pdf viewer library c# : How to paste a picture into pdf software application project winforms html .net UWP text7-part1781

CHA PTER 1
Recent Deve lo pMe nts anD pRo spec ts 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
51
周e global financial crisis put the spotlight on the issue 
of hysteresis, the hypothesis that recessions may have 
permanent effects and lead to lower output later. Fig-
ure1.1.1 shows why. 周e figure shows the evolution of 
U.S. and euro area output since2000. Its visually striking 
implication is that, since the global financial crisis, output 
appears to be evolving on a lower path, perhaps even a 
lower growth path, especially in the euro area. 
To get a sense of how unusual such evolution is, 
Blanchard, Cerutti, and Summers (2015) look at 122 
recessions in 23 advanced economies since the1960s. 
周eir analysis of the relative evolution of output after 
each recession takes a nonparametric approach that 
estimates and extrapolates prerecession trends—taking 
into account, among other factors, that an economy 
may have been in a boom, and thus above trend, 
before the recession started. Figure1.1.2 shows the 
case of Portugal, which is representative of other 
countries. All but one of the recessions in Portugal 
since1960 appear to be associated not only with 
lower output relative to trend, but with a subsequent 
decrease in trend growth, and thus increasing gaps 
between actual and past trend output.
More generally, these authors’ analysis of the average 
output gaps between the prerecession trend and actual 
log GDP (covering from three to seven years after the 
recession) concludes that a surprisingly high two-thirds 
of recessions are followed by lower output relative to the 
prerecession trend. Even more surprisingly, almost half of 
those are followed not only by lower output, but also by 
lower output growth relative to the prerecession trend.
But correlation does not necessarily imply causality. 
One can think of three different explanations:
•  Hysteresis: A number of mechanisms have been sug-
gested that could generate lower output paths after 
recessions. Financial crises, like the recent global 
meltdown, often trigger institutional changes, such 
as tougher capital requirements or changes in bank 
business models, which could affect the long-term 
level of output. In the labor market, a recession 
and the associated high unemployment may lead 
some workers either to drop out permanently or 
to become unemployable.1 Firms may cut back 
on research and development during a recession, 
周e authors of this box are Olivier Blanchard and Eugenio 
Cerutti, drawing on Blanchard, Cerutti, and Summers 2015.
1Blanchard and Summers (1986) also relate the increase in 
unemployment in Europe during the 1980s to hysteresis in the 
form of prolonged unemployment episodes leading to a change 
in labor market institutions.
Box 1.1. What Is the Effect of Recessions?
Figure 1.1.1.  Advanced Economies: Real GDP
(Index, 2000:Q1 = 100)
100
105
110
115
120
125
130
135
140
2000
02
04
06
08
10
12
14
16
Source: IMF staff calculations.
United States
Euro area
3.0
3.5
4.0
4.5
5.0
5.5
1960:Q1
70:Q1
80:Q1
90:Q1
2000:Q1
10:Q1
Figure 1.1.2.  Portugal: Evolution of Log Real 
GDP and Extrapolated Trends
Source: IMF staff calculations.
Note: Peaks in log GDP are indicated by black vertical lines, 
troughs by red vertical lines. Recession dates are 1974:Q1– 
75:Q2; 1982:Q4–84:Q2; 1992:Q1–93:Q4; 2002:Q1–03:Q2; 
2008:Q1–09:Q1; 2010:Q1–12:Q4.
How to paste a picture into pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to cut and paste image from pdf; copying image from pdf to powerpoint
How to paste a picture into pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy picture from pdf file; copy images from pdf
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
52 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
leading to a lower productivity level than had there 
not been a recession. It is more difficult, but not 
impossible, to think of mechanisms through which 
a recession leads to lower output growth later.2 A 
recession may trigger changes in behavior or to 
institutions’ permanently cutting back on research 
and development or lowering reallocation forever. 
Changes may range from increased legal or self-
imposed restrictions on risk taking by financial 
institutions to changes in taxation discouraging 
entrepreneurship.
•  Dynamic effects of supply shocks: Supply shocks (for 
example, oil shocks and financial crises) may be 
behind both the recession and the lower output 
later. For example, it is plausible to argue that the 
sharp decline in output at the start of the global 
crisis and the subsequent lower growth path stem 
from the same underlying cause—namely, the crisis 
in the financial system, manifesting itself through 
an acute effect at the start and a more chronic effect 
thereafter.
•  Reverse causality: A recession could be partly due 
to the anticipation of lower growth to come. For 
example, an exogenous decrease in underlying 
2In order to differentiate the impact of a recession on the 
growth rate from its impact on the level of output, Ball (2014) 
calls the former “super-hysteresis.”
potential growth might lead households to reduce 
consumption and firms to reduce investment, lead-
ing to an initial recession.
To distinguish between these three explanations, 
Blanchard, Cerutti, and Summers (2015) focus on 
decompositions based on the recessions’ proximate 
cause. 周ey home in on recessions induced by inten-
tional disinflation—demand shock recessions char-
acterized by a large increase in nominal interest rates 
followed by subsequent disinflation—in which the 
correlation is more likely to reflect hysteresis than the 
other two hypotheses. 周ey find that, even for those 
recessions, the proportion followed by lower output 
relative to the prerecession trend is substantial (in 
about 17 of the 28 intentional-disinflation recessions). 
周e policy implications of these findings are impor-
tant, but potentially conflicting. When hysteresis is 
present, in general, macroeconomic policies must be 
more aggressive. Deviations of output from its optimal 
level are much longer lasting and thus more costly 
than usually assumed. Nevertheless, to the extent that 
the other two explanations are also relevant, there is 
the risk of overestimating potential output during and 
after a recession, and by implication of overestimat-
ing the output gap. Macroeconomic policies based on 
an overestimated output gap may turn out to be too 
aggressive. Hence, the macroeconomic policy mix must 
be not only country specific, but also recession specific.
Box 1.1 (continued)
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
vector images to PDF file. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Ability to put image into
how to copy pictures from pdf to word; copy image from pdf to ppt
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
project. Import graphic picture, digital photo, signature and logo into PDF document. Add images to any selected PDF page in VB.NET.
how to copy pdf image to word; cut and paste pdf image
CHA PTER 1
Recent Deve lo pMe nts anD pRo spec ts 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
53
Despite the narrowing of global current account 
imbalances, the number of countries with large current 
account deficits remains high. Over the period2012–
14, 62 countries had an average current account deficit 
exceeding 7percent of GDP—only 4 fewer than 
over2005–08.1 周is box presents stylized facts on the 
characteristics of these countries and tries to shed light 
on the potential drivers of their external borrowing 
and their external vulnerabilities. 
周e first striking fact about these countries is their 
small size. Despite representing about one-third of 
the IMF membership and half of the countries with 
current account deficits, their aggregate GDP is below 
1½percent of world GDP at market prices, and their 
aggregate current account deficit is about one-tenth of 
global current account deficits (somewhat smaller than 
the deficit in the United Kingdom). 周eir geographic 
distribution is heterogeneous, with 22 economies in 
sub-Saharan Africa, 12 in the Caribbean, 3 in Central 
America, 5 in the Pacific islands, 4 in Asia, 7 in the 
Middle East and North Africa, 5 in emerging Europe, 
and 4 in the Commonwealth of Independent States. 
Roughly half are low-income countries, and the other 
half are emerging markets. Table1.2.1 provides a 
周e authors of this box are Carolina Osorio-Buitrón and Gian 
Maria Milesi-Ferretti.
1周e number of countries with current account surpluses 
exceeding 7 percent of GDP in 2012–14 was much smaller (15), 
but their aggregate size was four times larger. 周e majority are 
oil exporters. 
comparison of country characteristics for the median 
country in this group compared to the rest of the 
world, highlighting that these countries have both 
small populations and low GDP per capita as well. 
周ey are also highly dependent on oil imports. 
Table1.2.2 examines more formally whether the 
variables in Table1.2.1 are systematically related to 
current account balances, estimating a simple cross-
sectional regression in which the dependent variable 
is the average current-account-to-GDP ratio over the 
period2012–14 and the parsimonious set of explana-
tory variables includes GDP per capita, population, 
and a proxy for net oil exports and imports over the 
same time period. 周ere is of course a vast litera-
ture estimating current account regressions (see, for 
instance, Chinn and Prasad2003, Lee and oth-
ers2008, and Prati and others2011). In contrast to 
Box 1.2. Small Economies, Large Current Account Deficits
Table 1.2.1. Median Country Characteristics
(2012–14 average)
Population 
(millions)
GDP per 
Capita 
(thousands 
of U.S. 
dollars)
Oil Net 
Exports 
(percent 
of  GDP)
Large Current 
Account Deficits
3.8
2.4
–7.3
Others
10.5
9.3
–2.9
Sources: World Bank, World Development Indicators; and IMF staff 
estimates.
Table 1.2.2. Cross-Sectional Current Account Models 
(Variables expressed as 2012–14 averages, unless noted otherwise
(1)
(2)1
(3)
(4)
Log GDP Per Capita
3.40***
(0.44)
2.22***
(0.31)
3.49***
(0.43)
3.34***
(0.43)
Log Population
1.43***
(0.29)
1.40***
(0.28)
0.97**
(0.31)
1.13***
(0.32)
Hydrocarbon-Rich Dummy
9.18***
(1.82)
8.65***
(2.04)
9.02***
(1.77)
Caribbean Dummy
–7.36**
(2.42)
–3.55
(2.41)
Oil Net Exports (percent of GDP)
0.24***
(0.06)
Number of Observations
188
172
188
171
R2
0.40
0.46
0.42
0.49
Adjusted R2
0.39
0.45
0.41
0.48
Note: Standard errors are in parentheses. 
1The dependent and explanatory variables are expressed as 1995–2014 averages.
**p < .01;  ***p < .001.
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo, scanned signature, logo, etc. Able to cut and paste image into another PDF file.
paste picture pdf; copy and paste image from pdf to pdf
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET Support removing vector image, graphic picture, digital photo
copy image from pdf acrobat; how to copy and paste image from pdf to word
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
54 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
that in most of the literature, the focus here is purely 
on the cross-section, and the very limited number of 
control variables permits a truly global sample (wider 
than commonly used samples). 
Results show a very strong cross-sectional relation-
ship between current account balances and GDP per 
capita: for instance, a country with GDP per capita 
of $5,000 will have on average a current account 
balance 6percentage points of GDP stronger than a 
country with GDP per capita of $1,000. 周e regres-
sion also yields a positive relationship between current 
account balances and population, which is statistically 
and economically significant, after GDP per capita is 
controlled for. For instance, a country with a popula-
tion of 10million has on average a current account 
balance that is about 2.8percentage points of GDP 
stronger than a country with the same GDP per capita 
but a population of 1million. 周ese results are not 
specific to the2012–14 period, as shown in column 
(2) of Table 1.2.2. Possible reasons why countries 
with smaller populations have on average larger 
deficits are discussed later in this box.2 A dummy 
for oil exporters is also highly significant, and even 
more so the oil trade balance. Column (3) shows that 
the significance of population is not solely driven by 
Caribbean islands, which have large deficits and very 
small populations—but it suggests that these countries 
do run larger deficits than others, after their size and 
level of development are controlled for. 周e intensity 
of their oil dependence is clearly a factor explaining 
their deficits—as shown in column (4), substituting 
the oil balance for the oil exporter dummy reduces the 
economic and statistical significance of the Caribbean 
dummy. 
External Financing
Figure1.2.1 provides information on the struc-
ture of external financing for the countries in the 
large-deficit sample. 周ese countries have relied to 
an important extent on net foreign direct investment 
(FDI) flows—the median is about 5percentage points 
of GDP—as well as net flows of other investments (a 
broad category including private and official loans). 
周is variable understates net inflows in the presence 
of debt relief, since the latter is recorded as a capital 
account transfer accompanied by a repayment of other 
investment liabilities. Indeed, capital account transfers 
account for close to 1percent of GDP of median 
current account financing. Median portfolio flows are 
negligible, even though a few countries have relied 
heavily on them. Neither median changes in foreign 
exchange reserves nor errors and omissions play an 
important role. 
Given the balance of payments identity, net sources 
of current account financing are also correlated with 
both GDP per capita and population. 周e correlation 
is especially strong for capital account transfers, foreign 
official flows, and foreign direct investment—all of 
which are proportionately higher, as a share of domes-
tic GDP, in poor countries as well as in countries with 
small populations. 
2Since the current-account-to-GDP ratio in small economies 
tends to be more volatile than that in larger ones, countries with 
small populations could be overrepresented in the sample of 
large-deficit countries. But volatility is unlikely to be the main 
driver of the relationship between population and the current 
account, as the negative correlation between these variables is sys-
tematic across all countries. Moreover, small economies are not 
overrepresented in the sample of countries with large surpluses.
Box 1.2 (continued)
–2
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
Countries with large deficits
Other deficit countries
Figure 1.2.1.  Sources of External Financing,
Current Account Deficit Countries
(Percent of GDP; median values, 2012–14)
Current account deficit
Use of foreign reserves
Capital account
Net FDI
Net other investment
Net portfolio flows
Errors and omissions
Sources: IMF, Balance of Payments Statistics; and IMF staff 
calculations.
Note: The figure presents the median values of the 2012–14 
averages in each country group for each financing source. 
FDI = foreign direct investment.
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
the size of SDK package, all dlls are put into RasterEdge.DocImagSDK a Home folder under Views according to config in picture above. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll.
how to copy and paste an image from a pdf; copy paste image pdf
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on IIS
reduce the size of SDK package, dlls are not put into Xdoc.HTML5 dll files listed below under RasterEdge.DocImagSDK/Bin directory and paste to Xdoc see picture).
copy and paste image from pdf to word; copy image from pdf preview
CHA PTER 1
Recent Deve lo pMe nts anD pRo spec ts 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
55
Drivers of Large External Financing
Large current account deficits can in principle be 
associated with a variety of factors: 
•  Sizable reliance on development assistance, particu-
larly in small economies: Countries with smaller 
populations tend to receive more aid as a share of 
GDP than larger nations (see Alesina and Dol-
lar2005).3 With greater reliance on aid flows, the 
current account balance can overstate the access to 
external borrowing (through grants classified under 
the capital account), and borrowing costs may be 
lower than for other countries, given concessional 
loans. Indeed, if the financial account is used as the 
dependent variable in the regressions of Table1.2.2 
(thereby netting out the part of current account 
financing accounted for by capital transfers), the 
link with population size weakens, both economi-
cally and statistically. 
•  Legacy effects from large past external borrowing, 
which imply a strongly negative income balance: 
Such legacy effects are intensified by low economic 
growth. 
•  Negative growth shocks, such as natural disasters or 
conflicts, which (temporarily) curtail a country’s pro-
duction possibilities, as well as the induced increase in 
spending associated with reconstruction needs: In small 
states, the macroeconomic consequences of natural 
disasters are particularly large, as these shocks tend 
to affect a larger share of the population and of the 
economy.4 While existing estimates of the GDP cost 
of natural disasters are not a significant determi-
nant of current account balances when added to 
the regression specifications of Table1.2.2, these 
estimates’ incomplete coverage poses a challenge 
to testing their empirical relevance in a reliable 
fashion. 
•  Measurement issues: The sample of large-deficit 
countries includes 18 with tourism-based econo-
mies, for which there is anecdotal evidence that 
tourist spending may be underestimated and hence 
the current account deficit overestimated (see, for 
instance, IMF2015d). When added to the regres-
3Hence, a country’s size, measured by its population, has been 
used as a measure of donor interest (Bräutigam and Knack 2004) 
and as an instrument for aid flows (see, for instance, Rajan and 
Subramanian 2008). 
4It is estimated that natural disasters cost microstates (coun-
tries with populations of 200,000 or less) between 3 and 5 
percent of GDP annually (Jahan and Wang 2013). 
sions presented in Table1.2.2, tourism revenues as a 
share of total exports are negatively correlated with 
the current account balance (and reduce the size 
and significance of the coefficient on population), 
consistent with the hypothesis that such revenues 
may be underestimated. Analogously, large-deficit 
countries rely more on remittances than other defi-
cit countries.5 However, these flows are notoriously 
difficult to distinguish from capital inflows and to 
measure accurately, for instance, because individual 
remittances often fall below financial institutions’ 
reporting thresholds (see UNECE2011).
Different countries in the diverse high current 
account deficit sample fall into each of these catego-
ries. Chronic current account deficits with low GDP 
per capita and sizable reliance on development assis-
tance is the most common profile among countries in 
the sample. Indeed, while some 50 countries in the 
group experienced a worsening in current account 
deficits relative to their average current account values 
during1995–2011, only 11 of them had deficits aver-
aging less than 5percent of GDP during the earlier 
period. In a number of these countries, legacy effects 
from past external borrowing were alleviated through 
debt forgiveness or debt reduction agreements, either 
during the2012–14 period or in the preceding decade 
(for instance, Liberia, Mozambique, and St. Kitts 
and Nevis). However, the number of countries with 
very high net external liabilities remains elevated, as 
discussed next.
Turning to reasons for sizable changes in current 
account balances, Mauritania, Mongolia, Mozam-
bique, and Papua New Guinea have had booms in 
FDI related to natural resources, and 周e Bahamas, 
Grenada, and Guyana have had natural disasters with 
estimated macroeconomic costs exceeding 2percentage 
points of GDP a year. 
External Risks for High-Deficit Countries
Many countries in the large-deficit sample have 
structural vulnerabilities. For instance, small develop-
ing states, which constitute a third of the sample, 
face vulnerabilities and policy challenges due to their 
size, which adds to production and distribution costs, 
hampers the delivery of public goods, poses other 
administrative capacity constraints, and leaves them 
5周e median remittances-to-GDP ratio is roughly 3 percent 
in large-deficit countries and close to zero for other deficit 
countries. 
Box 1.2 (continued)
C# Raster - Modify Image Palette in C#.NET
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; edit, C#.NET PDF pages extract, copy, paste, C#.NET to reduce the size of the picture, especially in
paste image into preview pdf; paste picture to pdf
C# Word - Document Processing in C#.NET
Open(docFilePath); //Get the main ducument IDocument doc = document.GetDocument(); //Document clone IDocument doc0 = doc.Clone(); //Get all picture in document
how to copy images from pdf to word; how to cut image from pdf file
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
56 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
with minimal diversification against external shocks, 
including natural disasters (IMF2013,2015e).  
More generally, with sizable reliance on external 
financing, countries in this sample are generally sensitive 
to changes in the global macroeconomic environment, 
given their generally small size, openness, and reli-
ance on external financing. 周ese changes include, for 
example, a tightening of external financing conditions 
and a growth slowdown in emerging market economies. 
Declines in commodity prices hurt natural resource 
exporters, but as Table1.1.1 highlights, lower oil prices 
are actually beneficial for a large majority of countries 
in this group. Of course an assessment of external sector 
risks has to take into account sizable differences in the 
macroeconomic environment, as well as the level and 
structure of external financing—and risks arising from 
external factors are exacerbated by domestic macroeco-
nomic shocks and weak economic growth. 
A heavy reliance on portfolio flows to finance large 
current account deficits can imply a higher risk of cap-
ital flow reversals should global attitudes toward risk 
change. For the period2012–14, 10 countries in the 
large-deficit group (excluding financial centers, which 
by their nature have large portfolio flows) had average 
net portfolio inflows exceeding 2percent of GDP (for 
instance, Ghana, Kenya, Mongolia, and Serbia). 
Furthermore, 5 countries in the sample, includ-
ing countries with conflicts such as Ukraine, as well 
as others such as Papua New Guinea, had substantial 
drawdowns in foreign exchange reserves during2012–
14 (averaging more than 2percent of GDP a year). 
In addition, with large and persistent current 
account deficits, a sizable number of countries in 
the sample have high net external liabilities, despite 
the external transfers and debt reduction agreements 
discussed earlier (Figure1.2.2). In many countries, net 
FDI represents the lion’s share of net foreign liabilities. 
周e value of FDI liabilities is generally tied to a coun-
try’s economic prospects, which implies better risk 
sharing in comparison to foreign-currency debt.6 周is 
notwithstanding, large FDI liabilities also imply sizable 
income outflows, and a country with large FDI liabili-
ties is still vulnerable to a sharp decline in FDI flows, 
should its prospects or those for the sector in which its 
FDI is primarily located (for example, resource extrac-
tion or tourism) deteriorate. 
Figure1.2.2 also shows that external debt liabilities 
net of reserves exceed 40percent of GDP in more 
than half of the sample of countries, and empiri-
cal evidence suggests that a country’s net external 
debt position is correlated with the probability of an 
external crisis (Catão and Milesi-Ferretti2014). In a 
number of countries in the sample, the sizable share of 
concessional loans is a mitigating factor (for more than 
20 of them, that share was above 50percent in2013). 
However, the share of concessional loans is generally 
declining and is below one-third for about half of the 
sample. 
In sum, this box documents that a sizable number 
of countries still run large current account deficits. 
周ese countries are overwhelmingly small—in terms of 
GDP per capita, population, or both. Factors that can 
6In a number of cases a large share of FDI inflows is associated 
with matching imports of machinery and equipment. 周ere-
fore, a decline in FDI could reduce FDI-related imports and 
strengthen the current account balance, as was the case in many 
countries in the Caribbean during the global financial crisis.
Box 1.2 (continued)
–120
–100
–80
–60
–40
–20
0
20
40
60
80
Countries with large
deficits
Other deficit countries
Net IIP
Debt assets excluding reserves
Net FDI
Net portfolio equity
External debt liabilities minus reserves
Sources: IMF, Balance of Payments Statistics; and Lane and 
Milesi-Ferretti 2007.
Note: The figure presents the median values for 2013 in each 
country group for each investment type. FDI = foreign direct 
investment; IIP = international investment position.
Figure 1.2.2.  Composition of Net 
International Investment Position, Current 
Account Deficit Countries
(Percent of GDP; median values, 2013)
CHA PTER 1
Recent Deve lo pMe nts anD pRo spec ts 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
57
Box 1.2 (continued)
Table 1.2.3. Profile of Countries with Large Current Account Deficits 
Large Debt   
Relief1
Fragile2
Natural Resource 
Rich3
Tourism Based4
Financial Center
Albania
Yes
Anguilla
Antigua and Barbuda
Yes
Yes
Armenia
Bahamas, The
Yes
Yes
Barbados
Yes
Benin
Yes
Bhutan
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Yes
Burundi
Yes
Yes
Cabo Verde
Yes
Cambodia
Yes
Chad
Yes
Yes
Comoros
Yes
Yes
Congo, Dem. Rep. of the
Yes
Yes
Yes
Djibouti
Dominica
Yes
Fiji
Yes
Gambia, The
Georgia
Ghana
Yes
Grenada
Yes
Guinea
Yes
Yes
Guyana
Yes
Honduras
Jamaica
Yes
Jordan
Yes
Kenya
Kiribati
Yes
Kosovo
Yes
Kyrgyz Republic
Yes
Lao P.D.R.
Lebanon
Yes
Yes
Lesotho
Liberia
Yes
Yes
Yes
Marshall Islands
Yes
Mauritania
Yes
Mongolia
Yes
Montenegro
Yes
Montserrat
Morocco
Mozambique
Yes
Nicaragua
Yes
Niger
Palau
Yes
Panama
Yes
Papua New Guinea
Yes
Rwanda
Yes
São Tomé & Príncipe
Yes
Yes
Yes
Senegal
Yes
Serbia
Seychelles
Yes
Yes
Yes
Sierra Leone
Yes
Yes
Yes
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
58 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
help explain the incidence of large deficits in coun-
tries with small populations include higher grants and 
external assistance relative to the size of the economy 
and vulnerabilities of particular relevance to small 
countries (such as the effects of recurrent natural disas-
ters), as well as measurement problems (for instance, 
in regard to revenues from tourism or remittances). In 
recent years, these countries have benefited from a very 
benign external financing environment, with several of 
them issuing international securities for the first time. 
周e environment is likely to change, and this will pose 
policy challenges, particularly to those countries with 
large net external liabilities and sizable recourse to 
nonconcessional debt.
Box 1.2 (continued)
Table 1.2.3. Profile of Countries with Large Current Account Deficits (continued)
Large Debt   
Relief1
Fragile2
Natural Resource 
Rich3
Tourism Based4
Financial Center
St. Kitts and Nevis
Yes
St. Lucia
Yes
St. Vincent and the Grenadines
Yes
Sudan
Yes
Tanzania
Yes
Togo
Yes
Yes
Tunisia
Tuvalu
Yes
Uganda
Yes
Ukraine
Zimbabwe
Yes
1Countries with cumulative debt relief since 2000 greater than 10 percent of GDP.
2Countries classified as fragile in IMF 2015c. 
3Countries that are hydrocarbon rich, potentially hydrocarbon rich, or mineral rich according to the IMF’s Guide to Resource Transparency. 
4Tourism-based economies have a ratio of international tourism receipts to total exports that exceeds 25 percent and international tourism receipts in 
excess of 10 percent of GDP.
CHA PTER 1
Recent Deve lo pMe nts anD pRo spec ts 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
59
Low-income developing countries have integrated 
significantly with global financial markets over the past 
few decades—with annual gross private capital inflows 
increasing from $4billion in the early1980s to more 
than $60billion in recent years, representing almost 
6.4percent of GDP in2013.1 周is acceleration, which 
occurred together with the commodity price boom, 
has been driven by foreign direct investment, which 
has increased from about 2percent of GDP in the 
early2000s to more than 4percent since2011. Other 
inflows to the nonofficial sector have also increased 
in recent years, but they still account for less than 
1.5percent of GDP. Portfolio flows have been a 
negligible source of external financing for low-income 
developing countries, although they have been increas-
ing recently in some frontier economies (Araujo and 
others2015).
Low-income developing countries are typically more 
credit constrained than advanced economies, and 
capital inflows can be an important source of financial 
deepening for these economies to stimulate investment 
and efficient allocation of resources. Capital inflows 
can raise private credit directly—through increased 
bank deposits and collateral valuation effects (thanks 
to increased asset prices)—and indirectly, through 
their effect on macroeconomic and financial variables 
that influence the demand for and the supply of 
credit.2
Foreign direct investment could, for example, 
have positive spillovers on local firms, easing financing 
constraints (Harrison, Love, and McMillan 2004), and 
increase their demand for credit.3 
周e authors of this box are Filippo Gori, Bin Grace Li, and 
Andrea F. Presbitero.
1Weighted average; the unweighted average is 9.6 percent 
of GDP. 周e definition of private capital inflows used here 
follows Bluedorn and others 2013 and excludes from total 
capital inflows changes in recorded reserves, IMF lending, and 
other flows that record the official sector as a counterparty (for 
example, other flows to the central bank or monetary authority 
and general government, which are typically official lending or 
aid).
2Recent studies have explored the relationship between finan-
cial integration and domestic financial deepening for advanced 
and emerging market economies but not for low-income 
developing countries. 周e size of the domestic banking system 
and the scale of financial globalization have been shown to be 
strongly correlated (Lane and Milesi-Ferretti 2008), and episodes 
of capital inflows, mainly debt driven, have been associated with 
an increase in domestic credit growth (Furceri, Guichard, and 
Rusticelli 2012; Lane and McQuade 2014; Igan and Tan 2015). 
3While foreign direct investment is often concentrated in 
enclave sectors, it is becoming more important in manufacturing 
Against this backdrop, this box examines the role of 
global capital flows in driving credit to the private sec-
tor in low-income developing countries. Figure1.3.1 
suggests strong comovement between domestic bank 
lending and international capital flows in these coun-
tries, although the acceleration in credit from the mid-
2000s surpassed that in capital inflows. 周e specific 
contribution of the latter in driving private credit (as 
a percentage of GDP) is identified here by estimating 
the following specification: 
CRED
i,t
= aCRED
i,t–1
+ bCF
i,t
+ gX
i,t
+ d
i
+ e
i,t
.
周e vector X
i,t
includes a set of standard control vari-
ables (real per capita GDP, interest rate, GDP growth, 
and a banking crisis dummy), while a measures the 
persistence of private credit. 周e model is estimated 
with annual data for a sample of 36 low-income 
developing countries over the period1980–2012, with 
country fixed effects d
i
and robust clustered standard 
errors.4 
Given the obvious challenges in establishing a causal 
relationship between capital flows and domestic credit, 
the analysis relies on an instrument for capital inflows, 
which are uncorrelated with domestic economic condi-
tions in recipient economies (see Gori, Li, and Pres-
bitero, forthcoming). Gross capital inflows to emerging 
markets are taken as an instrument for capital inflows 
to low-income developing countries on the basis of 
the following three conditions. First, aggregate capital 
inflows to emerging markets are strongly and positively 
correlated with capital inflows to low-income develop-
ing countries, as shown in Figure1.3.1, especially in 
the period before the global financial crisis, and this is 
confirmed by the first-stage coefficients (Table1.3.1).5 
and service sectors, with significant spillovers to domestic firms 
(Amendolagine and others 2013).
4To deal with the volatility of capital flows during the global 
financial crisis (see Figure 1.3.1), a dummy for 2008–12 is 
added. 周e sample includes Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Burkina 
Faso, Cambodia, Cameroon, Republic of Congo, Djibouti, 
Ethiopia, 周e Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, 
Honduras, Kenya, Lao P.D.R., Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, 
Mali, Mongolia, Mozambique, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, 
Papua New Guinea, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon 
Islands, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, and Zambia. 周e analysis 
focuses on the overall relationship between domestic credit 
and capital flows, and although it controls for the incidence of 
banking crises, financial stability risks related to the cyclicality of 
capital flows are not tackled here.
5Moreover, the first-stage F-statistics are generally close to or 
above the critical value of 10, which signals (for values below) a 
weak instrument. Results are robust to the exclusion of the crisis 
Box 1.3. Capital Flows and Financial Deepening in Developing Economies
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
60 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
Second, they are unlikely to be affected by the coun-
tries’ economic performance. 周ird, for the uniqueness 
condition, the instrument is valid only if it affects pri-
vate credit through its effect on capital inflows. It is not 
restrictive to imagine that capital inflows to emerging 
markets could affect low-income developing countries 
through international capital flows, but there may be 
other channels at work, particularly trade. To control 
years and the use of alternative instruments, such as the first 
principal components of capital outflows from advanced econo-
mies and capital outflows from the United States.
for the trade channel, the set of controls includes the 
trade balance of emerging markets.
A number of global factors affecting advanced and 
developing economies at the same time could also 
weaken the identification strategy, to the extent that 
changes in such factors simultaneously affect capi-
tal inflows to emerging markets and to low-income 
developing countries. A proxy for these factors is con-
structed by extracting the first principal component of 
real GDP in a large sample of 135 advanced, emerg-
ing market, and developing economies. 周is variable 
explains more than 82percent of the cross-country 
comovement in real GDP and is included as a measure 
of the global business cycle. Given that a large share of 
the countries in the sample are commodity exporters, 
commodity prices and terms-of-trade shocks can boost 
both private credit and capital inflows. To show that 
results are not driven by commodity prices, the model 
is also estimated on the sample of noncommodity 
exporters. 
周e main results suggest that global capital 
inflows contribute to private credit creation in 
low-income developing countries, and this is true 
also for noncommodity exporters (columns (4)–(6) 
of the table).6 Quantitatively, a 1percentage point 
increase in total private capital inflows (as a share 
of GDP) increases the private-credit-to-GDP ratio 
by 0.32percentage point (column 1). 周e results 
are largely driven by foreign direct investment and 
other private inflows (flows to the nonofficial sec-
tor, including bank loans and trade credit).7 周e 
response of domestic credit to foreign investment 
may reflect direct local funding of foreign firms 
and potential positive spillovers from foreign direct 
investment increasing the demand for credit by local 
firms. 周e statistically significant bearing between 
private credit and other private flows, by contrast, 
reflects a supply channel working through cross-
border bank flows (although the magnitude of other 
private flows is still relatively small in low-income 
developing countries). 周ese results contrast with 
those of studies on advanced and emerging market 
6Results are robust to the inclusion of country-specific net 
commodity terms of trade (defined as in Gruss 2014; see Chap-
ter 2 for details). 
7When capital flows are measured by portfolio flows, the 
model is weakly identified, and the coefficients on capital flows 
are imprecisely estimated. For that reason, results are not shown 
in Table 1.3.1. Results are similar when net flows are used.
Box 1.3 (continued)
Figure 1.3.1.  Gross Capital Inflows and 
Private Credit in Selected Low-Income 
Developing Countries
(Percent of GDP)
Source: IMF staff calculations.
Note: Unweighted averages. Gross private capital inflows 
(calculated with cross-border flows to the official sector 
within other capital inflows stripped out) to the sample of 36 
low-income developing countries (those used in the 
regressions with at least 10 observations in each variable) 
and total gross capital inflows to emerging markets are 
based on IMF staff calculations; private credit refers to the 
same sample of 36 low-income developing countries (LIDCs) 
and is from the World Bank’s Global Financial Development 
Database, integrated with the World Bank’s World 
Development Indicators.
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
1980
84
88
92
96
2000
04
08
13
Gross private capital inflows to LIDCs
Private credit
Total capital inflows to emerging market 
economies
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested