pdf viewer library c# : Paste picture into pdf SDK Library service wpf asp.net winforms dnn text6-part1780

SPECIAL FEATURE COMMODITY MARKET DEVELOPMENTS AND FORECASTS, WITH A FOCUS ON METALS IN THE WORLD ECONOMY
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
41
metals. 周ose high degrees of concentration have at 
times led to concerns over market manipulation and 
collusion either through output restrictions, export 
bans, stock accumulations, or some combination of 
these (see Rausser and Stuermer 2014 for an analysis of 
collusion in the copper market). 
From an economic point of view, iron ore is by far 
the most important base metal, with a $225 billion 
annual industry in terms of global sales.2 Steel, which 
is produced from iron ore, is mostly used for construc-
tion, transportation equipment, and machinery. In the 
past, iron ore prices were mostly determined by nego-
tiations between Japanese steel makers and producers. 
More recently, the market has become more transpar-
ent, with the price on delivery at Chinese ports used 
as the benchmark price. 周e top iron-ore-producing 
country is China, whose share is about half of the 
world’s production, followed by Australia and Brazil.3 
Considering that mining iron ore is capital intensive, 
2World production of iron ore is currently 3 billion metric tons; 
its metal content weighs about 1.4 billion tons, according to the U.S. 
Geological Survey. 周e price of iron ore with 62 percent iron content 
has been roughly $100 a metric ton in the past year. 
3China’s share, however, is much smaller when the ore’s metal 
content is taken into consideration. Iron ore is also important for 
individual countries, such as Ukraine, which relies on coal and iron 
ore to produce steel.
iron ore production is concentrated among top pro-
ducers (Table 1.SF.1, Figure 1.SF.3). 周e production of 
iron ore depends crucially on the level of investment 
activity in the sector, which has been on the decline 
in the past few years. 周e demand for iron ore comes 
primarily from large steel-producing countries such as 
China, which consumes more than half of the world 
production of iron ore. 
Copper is the second-most-important base metal by 
value—accounting for roughly a $130 billion industry 
annually.4 Copper is used for construction and electri-
cal wire. Chile is the largest producer, followed by 
China and Peru. A few companies are involved in cop-
per production—Chile’s Codelco is the largest. Copper 
prices have been more transparent than those for iron 
ore because copper futures markets and London Metal 
Exchange settlements are used as benchmarks. China 
consumes about half of the world’s refined copper. 
周e third-most-important base metal is aluminum 
(with an annual $90 billion industry).5 Aluminum 
is used in the aerospace industry as well as other 
industries requiring light metal. Large producers of 
aluminum are located where electricity is cheap and 
abundant. 周e largest producer is China, followed 
by Russia, Canada, and the United Arab Emirates. 
Aluminum prices are the most stable among those 
for metals because of the reliance on electricity in its 
production—electricity prices are heavily regulated in 
most countries. 
4World mine production was 18.7 million metric tons in 2014. 
It is evaluated at $7,000 a metric ton, close to the average price in 
2014.
5World primary aluminum production last year was 49.3 million 
metric tons, and the associated price was $1,900 a metric ton.
0
200
400
600
800
1,000
1,200
1,400
1,600
2002
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
Aug. 
15
Aluminum
Copper 
Iron ore 
Nickel
Sources: IMF, Primary Commodity Price System; and IMF staff calculations.
Figure 1.SF.2.  Metal Price Indices
(2002 = 100)
Table 1.SF.1. World Crude Steel Production, 2014
(Millions of metric tons)
World
1,643.51
Share (Percent)
China
822.70
50
Japan
110.67
7
United States
88.17
5
India
86.53
5
Russia
71.46
4
Korea
71.04
4
Germany
42.94
3
Turkey
34.04
2
Brazil 
33.90
2
Ukraine
27.17
2
Italy
23.71
1
Taiwan Province of China
23.12
1
Source: World Steel Association.
Paste picture into pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
paste image on pdf preview; how to cut a picture out of a pdf
Paste picture into pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
copy image from pdf to powerpoint; how to copy pdf image
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
42 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
Recycling has become an important part of alu-
minum production because the recycling process is 
much less energy intensive than the production of 
primary aluminum. China consumes about half of the 
world’s production of primary aluminum. In contrast, 
advanced economies rely more on recycling and in 
turn have less influence over primary aluminum prices.
周e fourth-most-important base metal is nickel 
(accounting for a $40 billion market),6 which is used 
for alloys such as stainless steel. Nickel ore is mined in 
several countries, including the Philippines. 周e Brazil-
ian Vale groups and Russia-based Norilsk are the two 
top producers, and their combined share is 23 percent 
of global production. Nickel is typically extracted 
from its ores by conventional roasting and reduction 
processes that yield a metal of greater than 75 per-
cent purity. China consumes about half of the world’s 
smelted and refined nickel, followed by Japan. Indone-
sia, whose production share was 27 percent in 2012, 
imposed an export ban on nickel ore in January 2014 
to increase incentives for domestic processing. 周e 
Philippines and New Caledonia have used the opportu-
nity created by the ban to increase their market shares, 
but may not be in a position to meet the portion of 
Chinese demand that relied on Indonesian production. 
On the other hand, global inventory of refined nickel 
has been increasing, suggesting a supply glut. 
How Have Metal Markets Evolved? 
Over the past decades, metal markets have under-
gone dramatic shifts in the volume and structure 
of both demand and supply. Global production has 
increased across the board for most metals owing to 
the rapid investment in capacity in the 2000s (Figure 
1.SF.4, panel 1). On the demand side, demand has 
shifted from West to East; that is, from consump-
tion concentrated in advanced economies toward that 
concentrated in emerging markets—especially China 
on account of its rapid growth (Figure 1.SF.4, panel 2). 
On the supply side, the so-called frontier of extrac-
tion of nonferrous metals, including precious metals 
such as gold, has shifted from North to South—that 
is, from advanced to developing economies—because 
of the rapid improvement in the investment climate, 
first in Latin America and then in sub-Saharan Africa 
(see Box 1.SF.1). While high-income member coun-
6Nickel mine production was 2.4 million tons in 2014, and the 
price of refined nickel was roughly $17,000 a metric ton.
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
Iron ore1
Copper
Primary aluminum
Nickel
CHN
AUS
BRA
IND
RUS
USA
CAN
CHL
PER
COD
ARE
PHL
NCL
Other
Figure 1.SF.3.  Production and Consumption of Metals
(Percent of world production or consumption)
1. Production
Sources: Bloomberg, L.P.; World Bureau of Metal Statistics; and IMF staff 
calculations.
Note: Data labels in the figure use International Organization for Standardization 
(ISO) country codes.
1Mine production for China is based on crude ore, rather than usable ore, which is 
reported for the other countries. 
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
Iron ore
Refined copper Primary aluminum
Nickel
2. Consumption
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
Iron ore
Copper
Primary aluminum
Nickel
3. Top Five Companies Accounting for More Than 2
Percent of World Metal Production 
Alcoa Inc.
Aluminum Corp. of China Ltd.
Anglo American PLC
BHP Billiton Ltd.
Codelco
Emirates Global Aluminium
ERAMET
Fortescue Metals Group Ltd.
Freeport-McMoRan Inc. 
Glencore PLC
Jiangxi Copper Co. Ltd.
OJSC MMC Norilsk Nickel
Rio Tinto PLC
United Co RUSAL PLC
Vale S.A.
CHN
JPN
IND
RUS
KOR
USA
DEU
TWN
Other
World Metal Production by Company
World Metal Production and Consumption by Country, 2014
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
vector images to PDF file. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Ability to put image into
paste image into pdf; how to cut an image out of a pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
paste image in pdf file; how to copy and paste a picture from a pdf document
SPECIAL FEATURE  COMMODITY MARKET DEVELOPMENTS AND FORECASTS, WITH A FOCUS ON METALS IN THE WORLD ECONOMY
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
43
tries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation 
and Development accounted for close to half of global 
discoveries of major mines between 1950 and 1990, 
sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America and the Carib-
bean have doubled their shares in total discoveries 
since 1990, which are about half what they were in the 
preceding period. 周e pattern of global trade in metals 
has radically changed as a result of those shifts in the 
loci of major discoveries. It should be noted that for 
steel and aluminum, production tends to be located in 
countries with combined deposits of iron ore or baux-
ite—which are abundant worldwide—and port facili-
ties, easy access to energy, and proximity to markets. 
On the demand side, the most dramatic development 
explaining the shift from West to East is the formi-
dable growth performance of China. China’s growth in 
consumption of metals has been the main driving force 
behind global metal consumption since the early 2000s 
(Figure 1.SF.5, panels 1 and 2). As a result China is 
now the main consumption locus for most metals. Far 
behind, India, Russia, and Korea have also increased 
their metal consumption, while consumption in Japan 
has stagnated somewhat. 周e rapid rise in demand from 
emerging markets has been a key driver of metal and 
other commodity prices (see Gauvin and Rebillard 2015 
and Aastveit, Bjørnland, and 周orsrud, forthcoming, 
for systematic evidence on the importance of China and 
emerging markets in driving metal and oil prices). 
On the supply side, investment in the sector has been 
on the decline. Indeed, available data on investment by 
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
3.5
1995
2000
05
10
14
Figure 1.SF.4.  Evolution of Metal Market
1. World Metal Production
(Index, 1995 = 1.0)
–5
0
5
10
15
20
25
Iron ore
Aluminum
Copper
Nickel
2. Average Consumption Growth, 2002–14
(Percent)
Aluminum
Copper
Iron ore
Nickel
China
Rest of the world
Sources: Bloomberg, L.P.; World Bureau of Metal Statistics; and IMF staff 
calculations.
Note: The figures reported for iron ore production in China are in crude terms, 
contrary to what other countries report. Iron ore production data should thus 
be interpreted with caution. The production figures for iron ore are thus not 
consistent with those for consumption, because the latter are based on 
effectively usable iron ore.
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
Iron ore
Aluminum
Copper
Nickel
Figure 1.SF.5. Development of Metal Market
t
1. China's Share of Global Consumption
(Percent)
Sources: Bloomberg, L.P.; IMF, Primary Commodity Price System; World Bureau of
Metal Statistics; and IMF staff estimates.
Note: Investments are deflated by the price index for mining and oil field machinery.
Total investment is the sum of capital expenditures for Anglo American PLC, BHP 
Billiton Ltd, Codelco, Freeport
-
McMoRan Inc., Glencore PLC, Grupo Mexico S.A.B.
de C.V., Mitsubishi Corp., Mitsui & Co. Ltd., Rio Tinto PLC, and Vale S.A.
0
200
400
600
800
1,000
1,200
1,400
1,600
1,800
2,000
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
180
200
2000
05
10
14
2. Development of Iron Ore Demand and Iron Ore Price
(Millions of metric tons, unless noted otherwise)
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
2000 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14
3. Investment of Major Metal Companies and Metal Price Index
(Billions of U.S. dollars, unless noted otherwise)
Major 10 companies total investment
Metal index (2000 = 100, right scale)
BHP Billiton Ltd.
Freeport-McMoRan Inc.
Glencore PLC
Rio Tinto PLC
Vale S.A.
2000
2005
2010
2014
Iron ore price (U.S. dollars a 
metric ton, right scale)
China
Japan
India
Russia
Korea
United States
Brazil
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned signature, logo, etc. Able to cut and paste image into another PDF file.
how to copy and paste a pdf image; copy pictures from pdf to word
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo
paste image into pdf preview; how to copy pdf image into word
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
44 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
major metal companies producing iron ore suggest that 
the rapid increase in investment during the period of 
high metal prices in the early 2000s has been followed 
by a gradual decline since 2011, closely following the 
trajectory of metal prices (Figure 1.SF.5, panel 3). As 
mentioned earlier, for ferrous metals, investment is a 
good indicator of future supply capacity. For nonfer-
rous metals, the actual quantity available from mineral 
deposits is much more relevant for predicting supply. A 
unique data set of discoveries is used here to allow an 
assessment of the emergence of new frontiers of metal 
extraction. 周at assessment offers evidence that prices 
have played little role in driving discoveries of mineral 
deposits (see Box 1.SF.1). Instead, rapid improvements 
in institutions, including those related to property rights 
in Latin America and Africa, have led to a gradual 
increase in the number of major discoveries of metals in 
those regions since the 1990s. 周e results have impor-
tant implications both for the welfare of individual 
countries and for our global understanding of the bal-
ance of forces shaping metal markets and the pattern of 
global trade in metals. 
周e pattern of global metal trade has evolved 
dramatically over the past decades,7 with the major 
destination countries shifting from West to East and 
the source countries from North to South. In 2002, 
metals were exported mainly from Canada and Russia 
to the United States or from Australia to Japan, Korea, 
7Here, metals include aluminum, copper, iron ore, lead, nickel, 
tin, uranium, and zinc. 
and China. In contrast, by 2014 almost half of metal 
exports were going from Australia, Brazil, and Chile to 
China. China has become the largest importer of met-
als, with its share increasing from less than 10 percent 
to 46 percent from 2002 to 2014 (Table 1.SF.2). 
Many developing economies depend heavily on metal 
exports. 周ese exports have risen sharply as a percentage 
of GDP, and the group of largest metal exporters (as a 
percentage of GDP) has changed substantially as a result 
(Table 1.SF.3). Metal exports from Chile, Mauritania, 
and Niger now account for more than half of these 
countries’ total exports of goods. 周ese countries are 
thus vulnerable to fluctuations in metal prices such as 
those that have recently occurred as a result of shifts in 
demand from large importers such as China. Discov-
eries of new metal deposits have expanded the list of 
resource-dependent countries that face new challenges in 
terms of macroeconomic management.
China’s recent attempts to rebalance its economy 
away from investment toward domestic consumption 
are leading not only to lower Chinese demand for met-
als, but also to a compositional shift in that demand, 
which may have different implications for different 
metals. Metals are heavily used in machinery, construc-
tion, transportation equipment, and manufacturing 
industries, while oil is used mainly in transportation. 
周us the decline in growth of manufacturing, machin-
ery, and construction has led to slowing demand for 
metal since 2010 (Figure 1.SF.6). 周e metal price index 
has decreased correspondingly. 周e potential future rise 
in the share of the service sector should lead to lower 
Table 1.SF.2. Metal Trade Evolution
(Millions of U.S. dollars)
1. Bilateral Metal Trade, 2002
Country
China
Germany
Japan
Korea
United States
Australia
1,043
 63
2,309
1,067
181
Brazil
 605
 360
 700
179
754
Canada
  90
 270
 353
212
4,232
Chile
 784
 197
 768
541
687
Russia
 196
 161
 716
 93
1,061
2. Bilateral Metal Trade, 2014
Country
China
Germany
Japan
Korea
United States
Australia
52,153
 53
10,985
6,283
268
Brazil
12,851
1,194
3,004
1,368
1,207
Canada
2,496
311
1,522
1,074
8,815
Chile
15,249
415
4,875
3,252
2,349
Peru
5,621
593
1,030
856
351
Sources: UN Comtrade; and IMF staff calculations.
Note: Data show exports of metals from the countries listed at the left of the rows to the countries listed at the tops of the columns. The gradient of color from 
green to red refers to the absolute size of trade volume in each panel.
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
the size of SDK package, all dlls are put into RasterEdge.DocImagSDK a Home folder under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll.
how to paste a picture into a pdf; how to copy and paste a pdf image into a word document
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on IIS
reduce the size of SDK package, dlls are not put into Xdoc.HTML5 dll files listed below under RasterEdge.DocImagSDK/Bin directory and paste to Xdoc see picture).
copy picture from pdf reader; how to copy pictures from pdf
SPECIAL FEATURE  COMMODITY MARKET DEVELOPMENTS AND FORECASTS, WITH A FOCUS ON METALS IN THE WORLD ECONOMY
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
45
consumption of metals. Notwithstanding the dramatic 
increase in Chinese imports of metals, these represent 
less than 2 percent of China’s GDP (Figure 1.SF.7). 
What Lies Ahead? 
周e slower pace of investment in China, that coun-
try’s sharp stock market decline since June, and the 
ample supply of metals have been exerting downward 
pressure on metal prices. Considering that the decline 
in metal prices started much earlier, it makes sense to 
ask what should be expected. As mentioned earlier, 
futures markets point to lower prices, though the 
decline is projected to bottom out. But it is helpful in 
this regard to go beyond futures and review the forces 
underpinning demand and supply of metals.
On the demand side, the Chinese economy is 
projected to slow further, albeit gradually, but with 
considerable uncertainty as to both the time frame for 
the slowdown and the full extent of the slowing. A basic 
econometric exercise using historical data and relat-
ing the IMF’s metal price index to China’s industrial 
production (with both variables expressed as logarithms) 
shows that the fall in prices can be explained quite well 
by the decline in industrial production (Figure1.SF.8), 
with 60 percent of the variance in metal prices explained 
by fluctuations in China’s industrial production. In 
addition, this simple regression suggests that the fall in 
China’s industrial production in recent months could 
produce further metal price declines, as evidenced by the 
decoupling between the fitted and actual growth rates in 
the metal price index. 
On the supply side, the drop in investment is 
unlikely to lead to a substantial price rebound in the 
near future. Low energy prices have in fact helped 
reduce mining and refining costs, including those for 
copper, steel, and aluminum. High-cost mines will 
certainly close down first, considering that current 
metal prices may be close to these mines’ break-even 
point. However, a recent analysis of the cost-price 
relationship released by consulting firm SNL Metals 
& Mining concludes that during cyclical low points in 
metal prices, the copper price has fallen to at least the 
ninth decile of high-cost producers, which indicates 
that prices would need to fall further before substantial 
–10
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
2002
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
Figure 1.SF.6. China: Composition of Metal Use and Growth 
Rates by Sector 
(Percent)
Total metal demand
Basic metals and fabricated metal
Machinery
Electrical and optical equipment
Construction
Others
GDP
Sources: Bureau of National Statistics, China; World Input-Output Database; and 
IMF staff calculations.
Note: The growth rates of total demand for metals are calculated as the sum of 
output growth rates for each sector, weighted by the shares of metal input in 
the individual sector in the total economy. The share of metal input for each 
sector is calculated based on the World Input-Output Database. For the 
calculation, the value of the share of metal input in the most recent year is 
chosen, that is, 2011, considering that the share of metal input has been quite 
stable over the years. Given that the output data for China are not available at the 
sector level, profit data by sector are used as a proxy for most of the industries, 
and for nonindustry sectors, GDP data by industrial classification are used. 
Table 1.SF.3. Net Metal Exports
(Percent of GDP) 
2002
Zambia
11.27
Chile
8.82
Guinea
8.02
Mozambique
7.27
Papua New Guinea
7.07
Niger
4.31
Iceland
4.21
Peru
3.62
Namibia
2.88
Bolivia
2.16
2014
Mongolia
26.52
Mauritania
21.06
Chile
15.00
Zambia
14.76
Iceland
8.67
Peru
6.23
Niger
5.94
Australia
5.23
Bolivia
4.75
Guyana
4.64
Sources: UN Comtrade; and IMF staff calculations.
C# Raster - Modify Image Palette in C#.NET
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET to reduce the size of the picture, especially in
paste image into pdf acrobat; how to copy pdf image to jpg
C# Word - Document Processing in C#.NET
Open(docFilePath); //Get the main ducument IDocument doc = document.GetDocument(); //Document clone IDocument doc0 = doc.Clone(); //Get all picture in document
how to copy pictures from a pdf; paste jpg into pdf preview
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
46 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
capacity becomes vulnerable to closure.8 Moreover, the 
secular expansion of the frontier of metal extraction to 
Latin America and Africa as a result of improvements 
in the investment climate is unlikely to revert to any 
great extent. Instead, those improvements should con-
tinue steadily. 周us ample supply is likely to continue 
pushing metal prices farther down.
8See http://www.snl.com/Sectors/MetalsMining/Default.aspx. 
周e balance between weaker demand and a steady 
increase in supply suggests that given the existing cost 
structure, metal markets are likely to experience a con-
tinued glut, leading to a low-for-long price scenario. In 
turn, the risks associated with such a scenario are that 
investment will continue to falter and lead to a sharp 
increase in prices down the road.
0
10
20
30
40
50
0.0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
2002
04
06
08
10
12
14
Percent of world metal imports (left scale)
Percent of GDP (right scale)
Figure 1.SF.7. China: Metal Imports
Sources: UN Comtrade; and IMF staff calculations.
–0.8
–0.6
–0.4
–0.2
0.0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
2001
03
05
07
09
11
13
15
Actual growth rate
Fitted growth rate
Figure 1.SF.8. Growth Rates of Metal Price Index
(Percent)
Sources: IMF, Primary Commodity Price System; and IMF staff calculations.
Note: The figure shows the actual and fitted annual growth rate of the metal price 
index. The fitted growth rate is based on the regression of the annual growth rate 
of the metal price index on the annual growth rate of China's industrial production.
SPECIAL FEATURE  COMMODITY MARKET DEVELOPMENTS AND FORECASTS, WITH A FOCUS ON METALS IN THE WORLD ECONOMY
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
47
Fundamental factors underpinning the demand for 
primary commodities, including metals, have received 
much attention, but supply-side factors have not. As 
noted in the Special Feature text, the center of gravity 
of global demand has shifted from West to East as a 
result of the high growth in emerging markets—espe-
cially China—in the past two decades. 周is box argues 
that developments in the supply of metals have been 
perhaps just as dramatic. 周e box focuses on discoveries 
of major metal deposits that signal previously unknown 
possibilities to expand global supply.1 周e main finding 
is that the new frontiers of metal exploitation have 
shifted from North to South, that is, from advanced to 
emerging market and developing economies. 
Metal Discoveries through Space and Time
A critical look at the data on known reserves of 
subsoil assets suggests that emerging market and devel-
oping economies have substantial deposits of metals 
that have yet to be discovered. 周ere is an estimated 
$130,000 in known subsoil assets beneath the average 
square kilometer of Organisation for Economic Co-
operation and Development (OECD) countries, which 
contrasts with only about $25,000 in Africa (see Col-
lier 2010 and McKinsey Global Institute 2013). It is 
unlikely that those differences represent differences in 
geological formations between advanced and develop-
ing economies. Rather, differences in the quality of 
property rights and political stability can help explain 
why relatively less exploration effort has been devoted 
to emerging market and developing economies. 
Improvements in the institutional environments of 
these economies accelerated rapidly in the 1990s, how-
ever, and a cursory look at the data on political risk 
seems to indicate that the timing of the improvements 
coincides with the increase in the share of discoveries 
in Latin America and Africa (Figure 1.SF.1.1).
Data on discoveries of a wide range of metal deposits 
obtained from the consulting firm MinEx suggest that the 
frontier of metal exploitation has gradually moved from 
周e authors of this box are Rabah Arezki and Frederik 
Toscani.
1周e data used in this box are from MinEx Consulting. 周e 
list of metals used in the analysis is comprehensive and includes 
precious metals and rare earth. 周e data set excludes iron ore and 
bauxite, which tend to be relatively more abundant than other 
metals and require for their exploitation proximity to port facili-
ties in the case of the former and substantial energy availability 
for the latter.
advanced to emerging market and developing econo-
mies (Figure 1.SF.1.2). 周e total number of discover-
ies has remained broadly constant, but the distribution 
has changed. Although high-income OECD countries 
accounted for 37 to 50 percent of all discoveries during 
1950–89, this share fell to 26 percent in the first decade of 
this century, with sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America 
and the Caribbean doubling their shares. Latin America 
has experienced the most discoveries of metal deposits in 
the past two decades.
What Do the Data Show about the Drivers of 
Discoveries? 
Investments in exploration and extraction activities 
involve sunk costs and are thus subject to the holdup prob-
lem.2 For an investment to be expected to be profitable, a 
stable political environment, a low risk of expropriation, 
2周e results presented in this section are also robust to an 
array of checks, including additional controls and estimators. 
Box 1.SF.1. The New Frontiers of Metal Extraction: The North-to-South Shift
Discoveries (percent of total global
discoveries, left scale) 
Political risk rating (median, right scale)
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
1984
88
92
96
2000
04
08
12
Figure 1.SF.1.1. Metal Deposit Discoveries in 
Latin America and the Caribbean and Sub- 
Saharan Africa
Sources:  MinEx Consulting; PRS Group, International Country 
Risk Guide; and IMF staff calculations. 
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
48 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
and a favorable investment climate are crucial (Acemoglu, 
Johnson, and Robinson 2001; Bohn and Deacon 2000). 
Cust and Harding (2014) provide evidence that institu-
tions substantially affect oil and gas exploration.3 Mining 
could be seen as more expropriable than oil extraction 
because mining output does not move through pipelines 
and takes place exclusively on land.
周e approach in this box is to estimate, using a panel 
data set, a zero-inflated Poisson model with the number 
of mine discoveries by country, year, and metal as the 
dependent variable.4 N
itm
denotes the number of mines 
Arezki, van der Ploeg, and Toscani (forthcoming) present exten-
sive technical details and an in-depth discussion of endogeneity.
3周ese authors’ identification strategy relies on exploiting 
variations in institutions and oil deposits sitting on both sides of 
a border.
4Large numbers of zeros and the heteroscedasticity of errors 
may imply that ordinary least-squares results will be biased and 
inconsistent. Silva and Tenreyro (2006) suggest the Poisson 
pseudo–maximum likelihood estimator to address this issue. 
周is box follows this suggestion and uses zero-inflated Poisson 
discovered in country i at time t and for a specific metal 
m. N
itm
is assumed to follow a Poisson distribution.
周e main explanatory variable of interest is a coun-
try’s political risk rating, obtained from the International 
Country Risk Guide’s (ICRG’s) Political Risk Index. 周e 
regressions include metal fixed effects because met-
als differ in their abundance and location. 周ey also 
include country fixed effects to capture time-invariant 
country characteristics that are hard to observe, such 
as actual geology, and year fixed effects to control for 
technology and other global shocks. In addition, price 
changes for the corresponding metals over the past five 
years are controlled for. 周e baseline specification uses 
the standard log-linear approach to model the expected 
number of mine discoveries for metal m in country i at 
time t in the three-way Poisson regression model:
ln E(N
itm
) = a + bDp
t–1,m
+ gICRG
it–1
+ dX
itm
,
models. 周e count data are modeled as a Poisson count model, 
and a logit model is used to predict zeros.
Box 1.SF.1 (continued)
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
160
180
East Asia and 
Pacific
Europe and 
central Asia
High-income 
OECD
High-income 
non-OECD
Latin America 
and the 
Caribbean
Middle East 
and North 
Africa
South Asia Sub-Saharan
Africa
Figure 1.SF.1.2. Number of Metal Deposit Discoveries by Region and Decade
Source: MinEx Consulting.
Note: OECD = Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.
1950–59
1960–69
1970–79
1980–89
1990–99
2000–09
SPECIAL FEATURE  COMMODITY MARKET DEVELOPMENTS AND FORECASTS, WITH A FOCUS ON METALS IN THE WORLD ECONOMY
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
49
in which the vector a includes country, time, and 
metal fixed effects. 周e key controls of interest are the 
natural logarithm of the world market price for metal 
m and the measure of political risk ICRG. 周e vector 
X includes other controls. It should be noted that the 
quality of institutions may be endogenous to metal 
discoveries in that these discoveries may, for instance, 
trigger conflicts over resources and erode institu-
tions (Ross 2001, 2012). Any such endogeneity will, 
however, tend to bias the coefficient associated with 
institutions toward zero, and as such, that coefficient 
should be interpreted as presenting a lower bound. To 
alleviate issues of reverse causality somewhat, the polit-
ical risk rating is included with a one-year lag. In addi-
tion, lagged discoveries are controlled for, to account 
for the clustering of discoveries. 周e interactions 
between ICRG and metal price and between price and 
fixed effects are also explored. Other robustness checks 
consist of adding controls such as GDP per capita and 
the initial capital stock and using price levels instead 
of changes. 周e main results remain unchanged.
周e political risk rating, reflecting property rights 
and political stability, is found to be statistically and 
economically significant (Table 1.SF.1.1). 周e results 
indicate that a one standard deviation improvement 
in the political risk rating (which corresponds to a 
move from, for example, Mali to South Africa, South 
Africa to Chile, or Chile to Canada) would lead to 
1.2 times as many metal discoveries in those countries. 
To provide a further sense of the relevant magnitude, 
a thought experiment is conducted in which Latin 
America’s and sub-Saharan Africa’s median prop-
erty rights suddenly jump to the levels of the most 
advanced economies in each of these regions, which 
are, respectively, Chile and Botswana. 周is experi-
ment yields a 15 percent increase in the number of 
mines discovered worldwide, all else equal. 周e figure 
increases to 25 percent if instead Latin America and 
sub-Saharan Africa were to suddenly adopt the same 
level of property rights as in the United States, again 
all else equal. Notwithstanding the dramatic increase 
in institutions forced by the thought experiment, the 
magnitudes suggest that institutions play an important 
role in driving exploration for and ultimately discover-
ies of metals. Institutions affect discoveries through 
a variety of channels besides the perception of risk 
on the part of the potential foreign investors. For 
instance, better institutions could affect the adoption 
of better technology or improve the quality of the 
labor force and in turn affect the number of discover-
ies. 周e analysis here does not attempt to separate 
those channels. 
Results also suggest that movements in metal prices 
over the past five years are not statistically significant 
in explaining the number of discoveries. 周e likeli-
hood of additional discoveries appears to increase with 
Box 1.SF.1 (continued)
Table 1.SF.1.1. Impact of Political Institutions on Mineral Discoveries 
Variables
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
Political Risk Rating, Lagged
0.0216***
(0.00729)
0.0171**
(0.00782)
0.0192**
(0.00783)
0.0195**
(0.00787)
Polity2 Score, Lagged
0.0128
(0.0155)
0.0179
(0.0156)
0.0173
(0.0155)
Stock of Discoveries, Lagged
0.0161***
(0.00343)
0.0162***
(0.00344)
Political Risk Rating x Change in Metals Price
–0.00635
(0.0165)
Log Change in Metals Price
–0.449
(0.316)
–0.464
(0.320)
–0.466
(0.320)
–0.0207
(1.159)
Log Change in Metals Price, Lagged
–0.334
(0.315)
–0.341
(0.314)
–0.345
(0.322)
–0.345
(0.322)
Number of Observations
37,252
35,480
31,812
31,812
Source: IMF staff estimates.
Note: Robust standard errors are in parentheses. Country, year, and metal fixed effects are included in all regressions.
*p < .1; **p < .05; ***p < .01.
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
50 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
previous discoveries, as would be expected given the 
reduced risk of exploring close to a known deposit. 
What Are the Implications?
周e North-South shift in the frontier of metal 
exploitation is likely to have important consequences 
for individual economies with newly found metal 
deposits, especially in Latin America and Africa. 
Indeed, these discoveries expand the list of resource-
rich countries. New mines mean more investment and 
jobs, especially in the resource sector, and increased 
government revenues. New trade routes have been 
inaugurated from Latin America and Africa to emerg-
ing Asia. However, these newly found resources pose 
challenges for the conduct of macroeconomic policy in 
developing economies in both the short and the long 
term.
While demand for metals emanating from emerg-
ing markets has been a key driver of recent global metal 
market developments, progress in the quality of institu-
tions has helped increase the supply of metals and shifted 
its composition. A future steady increase in institutions 
along with slowing demand could lead to excess supply 
and exercise further downward pressure on prices.
Box 1.SF.1 (continued)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested