pdf viewer library c# : Paste jpg into pdf preview Library software API .net wpf web page sharepoint text2-part1773

1
CHAPTER
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
1
1
CHAPTER
RECENT DEVELOPMENTS AND PROSPECTS 
Global growth declined in the first half of2015, reflect-
ing a further slowdown in emerging markets and a weaker 
recovery in advanced economies. It is now projected at 
3.1percent for2015 as a whole, slightly lower than 
in2014, and 0.2percentage point below the forecasts 
in the July2015 World Economic Outlook (WEO) 
Update. Prospects across the main countries and regions 
remain uneven. Relative to last year, growth in advanced 
economies is expected to pick up slightly, while it is 
projected to decline in emerging market and developing 
economies. With declining commodity prices, depreciat-
ing emerging market currencies, and increasing financial 
market volatility, downside risks to the outlook have risen, 
particularly for emerging market and developing economies. 
Global activity is projected to gather some pace 
in2016. In advanced economies, the modest recovery 
that started in2014 is projected to strengthen further. 
In emerging market and developing economies, the 
outlook is projected to improve: in particular, growth 
in countries in economic distress in2015 (including 
Brazil, Russia, and some countries in Latin America 
and in the Middle East), while remaining weak or 
negative, is projected to be higher next year, more than 
offsetting the expected gradual slowdown in China.
Recent Developments and Prospects
周 e evolution of the global outlook in recent 
months refl ects a combination of short-term factors 
and longer-term forces.
The World Economy in Recent Months
Growth in advanced economies in the fi rst half 
of2015 remained modest. For most emerging market 
economies, external conditions are becoming more 
diffi  cult. Financial market volatility rose sharply during 
the summer, with declining commodity prices and 
downward pressure on many emerging market cur-
rencies. Capital infl ows have slowed, and the liftoff  of 
U.S.policy rates from the zero lower bound is likely 
to herald some further tightening of external fi nancial 
conditions. And while the growth slowdown in China 
is so far broadly in line with forecasts, its cross-border 
repercussions appear larger than previously envisaged. 
周 is is refl ected in weakening commodity prices (espe-
cially those for metals) and weak exports to China. 
Slowing Global Activity, Tame Infl ation
Preliminary data suggest that global growth in the 
fi rst half of2015 was 2.9percent, about 0.3percentage 
point weaker than predicted in April of this year (Fig-
ure1.1). Growth was below forecast for both advanced 
economies and emerging markets. Specifi cally:
• Growth in the United States was weaker than 
expected, despite a strong second quarter. This 
reflected setbacks to activity in the first quarter, 
caused by one-off factors, notably harsh winter 
weather and port closures, as well as much lower 
capital spending in the oil sector. Despite weaker 
growth, the unemployment rate declined to 5.1per-
cent at the end of August, 0.4percentage point 
below its February level (and 1percentage point 
below the level a year ago). Lower capital expendi-
tures in the oil sector were also a major contributor 
to the slowdown in Canada, where economic activ-
ity contracted modestly during the first two quarters 
of2015.
• The recovery was broadly in line with the April fore-
cast in the euro area, with stronger-than-expected 
growth in Italy and especially in Ireland and Spain 
(sustained by recovering domestic demand) offset-
ting weaker-than-expected growth in Germany. 
• In the United Kingdom, GDP expanded at an 
annualized rate of 2¼percent in the first half of 
2015, with the unemployment rate now back near 
its precrisis average of about 5½percent.
• In Japan, a strong rebound in the first quarter was 
followed by a drop in activity in the second quar-
ter. Over the first half of the year, consumption fell 
short of expectations and so did net exports. Exports 
declined substantially in the second quarter. 
• Growth in China was broadly in line with previous 
forecasts. Investment growth slowed compared with 
Paste jpg into pdf preview - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy picture from pdf file; how to copy and paste a pdf image
Paste jpg into pdf preview - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
copy images from pdf to word; extract images from pdf files without using copy and paste
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
Table 1.1. Overview of the World Economic Outlook Projections
(Percent change, unless noted otherwise)
Difference from July 
2015 WEO Update1
Difference from April 
2015 WEO1
Projections
2014
2015
2016
2015
2016
2015
2016
World Output
3.4
3.1
3.6
–0.2
–0.2
–0.4
–0.2
Advanced Economies
1.8
2.0
2.2
–0.1
–0.2
–0.4
–0.2
United States 
2.4
2.6
2.8
0.1
–0.2
–0.5
–0.3
Euro Area
0.9
1.5
1.6
0.0
–0.1
0.0
0.0
Germany
1.6
1.5
1.6
–0.1
–0.1
–0.1
–0.1
France
0.2
1.2
1.5
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Italy
–0.4
0.8
1.3
0.1
0.1
0.3
0.2
Spain
1.4
3.1
2.5
0.0
0.0
0.6
0.5
Japan
–0.1
0.6
1.0
–0.2
–0.2
–0.4
–0.2
United Kingdom
3.0
2.5
2.2
0.1
0.0
–0.2
–0.1
Canada
2.4
1.0
1.7
–0.5
–0.4
–1.2
–0.3
Other Advanced Economies2
2.8
2.3
2.7
–0.4
–0.4
–0.5
–0.4
Emerging Market and Developing Economies
4.6
4.0
4.5
–0.2
–0.2
–0.3
–0.2
Commonwealth of Independent States
1.0
–2.7
0.5
–0.5
–0.7
–0.1
0.2
Russia
0.6
–3.8
–0.6
–0.4
–0.8
0.0
0.5
Excluding Russia
1.9
–0.1
2.8
–0.8
–0.5
–0.5
–0.4
Emerging and Developing Asia
6.8
6.5
6.4
–0.1
0.0
–0.1
0.0
China
7.3
6.8
6.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
India3
7.3
7.3
7.5
–0.2
0.0
–0.2
0.0
ASEAN-54
4.6
4.6
4.9
–0.1
–0.2
–0.6
–0.4
Emerging and Developing Europe
2.8
3.0
3.0
0.1
0.1
0.1
–0.2
Latin America and the Caribbean 
1.3
–0.3
0.8
–0.8
–0.9
–1.2
–1.2
Brazil
0.1
–3.0
–1.0
–1.5
–1.7
–2.0
–2.0
Mexico
2.1
2.3
2.8
–0.1
–0.2
–0.7
–0.5
Middle East, North Africa, Afghanistan, and Pakistan
2.7
2.5
3.9
–0.1
0.1
–0.4
0.1
Saudi Arabia
3.5
3.4
2.2
0.6
–0.2
0.4
–0.5
Sub-Saharan Africa 
5.0
3.8
4.3
–0.6
–0.8
–0.7
–0.8
Nigeria
6.3
4.0
4.3
–0.5
–0.7
–0.8
–0.7
South Africa
1.5
1.4
1.3
–0.6
–0.8
–0.6
–0.8
Memorandum
European Union
1.5
1.9
1.9
0.0
–0.1
0.1
0.0
Low-Income Developing Countries
6.0
4.8
5.8
–0.3
–0.4
–0.7
–0.2
Middle East and North Africa 
2.6
2.3
3.8
–0.1
0.1
–0.4
0.1
World Growth Based on Market Exchange Rates
2.7
2.5
3.0
–0.1
–0.2
–0.4
–0.2
World Trade Volume (goods and services)
3.3
3.2
4.1
–0.9
–0.3
–0.5
–0.6
Imports
Advanced Economies
3.4
4.0
4.2
–0.5
–0.3
0.7
–0.1
Emerging Market and Developing Economies
3.6
1.3
4.4
–2.3
–0.3
–2.2
–1.1
Exports
Advanced Economies
3.4
3.1
3.4
–0.5
–0.6
–0.1
–0.7
Emerging Market and Developing Economies
2.9
3.9
4.8
–1.1
0.1
–1.4
–0.9
Commodity Prices (U.S. dollars)
Oil
5
–7.5
–46.4
–2.4
–7.6
–11.5
–6.8
–15.3
Nonfuel (average based on world commodity export weights)
–4.0
–16.9
–5.1
–1.3
–3.4
–2.8
–4.1
Consumer Prices
Advanced Economies
1.4
0.3
1.2
0.3
0.0
–0.1
–0.2
Emerging Market and Developing Economies
5.1
5.6
5.1
0.1
0.3
0.2
0.3
London Interbank Offered Rate (percent)
On U.S. Dollar Deposits (six month)
0.3
0.4
1.2
0.0
0.0
–0.3
–0.7
On Euro Deposits (three month)
0.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
On Japanese Yen Deposits (six month)
0.2
0.1
0.1
0.0
0.0
0.0
–0.1
Note: Real effective exchange rates are assumed to remain constant at the levels prevailing during July 27–August 24, 2015. Economies are listed on the 
basis of economic size. The aggregated quarterly data are seasonally adjusted. Data for Lithuania are included in the euro area aggregates but were excluded 
in the April 2015 World Economic Outlook (WEO).
1Difference based on rounded figures for both the current, July 2015 WEO Update, and April 2015 World Economic Outlook forecasts.
2Excludes the G7 (Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, United States) and euro area countries.
3For India, data and forecasts are presented on a fiscal year basis and GDP from 2011 onward is based on GDP at market prices with FY2011/12 as a base 
year. 
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif Insert images into PDF form field in VB.NET. NET framework component supports inserting image to PDF in preview
copying image from pdf to word; copy and paste image into pdf
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
various image formats, like Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif Ability to put image into specified PDF page position and component supports inserting image to PDF in preview
how to cut image from pdf file; cut picture pdf
CHAPTER 1
Recent DevelopMents anD pRospects 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
3
Year over Year
Q4 over Q46
Projections
2013
2014
Projections
2013
2014
2015
2016
2015
2016
World Output
3.3
3.4
3.1
3.6
3.6
3.3
3.0
3.6
Advanced Economies
1.1
1.8
2.0
2.2
2.0
1.8
2.0
2.3
United States 
1.5
2.4
2.6
2.8
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.8
Euro Area
–0.3
0.9
1.5
1.6
0.6
0.9
1.5
1.7
Germany
0.4
1.6
1.5
1.6
1.3
1.5
1.6
1.6
France
0.7
0.2
1.2
1.5
1.0
0.1
1.5
1.5
Italy
–1.7
–0.4
0.8
1.3
–0.9
–0.4
1.2
1.5
Spain
–1.2
1.4
3.1
2.5
0.0
2.0
3.2
2.2
Japan
1.6
–0.1
0.6
1.0
2.3
–0.8
1.3
1.3
United Kingdom
1.7
3.0
2.5
2.2
2.4
3.4
2.2
2.2
Canada
2.0
2.4
1.0
1.7
2.7
2.5
0.5
2.0
Other Advanced Economies2
2.2
2.8
2.3
2.7
2.7
2.6
2.5
2.6
Emerging Market and Developing Economies
5.0
4.6
4.0
4.5
5.2
4.7
4.0
4.8
Commonwealth of Independent States
2.2
1.0
–2.7
0.5
2.3
–0.6
–3.3
0.3
Russia
1.3
0.6
–3.8
–0.6
1.9
0.3
–4.6
0.0
Excluding Russia
4.2
1.9
–0.1
2.8
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
Emerging and Developing Asia
7.0
6.8
6.5
6.4
6.8
6.8
6.4
6.4
China
7.7
7.3
6.8
6.3
7.5
7.1
6.7
6.3
India3
6.9
7.3
7.3
7.5
6.9
7.6
7.3
7.5
ASEAN-54
5.1
4.6
4.6
4.9
4.6
4.8
4.4
5.2
Emerging and Developing Europe
2.9
2.8
3.0
3.0
3.9
2.6
3.2
4.2
Latin America and the Caribbean 
2.9
1.3
–0.3
0.8
1.7
1.1
–1.5
1.7
Brazil
2.7
0.1
–3.0
–1.0
2.1
–0.2
–4.4
1.3
Mexico
1.4
2.1
2.3
2.8
1.0
2.6
2.3
2.9
Middle East, North Africa, Afghanistan, and Pakistan
2.3
2.7
2.5
3.9
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
Saudi Arabia
2.7
3.5
3.4
2.2
4.9
1.6
3.9
1.6
Sub-Saharan Africa 
5.2
5.0
3.8
4.3
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
Nigeria
5.4
6.3
4.0
4.3
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
South Africa
2.2
1.5
1.4
1.3
2.8
1.3
0.7
1.7
Memorandum
European Union
0.2
1.5
1.9
1.9
1.1
1.5
1.8
2.1
Low-Income Developing Countries
6.1
6.0
4.8
5.8
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
Middle East and North Africa 
2.1
2.6
2.3
3.8
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
World Growth Based on Market Exchange Rates
2.4
2.7
2.5
3.0
2.8
2.5
2.4
3.0
World Trade Volume (goods and services)
3.3
3.3
3.2
4.1
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
Imports
Advanced Economies
2.0
3.4
4.0
4.2
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
Emerging Market and Developing Economies
5.2
3.6
1.3
4.4
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
Exports
Advanced Economies
2.9
3.4
3.1
3.4
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
Emerging Market and Developing Economies
4.4
2.9
3.9
4.8
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
Commodity Prices (U.S. dollars)
Oil5
–0.9
–7.5
–46.4
–2.4
2.6
–28.7
–38.0
13.6
Nonfuel (average based on world commodity export weights)
–1.2
–4.0
–16.9
–5.1
–2.9
–7.5
–16.1
–0.3
Consumer Prices
Advanced Economies
1.4
1.4
0.3
1.2
1.2
1.0
0.5
1.4
Emerging Market and Developing Economies
5.8
5.1
5.6
5.1
5.6
5.1
6.7
5.7
London Interbank Offered Rate (percent)
On U.S. Dollar Deposits (six month)
0.4
0.3
0.4
1.2
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
On Euro Deposits (three month)
0.2
0.2
0.0
0.0
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
On Japanese Yen Deposits (six month)
0.2
0.2
0.1
0.1
. . .
. . .
. . .
. . .
4Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand,  Vietnam.
5Simple average of prices of U.K. Brent, Dubai Fateh, and West Texas Intermediate crude oil. The average price of oil in U.S. dollars a barrel was $96.25 in 2014; 
the assumed price based on futures markets is $51.62 in 2015 and $50.36 in 2016.
6For World Output, the quarterly estimates and projections account for approximately 90 percent of annual world output at purchasing-power-parity weights. For 
Emerging Market and Developing Economies, the quarterly estimates and projections account for approximately 80 percent of annual emerging market and develop-
ing economies' output at purchasing-power-parity weights.
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Support various formats image deletion, such as Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif, Bmp, Tiff and other bitmap images. Able to cut and paste image into another PDF file.
how to copy images from pdf file; copy pictures from pdf to word
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET in Visual Studio, such as Jpeg or Jpg, Png, Gif
how to copy a pdf image into a word document; pasting image into pdf
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
last year and imports contracted, but consump-
tion growth remained steady. While exports were 
also weaker than expected, they declined less than 
imports, and net exports contributed positively to 
growth. Equity prices have dropped sharply since 
July after a one-year bull run. While the authori-
ties intervened to restore orderly market conditions, 
market volatility remained elevated through August.
• Economic activity in some advanced and emerg-
ing market economies in east Asia—such as Korea, 
Taiwan Province of China, and economies of 
Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) 
members—was also a bit weaker than expected, 
reflecting lower exports but also a slowdown in 
domestic demand. 
• In Latin America, the downturn in Brazil was 
deeper than expected, and with declining commod-
ity prices, momentum continues to weaken in other 
countries in the region. Growth was also lower than 
expected in Mexico, reflecting slower U.S.growth 
and a drop in oil production. 
• The decline in GDP in Russia over the first half 
of2015 was somewhat larger than forecast, and the 
recession in Ukraine was deeper than previously fore-
cast, reflecting the ongoing conflict in the region. 
• Macroeconomic indicators suggest that economic 
activity in sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle 
East—for which quarterly GDP series are not 
broadly available—also fell short of expectations, 
affected by the drop in oil prices, declines in other 
commodity prices, and geopolitical and domestic 
strife in a few countries. 
Global industrial production remained weak 
through2014, consistent with the uneven strength in 
demand across major economies and groups of coun-
tries, and slowed markedly over the course of the first 
half of2015, reflecting some building of inventories 
in late2014 and early2015 but also lower investment 
growth. World trade volumes also slowed in the first 
half of 2015. Weak investment worldwide, particularly 
in mining, as well as the trade spillovers of China’s 
growth transition, has likely contributed to this slow-
ing. Measuring the extent of the trade slowdown in the 
current context of large commodity price and exchange 
rate changes is challenging, however, and depends 
on the underlying measure. National-accounts-based 
estimates suggest a moderation in the growth of world 
trade volumes, while measures based on international 
merchandise trade statistics, depicted in the first panel 
of Figure 1.1, imply an outright contraction.
GDP Growth
(Annualized semiannual percent change)
–4
–2
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
2010
11
12
13
14
Aug.
15
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0
2010:
H1
11:
H1
12:
H1
13:
H1
14:
H1
15:
H1
16:
H2
–10
–5
0
5
10
15
20
25
2010
11
12
13
14
Aug.
15
Figure 1.1.  Global Activity Indicators
1. World Trade, Industrial Production, and Manufacturing PMI
(Three-month moving average; annualized percent change,
unless noted otherwise)
April 2015 WEO
October 2015 WEO
4. Advanced Economies
3.5
4.0
4.5
5.0
5.5
6.0
6.5
7.0
7.5
8.0
8.5
2010:
H1
11:
H1
12:
H1
13:
H1
14:
H1
15:
H1
16:
H2
5. Emerging Market and
Developing Economies 
2. Manufacturing PMI
(Three-month moving
average; deviations
from 50)
–8
–4
0
4
8
12
16
20
24
28
2010
11
12
13
14
July
15
Advanced
economies1
Emerging market 
economies
2
Manufacturing PMI (deviations from 50)
Industrial production
World trade volumes
3. Industrial Production
(Three-month moving
average; annualized
percent change)
Advanced economies
1
Emerging market economies2
Global growth moderated in the first half of 2015, and global industrial production 
and world trade volumes slowed markedly. Global activity is projected to gather 
pace in 2016. In advanced economies, the projections suggest a broad-based 
further strengthening of growth in the second half of 2015 and in early 2016. In 
emerging market and developing economies, the pickup in 2016 mainly reflects a 
gradual improvement in countries in economic distress in 2015.
Sources: CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis; Haver Analytics; 
Markit Economics; and IMF staff estimates.
Note: IP = industrial production; PMI = purchasing managers’ index.
1
Australia, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, euro area, Hong Kong SAR (IP only), 
Israel, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Norway (IP only), Singapore, Sweden (IP only), 
Switzerland, Taiwan Province of China, United Kingdom, United States.
2
Argentina (IP only), Brazil, Bulgaria (IP only), Chile (IP only), China, Colombia (IP 
only), Hungary, India, Indonesia, Latvia (IP only), Lithuania (IP only), Malaysia (IP 
only), Mexico, Pakistan (IP only), Peru (IP only), Philippines (IP only), Poland, 
Romania (IP only), Russia, South Africa, Thailand (IP only), Turkey, Ukraine (IP only), 
Venezuela (IP only).
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
for creating PDF from multiple image formats such as tiff, jpg, png, gif doc = PDFDocument.Create(2); // Save the new created PDF document into file doc
how to cut picture from pdf file; paste picture pdf
C# powerpoint - Convert PowerPoint to JPEG in C#.NET
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg.
how to cut image from pdf; copy picture from pdf to word
CHAPTER 1
Recent DevelopMents anD pRospects 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
5
Headline inflation declined in advanced economies 
(Figure1.2), mostly reflecting the decline in oil prices 
and softer prices for other commodities, while core 
inflation remained stable. With regard to emerging 
markets, lower prices for oil and other commodities 
(including food, which has a larger weight in the con-
sumer price index of emerging market and developing 
economies) have generally contributed to reductions in 
inflation, except in countries suffering sizable currency 
depreciations, such as Russia.
Declining Commodity Prices
After remaining broadly stable during the second 
quarter of2015, oil prices declined through much of 
the third quarter (Figure 1.3). Weaker-than-expected 
global activity played a role, but supply was also higher 
than expected, reflecting strong production in mem-
bers of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting 
Countries as well as in the United States and Russia. 
Furthermore, a future boost to supply is expected, 
coming from the Islamic Republic of Iran after the 
recent nuclear agreement with the P5+1 nations.1 
Recent developments suggest that oil markets will 
take longer to adjust to current conditions of excess 
flow supply, and oil prices through2020 are now fore-
cast to remain below the levels projected a few months 
ago. Supply has remained more resilient than expected, 
and global activity has been weaker. While lower oil 
prices have supported demand in importers, other 
shocks have partly offset the effects and so far prevented 
a broad-based pickup in activity, which in turn would 
have supported oil market rebalancing. 周e income 
windfall gains from lower oil prices have supported a 
pickup in private consumption in advanced economies, 
broadly as expected, except in the United States, where 
harsh winter weather and other temporary factors weak-
ened the consumption response somewhat, and Japan, 
where the consumption response has been dampened 
by delayed pass-through and wage moderation. But 
investment has not responded, partly reflecting a greater 
contraction in oil sector investment, but also lackluster 
investment more broadly. And in emerging markets, 
economic activity has been weaker than expected, par-
ticularly in oil exporters, as discussed earlier.
As examined in more detail in the Special Feature, 
the prices of nonfuel commodities—especially base 
metals—have fallen sharply in recent weeks. 周e 
1周e P5+1 are the five permanent members of the UN Security 
Council and Germany.
–5
–4
–3
–2
–1
0
1
2
3
4
5
USA
Euro area
Japan
Other Adv. Eur.
Other Adv.
USA
Euro area
Japan
Other Adv. Eur.
Other Adv.
–4
–2
0
2
4
6
8
2005
07
09
11
13
15
16
Figure 1.2.  Global Inflation
(Year-over-year percent change, unless noted otherwise)
–2
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
2005
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
1. Global Aggregates: Headline Inflation
50
100
150
200
250
300
2005
07
09
11
13
15
16
3. Commodity Prices
(Index, 2005 = 100)
Emerging market and developing economies1
Advanced economies
World1
2. Headline Inflation (Dashed
lines are six- to ten-year
inflation expectations)
United States
Euro area
Japan2
Energy
Food
Metal
Sources: Consensus Economics; IMF, Primary Commodity Price System; and IMF
staff estimates.
Note: Other Adv. = other advanced economies; other Adv. Eur. = other advanced 
Europe; USA = United States.
1Excludes Venezuela.
2In Japan, the increase in inflation in 2014 reflects, to a large extent, the increase
in the consumption tax.
4. Nominal Unit Labor Cost and Compensation
(Quarterly percent change, annual rate)
Unit labor cost
Compensation
Average, 2012–14
2015:Q1
Headline inflation has declined in advanced economies, mostly reflecting the decline 
in the prices of oil and other commodities. Core inflation has remained more stable, 
but generally is below central banks’ inflation objectives, as are nominal unit labor 
costs. In emerging market economies, lower commodity prices have also 
contributed to lowering headline inflation, but sizable currency depreciation has led 
to offsets on the upside in some economies.
C# Word - Convert Word to JPEG in C#.NET
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg.
how to copy pdf image to powerpoint; copy image from pdf to pdf
C# Word - Insert Image to Word Page in C#.NET
C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET the reference RasterEdge.XImage.Raster. dll into your project. image = new REImage(@"C:\logo2.jpg"); page.AddImage
how to copy pictures from a pdf document; how to copy a picture from a pdf to a word document
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
dynamics are similar to those of the recent adjust-
ment in the oil market. High prices have generally led 
to a buildup in supply capacity that came onstream 
as demand began to slow. However, developments 
in China play a much more important role in base 
metal markets than they do in the oil market. China’s 
share in the global consumption of these metals 
has increased from some 10 to20percent in the 
early2000s to more than 50percent currently. Some 
of this increase relates to the country’s role as a manu-
facturing hub, but it also reflects the infrastructure 
investment and construction boom in2009–13 after 
the global financial crisis. China’s growth transition 
and slower metal-intensive investment growth have 
been instrumental in weakening base metal prices, and 
the trend is expected to continue during the transition. 
With demand growth expected to stay relatively weak 
under the baseline projections, prices are assumed to 
move broadly sideways in the near term. 
周e global macroeconomic implications of lower 
oil prices were discussed in detail in the April2015 
WEO. In commodity exporters, the near-term outlook 
has deteriorated with lower oil prices and commod-
ity prices more broadly. Chapter 2 analyzes in more 
detail the implications of commodity terms-of-trade 
fluctuations for real GDP in commodity exporters. All 
else equal, current WEO assumptions for commodity 
prices imply average commodity exporter growth rates 
almost 1 percentage point lower in 2015–17 than in 
2012–14—with a stronger drag for exporters of fuel 
and metals (about 2¼ percentage points). 周e impact 
will, of course, also depend on other factors, including 
macroeconomic policy responses—as discussed in the 
October2015 Fiscal Monitor.
Exchange Rate Movements
Weakening commodity prices have been reflected in 
sizable exchange rate depreciation for many commod-
ity exporters with flexible exchange rate regimes. But 
emerging market currencies more generally have seen 
sharp depreciations since the spring, and particularly 
since July. Exchange rate movements across major 
advanced economy currencies have instead been rela-
tively modest in recent months, after the large changes 
during the August2014–March2015 period. In real 
effective terms, the euro appreciated by 3.7percent 
and the U.S.dollar by 2.3percent between March 
and August 2015, while the yen weakened slightly. 
Exchange rate volatility increased in August, particu-
–15
–10
–5
0
5
10
2014
2015
2014
2015
2014
2015
2014
2015
2014
2015
2014
2015
–15
–10
–5
0
5
10
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
2014
2015
2014
2015
2014
2015
2014
2015
40
80
120
160
200
2005
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
APSP
Food
Metal
30
32
34
36
38
40
2005
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15:
Q2
Figure 1.3.  Commodity and Oil Markets
1. Real Commodity Price Indices
(Deflated using U.S. consumer price index; index, 2014 = 100)
Sources: International Energy Agency (IEA); IMF, Primary Commodity Price System; 
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development; and IMF staff estimates.
Note: APSP = average petroleum spot price; CIS = Commonwealth of
Independent States; LAC = Latin America and the Caribbean; MENA = Middle
East and North Africa; OECD = Organisation for Economic Co-operation and
Development; SSA = sub-Saharan Africa.
3. OECD Oil Inventories
(Days of consumption)
4.  Oil Trade Balance, Fuel
Exporters (Percent of GDP;
average and 10th/90th
percentiles)
5.  Oil Trade Balance, Fuel
Importers (Percent of GDP;
average and 10th/90th
percentiles)
Fuelexporters
SSAoil
exporters
MENAoil
exporters
CISenergy
exporters
Fuelimporters
Advanced
Asia
Advanced
Europe
Emerging
Asia
Emerging
Europe
LAC
In global oil markets, spot prices have declined again after rising from the lows 
reached in January 2015. More resilient supply, including in North America, and 
weaker global activity likely have been the main factors behind the renewed 
downward pressure on prices. The adjustment to excess flow supply conditions is 
now expected to take longer, and prices are projected to remain below the levels 
assumed a few months ago.
–4
–2
0
2
4
6
8
–12
–6
0
6
12
18
24
2005
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15:
Q4
2. Global Activity and Oil Demand 
(Year-over-year percent change)
Global oil demand (IEA)
World real GDP
Global industrial production 
(right scale)
C# Excel - Convert Excel to JPEG in C#.NET
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET will name the converted JPEG image file Output.jpg.
how to copy and paste a pdf image into a word document; paste image in pdf file
CHAPTER 1
Recent DevelopMents anD pRospects 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
7
larly after the depreciation of the renminbi associated 
with the announced increase in exchange rate flexibil-
ity. Despite its 4percent adjustment with respect to 
the U.S.dollar, the renminbi remains some 10percent 
stronger than its2014 average in real effective terms. 
More generally, exchange rate movements across float-
ing-rate currencies over the past year have reflected to 
an important extent large variations in underlying fun-
damentals, such as expected demand growth at home 
and in trading partners, declines in commodity prices, 
and country-specific shocks. For instance, countries 
with weakening growth prospects and worsening terms 
of trade are facing currency depreciation pressures as 
part of global adjustment. And as discussed in Chapter 
3, countries experiencing sharp and persistent exchange 
rate movements will likely see notable changes in net 
external demand. 
Long-Term Interest Rates and Financial Conditions
Financial market volatility spiked in August, with an 
increase in global risk aversion triggered by concerns 
about China’s outlook, uncertainty about the imple-
mentation of its new exchange rate regime, and emerg-
ing market prospects more generally. 周is episode was 
associated with lower equity prices, higher interest 
rate spreads, declining yields on safe assets, and—as 
discussed earlier—sharp declines in commodity prices 
and currency depreciation for most emerging markets. 
Longer-term sovereign bond yields are currently some 
30 basis points higher than the level prevailing in April 
in the United States and are up by 45–80 basis points 
in the euro area (excluding Greece) over the same 
period (Figure 1.4). Despite some increases in corpo-
rate bond spreads (modest for investment-grade firms 
and larger for high-yield bonds), financial conditions 
for corporate and household borrowers have remained 
broadly favorable, with solid growth in household 
credit in the United States and gradually improving 
lending conditions in the euro area (Figure 1.5). 
Higher yields partly reflect improving economic 
activity and the bottoming out of headline inflation; in 
the euro area, they also reflect a correction after earlier 
declines to extremely compressed levels in response 
to increased bond purchases by the European Central 
Bank. On the policy rate front, the United States and 
the United Kingdom are approaching liftoff, but a 
number of other countries are easing monetary policy. 
Namely, policy rates have been reduced in commod-
ity exporters (Australia, Canada, New Zealand) and 
–0.1
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.3
–0.2
–0.1
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.3
Euro area
Japan
United Kingdom
United States
Change in 10-year bond yield
Change in forward inflation swap
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
2007
09
11
13
Aug.
15
Italy
Spain
Sources: Bank of Spain; Bloomberg, L.P.; Haver Analytics;Thomson Reuters 
Datastream; and IMF staff calculations.
Note: DJ = Dow Jones; ECB = European Central Bank; MSCI = Morgan Stanley
Capital International; S&P = Standard & Poor’s; TOPIX = Tokyo Stock Price Index.
1Expectations are based on the federal funds rate futures for the United States.
2Interest rates are 10-year government bond yields, unless noted otherwise. Data
are through September 11, 2015.
3Changes are calculated from the beginning of 2015 to September 15, 2015. 
Interest rates are measured by 10-year government bond yields. Expected 
medium-term inflation is measured by the implied rate from five-year five-year-
forward inflation swaps.
4Data are through September 14, 2015.
Figure 1.4.  Financial Conditions in Advanced Economies
(Percent, unless noted otherwise)
)
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
2007
09
11
13
Sep.
15
6. Price-to-Earnings Ratios4
0
40
80
120
160
200
2007
09
11
13
Aug.
15
5. Equity Markets
(Index, 2007 = 100;national
currency)
4. ECB Gross Claims on
Spanish and Italian Banks
(Billions of euros; dashed
lines are 10-year
government bond yields,
percent, left scale)
S&P 500
TOPIX
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
2007
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
Sep.
15
2. Key Interest Rates2
Japan
U.S.
May 22,
2013
May 22,
2013
May 22,
2013
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
2013
14
15
16
17
Aug.
18
May 21, 2013
Jun. 21, 2013
Sep. 20, 2013
Mar. 26, 2014
Sep. 15, 2015
U.S. average 30-year 
fixed-rate mortgage 
U.S.
Japan
Germany
Italy
Germany
1. U.S. Policy Rate
Expectations1
MSCI Emerging Market
DJ Euro Stoxx
Financial market volatility spiked in August following an increase in global risk 
aversion triggered by concerns about China’s growth outlook and emerging market 
prospects more broadly. But financial conditions have remained favorable in 
advanced economies. Slightly higher yields on longer-term bonds primarily reflect 
improving activity and the bottoming out of headline inflation.
.
3. Changes in Forward 
Inflation Swap and 
Bond Yields, 20153 
(Percentage points)
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
in Korea, and Sweden has adopted and subsequently 
expanded quantitative-easing measures. 
Low long-term interest rates, easy monetary policy 
conditions, and still-compressed spreads in advanced 
economies support the recovery and have favorable 
impacts on debt dynamics. But they also raise some 
concern, as discussed in the October2015 Global 
Financial Stability Report (GFSR) and in the “Risks” 
section of this chapter. Inflation expectations, par-
ticularly in the euro area and Japan, remain low, and 
there is a risk they may drift downward if inflation 
remains persistently weak. Financial stability concerns 
associated with a protracted period of low interest rates 
remain salient—particularly in advanced economies 
with modest slack. Insurance companies and pension 
funds face difficult challenges in this respect. And 
compressed term premiums imply a potential risk of 
a sharp increase in long-term rates, with significant 
spillovers to emerging markets.
Financial conditions have in contrast tightened in 
most emerging market and developing economies, 
albeit very differently across countries and regions 
(Figure 1.6). Corporate and sovereign dollar bond 
spreads have risen by 40 to 50 basis points on aver-
age since the spring, and long-term local-currency 
bond yields by close to 60 basis points on average. 
Stock prices have weakened, and exchange rates have 
depreciated or come under pressure, particularly in 
commodity exporters. 周e evolution of policy rates in 
recent months has also differed across regions, reflect-
ing differences in inflation pressure, other domestic 
macroeconomic conditions, and the external environ-
ment (Figure 1.7). Nominal policy rates have been 
reduced in China and other countries in emerging 
Asia (notably India) and in Russia, after the very sharp 
increase in December2014. In contrast, because of 
increasing inflation, policy rates have risen further in 
Brazil, while in the rest of the region they have been 
stable or declining, reflecting the weakness in domestic 
demand. 
Longer-Term Factors
Productivity Growth in Advanced Economies 
As highlighted in previous WEO reports, growth 
has fallen short of forecasts over the past four years. A 
comparison of output growth for advanced economies 
for2011–14 with the forecast in the April2011 WEO 
shows an aggregate overprediction over the horizon of 
350
450
550
650
750
850
950
2000
02
04
06
08
10
12
15:
Q1
United States
Euro area
Japan3
60
80
100
120
140
160
180
200
2000
02
04
06
08
10
12
15:
Q2
Figure 1.5.  Advanced Economies: Monetary Conditions
–10
–5
0
5
10
15
20
2006
08
10
12
15:
Q2
2. Nonfinancial Firm and
Household Credit Growth2
(Year-over-year percent 
change)
5. Real House Price Indices 
(Index, 2000 = 100)
60
80
100
120
140
160
2000
02
04
06
08
10
12
15:
Q1
4. Household Debt
(Percent of household
gross disposable income)
United States
Euro area
United States
Euro area
Japan
AEs experiencing upward
pressure5
United States
Euro area4
Japan
Italy
Spain
3. Household Net Worth
(Percent of household
gross disposable income)
Markets still expect a policy rate liftoff in late 2015 in the United States, but 
subsequent rate increases are expected to be more gradual. With more 
accommodative monetary conditions in the euro area, the contraction in private 
credit has started to bottom out. In the United States, household net worth has 
stabilized at a higher level, and household debt continues to decrease.
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
3.5
2015
16
17
Sep.
18
1. Policy Rate Expectations1
(Percent; dashed lines
are from the April 2015
WEO)
United Kingdom
United States
Euro area
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
2007
09
11
13
Sep.
15
6. Central Bank Total Assets6
(Percent of 2008 GDP)
Federal Reserve
ECB
Bank of Japan
Sources: Bank of England; Bank of Spain; Bloomberg, L.P.; European Central 
Bank (ECB); Haver Analytics; Organisation for Economic Co-operation and 
Development; and IMF staff calculations.
1Expectations are based on the federal funds rate futures for the United States, the 
sterling overnight index swap forward for the United Kingdom, and the euro 
interbank offered forward rate for the euro area; updated September 15, 2015.
2Flow-of-funds data are used for the euro area, Spain, and the United States. Italian 
bank loans to Italian residents are corrected for securitizations.
3Interpolated from annual net worth as a percentage of disposable income.
4Includes subsector employers (including self-employed workers).
5Upward-pressure countries are those with a residential real estate vulnerability 
index above the median for advanced economies (AEs): Australia, Austria, Belgium, 
Canada, France, Hong Kong SAR, Israel, Luxembourg, New Zealand, Norway, 
Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom.
6Data are through September 11, 2015. ECB calculations are based on the 
Eurosystem’s weekly financial statement. 
CHAPTER 1
Recent DevelopMents anD pRospects 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
9
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
2010
11
12
13
14
Sep.
15
Emerging Europe
China
Emerging Asia excluding China
Latin America
60
80
100
120
140
160
180
200
2010
11
12
13
14
Sep.
15
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
2010
11
12
13
14
Sep.
15
4
6
8
10
12
14
2010
11
12
13
14
Aug.
15
1. Policy Rate
(Percent)
Sources: Bloomberg, L.P.; EPFR Global; Haver Analytics; IMF, International 
Financial Statistics; and IMF staff calculations.
Note: Emerging Asia excluding China comprises India, Indonesia, Malaysia, the
Philippines, and Thailand; emerging Europe comprises Poland, Romania (capital
inflows only), Russia, and Turkey; Latin America comprises Brazil, Chile, Colombia,
Mexico, and Peru.EMBI = J.P. Morgan Emerging Market Bond Index.
1Data are through September 11, 2015.
Figure 1.6.  Financial Conditions in Emerging Market
Economies
4. Equity Markets
(Index, 2007 = 100)
2. Ten-Year Government BondYields1
(Percent)
Financial conditions in emerging market economies have tightened since the April 
2015 World Economic Outlook in a more challenging external environment.
3. EMBI Sovereign Spreads1
(Basis points)
–10
0
10
20
30
40
2009
10
11
12
13
14
Jun.
15
90
100
110
120
130
140
150
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
2006
08
10
12
15:
Q2
MEX (right scale)
CHN
MYS
Credit-to-GDP Ratio2
(Percent)
–2
0
2
4
6
8
BRA
CHL
CHN
COL
IDN
IND
KOR
MEX
MYS
PER
PHL
POL
RUS
THA
TURZAF
Sources: Haver Analytics; IMF, International Financial Statistics (IFS) database;and 
IMF staff calculations.
Note: Data labels in the figure use International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 
country codes.
1Deflated by two-year-ahead World Economic Outlook inflation projections.
2Credit is other depository corporations’ claims on the private sector (from IFS),
except in the case of Brazil, for which private sector credit is from the Monetary 
Policy and Financial System Credit Operations published by Banco Central do Brasil.
Figure 1.7.  Monetary Policies and Credit in Emerging
MarketEconomies
January 2014
August 2015
January 2014 average 
August 2015 average
1. Real Policy Rates1
(Percent)
BRA
CHN
IND
MEX
Real Credit Growth2
(Year-over-year percent change)
–10
0
10
20
30
40
2009
10
11
12
13
14
Jun.
15
3.
IDN
MYS
TUR
15
25
35
45
55
65
75
2006
08
10
12
15:
Q2
RUS
BRA
IDN
TUR
COL
IND
4.
5.
COL
RUS
2.
Monetary conditions generally remain accommodative in many emerging market 
economies. Real policy rates are low, while currencies have depreciated in real 
effective terms. However, in a number of emerging market economies with 
inflationary pressures or external vulnerabilities, central banks have raised policy 
rates. Real credit growth has slowed in many emerging market economies after 
credit booms and rapid increases in credit-to-GDP ratios.
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
10 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
about 1percentage point. However, the overpredic-
tion of employment growth (0.3percentage point) is 
much lower. And for a range of economies—including 
Germany, Japan, Korea, and the United Kingdom—
the overprediction of output growth has instead been 
associated with an underprediction of employment 
growth. In other words, labor productivity has fallen 
well short of predictions.
Figure1.8 looks at this issue in more detail. 周e 
first two panels show the average relationship between 
output growth and employment growth across coun-
tries, before and after the crisis. A comparison of these 
panels highlights that both output growth and employ-
ment growth were much weaker in the period2008–
14 relative to the precrisis period1995–2007. 周e 
panels also show that, on average, the same rate of 
output growth has been associated since the crisis with 
higher employment growth—but with much lower 
output growth rates, employment growth since the cri-
sis has nevertheless been weaker than before the crisis. 
Adjusting employment growth for changes in hours 
worked yields the same results.
周e figure’s third panel compares labor productiv-
ity growth in advanced economies—proxied by the 
difference between output growth and employment 
growth—across the periods1995–2007 and2008–14. 
It shows that while labor productivity growth still 
varies substantially across countries, there has been a 
common slowdown across virtually all countries—the 
only exception being Spain (the only point above the 
45-degree line in the panel), reflecting large changes 
especially in temporary, lower-productivity jobs over 
the cycle. Again, adjusting employment growth for 
changes in hours worked leads to a virtually identical 
picture.
周e fourth panel of the figure compares the2014 
level of unemployment with the maximum level during 
the period2008–14. Although the recently elevated 
“employment intensity” of growth has helped reduce 
unemployment in a number of countries, the low rate 
of output growth implies that unemployment is still 
high and that output gaps are sizable in a number of 
advanced economies. 
What is behind the decline in labor productiv-
ity? Clearly weak investment after the crisis is play-
ing a role, but as Chapter 3 of the April2015 WEO 
shows, slowing total factor productivity growth across 
large advanced economies looks so far to be the most 
important part of the explanation in most cases. In 
turn, the reasons for slowing total factor productiv-
Labor productivity growth in advanced economies has been much lower since the 
global financial crisis. The flip side is that, since the crisis, the same rate of output 
growth has, on average, been associated with higher employment growth (as 
reflected in a higher slope coefficient in the trend line). With relatively more 
employment-intensive growth, unemployment has decreased noticeably in 
economies that have experienced a sustained growth recovery.
–4
–2
0
2
4
6
–5
–4
–3
–2
–1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Employment growth
Real GDP growth
Figure 1.8.  Growth, Employment, and Labor Productivity in
Advanced Economies
(Percent)
1. Average Employment and Real GDP Growth, 2008–14
Sources: IMF, Global Data Source database; and IMF staff calculations.
Note: Scatter plots exclude the Czech Republic, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, 
the Slovak Republic, and Slovenia. Data labels in the figure use International 
Organization for Standardization (ISO) country codes.
–4
–2
0
2
4
6
–5
–4
–3
–2
–1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Employment growth
Real GDP growth
2. Average Employment and Real GDP Growth, 1995–2007
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
GRC ESP PRT T ITA FRA FIN IRL
AUT
NLD BEL
SWE LUX
CAN DEU
AUS
DNK NZL
GBR
USA ISR
NOR
TWN KOR
CHE JPN N HKG
4. Unemployment Rate
Latest value
Maximum value between 2008 and 2014
–2
–1
0
1
2
3
4
5
–2
–1
0
1
2
3
4
5
2008–14
1995–2007
3. Change in Average Labor Productivity
y = 0.57x – 0.35
R² = 0.54
y = 0.76x – 0.19
R² = 0.79
45-degree line
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested