pdf viewer library c# : How to copy images from pdf SDK control project winforms web page wpf UWP text4-part1778

CHA PTER 1
Recent Deve lo pMe nts anD pRo spec ts 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
21
even stronger growth rebound above trend than is 
already incorporated in current forecasts is unlikely in 
advanced economies. Productivity growth has turned 
out weaker than expected, and potential output growth 
is projected to remain substantially below precrisis rates 
(see the discussion earlier and in Box 1.1). In addition, 
downside risks to growth in many major emerging 
market economies have increased.
While upside risks from large positive growth sur-
prises have decreased, the probability of global growth 
falling below 2percent remains small and broadly 
unchanged relative to that in the April2015 WEO. 
Simulations using the IMF’s Global Projection Model, 
which draw on past shocks over a longer horizon, 
suggest a small increase in the probability of a reces-
sion in the major advanced economies and in the Latin 
America 5 economies over a four-quarter horizon rela-
tive to April 2015 (Figure 1.15, panel 1). 周is increase 
primarily reflects the lower starting values for growth 
for some of the economies and the somewhat lower 
growth forecast under the baseline. With the latter, the 
probability of negative shocks leading to a technical 
recession is higher compared to a situation in which 
the baseline forecast is stronger.
Risks to the Global Outlook
Downside risks differ between advanced and emerg-
ing market economies to some extent. However, there 
would be spillovers if any of the risks discussed in 
this subsection materialized, and these spillovers, as 
illustrated in Scenario Box 1 and in the October 2015 
GFSR, could be substantial. In regard to upside risks, 
lower oil and commodity prices could have a stronger 
impact on demand than currently expected (including 
through lagged effects of earlier price declines). 
Disruptive Asset Price Shifts and Financial Market 
Turmoil 
As elaborated in the October2015 GFSR, disrup-
tive asset price shifts and financial turmoil could take 
a toll on global activity. Emerging market economies 
are particularly exposed, as these risks, if they material-
ized, could involve capital flow reversals. Four factors 
underpin these risks. 
•  Term premiums and risk premiums in bond markets 
are still very low by historical standards. Estimates 
of the term premium on longer-term U.S.Treasury 
bonds suggest that it turned negative in late2014, 
and estimates of term premiums for other advanced 
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
2012
13
14
15
16
0
25
50
75
100
125
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
2006
08
10
12
Aug.
Figure 1.14.  Risks to the Global Outlook
–2.0
–1.5
–1.0
–0.5
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
Term spread
S&P 500
Inflation risk
Oil market risks
0
20
40
60
80
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1.0
1.2
2006
08
10
12
Aug.
1. Prospects for World GDP Growth1
(Percent change)
WEO baseline
90 percent confidence interval
70 percent confidence interval
50 percent confidence interval
90 percent confidence interval from April 2015 WEO
2. Balance of Risks Associated with Selected Risk Factors2
(Coefficient of skewness expressed in units of the underlying
variables)
Balance of risks for
Dispersion of Forecasts and Implied Volatility3
3.
4.
GDP (right scale)
VIX (left scale)
Term spread       
(right scale)
Oil (left scale)
2015 (Apr. 2015 WEO)
2015 (Oct. 2015 WEO)
2016 (Oct. 2015 WEO)
Sources: Bloomberg, L.P.; Chicago Board Options Exchange (CBOE); Consensus 
Economics; Haver Analytics; and IMF staff estimates.
1The fan chart shows the uncertainty around the WEO central forecast with 50, 70, 
and 90 percent confidence intervals. As shown, the 70 percent confidence interval 
includes the 50 percent interval, and the 90 percent confidence interval includes 
the 50 and 70 percent intervals. See Appendix 1.2 of the April 2009 WEO for 
details. The 90 percent intervals for the current-year and one-year-ahead forecasts 
from the April 2015 WEO are shown relative to the current baseline.
2The bars depict the coefficient of skewness expressed in units of the underlying 
variables. The values for inflation risks and oil price risks enter with the opposite 
sign since they represent downside risks to growth.
3GDP measures the purchasing-power-parity-weighted average dispersion of GDP 
growth forecasts for the G7 economies (Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, 
United Kingdom, United States), Brazil, China, India, and Mexico. VIX is the CBOE 
Standard & Poor's 500 (S&P 500) Implied Volatility Index. Term spread measures 
the average dispersion of term spreads implicit in interest rate forecasts for 
Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Oil is the CBOE crude 
oil volatility index. Forecasts are from Consensus Economics surveys. Dashed lines 
represent the average values from 2000 to the present.
The fan chart, which indicates the degree of uncertainty about the global growth 
outlook, suggests that upside risks to the forecast have narrowed compared to the 
April 2015 World Economic Outlook (WEO), while the distribution of downside risks 
is broadly unchanged. The distribution of the risks to the forecast for global growth 
is thus tilted more to the downside. Measures of forecast dispersion and implied 
volatility for equity and oil prices as well as the term spread in major advanced 
economies suggest an increase in perceived uncertainty about key variables for 
the global outlook. 
How to copy images from pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to paste picture on pdf; how to cut an image out of a pdf
How to copy images from pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
paste picture into pdf; copy a picture from pdf
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
22 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
economies are also low if not negative. A correction 
to higher term premiums in the United States could 
lead to sharply higher yields abroad, given the strong 
linkages among longer-term bond yields.8
•  The context underlying this asset price configura-
tion—in particular, very accommodative monetary 
policies in the major advanced economies, as well 
as crisis legacies and deflation risks—is expected to 
start changing with improved recovery prospects in 
8See, example, Chapter 3 of the April 2014 WEO. 
those economies. Deflation risks, for example, which 
appear to have partly underpinned very low bond 
term premiums, should decrease as output gaps 
close. Under the baseline, the change in term premi-
ums is assumed to be gradual, but news that changes 
expectations about these fault lines and unexpected 
portfolio shifts could trigger disruptive asset price 
adjustments. These adjustments might be related to 
the start and especially the pace of monetary policy 
normalization in the United States, also in light of 
the remaining divergence between market expecta-
tions and estimates by members of the Federal Open 
Market Committee about the path of U.S.policy 
rates over the next few years. 
•  Vulnerabilities and financial stability risks in 
emerging market economies have likely increased 
amid lower growth, recent commodity price 
declines, and increased leverage after years of 
rapid credit growth. Hence, unfavorable news in 
these areas could trigger higher risk premiums and 
disruptive declines in emerging market asset prices 
and currency values. 
•  Financial market reaction to the protracted uncer-
tainties surrounding the negotiations for a new 
financing program with Greece was limited, reflect-
ing the strength of euro area firewalls and European 
Central Bank policies, as well as declining systemic 
linkages with Greece. Risks have diminished since 
the agreement on a new European Stability Mecha-
nism program for Greece, but should policy and 
political uncertainty reemerge in Greece, sovereign 
and financial sector stress in the euro area could also 
reemerge, with potentially broader spillovers. 
Lower Potential Output
Potential output is projected to grow at a rate 
lower than it did before the crisis, in both advanced 
and emerging market economies.9 Risks are that the 
growth rate of potential output could be even lower 
than expected. Indeed, recent revisions in U.S.national 
accounts data suggest that productivity growth in 
recent years was weaker than estimated previously. 周at 
said, the growth rate of potential output will likely 
continue to differ between advanced and emerging 
market economies even if this risk materializes. In the 
latter, potential output growth will remain substantially 
9Chapter 3 of the April 2015 WEO discusses prospects for 
potential output in major advanced and emerging market economies 
in more detail.
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
United 
States
Euro area
Japan
Emerging 
Asia
Latin
America 5
Rest of the 
world
Figure 1.15.  Recession and Deflation Risks
(Percent)
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
United 
States
Euro area
Japan
Emerging 
Asia
Latin
America 5
Rest of the 
world
1. Probability of Recession, 2015:Q3–2016:Q2
2. Probability of Deflation, 2016:Q41
April 2015 WEO: 
2015:Q1–2015:Q4
April 2015 WEO: 
2016:Q2
The IMF staff's Global Projection Model suggests that recession risks have 
increased for most advanced economies and the Latin America 5 group, mostly 
reflecting relatively weaker baseline projections. The risk of deflation, while 
decreasing, remains elevated in the euro area. 
Source: IMF staff estimates.
Note: Emerging Asia comprises China, Hong Kong SAR, India, Indonesia, Korea, 
Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan Province of China, and Thailand; Latin 
America 5 comprises Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru; Rest of the world 
comprises Argentina, Australia, Bulgaria, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, 
Estonia, Israel, New Zealand, Norway, Russia, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, 
Turkey, United Kingdom, and Venezuela.
1Deflation is defined as a fall in the price level on a year-over-year basis in the 
quarter indicated in the figure.
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
Please refer to below listed demo codes. VB.NET DLLs: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Page. VB.NET: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
how to copy pictures from pdf in; copy and paste image from pdf to word
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Able to extract vector images from PDF. Extract all images from whole PDF or a specified PDF page. C#: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
how to copy picture from pdf file; how to copy an image from a pdf file
CHA PTER 1
Recent Deve lo pMe nts anD pRo spec ts 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
23
higher than in the former, given demographic trends 
and the forces of convergence in per capita income. 
Some of the forces underlying the risks of lower 
potential output growth are the same in the two 
groups of economies, while others differ. 
• In terms of common forces, lower capital stock 
growth is a concern in both groups. In advanced 
economies, the protracted crisis legacies—notably 
financial sector weakness, still-high public debt 
ratios, and private debt overhang—are the main 
concern. In emerging market economies, the 
concerns are structural constraints, less favorable 
external conditions for investment, notably tighter 
financial conditions and lower commodity prices, 
and a possible greater credit overhang after the 
recent credit booms. As a result, capital stock growth 
could be lower for longer, which, in turn, might 
also lower productivity growth at least temporarily 
because of capital-embodied technological progress. 
• In terms of differences, risks of negative productivity 
effects from longer-lasting high unemployment (skill 
losses, lower labor force participation) apply primar-
ily to advanced economies. Conversely, lower total 
factor productivity growth than expected under cur-
rent convergence assumptions is primarily a concern 
for emerging market economies. 
Risks to Growth in China 
Growth has slowed in China in recent years, and 
a further moderate slowdown has been factored into 
the baseline projections. 周ere are risks of a stronger 
growth slowdown if the macroeconomic manage-
ment of the end of the investment and credit boom 
of2009–12 proves more challenging than expected. 
Risks span a broad spectrum, with real and finan-
cial spillovers, including through commodity market 
channels: 
• A moderate growth shortfall: Given risks of a further 
growth slowdown in the future and expectations of 
policy reforms that may increase input and capi-
tal costs, firms may lower investment more than 
expected. But unlike in2013–14, the Chinese 
authorities could put greater weight on reducing 
vulnerabilities from recent rapid credit and invest-
ment growth, rather than on supporting growth. 
•  Hard landing in China: In this case, the authorities 
would use their policy space to prevent growth from 
slowing by shoring up investment through credit 
and public resources. Vulnerability from boom-
ing credit and investment would thus continue to 
increase, and policy space would shrink. This could 
mean a sharper growth slowdown in the medium 
term when the vulnerabilities would be more dif-
ficult to manage. 
Lower Commodity Prices 
Prices of commodities have fallen sharply in recent 
months. 周ey could fall further if market rebalancing 
in response to recent excess supply conditions were 
to take longer than expected.10 Growth in commod-
ity exporters would be negatively affected, and their 
vulnerabilities would increase further in light of lower 
revenue and foreign exchange earnings. In com-
modity importers, however, the windfall gains from 
lower commodity prices from more persistent supply 
improvements would lower costs and increase real 
incomes, which should boost spending and activity, 
as discussed in the April2015 WEO for the case of 
oil. In that case, the spending increases by importers 
should more than offset lower spending in exporters, as 
the latter tend to smooth spending more in the aggre-
gate, and global demand would increase (see Husain 
and others 2015). 周e case is less clear-cut for other 
commodities: exporters of metals may not smooth 
spending to the same extent as oil exporters, given that 
exhaustibility considerations generally play a smaller 
role for the former. 
However, possible nonlinear effects of lower com-
modity prices are a concern. Specifically, if lower prices 
also led to significant financial stress, defaults, and 
broad contagion among commodity exporters, the 
negative impact on activity in these economies would 
be larger, as exporters might not be able to smooth 
spending to the extent they would otherwise. 周is 
would also lead to larger adverse spillovers to commod-
ity importers. 
A Further Sizable Strengthening of the U.S.Dollar
周e constellation underpinning dollar apprecia-
tion over the past year or so is expected to remain in 
place for some time in the baseline forecast. It includes 
domestic demand strength relative to most other 
advanced economies, monetary policy divergence among 
major advanced economies, and an improved external 
position with lower oil prices. U.S.dollar appreciation 
10Specifically, the demand increases in response to lower prices or 
capacity adjustment through lower investment might be very grad-
ual. In the meantime, spot prices might have to fall more relative to 
expected future prices, so as to create incentives for further inventory 
buildup to absorb excess flow supply in the meantime.
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Able to extract images from PDF in both .NET WinForms and ASP.NET project. using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; VB.NET: Extract All Images from PDF Document.
how to copy an image from a pdf in; how to copy an image from a pdf to powerpoint
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy Ability to copy selected PDF pages and paste into another PDF file. The
cut and paste pdf image; how to copy pictures from pdf
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
24 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
against most currencies could thus continue, causing a 
lasting upswing in the dollar, as has happened previ-
ously. If this risk were to materialize, balance sheet and 
funding strains for dollar debtors could potentially 
more than offset trade benefits from real depreciation in 
some economies. In addition, if dollar appreciation were 
driven by increases in longer-term bond yields, the latter 
would likely be transmitted rapidly to other economies, 
which might negatively affect the interest-sensitive com-
ponents of domestic demand. Balance sheet and funding 
constraints are a particular concern for emerging market 
economies with considerable international financial 
integration, in which—as discussed in the2015 Spillover 
Report (IMF 2015b) and the October2015 GFSR— 
foreign-currency corporate debt has increased substan-
tially over the past few years. Much of the increase 
has been in the energy sector, in which a high share 
of revenue in U.S.dollars provides a natural hedge, 
although increased leverage in the sector remains a 
concern, especially if energy prices were to fall while the 
dollar appreciated. In addition, foreign-currency debt is 
also higher in firms operating in sectors without natural 
revenue hedges, especially the nontradables sector.
Geopolitical Risks
Ongoing events around Ukraine, the Middle 
East, and parts of Africa could lead to escalation in 
tensions and increased disruptions in global trade 
and financial transactions. Disruptions in energy 
and other commodity markets remain a particular 
concern, given the possibility of sharp price spikes, 
which, depending on their duration, could substan-
tially lower real incomes and demand in importers. 
More generally, an escalation of such tensions could 
take a toll on confidence. 
Secular Stagnation and Hysteresis
周e risk of a protracted shortfall of domestic 
demand associated with excess saving (discussed in 
more detail in a scenario analysis in the October2014 
WEO) will remain a concern. In some advanced econ-
omies, especially in the euro area, demand continues 
to be relatively weak, and output gaps are still large. 
Inflation is expected to stay below target beyond the 
usual monetary policy horizons, and deflation risks—
while lower than in April—remain elevated amid crisis 
legacies and constraints on monetary policy at the 
zero lower bound (Figure1.15, panel 2). Furthermore, 
after six years of demand weakness, the likelihood of 
damage to potential output is increasingly a concern, 
and the considerations previously presented under risks 
from lower potential output apply. 
A Combined Risk Scenario
周e possible global repercussions of a general-
ized slowdown in emerging market and developing 
economies are presented in Scenario Box 1. 周e 
scenario includes the materialization of a number of 
risks highlighted earlier—a slowdown in investment 
and growth across emerging market economies, more 
severe in faster-growing economies such as China and 
India; lower commodity prices, arising from this slow-
down; and higher risk premiums and exchange rate 
depreciation across emerging market economies. 周e 
implications for growth in emerging market econo-
mies and developing countries would be sizable, with 
growth rates 1.5 to 2percentage points lower after five 
years—even though the model assumes no “sudden 
stop” in capital flows or crisis outcomes with contagion 
effects. Spillovers onto advanced economies would also 
be material, with growth about 0.2 to 0.3percentage 
point lower after five years, depending on whether risk 
aversion toward emerging market assets increases, and 
a sizable deterioration in current account balances, 
despite the partial offset from lower commodity prices. 
Policies
Raising actual and potential output continues to be 
a general policy priority. Specific policy requirements 
vary from country group to country group and among 
individual countries, although there is a broad need for 
structural reforms in many economies, advanced and 
emerging market alike. In this regard, more coun-
tries should capitalize on the opportunities that lower 
energy prices offer to reform energy subsidies and taxes. 
Addressing external vulnerabilities is also of the essence 
in a number of emerging market and developing econo-
mies facing a more difficult external environment.
Policies for Full Employment and Stable Inflation in 
Advanced Economies
With nominal policy rates still at or close to the 
zero lower bound in many countries, reducing risks to 
activity from low inflation and prolonged demand defi-
ciency remains a priority for macroeconomic policy. 
In particular, to prevent real interest rates from rising 
prematurely, monetary policy must stay accommoda-
tive, including through unconventional measures (such 
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
C#.NET Project DLLs for Conversion from Images to PDF in C#.NET Program. C# Example: Convert More than Two Type Images to PDF in C#.NET Application.
how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf document; how to cut a picture out of a pdf file
VB.NET PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in vb.
C#.NET convert PDF to svg, C#.NET convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#
how to copy pictures from a pdf document; how to copy and paste image from pdf to word
CHA PTER 1
Recent Deve lo pMe nts anD pRo spec ts 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
25
Two simulations employing the IMF’s G20 Model 
are used to examine the global impact of a stronger-
than-expected slowing in potential output growth in 
emerging market economies. In both simulations, inves-
tors expect lower growth in the future, because of slower 
catching up and lower productivity growth, as well as 
because of lower capital inflows and tighter financial 
conditions. Hence, they reduce investment expenditure 
relative to the World Economic Outlook (WEO) baseline 
projections, resulting in weaker domestic demand in 
emerging market economies. In particular, the sizable 
decline in investment and growth in China—together 
with the generalized slowdown across emerging market 
economies—implies a sizable weakening of commodity 
prices, particularly those for metals, resulting in a weak-
ening of the terms of trade for commodity exporters. 
Investment growth in emerging market economies 
is assumed to decline annually by about 4 percentage 
points on average relative to the baseline in both simu-
lations. 周e decline varies within regions: countries 
with weaker baseline medium-term growth projections 
see a smaller decline. 周is reflects the assumption of a 
broader slowing in economic convergence in the cur-
rent global environment.
周e lower investment growth and the resulting 
weaker domestic demand conditions reduce potential 
output in emerging market economies. 周e nega-
tive impact operates not only through the relatively 
lower growth in the capital stock, but also through 
a reduction in total factor productivity growth. 周e 
latter reflects the assumption of new technology being 
embodied in new capital. Lower investment growth 
therefore results in a lower rate of technological prog-
ress, with the decline assumed to be proportional to 
the slowing in investment growth. In addition, weaker 
domestic demand leads to higher unemployment, 
which, in turn, results in a reduction in labor supply. 
Skill depreciation among the unemployed leads to a 
higher natural rate of unemployment, and discouraged 
workers withdraw from the labor force. 
周e first simulation focuses on the real side of the 
shock, while in the second simulation, the stronger 
slowing in potential output also leads to increased risk 
aversion toward emerging market assets. 周e reason 
is that investors worry about return prospects on 
assets and default risks on loans made before expected 
growth fell. As a result, risk premiums on assets issued 
by entities in these economies increase at the outset 
by 100 basis points, and their currencies depreciate by 
10 percent relative to the dollar. 周e increase in risk 
aversion and premiums is akin to the decompression 
of risk premiums in the global asset market disruption 
scenario in the October 2015 Global Financial Stability 
Report, except that in the risk scenario examined in 
this box, it is confined to emerging market economies 
where the shock originates. 
In the first simulation (red lines in Scenario Fig-
ure1), growth in 2016 would be about 0.4 percentage 
point below the WEO baseline (blue lines in the fig-
ure). Economic growth in the major emerging market 
economies (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa) 
would gradually decline by 1 percentage point relative 
to 2015. Compared with the baseline, this would 
amount to a sizable growth differential of 2 percent-
age points after five years. In other emerging market 
economies, growth would remain broadly unchanged 
relative to 2015, rather than increasing by about 1per-
centage point under the baseline. 
周e growth rebound in advanced economies in 2016 
would be smaller. Lower global interest rates and a more 
modest recovery in oil prices would boost domestic 
demand in these economies relative to the baseline. 
Lower interest rates would reflect both weaker global 
activity and the monetary policy response across the 
globe. But the positive domestic demand impact from 
lower interest rates and oil prices in advanced econo-
mies would be more than offset by the effects of weaker 
external demand. In fact, the scenario suggests substan-
tial demand rebalancing. Currencies of emerging market 
economies would depreciate in real effective terms, 
and these economies’ current accounts would improve 
with the positive impact on net exports. Conversely, 
advanced economies would see real appreciation and a 
deterioration in current accounts. Overall, the spillovers 
to advanced economies from the structural slowdown in 
emerging market economies would be negative. 
In a second simulation, in which lower growth pros-
pects in emerging market economies also heighten risk 
aversion, growth in emerging market economies would 
decline by more (yellow lines in the figure). While the 
depreciations and initial tightening in financial condi-
tions would gradually dissipate, there would be some 
persistent tightening in financial conditions broadly 
proportional to emerging market economies’ growth 
slowdowns, highlighting the amplifying role of financial 
channels in the transmission of the shock. 周ere would 
be no pickup in global growth in 2016, and average 
growth would be lower across all country groups over 
Scenario Box 1. A Structural Slowing in Emerging Market Economies
C# Create PDF from Tiff Library to convert tif images to PDF in C#
NET component for batch converting tiff images to PDF RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll. Please copy the following C#.NET demo code to have a quick evaluation of our XDoc
how to cut an image out of a pdf file; how to paste a picture into pdf
C# PDF Convert to Images SDK: Convert PDF to png, gif images in C#
Professional .NET library and Visual C# source code for creating high resolution images from PDF in C#.NET class. Cut and paste any areas in PDF pages to images.
copy image from pdf; how to copy an image from a pdf
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
26 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
the next five years. 周e decline in growth in emerg-
ing market economies would be partly cushioned by 
stronger net exports, and their current account balances 
would improve substantially, reflecting the weakness in 
domestic demand as well as the real depreciation. On 
the other hand, advanced economies would see a sizable 
deterioration in current account balances, given weaker 
external demand and stronger currencies.
Scenario Box 1 (continued)
1.4
1.6
1.8
2.0
2.2
2.4
2015
16
17
18
19
20
–2
–1
0
1
2
2015
16
17
18
19
20
1.8
2.2
2.6
3.0
3.4
2015
16
17
18
19
20
3.0
3.2
3.4
3.6
3.8
4.0
2015
16
17
18
19
20
Scenario Figure 1.  World Economic Outlook Stagnation Scenario
(Percent, unless noted otherwise)
1. Global GDP Growth
2. Global Nominal
Interest Rate
45
50
55
60
65
2015
16
17
18
19
20
3. Nominal Oil Price
(U.S. dollars a barrel)
4. Advanced Economies
GDP Growth
3.5
4.0
4.5
5.0
5.5
6.0
2015
16
17
18
19
20
5. BRICS GDP Growth
3.0
3.5
4.0
4.5
5.0
2015
16
17
18
19
20
6. Other Emerging Market
Economies GDP Growth
–1
0
1
2
3
4
5
2015
16
17
18
19
20
8. BRICS Current Account
Balance
(Percent of GDP)
–3
–2
–1
0
1
2015
16
17
18
19
20
9. Other Emerging Market
Economies Current
Account Balance
(Percent of GDP)
World Economic Outlook baseline
Structural slowing in emerging 
economies
Structural slowing plus capital 
outflows
Sources: IMF, G20MOD simulations; and IMF staff estimates.
Note: BRICS = Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa. Other emerging market economies = Albania, Antigua and 
Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, The Bahamas, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, 
Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cabo Verde, Cambodia, Cameroon, Chile, Colombia, Comoros, Democratic Republic of 
the Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, The Gambia, 
Georgia, Ghana, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Indonesia, Jamaica, Kenya, Kiribati, 
Kosovo, Kyrgyz Republic, Lao P.D.R., Latvia, Lesotho, Liberia, Lithuania, FYR Macedonia, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, 
Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Moldova, Montenegro, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Niger, 
Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Romania, Rwanda, Samoa, São Tomé and Príncipe, Senegal, 
Serbia, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, Sudan, Suriname, 
Swaziland, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Thailand, Tonga, Tunisia, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, Vanuatu, Vietnam, Zambia,  
Zimbabwe.
7. Advanced Economies
Current Account
Balance
(Percent of GDP)
CHA PTER 1
Recent Deve lo pMe nts anD pRo spec ts 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
27
as large-scale asset purchases, but also negative policy 
rates where effective). It is important, however, that 
the overall policy mix be supportive. Monetary policy 
efforts should be accompanied by efforts to strengthen 
balance sheets and the credit supply channel, and by 
the active use of macroprudential policies to address 
financial stability risks. Complementary fiscal policy 
action in countries with fiscal space is also important, 
supporting global rebalancing, and demand- supporting 
structural reforms are necessary, in particular to 
improve productivity and stimulate investment. Man-
aging high public debt in a low-growth and low-infla-
tion environment also remains a key challenge in many 
advanced economies. Nominal income growth contrib-
utes little to reducing debt ratios in this environment, 
and fiscal consolidation would be the main means for 
achieving more sustainable public debt levels. But if 
the pace of consolidation is not attuned to the strength 
of the economic conditions, it risks lowering growth 
and putting downward pressure on prices, thereby 
offsetting the direct positive effect of consolidation on 
debt ratios. 
Within these broad contours, challenges differ con-
siderably across countries. 
In the euro area, the pickup in activity is welcome, 
but the recovery remains modest and uneven. Output 
gaps are still sizable, and projections suggest that euro-
area-wide inflation will remain below target into the 
medium term. Hence, ensuring a stronger euro-area-
wide recovery must remain a priority, helping global 
rebalancing and with positive spillovers through trade 
and financial channels. 
• On the monetary policy front, the European Central 
Bank’s expanded asset purchase program has boosted 
confidence and eased financial conditions. These 
monetary policy efforts must continue and should 
be supported by measures to strengthen bank bal-
ance sheets, which would help improve monetary 
policy transmission and credit market conditions. 
Stricter supervision of nonperforming loans and 
measures to improve insolvency and foreclosure 
procedures are a priority in this regard. 
• On the fiscal policy front, countries should adhere 
to their commitments under the Stability and 
Growth Pact. Nevertheless, countries with fiscal 
space, notably Germany and the Netherlands, could 
do more to encourage growth, especially by under-
taking much-needed infrastructure investment and 
supporting structural reforms. Countries without 
fiscal space should continue to reduce debt and meet 
their fiscal targets. In general, all countries should 
pursue growth-friendly fiscal rebalancing that lowers 
marginal taxes on labor and capital, financed by cuts 
to unproductive spending or measures to broaden 
the tax base. Swift implementation of investments 
related to the European Fund for Strategic Invest-
ments could help support the recovery, particularly 
in countries with limited fiscal space. 
In Japan, near-term prospects for economic activity 
have weakened, while medium-term inflation expecta-
tions are stuck substantially below the 2percent infla-
tion target. At the same time, potential output growth 
remains low. 
• On the monetary policy front, the Bank of Japan 
should stand ready for further easing, preferably by 
extending purchases under its quantitative and qual-
itative monetary easing program to longer-maturity 
assets. It should also consider providing stronger 
guidance to markets by moving to more forecast-
oriented monetary policy communication. This 
would increase the transparency of its assessment 
of inflation prospects and signal its commitment to 
the country’s inflation target, mainly through the 
discussion of envisaged policy changes if inflation is 
not on track. 
• On the fiscal front, the announced medium-term 
fiscal consolidation plan provides a useful anchor 
to guide fiscal policy. Japan should aim to put debt 
on a downward path, based on realistic economic 
assumptions, and specific structural revenue and 
expenditure measures should be identified up front.
In the United States, conditions for further job 
creation and improvement in labor market conditions 
remain in place, notwithstanding lower productivity 
growth and the less favorable prospects for exports in 
light of the sharp dollar appreciation. 
• On the monetary policy front, the main near-term 
policy issue is the appropriate timing and pace of 
monetary policy normalization. The Federal Open 
Market Committee’s decisions should remain data 
dependent, with the first increase in the federal 
funds rate waiting until there are firmer signs of 
inflation rising steadily toward the Federal Reserve’s 
2 percent medium-term inflation objective, with 
continued strength in the labor market. At present a 
broad range of indicators suggest a notable improve-
ment in the labor market, but there is little evidence 
of accelerating wage and price pressures. Regard-
less of the timing of the initial policy move, the 
data would suggest that the pace of subsequent rate 
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
28 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
increases should be gradual. An effective monetary 
policy communication strategy will remain essential, 
particularly in an environment of higher financial 
market volatility in which spillovers through finan-
cial channels could be material. 
• On the fiscal policy front, the priority remains to 
agree on a medium-term fiscal consolidation plan 
to prepare for rising aging-related fiscal costs, while 
avoiding disruptive changes to the fiscal stance in 
the short term because of political gridlock. A cred-
ible medium-term fiscal plan will need to include 
higher tax revenue. 
Structural Reforms
Potential output growth in advanced economies 
is expected to remain weak compared with precrisis 
standards. 周e main reasons for the subdued forecast 
are population aging, which underlies the projected 
low growth and possible decline in trend employment 
under current policies affecting labor force participa-
tion, and weak productivity growth. A first priority for 
structural policies therefore is to strengthen both labor 
force participation and trend employment. 
• In Japan, removing tax disincentives and raising the 
availability of child care facilities through deregula-
tion would help to boost female labor force partici-
pation further. Increasing reliance on foreign labor 
and providing incentives for older workers to remain 
in the workforce should also help in avoiding 
declines in trend employment. 
• In the euro area, where structural, long-term, and 
youth unemployment are high in many economies, 
an important concern is skill erosion and its effect on 
trend employment. In addition to macroeconomic 
policies to boost demand, priorities include lower 
disincentives to employment—among them lowering 
the labor tax wedge—as well as better-targeted train-
ing programs and active labor market policies. 
• In the United States, expanding the earned income 
tax credit, better family benefits (including child 
care assistance), and immigration reform would help 
boost labor supply. 
Increasing productivity growth through structural 
policies is challenging. But a number of high-priority 
structural measures would likely boost productivity 
through their direct or indirect effects on investment 
(as new technology is embodied in new capital) and 
through the effects of labor market reforms on incen-
tives for learning and human capital development. 
• In a number of advanced economies (including 
several countries in the euro area as well as the 
United States), there is a strong case for greater 
infrastructure investment. In addition to boosting 
medium-term potential output, partly by making 
private investment more efficient, such investment 
would also provide much-needed short-term support 
to domestic demand in some of these economies.
• In euro area economies, lowering barriers to entry in 
product markets and reforming labor market regula-
tions that hamper adjustment are critical. In debtor 
economies, these changes would strengthen external 
competitiveness and help sustain gains in external 
adjustment while economies recover, whereas in 
creditor economies, they would primarily strengthen 
investment and employment. Further progress 
should also be made in implementing the European 
Union Services Directive, advancing free-trade agree-
ments, and integrating capital and energy markets, 
which could raise productivity. And as mentioned 
earlier, reforms tackling legacy debt overhang (for 
instance, through resolving nonperforming loans, 
facilitating out-of-court settlement, and improving 
insolvency frameworks) would help credit demand 
and supply recover.
• In Japan, more forceful structural reforms (the 
third arrow of Abenomics) should be the priority. 
Measures to increase labor force participation are 
essential, as previously discussed, but there is also 
scope for raising productivity in the services sector 
through deregulation, invigorating labor productiv-
ity by reducing labor market duality, and supporting 
investment through corporate governance reform as 
well as improvements to the provision of risk capital 
by the financial system. 
Policies to Foster Growth and Manage Vulnerabilities in 
Emerging Market and Developing Economies 
Policymakers in emerging market economies face the 
challenge of dealing with slowing growth, more difficult 
external conditions, and increased vulnerabilities after 
a decade or so of buoyant growth. While the resilience 
to external shocks has increased in many emerging 
market economies because of increased exchange rate 
flexibility, higher foreign exchange reserves, more robust 
external financing patterns, and generally stronger policy 
frameworks, there are a number of important policy 
challenges and trade-offs to consider. 
CHA PTER 1
Recent Deve lo pMe nts anD pRo spec ts 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
29
• The extent of economic slack might be small despite 
the growth slowdown. An important consideration 
for the calibration of macroeconomic policies is 
the degree of economic slack. The latter might 
be smaller than the sizable growth slowdown 
since2011 in many emerging market economies 
might suggest. The reason is that the growth slow-
down partly reflects a cyclical return to potential 
output after overheating in broad credit and invest-
ment booms, driven by factors such as increasing 
commodity prices and easing financial conditions 
for emerging market economies.11 In addition, 
as discussed in Chapter 2, in countries where the 
growth slowdown has been partly driven by lower 
commodity prices, potential output growth is likely 
to have declined as well and might decrease further, 
given the weaker commodity price outlook. The 
evidence of slowing productivity growth in major 
emerging market economies in recent years adds to 
these concerns.12 
• Monetary conditions have eased with exchange rate 
depreciation, but vulnerabilities might limit the scope 
for monetary easing. Amid greater exchange rate flex-
ibility, substantial currency depreciation in real effec-
tive terms in many emerging market economies has 
contributed to easier monetary conditions. Whether 
economic conditions also call for monetary policy 
easing raises difficult trade-offs. Real policy rates are 
already below natural rates in many economies, and 
lowering rates could trigger sizable further deprecia-
tion. This could increase financial stability risks, 
given higher corporate leverage and balance sheet 
exposure to foreign-currency risks in many emerging 
market economies (as analyzed in Chapter 3 of the 
October2015 GFSR). Moreover, if monetary policy 
frameworks lack credibility or policy credibility 
is strained, the concern is that depreciation could 
also lead to persistently higher prices and pressure 
for further exchange rate depreciation, a particular 
worry when inflation is already above target.
• The likelihood of further currency depreciation in 
emerging market economies may require stronger 
regulatory and macroprudential frameworks. Emerg-
ing market and developing economies not relying 
on exchange rate pegs have to be ready to allow the 
exchange rate to respond to adverse external shocks. 
11See Box 1.2 of the October 2013 WEO.
12See Chapter 3 of the April 2015 WEO. 
In some countries, this may require strengthening 
the credibility of monetary and fiscal policy frame-
works, while balance sheet exposures to foreign 
exchange risks need to remain manageable. The 
latter calls for enforcing or (if needed) strengthen-
ing prudential regulation and supervision as well as 
adequate macroprudential frameworks.
• Increased vulnerabilities might also introduce fiscal pol-
icy trade-offs. Public debt ratios are relatively low in 
a number of emerging market economies, although 
budget deficits generally remain above precrisis 
ratios despite the strong recovery after the global 
financial crisis. Fiscal easing could support demand 
when output gaps are large and monetary policy is 
constrained, but it would also increase vulnerabili-
ties in the current context, mostly because of risks of 
higher country risk premiums in the broader context 
of capital flow reversal risks. In economies with 
preexisting fiscal vulnerabilities, the fiscal space is 
thus likely to be limited. In addition, in economies 
with downward revisions to medium-term growth 
prospects, fiscal policy might have to adjust to lower 
fiscal revenue at full employment, a first-order issue 
notably in commodity exporters, given commodity 
price declines. 
Beyond the common context, policy considerations 
for net commodity exporters generally differ from those 
for net commodity importers.
• In many net commodity importers, lower com-
modity prices have alleviated inflation pressure and 
reduced external vulnerabilities with the terms-of-
trade windfall gains. The trade-off between sup-
porting demand if there is economic slack and 
reducing macroeconomic vulnerabilities has become 
less pronounced as a result. In some importers with 
commodity-related subsidies, the windfall gains 
from lower oil prices have been used to increase 
public sector savings and strengthen fiscal positions. 
Whether the improved fiscal policy space should be 
used depends on the extent of economic slack, the 
strength of the economy’s fiscal position, and the 
need for structural reforms or growth-enhancing 
spending (on, for example, infrastructure).
• In commodity exporters, fiscal positions have dete-
riorated and external and fiscal vulnerabilities have 
increased. The urgency to adjust policies varies con-
siderably, depending on fiscal buffers. Exporters with 
buffers can afford to adjust government spending 
gradually to avoid exacerbating the slowdown. Nev-
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
30 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
ertheless, with some of the commodity price decline 
expected to be permanent, it will be important to 
assess the revenue implications and plan for fiscal 
adjustment. In exporters with limited policy space, 
allowing substantial exchange rate depreciation will 
be the main avenue available to cushion the impact 
of the commodity price shock on their economies. 
As discussed in the October2015 Fiscal Monitor, 
the weaker commodity price outlook also highlights 
that in some commodity exporters, fiscal policy 
frameworks might need to be upgraded to factor in 
commodity-market-related uncertainty and to provide 
a longer-term anchor to guide policy decisions. 
Turning to policy requirements in large emerging 
market economies, policymakers in China face the 
challenge of simultaneously achieving three objectives: 
avoiding a sharp growth slowdown in the transi-
tion to more sustainable patterns of growth, reduc-
ing vulnerabilities from excess leverage after a credit 
and investment boom, and strengthening the role of 
market forces in the economy. Modest further policy 
support to ensure that growth does not fall sharply 
is likely to be needed, but further progress in imple-
menting the authorities’ structural reforms will be 
critical for private consumption to pick up some of 
the slack from slowing investment growth. 周e core 
of the reforms is to give market mechanisms a more 
decisive role in the economy, eliminate distortions, 
and strengthen institutions. Examples include financial 
sector reforms to strengthen regulation and supervi-
sion, liberalize deposit rates, increase the reliance on 
interest rates as an instrument of monetary policy, and 
eliminate widespread implicit guarantees; fiscal and 
social security reforms; and reforms of state-owned 
enterprises, including leveling the playing field between 
the public and private sectors. 周e recent change in 
China’s exchange rate system provides the basis for 
a more market-determined exchange rate, but much 
depends on implementation. A floating exchange rate 
will enhance monetary policy autonomy and help the 
economy adjust to external shocks, as China contin-
ues to become more integrated into both the global 
economy and global financial markets.
In India, near-term growth prospects remain favor-
able, and the decrease in the current account deficit 
has lowered external vulnerabilities. 周e faster-than-
expected decline in inflation has created space for 
considering modest cuts in the nominal policy rate, 
but the real policy rate needs to remain tight for infla-
tion to decline to the inflation target in the medium 
term, given upside risks to inflation. Continued fiscal 
consolidation is also essential, but it should be more 
growth friendly (tax reform, reduction in subsidies). 
With balance sheet strains in the corporate and 
banking sectors, financial sector regulation should be 
enhanced, provisioning increased, and debt recovery 
strengthened. Structural reforms should focus on relax-
ing long-standing supply constraints in the energy, 
mining, and power sectors. Priorities include market-
based pricing of natural resources to boost investment, 
addressing delays in the implementation of infrastruc-
ture projects, and improving policy frameworks in the 
power and mining sectors. 
Several years of downgraded medium-term growth 
prospects suggest that it is also time for major emerg-
ing market economies to turn to important structural 
reforms to raise productivity and growth in a lasting 
way. Although the slowing in estimated total factor pro-
ductivity growth in major emerging market economies 
is partly a natural implication of recent progress in con-
vergence, as discussed in Chapter 3 of the April2015 
WEO, the concern is that potential output growth has 
become too dependent on factor accumulation in some 
economies. 周e structural reform agenda naturally dif-
fers across countries, but it includes removing infrastruc-
ture bottlenecks in the power sector (India, Indonesia, 
South Africa); easing limits on trade and investment and 
improving business conditions (Brazil, Indonesia, Rus-
sia); and implementing reforms to education, labor, and 
product markets to raise competitiveness and productiv-
ity (Brazil, China, India, South Africa) and government 
services delivery (South Africa). 
Policies in Low-Income Countries
Growth in low-income countries as a group 
has stayed high while growth in emerging market 
economies has weakened. But with weak activity in 
advanced economies, a slowdown in emerging market 
economies, and lower commodity prices, low-income 
countries’ growth prospects for2015 and beyond have 
been revised downward. In addition, greater access to 
foreign-market financing has increased some low-
income countries’ exposure to a possible tightening in 
global financial conditions. 
Policies must respond to the increased challenges 
and vulnerabilities. In some countries, fiscal posi-
tions must be improved against the backdrop of lower 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested