share 
of foreign value added in gross exports, and Ollivaud, Rusticelli, and 
Schwellnus (2015) find that the elasticity of the terms of trade to the 
exchange rate is weaker in such economies. In related work based on 
firm-level data, Amiti, Itskhoki, and Konings (2014) find that import-
intensive exporters have significantly lower exchange rate pass-through 
to their (foreign currency) export prices. Eichengreen and Tong (2015) 
find that renminbi appreciation has a positive effect on the stock mar-
ket valuation of firms in sectors exporting final goods to China, with 
a negligible effect on those providing inputs for China’s processing 
exports. 周e IMF (2015d) provides additional evidence, using data for 
Singapore, that products that have a higher foreign-value-added share 
respond more weakly to relative export prices.
40周is observation also suggests that biases in estimated value-
added trade relations due to incorrect use of standard real effective 
exchange rates could be small. 周e same implication applies to the 
estimation of gross trade relations based on value-added real effective 
exchange rates.
CHA PTER 3
EXCH ANG E RATES AND T RA DE FLO WS : D ISC ONNEC TED? 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
119
dramatically altered the responsiveness of gross exports 
and imports to exchange rates. 周is notion is further 
investigated in the next subsection.
Disconnect over Time? 
周is subsection investigates more generally whether 
the relationship between exchange rate movements and 
trade—either long-term effects or transmission lags—has 
weakened over time. Numerous developments beyond 
the rise of global value chains could, in principle, have 
altered the effects of exchange rate movements. Some, 
such as the liberalization of trade flows and increased 
international competition associated with globaliza-
tion, may have increased the responsiveness of trade to 
exchange rates. Others, such as the rise of pricing to 
market among several emerging markets and the mod-
eration and stabilization of inflation in some economies, 
may have reduced the effects of changes in exchange 
rates on trade prices.41 周e question is whether, taken 
together, these developments have led to a disconnect.
Stability Tests
To check whether the estimated links between 
exchange rates and trade have weakened, the analysis 
reestimates the four trade elasticities already discussed 
for successive 10-year rolling intervals. 周e first 10-year 
interval used for estimation is 1990–99 and the last is 
2005–14. Since a period of 10 years provides insuf-
ficient data to estimate the elasticities for individual 
economies (based on annual data), the analysis is based 
on a panel estimation approach that combines data for 
multiple economies.42 
41Frankel, Parsley, and Wei (2012) and Gust, Leduc, and Vigfus-
son (2010) provide evidence on the declining exchange rate pass-
through to import prices over time. Shifts in the invoice currency 
chosen by economies are also likely to play a role (see Gopinath, 
Itskhoki, and Rigobon 2010). 
42For each region, the analysis is based on the estimation of a 
multieconomy panel for the four trade equations already discussed. 
Given the lack of evidence of cointegration for the panel of econo-
mies considered (as assessed based on the panel cointegration tests in 
Pedroni 2004), the specification is estimated in first differences. For 
example, for export prices, the specification estimated is as follows 
(the other equations are set up analogously):
ePX 
ePX 
eP
D ln
—–
it
= a + r D ln
—–
i,t–1
+ ∑2
j=0
b
j
D ln
i,t–j
P* 
P* 
P*
ULC
+ ∑2
j=0
g
j
D ln
——
i,t–j
+ m
i
+ l
t
+ υ
it
,
P
in which the subscript i denotes the ith country and the subscript t 
denotes the tth year. As before, the estimated effects in years t + j, for 
j = 0, 1, and 2, are then based on the estimates of the b
j
coefficients. 
Given that some regions are likely to have expe-
rienced greater structural change than others, the 
analysis investigates the evolution of trade elasticities 
for a global sample and for separate regions. In particu-
lar, because the rise of global value chains has been 
particularly noticeable in a number of Asian and Euro-
pean economies, rolling regression results are provided 
separately for these two regions. 
周e results suggest that exchange rates have not 
generally become disconnected from trade (Figure 3.8). 
周e elasticity of imports with respect to import prices 
shows some weakening toward the end of the sample 
in some of the regions, which is consistent with the 
view that imports are increasingly responsive to export 
developments, as in global value chains. However, 
because there is no sign of weakening in the respon-
siveness of exports to relative export prices (there is 
even a mild strengthening in some subsamples), or in 
the effects of exchange rates on trade prices, the evi-
dence regarding the implications of the rise of global 
value chains remains inconclusive. Given that the rise 
of global value chains has generally been only gradual 
and appears to have decelerated recently, this inconclu-
sive evidence is perhaps not surprising.43
Structural-break tests for a number of different 
samples confirm this finding of broad stability in total 
trade elasticities over time. When the sample used 
for the estimation of the panel regressions is divided 
into two halves—years through 2001 and years since 
2002—a structural-break test fails to reject the null 
hypothesis of no change in the trade elasticities across 
the two time periods in most cases (Annex Table 
3.5.1). 周e tests are conducted for the geographical 
groups included in Figure 3.8, as well as for a sample 
of economies that increased their participation in 
global value chains particularly strongly (those with 
a rise during 1995–2009 in the share of foreign 
value added in gross exports that is greater than the 
cross-country median), and for those economies that 
Long-term effects are estimated as S2
j=0
b
j
/(1 – r). 周e estimated 
equation also includes a full set of time dummies (l
t
) to take account 
of global shocks such as shifts in commodity prices. To avoid changes 
in its composition over time, the sample includes only economies for 
which at least 20 years of data are available. Based on data availability, 
the full sample includes 88 advanced and emerging market and devel-
oping economies. 周ey are listed in Annex Table 3.1.4.
43周e finding of broad stability in exchange rate pass-through over 
time is consistent with the findings of Bussière, Delle Chiaie, and 
Peltonen (2014), who test stability in exchange rate pass-through 
coefficients for the period 1990–2011 for 40 advanced and emerging 
market and developing economies. 
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
120 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
–1.0
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
2000
05
10
14
–1.0
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
2000
05
10
14
–1.0
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
2000
05
10
14
Exchange Rate Pass-Through to Export Prices 
Figure 3.8.  Trade Elasticities over Time in Different Regions
(Ten-year rolling windows ending in year t)
1. Global Sample
There is little evidence of a general trend toward disconnect between exchange rates, trade prices, and total trade volumes.
2. Asia
3. Europe
–1.5
–1.0
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
2000
05
10
14
–1.5
–1.0
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
2000
05
10
14
–1.5
–1.0
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
2000
05
10
14
–1.0
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
2000
05
10
14
Price Elasticities of Export Volumes 
–1.0
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
2000
05
10
14
–1.0
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
2000
05
10
14
–1.5
–1.0
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
2000
05
10
14
Price Elasticities of Import Volumes 
–1.5
–1.0
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
2000
05
10
14
–1.5
–1.0
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
2000
05
10
14
Exchange Rate Pass-Through to Import Prices 
4. Global Sample
5. Asia
6. Europe
7. Global Sample
8. Asia
9. Europe
10. Global Sample
11. Asia
12. Europe
Source: IMF staff estimates.
Note: Figure is based on panel estimates using producer price index–based real effective exchange rate and export and 
import prices relative to foreign and domestic producer prices, respectively. Full sample spans 88 advanced and 
emerging market and developing economies from 1990 to 2014. Dashed lines denote 90 percent confidence intervals.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested