pdf viewer library c# : Copy picture from pdf to powerpoint Library SDK component .net asp.net web page mvc text15-part1768

CHA PTER 3
EXCH ANG E RATES AND T RA DE FLO WS : D ISC ONNEC TED? 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
131
in gross exports that is greater than the cross-country 
median), and for those economies that increased their 
participation less strongly (those with a rise in the 
foreign-value-added share that is less than the cross-
country median). 
As Annex Table 3.5.1 reports, the tests fail to reject 
the null of no change in most cases. Similarly incon-
clusive results emerge when the tests are repeated for 
data samples used elsewhere, as in the 46 economies 
included in the analysis of Ahmed, Appendino, and 
Ruta 2015. 周at study finds that the responsiveness 
of exports to the real effective exchange rate dropped 
substantially between 1996–2003 and 2004–12. 
When the analysis is repeated for this sample of 46 
economies, but export volumes are constructed by 
deflating nominal exports using export prices rather 
than the consumer price index (CPI)—as in that 
study—there is little evidence of a decline in export 
elasticities. (周e CPI reflects the prices of many non-
traded goods and services and increases on average 
at a considerably higher rate than export prices.) 周e 
same applies if outlier observations, including those 
associated with spikes in CPI inflation, are removed 
from the sample.
Annex Table 3.5.1. Trade Elasticities over Time: Stability Tests
Full
1990–2001
2002–14
Statistical 
Significance of the 
Difference between 
the Two Periods1
1. Pass-Through to Export Prices
By Region
All Countries 
0.569***
0.557***
0.457***
Asia
0.429***
0.419***
0.346***
Europe 
0.658***
0.647***
0.687***
By Integration into Global Value Chains
Countries with Larger Increase
0.572***
0.560***
0.548***
Countries with Smaller Increase
0.684***
0.608***
0.609***
2. Pass-Through to Import Prices
By Region
All Countries 
–0.612***
–0.549***
–0.632***
Asia
–0.671***
–0.684***
–0.668***
Europe 
–0.553***
–0.528***
–0.587***
By Integration into Global Value Chains
Countries with Larger Increase
–0.621***
–0.545***
–0.618***
Countries with Smaller Increase
–0.650***
–0.511***
–0.720***
**
3. Price Elasticities of Exports
By Region
All Countries 
–0.207***
–0.147***
–0.255***
*
Asia
–0.329***
–0.265***
–0.489***
**
Europe 
–0.281***
–0.303**
–0.375***
By Integration into Global Value Chains
Countries with Larger Increase
–0.305***
–0.343**
–0.373***
Countries with Smaller Increase
–0.402***
–0.225
–0.566***
*
4. Price Elasticities of Imports
By Region
All Countries 
–0.433***
–0.452***
–0.335***
Asia
–0.436***
–0.566***
–0.233
Europe 
–0.470***
–0.484***
–0.446***
By Integration into Global Value Chains
Countries with Larger Increase
–0.521***
–0.658***
–0.271**
**
Countries with Smaller Increase
–0.467***
–0.455***
–0.420***
Source: IMF staff estimates.
1Blank space in this column indicates no statistically significant difference.
*p < .1; **p < .05; ***p < .01.
Copy picture from pdf to powerpoint - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
paste image on pdf preview; how to cut a picture from a pdf document
Copy picture from pdf to powerpoint - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
paste image into preview pdf; copy image from pdf acrobat
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
132 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
Global value chains have increased in prominence in 
global production and trade. About one-third of world 
trade consists of intermediate products for subsequent 
reexport in a transformed state. 周is process contrasts 
with the traditional view of international trade, in 
which goods are produced in their entirety within a 
single country and shipped as final goods to export mar-
kets. Given that within a global value chain, imports 
are inputs into the production of exports, and imports 
(which represent foreign value added) are complements 
in production with domestic value added, global-
value-chain-related trade may respond differently than 
trade in final goods to exchange rate changes. Using 
a recently released data set on trade in value added, 
this box assesses how global value chains affect the 
responses of different types of exports and imports and 
the overall trade balance to changes in exchange rates.1 
Moreover, this approach isolates the impact of exchange 
rate changes on domestic value added, the concept that 
determines GDP and competitiveness, and one that is 
of ultimate concern to policymakers. 
Before turning to the main question at hand, explor-
ing the trade data is useful. As shown in Figure 3.1.1, 
gross exports comprise exports produced within a global 
value chain as well as other, non–global value chain 
exports. Gross global value chain exports can, in turn, 
be divided into domestic-value-added and foreign-value-
added components, both of which are subsequently 
exported as inputs into the next stage of the supply 
chain. In contrast, non–global value chain exports 
consist primarily of domestic value added. 周erefore, 
gross exports consist of both domestic value added and 
foreign value added. Gross imports encompass global-
value-chain-related imports—which is the foreign-
value-added component of global-value-chain-related 
exports—and non-global-value-chain-related imports. 
Since foreign value added in global value chain exports 
appears in both gross imports and exports, it has no 
impact on the size of the trade balance. It is apparent 
that global-value-chain-related gross exports (the sum of 
domestic value added in global value chains and foreign 
value added) grew substantially as a share of GDP in all 
周e authors of this box are Kevin Cheng and Rachel van 
Elkan, based on Cheng and others, forthcoming.
1周e analysis is based on the Organisation for Economic 
Co-operation and Development–World Trade Organization 
Trade in Value Added database, which covers 57 countries, for 
the years 1995, 2000, 2005, and 2008–09. 周e periodic data 
are transformed to annual frequency, as discussed in Cheng and 
others, forthcoming.
Box 3.1. The Relationship between Exchange Rates and Global-Value-Chain-Related Trade
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
1995 2011 1995 2011 1995 2011 1995 2011
1. Gross Exports
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
1995 2011 1995 2011 1995 2011 1995 2011
2. Imports
GVC-related FVA in 
exports
GVC-related DVA in exports
Non-GVC-related DVA in 
exports
Non-GVC-related imports
Asia
ASEAN
Euro area
Full 
sample
Asia
ASEAN
Euro area
Full 
sample
Figure 3.1.1.  Decomposition of Gross Exports 
and Imports, 1995 versus 2011
(Percent of GDP)
Sources: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and 
Development–World Trade Organization Trade in Value Added 
database; and IMF staff calculations.
Note: ASEAN = Association of Southeast Asian Nations; DVA = 
domestic value added; FVA = foreign value added; GVC = 
global value chain.
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document.
extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste; how to copy an image from a pdf in
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
copy image from pdf preview; how to copy pictures from a pdf file
CHA PTER 3
EXCH ANG E RATES AND T RA DE FLO WS : D ISC ONNEC TED? 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
133
regions during 1995–2011, and especially in member 
countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. 
Nonetheless, non-global-value-chain-related exports 
remain, on average, about two-thirds of world total 
exported domestic value added. 
周e Exchange Rate Response of Global-Value-Chain-
Related Trade
A panel framework with time and country fixed 
effects is used to estimate the responsiveness of global-
value-chain-related export and import volumes to 
changes in real effective exchange rates (REERs).2 A 
term for the interaction between the REER and the 
share of foreign value added in gross global-value-
chain-related exports is also included to capture the 
dampening effect arising from a larger foreign-value-
added share. 周e interpretation of this term and its 
corresponding coefficient is discussed later in this box.3 
2周e regressions are estimated using ordinary least squares. All 
variables are expressed in natural logarithm levels. Value-added 
trade weights are used to aggregate bilateral real exchange rates, 
and the consumer price index (CPI) is used to deflate nominal 
exchange rates. Real trade volumes are obtained by deflating 
nominal volumes by the CPI. Controls include own and partner 
country demand and others specified in the note to Table 3.1.1. 
Note that in the global value chain import equation, partner—
rather than domestic—demand is used as a regressor to account 
for the fact that the imports are intended for reexport and hence 
depend on external demand conditions.
3Inclusion of this interaction term is grounded in a theoretical 
model, available in Cheng and others, forthcoming. 
周e main findings of the analysis reported in Table 
3.1.1 are as follows:
•  A real appreciation not only reduces exports of 
domestic value added (a conventional result), but 
also lowers imports of foreign value added (contrary 
to the traditional view). This latter result is consis-
tent with the notion that global-value-chain-related 
domestic value added and foreign value added are 
complements in production, so producing and 
exporting less domestic value added also reduces the 
derived demand for imported foreign value added. 
•  A larger foreign-value-added share in gross global-
value-chain-related exports tends to dampen the 
response of domestic value added and foreign value 
added to REER changes. This finding is shown by 
the positive coefficients on the interaction between 
REER and the foreign-value-added share in the 
second row of Table 3.1.1. Intuitively, this result is 
consistent with the notion that when a country’s own 
domestic-value-added contribution in gross global 
value chain exports is relatively small, a change in its 
REER will have only a modest effect on the competi-
tiveness of the entire supply chain, thereby muting 
the domestic-value-added and foreign-value-added 
responses to a change in the country’s own REER. 
周e dampening effect on global value chain 
import and export elasticities from an increase in 
the foreign-value-added share is illustrated in Figure 
3.1.2. When the foreign-value-added share is very 
small (corresponding to a large domestic-value-
Box 3.1 (continued)
Table 3.1.1. Responses of Global-Value-Chain-Related Trade to the Real Effective Exchange Rate 
(1)
(2)
Variables
Imports 
(FVA)
Exports
(DVA)
Lagged Log (REER-Value-Added-Based)
−1.390***
(−2.822)
−1.670***
(−3.527)
Lagged Log (REER) x Lagged (FVA/DVA + FVA)
0.027***
(3.166)
0.026***
(3.330)
Lagged Log (Demand)
1.108***
(5.961)
0.758***
(4.470)
Time Fixed Effects
Yes
Yes
Country Fixed Effects
Yes
Yes
Additional Controls
Yes
Yes
Clustering
Country level
Country level
Number of Observations
699
699
R2
0.733
0.681
Source: IMF staff calculations.
Note: Specifications – log (Exports [Imports] volume)
c,t
= at + ac + a
1
log(REER)
c,t–1
+ a
2
interaction term + a
3
log(Demand)
c[w],t–1
+ alog(Controls)
c,t
+ e
t
. Additional controls included in the specifications are log of real stock of foreign direct investment, foreign-value-added share, tariffs, and output 
gap. Demand is proxied by GDP. DVA = domestic value added; FVA = foreign value added; GVC = global value chain; REER = real effective exchange 
rate. Robust t-statistics in parentheses.
***p < .01.
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.HTML5Editor. dll. Open RasterEdge_MVC3 DemoProject, copy following content to your project:
cut and paste pdf image; how to paste a picture into a pdf
VB.NET TIFF: How to Draw Picture & Write Text on TIFF Document in
Copy the demo codes and run your project to see New RaterEdgeDrawing() drawing.Picture = "RasterEdge" drawing & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
cut and paste image from pdf; paste picture pdf
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
134 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
added contribution), the spillover from a country’s 
exchange rate depreciation onto the competitiveness 
of the entire supply chain is correspondingly large. 
周erefore, the elasticities are negative and close to 
the “own effect” coefficients of row 1 of Table 3.1.1, 
causing both global-value-chain-related domestic 
value added and global-value-chain-related foreign 
value added to increase. As the foreign-value-added 
share rises—corresponding to a smaller own domes-
tic-value-added contribution to the global value 
chain—the spillover benefit from an own deprecia-
tion on the competitiveness of the entire supply 
chain (second row in the table) declines, resulting in 
smaller (negative) global value chain trade elasticities. 
When the foreign-value-added share rises to 50–60 
percent, the competitiveness benefit for the entire 
supply chain from an own depreciation is neutralized 
by the corresponding relative appreciation in global 
value chain partners’ REERs, leading to zero import 
and export elasticities. With even larger foreign-
value-added shares, import and export elasticities 
can become positive, although the relevance of the 
positive REER elasticity for global value chain trade 
appears to be limited in practice.4
Overall, it is worth recalling that although global 
value chain trade has grown considerably in recent 
decades, conventional trade remains important—if not 
dominant—at the global level. As additional analysis 
confirms, even for countries in the sample with the 
smallest domestic-value-added contributions and the 
largest global value chain trade shares, a depreciation is 
found to improve the real trade balance. 
4周e positive REER is irrelevant for two reasons. First, the 
estimated export elasticities corresponding to foreign-value-added 
shares of 50–80 percent lie within the 90 percent confidence 
interval spanning zero, suggesting that the elasticities are not 
statistically distinguishable from zero. For import elasticities, the 
corresponding foreign-value-added share range is 38–62 percent, 
but above this range, a positive elasticity cannot be rejected. Sec-
ond, the maximum foreign-value-added contribution to global-
value-chain-related gross exports for any country in the data set 
is less than 80 percent, with the average foreign-value-added 
share about 50–60 percent. 周us, most countries operate in the 
range in which global value chain elasticities are about zero.
Box 3.1 (continued)
–2.0
–1.5
–1.0
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
22
34
46
58
70
82
GVC trade elasticity
FVA Share in GVCs (percent)
–2.0
–1.5
–1.0
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
22
34
46
58
70
82
GVC trade elasticity
FVA Share in GVCs (percent)
Figure 3.1.2.  Global Value Chain Trade Elasticities
1. GVC Exports (GVC-
related DVA)
2. GVC Imports (FVA)
Source: Cheng and others, forthcoming.
Note: Shaded areas denote 90 percent confidence intervals. DVA = domestic value 
added; FVA = foreign value added; GVC = global value chain. 
VB.NET Image: Image Cropping SDK to Cut Out Image, Picture and
first! VB.NET Image & Picture Cropping Application. Do you need to save a copy of certain part of an image file in a programming way?
cut picture pdf; how to copy pdf image to word document
VB.NET Image: Image Resizer Control SDK to Resize Picture & Photo
NET Method to Resize Image & Picture. Here we code demo, which you can directly copy to your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to cut a picture out of a pdf file; how to copy images from pdf to word
CHA PTER 3
EXCH ANG E RATES AND T RA DE FLO WS : D ISC ONNEC TED? 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
135
周e real effective exchange rate (REER) is a widely 
used demand-based indicator of competitiveness.1 
Standard theory postulates that countries produce 
differentiated products and compete with one another 
to sell their products on world markets, and demand 
for products responds to relative prices. 周e rise of 
global value chains poses a challenge to this con-
ventional view as countries increasingly specialize in 
adding value to a particular state of production rather 
than producing entire finished products. 周is practice 
means that countries compete to supply value added, 
rather than supply gross exports, to world markets.
周is box, therefore, discusses two main questions 
related to the increased role of global value chains in 
international trade: 
•  How does the rise of global value chains affect the 
measurement of competitiveness and REERs? 
•  How do these new measures of competitiveness and 
REERs differ from the conventional measures?
周e rise of global value chains requires a rethink-
ing of the relationship between exchange rates and 
competitiveness. Consider, for example, the effect of a 
yuan depreciation on China’s Asian trading partners. 
According to the conventional view, yuan depreciation 
unambiguously increases demand for Chinese goods 
and lowers demand for goods produced elsewhere in 
Asia. As a result, depreciations are beggar-thy-neigh-
bor. When trade in inputs and specialization in stages 
of production are prevalent, this conventional view 
becomes incomplete. Because production in China 
is linked to its Asian supply chain partners, the yuan 
depreciation can make the supply chain’s final product 
more competitive, stimulating demand for value added 
at each stage of production. 周is outcome counterbal-
ances the conventional beggar-thy-neighbor channel. 
Which channel dominates is ultimately an empirical 
matter.
Bems and Johnson (2015) present a model frame-
work that extends the conventional demand-side 
analysis to include supply-side linkages. 周e extended 
framework incorporates two key features pertaining 
to global value chains. First, by modeling intermedi-
ate production inputs, the framework distinguishes 
between gross and value-added concepts in trade (in 
周e authors of this box are Rudolfs Bems and Marcos 
Poplawski-Ribeiro.
1Competitiveness for the purposes of this box is defined as a 
change in demand for a country’s output induced by changes in 
international relative prices.
terms of both quantities and prices). Second, there are 
two distinct margins of substitution (with potentially 
differing elasticities): substitution in final demand 
and substitution in production (between value added 
and intermediate inputs or across inputs). 周e latter 
captures substitution in supply chains. 
周e extended framework alters the conventional 
link between exchange rates and competitiveness in 
three important ways: different weights, different price 
indices, and country-specific trade elasticities.
Different Weights
周e weights used in the construction of these new 
REER measures of Bems and Johnson (2015) depend 
on both input-output linkages and relative elasticities 
in production versus consumption. In contrast, con-
ventional REER weights are constructed using gross 
trade flows. Accounting for input-output linkages and 
differences in elasticities can significantly alter REER 
weights. Bilateral weights can even become negative, 
if competitiveness gains for supply chain partners out-
weigh the beggar-thy-neighbor effects (as in the yuan 
depreciation example earlier).
Figure 3.2.1 illustrates this general result by compar-
ing REER weights that trading partners assign to 
China and Germany. 周e figure includes three sets 
of weights for each country: conventional consumer 
price index (CPI)–based REER weights; input-output 
REER (IOREER) weights, which account for both 
input-output linkages and the variation in elastici-
ties; and the intermediate case of value-added REER 
(VAREER) weights that impose equal elasticities in 
production and consumption.2
Consistent with standard intuition, neighboring 
countries that trade a great deal with China, such as 
Korea, Japan, and Malaysia, attach the largest weights 
to China in the conventional CPI-based REER 
indices.3 Relative to this benchmark, countries that 
are integrated into the supply chains with China and 
“Factory Asia” put less weight on China in the newly 
proposed REER indices. VAREER weights are reduced 
for China’s supply chain partners because value-added 
trade flows, on which the VAREER is based, eliminate 
2For VAREER weights Bems and Johnson (2015) show 
that value-added trade flow data are sufficient for the weight 
construction. 
3周ese large weights reflect the fact that in conventional 
macroeconomic analysis, large bilateral gross trade flows signify 
intense head-to-head competition.
Box 3.2. Measuring Real Effective Exchange Rates and Competitiveness: The Role of Global Value Chains
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C# Powerful PDF image editor control, compatible with .NET Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo
paste image in pdf preview; how to cut an image out of a pdf
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link Visual Studio .NET PDF image editor control, compatible Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo
paste image into pdf form; copying images from pdf files
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
136 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
“round-tripping,” which is more prevalent within the 
region. 周ese weight shifts are further amplified when 
production elasticities are relatively low, as captured 
by the IOREER index. 周is is the case because low 
production elasticities emphasize the role of substitu-
tion in final demand, as opposed to the within-region 
substitution in supply chains. For some countries, 
weights attached to China fall dramatically, with an 
offsetting rise in weights elsewhere. For Vietnam, a 
decline in Chinese prices actually raises Vietnamese 
competitiveness in the IOREER case, as captured by 
Vietnam’s negative IOREER weight.4
4Bems and Johnson (2015) find that the total weight attached 
by a typical Asian country to its Asian partners is 15 percentage 
周e basic insights from the Chinese example carry 
over to the case of Germany, reported in panel 2 of 
Figure 3.2.1. Conventional REER weights are largest 
for Germany’s regional trading partners. 周e VAREER 
and IOREER weights, relative to the conventional 
ones, fall the most for the European Union accession 
countries (the Czech Republic and Poland, for exam-
ple) because of supply chain linkages. 周e magnitudes 
of the weight changes can be substantial. For example, 
moving from the conventional REER to the IOREER 
roughly halves the weight that the Czech Republic 
attaches to Germany.
Different Price Indices
By distinguishing between gross flows and value 
added, the model framework provides clear guidance 
on how to combine REER weights and prices to mea-
sure competitiveness, where prices need to be mea-
sured using GDP deflators. Figure 3.2.2 reports REER 
changes during the 1990–2009 period, constructed 
points lower in the IOREER index than in a conventional CPI-
based REER index.
Box 3.2 (continued)
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
USA
CHN
IRL
GRC
TUR
ESP
FRA
SVK
HUN
POL
CZE
AUT
2. Weights Assigned to 
Germany, 2007
–0.05
0.00
0.05
0.10
0.15
0.20
TUR
GBR
DEU
BRA
USA
THA
IDN
PHL
VNM
MYS
JPN
KOR
CPI-based REER
VAREER
IOREER
1. Weights Assigned to 
China, 2004
Figure 3.2.1.  Real Effective Exchange Rate 
Weights Assigned to China and Germany
Sources: Bems and Johnson 2015; and IMF staff calculations.
Note: CPI = consumer price index; IO = input-output; REER = real 
effective exchange rate; VA = value added. Data labels in the 
figure use International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 
country codes.
–1.0
–0.8
–0.6
–0.4
–0.2
0.0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1.0
–1.0
–0.8
–0.6
–0.4
–0.2
0.0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1.0
ZAF
VNM
USA
TUR
THA
SWE
ROU
PRT
POL
NZL
NOR
NLD
MEX
KOR
JPN
ITA
ISR
IRL
IND
IDN
HUN
GRC
GBR
FRA
FIN
ESP
DNK
DEU
CHNCHL
CHE
CAN
BRA
BEL
AUT
AUS
ARG
IOREER
CPI-based REER
Sources: Bems and Johnson 2015; and IMF staff calculations.
Note: CPI = consumer price index; IO = input-output; and REER = 
real effective exchange rate. Data labels in the figure use 
International Organization for Standardization (ISO) country codes.
Figure 3.2.2. Comparison of Conventional and 
Input-Output Real Effective Exchange Rates
(Log changes, 1990–2009)
CHA PTER 3
EXCH ANG E RATES AND T RA DE FLO WS : D ISC ONNEC TED? 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
137
using historical input-output data and observed 
price changes for the period. IOREER indices can 
differ substantially from conventional (CPI-based) 
REER indices, both because of differences in weights 
and because of different measures of price changes.5 
However, over this long horizon (19 years), the bulk 
of the divergence between the two REER indices 
reflects persistent differences in the two price measures 
(CPI and GDP deflators). At the same time, the two 
measures of the REER are strongly correlated, partly 
because the vast majority of trade does not consist 
of global-value-chain-related trade.6 周is observation 
also implies that biases in estimated value-added trade 
relations due to incorrectly using standard REERs are 
likely to be small.
Country-Specific Trade Elasticities
Conventional measures of competitiveness rely on a 
universal trade elasticity that translates effective price 
developments into changes in economic activity and 
hence competitiveness. In contrast, with two distinct 
margins of substitution—final demand and produc-
tion—trade elasticities in the extended framework 
are country specific. If production is less responsive 
to price changes than is final demand,7 countries that 
5Bems and Johnson (2015) further show that value-added 
exchange rates capture competitiveness developments missed by 
conventional indices in important episodes.
6A regression of the IOREER measure on the CPI-based 
REER yields a slope coefficient of 0.89 that is statistically signifi-
cant at the 1 percent level.
7For example, in the case of the so-called Leontief production 
function, in which there is no substitutability between produc-
tion factors.
are more involved in global value chains (for example, 
China), and hence trade more in intermediate inputs, 
will in the aggregate exhibit lower trade elasticities 
than countries that trade more in final consumption 
goods (for example, the United States). In the latter 
case, the more price-sensitive final demand is weighted 
more heavily in the aggregate trade elasticity. One 
implication is that with country-specific aggregate 
trade elasticities, the REER index alone is an incom-
plete statistic for measuring competitiveness.8
Overall, global value chains change the measure-
ment of competitiveness and REERs. Relative to the 
conventional benchmark, global value chains change 
both the weights and the prices that are used in the 
construction of REER indices. Global value chains can 
allow countries to benefit from improvements in the 
competitiveness of supply chain partners, which can 
counteract the standard beggar-thy-neighbor channel. 
What do these findings mean for the relationship 
between trade and exchange rate movements? On the 
one hand, if production is less sensitive to relative 
price changes than is final demand, aggregate trade 
elasticities should be lower in countries that are more 
integrated in global value chains. On the other hand, 
if consumption is less price sensitive than is produc-
tion, then countries that are more integrated into 
global value chains should exhibit higher aggregate 
trade elasticities.
8Furthermore, with the worldwide rise of global value chains, 
value-added trade elasticities should decrease for the average 
country over time. For a more in-depth discussion of the role of 
value-added elasticities in the measurement of competitiveness, 
see Bems and Johnson 2015.
Box 3.2 (continued)
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
138 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
After rebounding from collapse during the global 
financial crisis, real goods exports from Japan have 
remained broadly flat during the past few years 
despite a sharp depreciation of the yen since late 
2012. Following aggressive monetary easing by 
the Bank of Japan, the yen has depreciated by 
about 35 percent in real effective terms during that 
period. 周is depreciation has come after a sharp yen 
appreciation from 2008 to 2011. So what explains 
the subdued recovery of Japanese exports? 周is box 
focuses on three interconnected explanations: lower 
pass-through from exchange rates to export prices, 
offshoring of production, and deeper involvement in 
global value chains. 
A Sluggish Export Recovery
周e recent pace of export recovery in Japan is 
much slower than could be expected based on the 
usual response of exports to external demand and the 
exchange rate. Exports are currently some 20 percent 
below the level predicted by a standard export demand 
equation estimated for the pre-Abenomics period 
(Figure 3.3.1).1 
Lower Pass-周rough to Export Prices
Japanese exporters have long demonstrated pricing-
to-market behavior by maintaining the stability of 
their export prices in overseas markets and absorbing 
exchange rate fluctuations through profit margins. 周is 
practice results in limited exchange rate pass-through 
to export prices. Since the onset of yen depreciation 
in 2012, export prices in yen have risen sharply, and 
Japanese exporters’ profit margins have surged by some 
周e authors of this box are Nan Li and Joong Shik Kang.
1周e export demand equation is based on an error correc-
tion model specification and is estimated on data from the first 
quarter of 1980 through the third quarter of 2012:
DlnEX
t
= c + ∑4
i=1
b
1i
DlnEX
t–i
+ ∑4
i=1
b
2i
DlnREER
t–i
+ ∑4
i=1
b
3i
DlnD
t–i
– g(lnEX
t–1
– a
1
lnREER
t–1 
– a
2
lnD
t–1
) + e
t
,
in which EX denotes the export volume, REER denotes the real 
effective exchange rate, and D is foreign demand—measured by 
the weighted average of trading partners’ real GDP. 周e specifica-
tion also includes dummy variables for the crisis (taking a value 
of 1 from the third quarter of 2008 through the first quarter of 
2009) and for the 2011 earthquake (taking a value of 1 in the 
first and second quarters of 2011). 
20 percent (Figure 3.3.2, panel 1).2 (Exporters also 
experienced a sizable compression in profit margins 
during the sharp yen appreciation from 2008 to 2011 
and have been rebuilding margins since.)
Incomplete exchange rate pass-through to export 
prices has been prevalent in Japan for some time, but 
evidence indicates that exchange rate pass-through 
has recently declined further (Figure 3.3.2, panel 2). 
2Exporters’ profit margins are proxied by 1 minus the ratio of 
the input cost to the export price.
Box 3.3. Japanese Exports: What’s the Holdup?
4.0
4.3
4.5
4.8
5.0
2004:Q1
06:Q1
08:Q1
10:Q1
12:Q1
14:Q1
Actual
Predicted3
4.0
4.5
5.0
3.0
3.5
4.0
4.5
5.0
1980: 
Q1
85:Q1
90:Q1
95:Q1
2000:
Q1
05:Q1
10:Q1
15:Q1
1. Real Effective Exchange Rate and Exports
(Log)
2. Exports: Actual and Predicted
(Log)
REER1
Export volume (right scale)
2
Figure 3.3.1. Japan: Exchange Rate and 
Exports
Sources: IMF, Information Notice System; and IMF staff 
calculations.
1REER denotes consumer price index–based real effective 
exchange rate.
2Goods exports.
3Out-of-sample prediction for third quarter of 2012 through 
first quarter of 2015 based on export demand equation 
estimated through third quarter of 2012. Dashed lines indicate 
90 percent confidence intervals.
CHA PTER 3
EXCH ANG E RATES AND T RA DE FLO WS : D ISC ONNEC TED? 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
139
Analysis based on rolling regressions suggests that 
exchange rate pass-through has declined from near 
85 percent during the 1980s to about 50 percent in 
recent years (Figure 3.3.2). In other words, a 10 per-
cent yen depreciation reduced export prices by about 
8.5 percent in the 1980s, but now reduces them by 
only 5 percent.3 周is observation suggests that if the 
pass-through had remained at the level of the 1980s, 
foreign export prices would have fallen by almost 30 
percent since 2012, compared with the actual decline 
of 17 percent. Based on the estimated price elastic-
ity of exports, this larger decline, in turn, could have 
boosted exports by an additional 6 percent.4 Note, 
however, that in the medium term, exchange rate pass-
through is likely to increase. Ree, Hong, and Choi 
(2015) find that exchange rate pass-through to export 
prices occurs over about five years in Japan, albeit not 
to a full extent, which would imply stronger export 
growth in the future. 
Production Offshoring
During the past two decades, Japanese firms have 
expanded abroad to exploit labor cost differentials and 
rising demand in host countries. 周e pace of offshor-
ing has accelerated since the global financial crisis, 
arguably as a reflection of the sharp appreciation of the 
yen in 2008–11 and uncertainty about the energy sup-
ply after the 2011 earthquake (Figure 3.3.3). Overseas 
investment by Japanese subsidiaries now accounts 
for about 25 percent of total manufacturing invest-
ment. Overseas sales––the sum of exports and sales 
3周e analysis is based on rolling regressions using the follow-
ing specification and 10-year rolling windows with quarterly 
data, starting with the window beginning in the first quarter of 
1980 and ending in the fourth quarter of 1989:
DlnP
t
X = a + ∑ 4
i=0
b
i
DlnNEER
t–i
+ ∑4
i=0
g
i
DlnC
t–i
 
+ ∑4
i=0
d
i
DlnCP
t–i
(3.3.1)
in which P
t
X stands for the export price index in foreign cur-
rency, C
t
is the input cost index, and CP
t
is the competitors’ 
price index, which is proxied by trading partners’ GDP defla-
tor. 周e sum of the coefficients on the exchange rate, S4
i=0
b
i
corresponds to the pass-through rate of the nominal effective 
exchange rate (NEER) to export prices in the destination country 
after one year. Using the consumer price index and import price 
index as alternative proxies for CP
t
and including more lags in 
the regression yield similar results.
4周e estimated one-year elasticity of exports to foreign export 
prices used here is 0.5 and is obtained by reestimating the 
exports equation while substituting export prices for the REER 
terms.
by Japanese subsidiaries––have risen by more than 60 
percent in value since 2011, which is much faster than 
the growth rate for domestic exports (14 percent), and 
now account for about 60 percent of total sales (Kang 
and Piao 2015). 周is trend increase in investment and 
sales overseas suggests that intrafirm trade has become 
much more important. 周is finding could help explain 
the decline in exchange rate pass-through, given that 
intrafirm transactions are less subject to the impact of 
exchange rate fluctuations.5 
5周ere is evidence that Japanese intrafirm trade is largely 
concentrated in the main exporting industries, such as trans-
Box 3.3 (continued)
0.0
0.5
1.0
1990: 
Q1
95:Q1
2000: 
Q1
05:Q1
10:Q1
15:Q1
Last observation of the 10-year sample
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
90
100
110
120
130
140
150
1980
85
90
95
2000
05
10
15
1. Profit Margin and Nominal Effective Exchange Rate
1
(Index, December 2011 = 100)
2. Pass-Through to Export Prices
2
(Foreign currency)
NEER 
Profit margin (right scale)
Figure 3.3.2. Exchange Rate, Profits, and 
Pass-Through
Sources: Haver Analytics; and IMF staff calculations.
Note: NEER = nominal effective exchange rate.
1Exporters’ profit margins are proxied by 1 minus the ratio of 
the input cost to the export price normalized to 100 for 
December 2011.
2Estimated percent change in export prices in foreign 
currency resulting from a 1 percent nominal effective 
appreciation.
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
140 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
To what extent does Japan’s lackluster export perfor-
mance reflect this shift toward offshoring? To address 
this question, the export model estimated is aug-
mented to control for the degree of offshoring, proxied 
portation equipment and electrical machinery, which have been 
the most active in expanding overseas and accounted for almost 
three-quarters of total overseas investment as of 2014. 周is type 
of intrafirm trade involves exports of parts and components from 
Japanese parent firms to their foreign affiliates. 周e products 
produced or assembled by foreign affiliates in these industries 
are either sold in local markets or shipped to unrelated buyers in 
third-country markets. 周erefore, the offshored production or 
sales by Japanese firms has increasingly become a “substitute” for 
domestic production or exports.
by the share of overseas investment in total invest-
ment in Japan’s manufacturing sector. 周e resulting 
out-of-sample forecasts come much closer to tracking 
the observed flat performance of Japan’s exports since 
2012 (Figure 3.3.3, panel 2). 周is result is consistent 
with the view that increases in production offshoring 
have decreased domestic exports, offsetting the positive 
impact of the yen depreciation on exports. 
Deeper Involvement in Global Value Chains
Japanese exports are dominated by high-value-added 
products: electrical machinery, transportation equip-
ment, and machinery, accounting for more than 60 
percent of exports. 周ese sectors are specialized, are 
not easily substitutable, and are tightly connected to 
global value chains. 
During the past two decades, Japan has been increas-
ingly involved in global value chains. According to the 
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Develop-
ment–World Trade Organization Trade in Value Added 
(TiVA) database, foreign value added as a percentage of 
Japan’s gross exports (backward participation) increased 
between 1995 and 2009 from 6 percent to 11 percent 
(Figure 3.7). Meanwhile, Japan has also become a 
more important intermediate-input supplier for other 
countries’ exports: domestically produced inputs used 
in third countries’ exports (forward participation) rose 
from 22 percent to 33 percent during the same period. 
周is places Japan among the countries experiencing 
the largest increase in the forward-participation rate. 
In addition, compared with other non-commodity-
exporting countries, Japan is more specialized in sectors 
at the beginning of a value chain that are more intensive 
in research and design, as shown by the TiVA data. As 
Japan becomes more heavily involved in global value 
chains and as global value chains become ever more 
complex, exchange rate depreciation could be expected 
to play a less important role in boosting export growth 
of such global-value-chain-related goods. 
Overall, the response of exports to the yen depre-
ciation has been weaker than expected as a result 
of a number of Japan-specific factors. In particular, 
this weak response largely reflects the acceleration 
in production offshoring since the global financial 
crisis. It also reflects deeper involvement of Japanese 
production and trade in global value chains and a 
decline in the strength of the short-term exchange rate 
pass-through.
Box 3.3 (continued)
4.0
4.3
4.5
4.8
5.0
2004: 
Q1
06:Q1
08:Q1
10:Q1
12:Q1
14:Q1
Figure 3.3.3. Offshoring and Exports
Sources: Haver Analytics; and IMF staff calculations.
0
10
20
30
1996: 
Q4
2001:
Q4
06:Q4
11:Q4
14: 
Q4
1. Share of Overseas Investment
(Percent of total manufacturing investment)
2. Exports: Actual and Predicted
(Log)
Actual
Predicted (without offshoring)
Predicted (with offshoring)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested