pdf viewer library c# : How to copy pictures from pdf to powerpoint control software utility azure windows wpf visual studio text3-part1777

CHA PTER 1
Recent Deve lo pMe nts anD pRo spec ts 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
11
ity growth across advanced economies are still poorly 
understood (see for instance OECD2015), but likely 
include slower human capital accumulation, a com-
positional shift of GDP toward services, and—at least 
for the United States—gradually declining positive 
effects on productivity from the information and 
communications technology revolution (Fernald2014; 
Gordon2014).2 
A key question is whether the protracted slow-
down in growth and weak productivity growth could 
also reflect the nature of the recent crisis, given the 
literature on weak recoveries in the aftermath of severe 
financial distress. Box 1.1 addresses this question by 
focusing on more than 100 recessions in 23 advanced 
economies since the1960s. It finds that two-thirds of 
recessions are followed by lower output relative to the 
prerecession trend. Even more surprising, almost half 
of those are followed not only by lower output, but 
also by lower output growth relative to the prerecession 
trend. 周e results discussed in the box raise important 
policy questions—for instance, the extent to which 
these effects reflect supply shocks or the erosion of 
potential output coming from protracted downturns in 
domestic demand. In the IMF staff’s view, both factors 
are at play in accounting for lower potential growth, 
and—despite lower potential growth—demand short-
falls are still sizable in a number of advanced econo-
mies (as shown, for instance, in the fourth panel of 
Figure1.8).
A Protracted Slowdown in Emerging Markets
After a strong rebound to almost 7½percent after 
the global financial crisis, real GDP growth in emerg-
ing market and developing economies decreased from 
about 6.3percent in2011 to 4.6percent in2014. 
In2015, it is projected to decline further to 4percent. 
With this decline, growth for the entire group in2014 
was about 1percentage point below the average growth 
recorded during1995–2007. 
Larger deviations from the average in the major 
emerging market economies heavily influenced these 
outcomes for the group, which are calculated using 
GDP weights. And among emerging market and 
developing economies, the slowdown has not been 
universal—for almost 40percent of them, growth 
2Some have argued that owing to rapid technological change, 
especially in the information and communications technology sector, 
conventional national income statistics increasingly understate the 
true income level, but that view is not widely accepted.
in2011–14 was above the1995–2007 average.3 
Against the backdrop of such variation, it should not 
come as a surprise that slightly more than half of the 
variation in the2011–14 change in growth in emerg-
ing market and developing economies appears to have 
resulted from country-specific factors. Such factors—
including, for example, supply bottlenecks and changes 
in structural policies—have been discussed extensively 
in previous WEO reports. 周e flip side is that slightly 
less than half of the variation can be related to a set of 
initial conditions and external factors. 
An interesting feature of the decline in growth is 
that in the first two years of the decline (2011–12), 
external factors, notably lower partner country growth, 
appear to have played a more important role than they 
did subsequently in2013–14.4 Changes in growth in 
all partner countries seem to have been a more relevant 
factor than changes in partner advanced economies 
only, perhaps a reflection of increased trade within 
the group of emerging market and developing econo-
mies. While the extent of direct trade exposure to 
China does not seem to have been a significant factor 
in explaining differences in growth declines across 
economies, being a net commodity exporter appears to 
have been a relevant factor: these economies experi-
enced relatively larger growth declines, all else equal. 
Still, as discussed in Chapter 2, the impact of com-
modity terms-of-trade fluctuations on both actual and 
potential (medium-term) growth depends on a number 
of factors, such as initial levels of financial develop-
ment, how much fiscal policy smooths or exacerbates 
the cycle, and exchange rate regimes. Typically, export-
ers with greater exchange rate flexibility experienced 
smaller reductions in growth in 2011–14, which was 
also true for other emerging market economies. 
周e growth slowdown also appears to reflect a 
correction after years of exceptionally rapid growth 
in the2000s. Countries that recorded growth much 
above longer-term averages around the time of the 
global financial crisis slowed down more during2011–
14 (“mean reversion”). 周is suggests that the protracted 
slowdowns could in part also reflect adjustment to 
various possible boom legacies, including an invest-
ment overhang and higher corporate sector leverage 
after credit booms, as discussed in Chapter 3 of the 
October2015 GFSR. 
3周e analysis of forecast errors shows a similar picture, as dis-
cussed in Box 1.3 of the October 2014 WEO.
4Chapter 4 of the April 2014 WEO also finds an important role 
for external shocks in the initial stages of the slowdown.
How to copy pictures from pdf to powerpoint - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy text from pdf image; copy images from pdf to word
How to copy pictures from pdf to powerpoint - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
paste picture into pdf preview; how to copy pdf image into powerpoint
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
12 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
The Forecast
Policy Assumptions
Fiscal consolidation is projected to moderate in 
advanced economies over the forecast horizon (Fig-
ure1.9). In emerging markets, the fiscal policy stance 
is projected to turn more expansionary to offset the 
slowdown—albeit with marked differences across 
countries and regions. On the monetary policy front, 
U.S.policy rates are expected to increase beginning 
in late2015 (Figure1.5). Monetary policy normal-
ization in the United Kingdom is projected to begin 
in 2016 (consistent with market expectations). Very 
accommodative policy stances are expected to remain 
in place for longer in Japan and also in the euro area, 
where monthly purchases of government bonds started 
March9. Policy rates are generally expected to be on 
hold in a number of emerging market economies until 
rate increases start in the United States. 
Other Assumptions
Global financial conditions are assumed to remain 
accommodative, with some gradual tightening reflected 
in, among other things, rising 10-year yields on 
U.S.Treasury bonds as the expected date for liftoff from 
the zero bound in the United States approaches. 周e 
process of normalizing monetary policy in the United 
States and the United Kingdom is assumed to proceed 
smoothly, without large and protracted increases in 
financial market volatility or sharp movements in long-
term interest rates. Nevertheless, financial conditions in 
emerging markets are assumed to be tighter than over 
the past few months, reflecting the recent rise in spreads 
and decline in equity prices, with some further increases 
in long-term rates reflecting rising 10-year yields in 
advanced economies. Oil prices are projected to increase 
gradually over the forecast horizon, from an average of 
$52 a barrel in2015 to about $55 a barrel in2017. 
In contrast, nonfuel commodity prices are expected to 
stabilize at lower levels after recent declines in both food 
and metal prices. Geopolitical tensions are assumed to 
stay elevated, with the situation around Ukraine remain-
ing difficult and strife continuing in some countries in 
the Middle East. 周ese tensions are generally assumed to 
ease, allowing for a gradual recovery in the most severely 
affected economies in2016–17.
Global Outlook for2015–16
Global growth is projected to decline from 3.4per-
cent in2014 to 3.1percent in2015, before picking 
–1.0
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
Advanced economies 
excluding euro area
Emerging market 
and developing 
economies
France and 
Germany
Selected euro area 
economies1
–10
–8
–6
–4
–2
0
2
2001
03
05
07
09
11
13
15
17
20
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
1950
60
70
80
90
2000
10
20
Source: IMF staff estimates.
1Euro area countries (Greece, Ireland, Italy, Portugal, Spain) with high borrowing 
spreads during the 2010–11 sovereign debt crisis.
2Data through 2000 exclude the United States.
3Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, UnitedKingdom, United States.
Figure 1.9.  Fiscal Policies
(Percent of GDP, unless noted otherwise)
2. Fiscal Balance
3. Gross Public Debt
1. Fiscal Impulse
(Change in structural balance)
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
April 2015 
WEO
World
Advanced economies
Emerging market and 
developing economies
World
Advanced economies2
Emerging and developing Asia
Major advanced economies2,3
Latin America and the Caribbean
Other emerging market and 
developing economies
Fiscal consolidation is expected to moderate in most advanced economies over the 
forecast horizon. However, in core euro area economies, the fiscal stance will be 
slightly tighter relative to projections in the April 2015 World Economic Outlook (WEO), 
while in some other euro area economies, it has eased relative to earlier projections. 
In emerging market and developing economies, the fiscal policy stance is projected 
to ease in 2015, but with considerable differences across countries. 
VB Imaging - VB Code 93 Generator Tutorial
pictures on PDF documents, multi-page TIFF, Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Please create a Windows application or ASP.NET web form and copy the
how to copy and paste a pdf image; paste image in pdf file
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
application. In addition, texts, pictures and font formatting of source PDF file are accurately retained in converted Word document file.
copying image from pdf to powerpoint; how to copy pictures from pdf file
CHA PTER 1
Recent Deve lo pMe nts anD pRo spec ts 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
13
up to 3.6percent in2016 (see Table1.1). 周e decline 
in growth this year reflects a further slowdown in 
emerging markets, partially offset by a modest pickup 
in activity in advanced economies—particularly in the 
euro area. 周is pickup, supported by the decline in 
oil prices (Figure1.3) and accommodative monetary 
policy, will modestly narrow output gaps. 
周e decline in growth in emerging markets—for the 
fifth year in a row—reflects a combination of factors: 
weaker growth in oil exporters; a slowdown in China, 
as the pattern of growth becomes less reliant on invest-
ment; and a weaker outlook for exporters of other 
commodities, including in Latin America, following 
price declines. In emerging market oil importers, a 
more limited pass-through to consumers of the wind-
fall gains from lower oil prices, together with in some 
cases substantial exchange rate depreciation, has muted 
the attendant boost to growth, with lower prices accru-
ing in part to governments (for example, in the form 
of savings from lower energy subsidies—as discussed in 
the April2015 Fiscal Monitor). 
周e sizable pickup in projected2016 growth reflects 
stronger performance in both emerging market and 
advanced economies. Among emerging market and 
developing economies, growth in countries in eco-
nomic distress in 2015 (including Brazil, Russia, and 
some countries in Latin America and in the Middle 
East), while remaining weak or negative, is projected 
to be higher than in 2015, and domestic demand in 
India is projected to remain strong. 周ese develop-
ments more than offset the projected continuation of 
the slowdown in China. Among advanced economies, 
higher growth reflects a strengthening recovery in 
Japan, the United States, and the euro area, as output 
gaps gradually close. 
周e outlook is weaker than the one in the July2015 
WEO Update for both advanced economies and emerg-
ing markets. Relative to the April2015 WEO, global 
growth has been revised downward by 0.4percentage 
point in2015 and0.2 percentage point in 2016. 
Global Outlook for the Medium Term
Global growth is forecast to increase beyond2016, 
entirely reflecting a further pickup in growth in emerg-
ing market and developing economies. 周is pickup 
reflects two factors. 周e first is the assumption of a 
gradual return to trend rates of growth in countries 
and regions under stress or growing well below poten-
tial in2015–16 (for example, Brazil and the rest of 
Latin America, Russia, and parts of the Middle East). 
周e second factor is the gradual increase in the 
global weight of fast-growing countries such as China 
and India, which further increases their importance as 
drivers of global growth. 
On the other hand, growth in advanced economies 
is projected to remain at about 2¼ percent as output 
gaps gradually close, and then to decline below 2 
percent, reflecting the gradual effects of demographics 
on labor supply and hence on potential output, which 
were discussed in Chapter 3 of the April2015 WEO. 
Economic Outlook for Individual Countries and 
Regions
• The recovery is expected to continue in the United 
States, supported by lower energy prices, reduced 
fiscal drag, strengthened balance sheets, and an 
improving housing market (Figure 1.10, panel 1). 
These forces are expected to more than offset the 
drag on net exports coming from the strengthen-
ing of the dollar. As a result, growth is projected to 
reach 2.6percent in2015 and 2.8percent in2016. 
However, longer-term growth prospects are weaker, 
with potential growth estimated to be only about 
2percent, weighed down by an aging population 
and low total factor productivity growth (which 
recent revisions to national accounts suggest was 
lower than previously thought during2012–14). 
• The moderate euro area recovery is projected to 
continue in2015–16, sustained by lower oil prices, 
monetary easing, and the euro depreciation (Figure 
1.10, panel 2). At the same time, potential growth 
remains weak—a result of crisis legacies, but also 
of demographics and a slowdown in total factor 
productivity that predates the crisis (see Chapter 
3). Hence the outlook is for moderate growth and 
subdued inflation. Growth is expected to increase 
from 0.9percent in2014 to 1.5percent this year 
and 1.6percent in2016, in line with the forecast 
of last April. Growth is forecast to pick up for2015 
and2016 in France (1.2percent in2015 and 
1.5percent in2016), Italy (0.8percent in2015 and 
1.3percent in2016), and especially Spain (3.1per-
cent in2015 and 2.5percent in2016). In Germany, 
growth is expected to remain at about 1½ percent 
(1.5percent in2015 and 1.6percent in2016). The 
outlook for Greece is markedly more difficult fol-
lowing the protracted period of uncertainty earlier 
in the year. 
• In Japan GDP growth is projected to rise from 
–0.1percent in2014 to 0.6percent in2015 and 
C# Imaging - C# Code 93 Generator Tutorial
pictures on PDF documents, multi-page TIFF, Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Please create a Windows application or ASP.NET web form and copy the
copy paste image pdf; how to copy image from pdf to word document
C#: Use OCR SDK Library to Get Image and Document Text
color image recognition for scanned documents and pictures in C#. text content from whole PDF file, single PDF page and You can directly copy demos to your .NET
how to paste a picture into a pdf; copy a picture from pdf to word
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
14 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
1.0percent in2016 (Figure 1.10, panel 1). The 
gradual pickup reflects support from higher real 
compensation and higher equity prices due to the 
Bank of Japan’s additional quantitative and quali-
tative easing, as well as lower oil and commodity 
prices. 
• In other advanced economies, growth is generally 
expected to be solid, but weaker than in2014. In 
the United Kingdom, continued steady growth is 
expected (2.5percent in2015 and 2.2 percent in 
2016), supported by lower oil prices and continued 
recovery in wage growth. The recovery in Sweden 
(2.8percent growth projected in2015) is supported 
by consumption and double-digit housing invest-
ment. In Switzerland, the sharp exchange rate appre-
ciation earlier in the year is projected to depress 
growth in the near term (1.0percent in2015). 
In commodity exporters, lower commodity prices 
weigh on the outlook through reduced disposable 
income and a decline in resource-related investment. 
The latter mechanism has been particularly sharply 
felt in Canada, where growth is now projected to 
be about 1percent in2015, 1.2 percentage points 
lower than forecast in April. Australia’s projected 
growth of 2.4percent in2015, a bit weaker than 
predicted in April, also reflects the impact of lower 
commodity prices and resource-related invest-
ment—partly offset by supportive monetary policy 
and a weaker exchange rate. In Norway GDP is 
projected to grow by 0.9percent this year as the fall 
in oil prices is reflected in stalling investment and 
weakening consumption. Among Asian advanced 
economies, growth is generally weaker than in2014, 
reflecting domestic shocks and slower exports. The 
decline in growth relative to last year is particularly 
noticeable for Taiwan Province of China (from 3.8 
percent to 2.2 percent), where exports have been 
slowing especially sharply.
• Growth in China is expected to decline to 6.8per-
cent this year and 6.3percent in2016—unchanged 
projections relative to April (Figure 1.10, panel 3). 
Previous excesses in real estate, credit, and invest-
ment continue to unwind, with a further modera-
tion in the growth rates of investment, especially 
that in residential real estate. The forecast assumes 
that policy action will be consistent with reducing 
vulnerabilities from recent rapid credit and invest-
ment growth and hence not aim at fully offsetting 
the underlying moderation in activity. Ongoing 
–4
–2
0
2
4
6
8
–8
–4
0
4
8
12
16
2010
11
12
13
14
15
16
–10
–5
0
5
10
15
2010
11
12
13
14
15
16
–2
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
2010
11
12
13
14
15
16
Figure 1.10.  GDP Growth Forecasts
(Annualized quarterly percent change)
–4
–2
0
2
4
6
8
2010
11
12
13
14
15
16
1. United States and Japan
2. Euro Area
Source: IMF staff estimates.
3. Emerging and Developing Asia
4.  Latin America and the Caribbean
Euro area
France and Germany
Spain and Italy
Emerging and developing Asia
China
India
Latin America and the Caribbean
Brazil
Mexico
Advanced economies (left scale)
United States (left scale) 
Japan (right scale)
In advanced economies, growth is expected to remain robust and above trend 
through 2016 and contribute to narrowing the output gap. The growth recovery in 
the euro area is projected to be broad based. Growth in India is expected to rise 
above the rates in other major emerging market economies. In Latin America and 
the Caribbean, activity is expected to rebound in 2016 after a recession in 2015. 
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Codes to Load Images from File / Stream in .
Now you can freely copy the VB.NET sample this VB.NET imaging library with pictures of your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to copy an image from a pdf to word; copy image from pdf acrobat
C# Imaging - C# MSI Plessey Barcode Tutorial
Create high-quality MSI Plessey bar code pictures for almost Copy C#.NET code below to print an MSI a document file, like Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF and TIFF
copy picture from pdf to word; copy and paste image into pdf
CHA PTER 1
Recent Deve lo pMe nts anD pRo spec ts 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
15
implementation of structural reforms and lower oil 
and other commodity prices are expected to expand 
consumer-oriented activities, partly buffering the 
slowdown. The decline in stock market valuations is 
assumed to have only a modest effect on consump-
tion (reflecting modest household holdings), and 
the current episode of financial market volatility is 
assumed to unwind without sizable macroeconomic 
disruptions.
• Elsewhere in emerging and developing Asia, India’s 
growth is expected to strengthen from 7.3percent 
this year and last year to 7.5 percent next year. 
Growth will benefit from recent policy reforms, a 
consequent pickup in investment, and lower com-
modity prices. Among the ASEAN-5 economies 
(Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, Viet-
nam), Malaysia and to a lesser extent Indonesia are 
expected to slow this year, affected by weaker terms 
of trade. Growth is on the other hand projected to 
pick up in Thailand, as a result of reduced policy 
uncertainty, to remain broadly stable at around 6 
percent in the Philippines, and to strengthen to 6.5 
percent in Vietnam, which is benefiting from the oil 
price windfall. 
• Economic activity in Latin America and the Carib-
bean continues to slow sharply, with a small 
contraction in activity in2015 (Figure 1.10, panel 
4). A modest recovery is projected for2016, but 
with growth at 0.8percent, still well below trend. 
Growth projections have been revised downward 
by more than 1percentage point in both2015 
and2016 relative to the April2015 WEO. The 
bleaker outlook for commodity prices interacts in 
some countries with strained initial conditions. In 
Brazil, business and consumer confidence continue 
to retreat in large part because of deteriorating 
political conditions, investment is declining rapidly, 
and the needed tightening in the macroeconomic 
policy stance is putting downward pressure on 
domestic demand. Output is now projected to 
contract by 3percent in 2015 and by 1 percent in 
2016 (for both years, a forecast 2percentage points 
lower than in April), with negative spillovers on 
other parts of the region, especially Brazil's trading 
partners in Mercosur. Venezuela is projected to expe-
rience a deep recession in2015 and2016 (–10per-
cent and –6percent, respectively), because the oil 
price decline since mid-June2014 has exacerbated 
domestic macroeconomic imbalances and balance of 
payments pressures. Venezuelan inflation is projected 
to be well above 100percent in2015. A modest 
decline in activity is now projected for Ecuador, 
where2015 growth has been revised downward by 
more than 2percentage points, reflecting the impact 
of lower oil prices coupled with sizable real apprecia-
tion driven by the stronger U.S.dollar. Additional 
weakness in metal prices is projected to dampen 
the growth recovery in Chile and Peru, while the 
projected deceleration in Colombia reflects the drop 
in oil prices. 
• Projections for economies in the Commonwealth 
of Independent States remain very weak, reflecting 
the recession in Russia with its attendant regional 
spillovers, as well as a very sharp further contraction 
in Ukraine. Overall, activity is projected to contract 
by 2.7percent, after growing by 1percent in2014. 
The outlook is projected to improve in2016, with 
a return to positive growth (0.5percent). In Russia 
the economy is expected to contract by 3.8percent 
this year, reflecting the interaction of falling oil 
prices and international sanctions with preexist-
ing structural weaknesses. Output is projected to 
decline further in2016. The projected 0.1percent 
contraction in the remainder of the region this year 
reflects to an important extent the deep recession 
in Ukraine (–9percent), where positive growth is 
expected to return in2016, supported by the begin-
ning of reconstruction. Elsewhere in the region, 
especially in the Caucasus and Central Asia, activity 
will be held back by lower commodity prices and 
spillovers from Russia (through trade, foreign direct 
investment, and especially remittances), which will 
interact with existing structural vulnerabilities.
• Growth in emerging and developing Europe is pro-
jected to rise modestly to 3.0 percent in 2015–16. 
The region has benefited from lower oil prices and 
the gradual recovery in the euro area, but is also 
affected by the contraction in Russia and the impact 
of still-elevated corporate debt on investment. The 
latter, together with political uncertainty, is expected 
to weigh on domestic demand in Turkey, where the 
growth of activity is projected to remain at about 
3 percent in 2015–16. Growth remains relatively 
robust in central and eastern Europe, with Hungary 
and Poland growing at rates of 3percent or higher 
in2015, but weaker in southeastern Europe (with 
the exception of Romania), with growth in Bulgaria, 
Croatia, and Serbia below 2percent. 
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Create Watermark on Images in .NET
and whether to burn it to the pictures to make Please feel free to copy them to your program provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to copy an image from a pdf in preview; how to copy a picture from a pdf to a word document
C# Imaging - Scan RM4SCC Barcode in C#.NET
you can easily detect & decode RM4SCC barcode from scanned documents and pictures in your Load an image or a document(PDF, TIFF, Word, Excel, PowerPoint).
how to paste a picture in a pdf; paste image into preview pdf
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
16 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
• Growth across the Middle East, North Africa, 
Afghanistan, and Pakistan is forecast to remain 
modest in2015 at 2.5 percent, slightly below last 
year. Spillovers from regional conflicts and intensi-
fied security and social tensions are weighing on 
confidence and holding back higher growth. Low 
oil prices are also taking a toll on the outlook for oil 
exporters. In oil importers, the recovery is strength-
ening. Headwinds from weak confidence are being 
offset by gains from lower oil prices, economic 
reforms, and improved euro area growth. Regional 
growth is projected to pick up substantially in2016, 
supported by accelerated activity in the Islamic 
Republic of Iran, where the lifting of sanctions—
once the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action 
becomes binding and is implemented—should allow 
for a recovery in oil production and exports, as well 
as by a gradual improvement in the outlook for 
countries severely affected by conflicts, such as Iraq, 
Libya, and Yemen. Compared with the April2015 
projections, the outlook for2015 is weaker, reflect-
ing the collapse in activity in Yemen and a fur-
ther decline in GDP in Libya, but looks stronger 
for2016, primarily on account of the improved 
prospects for the Islamic Republic of Iran. 
• Growth in sub-Saharan Africa is expected to slow 
this year to 3.8percent (from 5.0percent in2014, 
a 0.7percentage point downward revision rela-
tive to April). The slowdown in2015 is primarily 
driven by the repercussions of declining com-
modity prices, particularly those for oil, as well as 
lower demand from China—the largest single trade 
partner of sub-Saharan Africa—and the tighten-
ing of global financial conditions for the region’s 
frontier market economies. Among the region’s 
oil exporters, Nigeria’s growth is now projected 
at 4percent in2015, some 2¼ percentage points 
lower than last year, and growth in Angola is also 
expected to decline to 3.5percent from close to 
5percent in2014. Among the region’s oil import-
ers—projected to grow at 4percent on average—a 
majority will continue to experience solid growth, 
especially low-income countries, where investment 
in infrastructure continues and private consumption 
remains strong. Countries such as Côte d’Ivoire, the 
Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Mozam-
bique, and Tanzania are still expected to register 
growth of about 7percent or above this year and 
next. But others, such as Sierra Leone and Zambia, 
are feeling the pinch from lower prices for their 
main export commodity, even as lower oil prices 
relieve their energy import bill. South Africa’s growth 
is projected to be below 1½ percent both this year 
and next, reflecting  electricity-load shedding and 
other supply bottlenecks. In Ghana, power short-
ages and fiscal consolidation are also weighing on 
activity, which is projected to slow further in2015 
to 3.5percent. Growth for the region is projected 
to pick up in2016 to 4.3percent, with the global 
recovery supporting a moderate pickup in external 
demand, the modest recovery in oil prices benefiting 
oil exporters, and an improvement in the outlook 
for Ebola-affected countries. 
• Growth in low-income developing countries is 
projected to slow to 4.8percent in2015, more than 
1percentage point weaker than in2014, before 
picking up to 5.8percent in2016. These projec-
tions are shaped by the outlook for sub-Saharan 
economies, in particular Nigeria; the resilient 
growth in low-income developing countries in Asia, 
particularly Bangladesh and Vietnam; and for2015, 
the domestic-conflict-driven collapse in activity in 
Yemen. 
Global Inflation 
Inflation is projected to decline in2015 in advanced 
economies, reflecting primarily the impact of lower 
oil prices. 周e pass-through of lower oil prices into 
core inflation is expected to remain moderate, in line 
with recent episodes of large changes in commodity 
prices. In emerging market and developing economies, 
the inflation rate is projected to increase in2015, but 
this reflects the sharp increase in the inflation forecast 
for Venezuela (more than 100percent in2015) and 
Ukraine (about 50percent). Excluding these countries, 
inflation in emerging market and developing econo-
mies in2015 is projected to decline from 4.5 percent 
in 2014 to 4.2 percent in 2015. 
In advanced economies, inflation is projected to 
rise in2016 and thereafter, but to remain generally 
below central bank targets. In emerging market and 
developing economies, inflation is projected to decline 
in2016, with markedly lower inflation in countries 
that experienced sizable depreciation in recent months, 
such as Russia and to a lesser extent Brazil. 
• In the euro area, headline inflation is projected to 
be 0.2percent in2015, slightly lower than in2014. 
After dipping below zero in December2014 
and remaining negative through the first quarter 
of2015, inflation picked up in the second quarter 
C# Imaging - Scan ISBN Barcode in C#.NET
which can be used to track images, pictures and documents BarcodeType.ISBN); // read barcode from PDF page Barcode from PowerPoint slide, you can copy demo code
how to cut and paste image from pdf; how to cut image from pdf
VB.NET Image: Easy to Create Ellipse Annotation with VB.NET
ellipse annotation to document files, like PDF & Word ellipse annotation on documents, images & pictures using VB in Visual Studio, you can copy the following
copy paste picture pdf; copy and paste image from pdf to pdf
CHA PTER 1
Recent Deve lo pMe nts anD pRo spec ts 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
17
of2015, reflecting a modest recovery in economic 
activity, the partial reversal in oil prices, and the 
impact of the euro depreciation. Inflation expecta-
tions, while higher than in the first quarter, remain 
low, although core measures point to tentative signs 
of an upturn in underlying inflation. Headline infla-
tion is projected to increase to 1percent in2016, 
but is expected to remain subdued through the 
medium term.
• In Japan, several factors  will  put upward  pressure 
on the  price level, including the lagged impact of 
the recent yen weakening and the  closing of the 
output gap. Continued tightening of the labor 
market could accelerate favorable wage-price 
dynamics. As a result, under current policies, 
inflation is expected to rise gradually to 1½per-
cent over the medium term.
• In the United States, annual inflation in2015 is 
projected to decline to 0.1percent. After a sharp 
decline in late2014 and early2015 that reflected 
lower energy prices, it has started to increase gradu-
ally, even though the effects of dollar appreciation, 
muted wage dynamics, and the renewed bout of 
declines in oil prices act as a headwind. Inflation is 
then projected to rise gradually toward the Federal 
Reserve’s longer-term objective of 2percent.
• Inflation is projected to remain well below target in 
a number of other smaller advanced economies—
especially in Europe and east Asia. In particu-
lar, consumer prices are projected to decline in 
both2015 and2016 in Switzerland, following the 
sharp appreciation of the currency in January. Infla-
tion remains subdued in the Czech Republic, New 
Zealand, and Sweden, but is projected to gradually 
rise toward the target over 2016–17.
In emerging market economies, the decline in oil 
prices and a slowdown in activity are contributing to 
lower inflation in2015, even though not all of the 
decline in the price of oil will be passed on to end-
user prices. At the same time, however, large nomi-
nal exchange rate depreciations are putting upward 
pressure on prices in several countries, particularly 
commodity exporters. In subsequent years the effect of 
lower oil prices is expected to phase out, but this effect 
is projected to be offset by a phasing out of the effect 
of large depreciations as well as by a gradual decline 
in underlying inflation toward medium-term inflation 
targets. 
• In China, consumer price index inflation is forecast 
to be 1.5percent in2015—reflecting the decline 
in commodity prices, the sharp real appreciation 
of the renminbi, and some weakening in domestic 
demand—but to increase gradually thereafter. 
• In India, inflation is expected to decline fur-
ther in2015, reflecting the fall in global oil and 
agricultural commodity prices. In Brazil, average 
inflation is expected to rise to 8.9percent this year, 
above the ceiling of the tolerance band, reflecting 
an adjustment of regulated prices and exchange 
rate depreciation, and to converge toward the 
4.5percent target over the following two years. 
In contrast, inflation is projected to rise to about 
16percent in2015 in Russia, reflecting the large 
depreciation of the ruble, and to decline below 
9percent next year. In Turkey, inflation for2015 is 
projected at about 7½ percent, some 2½ percent-
age points above target. 
• A few emerging markets are projected to experience 
headline inflation well below target in2015, with 
modest increases in2016. These include in particu-
lar a number of small European countries whose 
currencies are tightly linked to the euro.
External Sector Developments
World trade growth is projected to remain mod-
est, as in the past two years (Figure1.11, panel 1). A 
pickup in trade is forecast for advanced economies. 
For emerging markets import growth is projected to 
decline further, reflecting weakening domestic demand 
and depreciating exchange rates, but export growth is 
projected to increase, sustained by higher oil exports 
from the Middle East and the pickup of domestic 
demand in advanced economies. 
Capital flows to and from advanced economies 
remained modest relative to their precrisis trends dur-
ing2014, but showed signs of a pickup in early2015. 
After a sustained period of strength, capital flows 
to emerging markets have been declining since the 
end of2013 (Figure1.12, panels 1 and 2). 周is has 
reflected to an important extent reductions in capi-
tal inflows to China and Russia, but also declining 
flows to other countries and regions, including Latin 
America. With no large change in the aggregate cur-
rent account balance for emerging market and develop-
ing economies, the decline in inflows has been offset 
by a corresponding decline in these economies’ net 
purchases of foreign assets (Figure1.12, panel 4). Large 
emerging market economies as a group sold about 
$100billion in foreign exchange reserves during both 
the last quarter of2014 and the first quarter of2015, 
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
18 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
–30
–25
–20
–15
–10
–5
0
5
10
15
20
1998
2000
02
04
06
08
10
12
14
3. Global Net Financial Assets Imbalances
(Percent of world GDP)
–5
–4
–3
–2
–1
0
1
2
3
4
1998
2000
02
04
06
08
10
12
14
16
18
20
2. Global Current Account Imbalances
(Percent of world GDP)
Sources: CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis; and IMF staff 
estimates.
Note: Data labels in the figure use International Organization for Standardization
(ISO) country codes. CHN+EMA = China and emerging Asia (Hong Kong SAR, 
Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan Province of China,
Thailand); DEU+EURSUR = Germany and other European advanced surplus
economies (Austria, Denmark, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Sweden, Switzerland); 
OCADC = other European countries with precrisis current account deficits (Greece, 
Ireland, Italy, Portugal, Spain, United Kingdom, WEO group of emerging and 
developing Europe); OIL = Norway and WEO group of emerging market and 
developing economy fuel exporters; ROW = rest of the world.
USA
OIL
DEU+EURSUR
OCADC
CHN+EMA
JPN
ROW
Discrepancy
–40
–20
0
20
40
60
–10
–5
0
5
10
15
2007
09
11
13
15:
Q2
1. World Real GDP and Trade Volume
(Annualized quarterly percent change)
Trade volume
Real GDP (right scale)
Figure 1.11.  External Sector
USA
OIL
DEU+EURSUR
OCADC
CHN+EMA
JPN
ROW
Discrepancy
Global trade volumes weakened more than GDP in the first half of 2015, 
highlighting that economic growth in the services and other nontradables sectors 
has been relatively stronger than in the tradables sectors. Global current account 
imbalances are expected to narrow further over the forecast horizon, with most of 
the contribution coming from smaller surpluses in oil exporters. In contrast, global 
creditor and debtor positions have increased further as a share of world GDP. 
–6
–3
0
3
6
9
12
15
2007
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15:
Q1
–40
–30
–20
–10
0
10
20
30
40
2010
11
12
13
14
Aug.
15
Figure 1.12.  Capital Flows in Emerging Market Economies
1. Net Flows in Emerging Market Funds
(Billions of U.S. dollars)
2. Capital Inflows
(Percent of GDP)
May 22, 
2013
Greek 
crisis
Irish 
crisis
1st ECB
LTROs
Bond
Equity
EM-VXY
–6
–3
0
3
6
9
12
15
2007
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15:
Q1
3. Capital Outflows Excluding Change in Reserves
(Percent of GDP)
Emerging Europe
Emerging Asia excluding China
Latin America
China
Saudi Arabia
Total
–6
–3
0
3
6
9
12
15
2007
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15:
Q2
4. Change in Reserves
(Percent of GDP)
Emerging Europe
Emerging Asia excluding China
Latin America
China
Saudi Arabia
Total
Emerging Europe
Emerging Asia excluding China
Latin America
China
Saudi Arabia
Total
Sources: Bloomberg, L.P.; EPFR Global; Haver Analytics; IMF, International Financial 
Statistics; and IMF staff calculations.
Note: Capital inflows are net purchases of domestic assets by nonresidents. Capital 
outflows are net purchases of foreign assets by domestic residents. Emerging Asia 
excluding China comprises India, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, and 
Thailand; emerging Europe comprises Poland, Romania, Russia, and Turkey; Latin 
America comprises Brazil, Chile, Colombia,Mexico, and Peru. ECB = European 
Central Bank; EM-VXY = J.P. Morgan Emerging Market Volatility Index; LTROs = 
longer-term refinancing operations.
Gross capital inflows to emerging market economies began slowing markedly in 
2014 and, as a percent of GDP, reached their lowest level since the recovery from 
the global financial crisis in the first quarter of 2015. As gross capital outflows 
have held up, and with little change in the aggregate current account balance, 
these economies as a group started selling foreign exchange reserves in 2014.
CHA PTER 1
Recent Deve lo pMe nts anD pRo spec ts 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
19
with net sales of foreign reserves by China, Russia, and 
Saudi Arabia representing the lion’s share.5
Current account deficits and surpluses across the 
main creditor and debtor regions declined further 
in2014, albeit relatively modestly (Figure1.12, panel 
2). Nevertheless, global creditor and debtor positions, 
as measured by net international investment positions, 
continued to grow in2014 as a share of world GDP 
(Figure1.12, panel 3). Valuation effects play an impor-
tant role in explaining such widening. Specifically, the 
appreciation of the U.S.dollar and the increase in the 
value of U.S.assets related to interest rate and equity 
price movements have increased the net external liabili-
ties of the United States and symmetrically boosted 
asset values in holders of U.S.financial instruments. 
Projections for2015 suggest changes in the com-
position of global current account deficits and sur-
pluses, reflecting the impact of declining prices of oil 
and other commodities, as well as the large exchange 
rate movements that have taken place since last year. 
As discussed in Chapter 3, the evidence suggests 
that exchange rate movements continue to have an 
economically significant impact on external bal-
ances. However, the aggregate size of global current 
account deficits and surpluses will remain broadly 
stable. Specifically, the contraction in the surpluses 
of oil-exporting countries will continue to be broadly 
offset by increasing surpluses in oil importers such as 
European surplus countries as well as in China, while 
the reduction in deficits for some oil importers is and 
will remain offset by a deteriorating current account 
balance in the United States. 
From a normative perspective, there is of course no 
presumption that current account deficits and surpluses 
should necessarily decline. But as discussed in the2015 
External Sector Report (IMF2015a), a number of 
countries’2014 current account imbalances appear too 
large relative to a country-specific norm consistent with 
external stability. 周ese countries have made limited 
progress in reducing the excess imbalances remaining 
after the large narrowing of imbalances in the aftermath 
of the global financial crisis. As discussed earlier, external 
balances in2015 are affected by substantial shocks, 
including changes in commodity prices and large fluctu-
ations in exchange rates. Panel 3 of Figure1.13 depicts 
5周e decline in the stock of reserves for emerging market and 
developing economies overstates the amount of actual sales because 
of valuation effects. Namely, the appreciation of the U.S. dollar with 
respect to most other reserve currencies in recent quarters implies a 
decline in the stock of reserves measured in U.S. dollars. 
projected changes in current account balances relative 
to GDP in2015 in relation to the current account gaps 
for2014 discussed in the2015 External Sector Report.6 
周e figure shows a modest general tendency for current 
account balances to move in the direction of narrow-
ing2014 current account gaps, but with large econo-
mies such as China, Germany, and the United States 
being notable exceptions, such gaps would not narrow 
on a global scale. Panel 2 of Figure1.13 undertakes 
the same exercise for real effective exchange rates, and 
it shows that exchange rate changes in2015 relative to 
their2014 average are not systematically consistent with 
a reduction in the exchange rate gaps identified for2014 
by the2015 External Sector Report. Of course a norma-
tive assessment of external balances and exchange rates 
must also take into account changes in the underlying 
current account and real exchange rate “norms” as well, 
and such an assessment will be undertaken in next year’s 
External Sector Report. 
More generally, a desirable pattern of global 
rebalancing would depend not just on exchange rate 
changes and their attendant current account implica-
tions, but on policies underpinning desirable shifts to 
relative demand and consistent with sustaining world 
growth. 
Although the compression of global current account 
imbalances following the global financial crisis has 
been discussed extensively (see, for instance, Chapter 
4 of the October2014 WEO), large current account 
surpluses and deficits in smaller countries have received 
less attention. 周eir number—especially the number 
of deficits—remains elevated. During2012–14, more 
than 80 countries ran current account deficits that 
exceeded 5percent of GDP but altogether accounted 
for only 3½percent of world GDP. For comparison, 
during2005–08 the number of countries with current 
account deficits above 5percent of GDP was only 
slightly larger (90), but they accounted for a share of 
world GDP that was larger by a factor of 10. And the 
number of countries running large surpluses is much 
smaller than in the previous period. Box 1.2 discusses 
the characteristics of countries that have run large 
current account deficits in recent years in more detail, 
highlighting a variety of different drivers (ranging 
from domestic shocks to commodity price booms to 
increased access to external finance after debt forgive-
6周ese gaps measure deviations of current account balances from a 
level consistent with underlying fundamentals and desirable policies. 
Real exchange rate gaps are defined analogously.
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
20 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
ness) within the general tendency for poor countries, 
as well as for small countries (in terms of population), 
to run current account deficits. Box 1.3 addresses a 
related question—namely, the impact of capital flows 
to low-income developing countries on those coun-
tries’ credit growth. Its findings suggest an important 
influence of external financial conditions on domestic 
credit expansion in those countries. Clearly, reliance on 
external finance among countries with pressing devel-
opment needs and high rates of return on investment 
is to be expected. However, given declining commodity 
prices and worsening external conditions, these two 
boxes suggest that some countries that relied heavily on 
private external financing may face significant external 
adjustment pressures in the future. 
Risks
周e distribution of risks to global growth remains 
tilted to the downside. Compared to the risk assess-
ment in the April2015 WEO, downside risks to 
growth for emerging market and developing economies 
have increased, given the combination of risks from 
China’s growth transition, more protracted commod-
ity market rebalancing, increased foreign-currency 
exposure of corporate balance sheets, and capital flow 
reversals associated with disruptive asset price shifts. 
In advanced economies, contagion risks from Greece-
related events to other euro area economies, while 
lower than earlier in the year, remain a concern, as do 
risks from protracted weak demand and low inflation. 
Oil price declines since June (and lagged effects from 
previous declines) could imply some upside risk to 
domestic demand and growth in oil importers. 
The Fan Chart: Risks around the Global GDP Forecast 
周e fan chart for the global GDP forecast suggests 
that the confidence interval around the projected path 
for global growth in2016 has narrowed, especially on 
the upside (Figure1.14, panel 1). Hence, high growth 
outcomes much above the baseline forecast are now less 
likely compared to what they were in the April2015 
WEO.7 
周e smaller probability of growth outcomes much 
above the baseline is consistent with the view that an 
7周e indicators used in the construction of the fan chart are based 
either on prices of derivatives or on the distribution of forecasts for 
the underlying variables.
–15
–10
–5
0
5
10
15
MYS
SGP
KOR
CHN
JPN
MEX
SWE
POL
EA
HKG
THA
CAN
IND
CHE
IDN
RUS
USA
AUS
TUR
GBR
ZAF
BRA
1. Changes in Real Effective Exchange Rates and Revision to Terms-
of-Trade Growth
(Percent)
Figure 1.13.  Real Exchange Rates and Current Account Gaps
REER percent change, Feb.–Aug. 20151
Revision to ToT growth (vs. April 2015 WEO)
–4
–2
0
2
4
6
–4
–3
–2
–1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
USA
GBR
TUR
THA
CHE
SWE
ESP
ZAF
SGP
RUS
POL
NLD
MEX
MYS
KOR
JPN
ITA
IDN
IND
HKG
DEU
FRA
CHN
CAN
BRA
BEL
AUS
Change in current account, 2014–15
ESR current account gap, 2014
3. ESR Current Account Gap in 2014 versus Change in Current
Account, 2014–15
(Percent of GDP)
Correlation = –0.12
–40
–30
–20
–10
0
10
20
30
MYS
SGP
KOR
CHN
JPN
MEX
SWE
POL
EA
HKG
THA
CAN
IND
CHE
IDN
RUS
USA
AUS
TUR
GBR
ZAF
BRA
REER percent change, 2014 (average)–Aug. 2015
REER gap for 2014 (midpoint)
2. Changes in Real Effective Exchange Rates and Gaps in Real
Effective Exchange Rates2
(Percent)
Sources: Global Insight; IMF, 2015 Pilot External Sector Report (ESR); IMF, 
International Financial Statistics; and IMF staff calculations.
Note: Data labels in the figure use International Organization for Standardization 
(ISO) country codes. EA = euro area; REER = real effective exchange rate; ToT = 
terms of trade.
1The data for the euro area are calculated by taking the average of the data for 
France, Germany, Italy, and Spain.
2REER gaps and classifications are based on the IMF's 2015 Pilot External Sector 
Report.
Currencies of many major emerging market economies have depreciated further in 
real effective terms since the projections for the April 2015 World Economic Outlook 
(WEO) were prepared, reflecting to an important extent weaker fundamentals, 
notably weakening growth prospects and worsening terms of trade. As for external 
imbalances, the assessment in the 2015 External Sector Report is that these 
remained too large in 2014 relative to underlying norms. WEO projections suggest 
some general tendency for the expected current account balances in 2015 to move 
in the direction of narrowing the implied 2014 current account gaps. However, in 
some large economies, including China, Germany, and the United States, no 
narrowing is expected. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested