pdf viewer library c# : Copy pictures from pdf to word application control utility azure html wpf visual studio text8-part1782

CHA PTER 1
Recent Deve lo pMe nts anD pRo spec ts 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
61
economies that find portfolio debt flows to be more 
important drivers of private credit (Furceri, Guich-
ard, and Rusticelli2012; Lane and McQuade2014). 
For low-income developing countries, portfolio debt 
and equity flows represent only a tiny fraction of 
total flows, and there is no robust correlation with 
domestic credit.
周is analysis identifies a causal relationship between 
capital flows and domestic private credit in low-
income developing countries—confirming the poten-
tially enabling role of global financial integration for 
financial deepening in these countries, conditional on 
financial depth itself being a robust driver of economic 
growth and development.
Box 1.3 (continued)
Table 1.3.1. Gross Capital Inflows and Private Credit: Two-State Least-Squares Estimates
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
Dependent variable: Private credit (% of GDP)
t
Total Private Capital Inflows (% of GDP)
t
0.320***
(0.006)
0.283**
(0.028)
Foreign Direct Investment Inflows (% of 
GDP)
t
0.611***
(0.007)
0.492**
(0.031)
Other Inflows to Nonofficial Sector (% of 
GDP)
t
0.693**
(0.022)
0.731*
(0.082)
Private Credit (% of GDP)
t–1
0.827***
(0.000)
0.802***
(0.000)
0.856***
(0.000)
0.849***
(0.000)
0.847***
(0.000)
0.836***
(0.000)
Real Per Capita GDP
t–1
3.208***
(0.004)
3.624**
(0.014)
3.100***
(0.003)
3.418
(0.144)
3.500
(0.178)
3.638*
(0.088)
Real GDP Growth
t–1
0.016
(0.442)
0.013
(0.594)
0.019
(0.437)
–0.002
(0.924)
0.006
(0.813)
–0.023
(0.468)
Interest Rate
t
–0.700**
(0.023)
–1.176***
(0.004)
–0.228
(0.443)
–0.458
(0.335)
–0.804
(0.217)
–0.004
(0.990)
Banking Crisis
t–1
(0/1)
–1.772**
(0.015)
–1.869**
(0.023)
–1.371
(0.108)
–1.190
(0.138)
–1.443*
(0.051)
–0.744
(0.474)
Emerging Market and Developing 
Economies Trade Balance
t
–0.133
(0.139)
–0.217*
(0.073)
–0.028
(0.735)
–0.101
(0.312)
–0.111
(0.348)
–0.058
(0.546)
Global Business Cycle
t
–0.065
(0.823)
–0.528
(0.205)
0.400
(0.241)
–0.158
(0.653)
–0.518
(0.319)
0.271
(0.429)
First-Stage Coefficient (Total Capital 
Inflows to Emerging Market and 
Developing Economies)
0.628***
(0.200)
0.324***
(0.113)
0.290**
(0.111)
0.537***
(0.119)
0.302***
(0.094)
0.208**
(0.073)
Number of Observations
939
927
939
540
532
540
R2
0.796
0.742
0.765
0.813
0.782
0.802
Sample
Low-income developing countries
Noncommodity-exporting low-income 
developing countries
Number of Countries
36
36
36
21
21
21
Underidentification Test (Kleibergen-Paap 
rk LM)
0.005
0.008
0.015
0.001
0.005
0.016
Weak Identification Test (Kleibergen-Paap 
rk Wald)
9.817
8.183
6.864
20.440
10.346
8.025
Source: Authors’ calculations.
Note: The table reports the regression results of a two-stage least-squares model in which the dependent variable is the ratio of private credit to 
GDP in country i at time t. Capital inflows are instrumented with total capital inflows to emerging markets. Standard errors, clustered at the country 
level, are in parentheses. The Kleibergen-Paap rk LM statistic tests the null hypothesis that the excluded instruments are not correlated with the 
endogenous regressor; the Kleibergen-Paap rk Wald F-statistic tests for weak identification. Each regression includes country fixed effects and a 
dummy for the crisis period 2008–12.
*p < .10; **p < .05; ***p < .01.
Copy pictures from pdf to word - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy pdf image to word document; copy picture from pdf
Copy pictures from pdf to word - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to copy a picture from a pdf; copy and paste images from pdf
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
62 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
References
Aastveit, Knut Are, Hilde C. Bjørnland, and Leif Anders 
周orsrud. Forthcoming. “What Drives Oil Prices? Emerging 
versus Developed Economies.” Journal of Applied Econometrics.
Acemoglu, Daron, Simon Johnson, and James A. Robinson. 
2001. “周e Colonial Origins of Comparative Development: 
An Empirical Investigation.” American Economic Review 91 
(5): 1369–1401.
Alesina, Alberto, and David Dollar. 2005. “Who Gives Foreign Aid 
to Whom and Why?” Journal of Economic Growth 5 (1): 33–63. 
Amendolagine, Vito, Amadou Boly, Nicola Daniele Coniglio, 
Francesco Prota, and Adnan Seric. 2013. “FDI and Local 
Linkages in Developing Countries: Evidence from Sub- 
Saharan Africa.” World Development 50: 41–56.
Araujo, Juliana D., Antonio C. David, Carlos van Hombeeck, 
and Chris Papageorgiou.2015. “Non-FDI Capital Inflows 
in Low-Income Developing Countries: Catching the Wave?” 
IMF Working Paper 15/86, International Monetary Fund, 
Washington.
Arezki, Rabah, Rick van der Ploeg, and Frederik Toscani. Forth-
coming. “Shifting Frontiers in Global Resource Extraction: 
周e Role of Institutions.” IMF Working Paper, International 
Monetary Fund, Washington.
Ball, Lawrence.2014. “Long-Term Damage from the 
Great Recession in OECD Countries.” NBER Working 
Paper20185, National Bureau of Economic Research, Cam-
bridge, Massachusetts.
Blanchard, Olivier, Eugenio Cerutti, and Lawrence Sum-
mers.2015. “Inflation and Activity: Two Explorations and 
周eir Monetary Policy Implications.” Paper presented at the 
ECB Forum on Central Banking, Sintra, Portugal, May 18.
Blanchard, Olivier, and Lawrence Summers.1986. “Hysteresis 
and the European Unemployment Problem.” In NBER Mac-
roeconomics Annual 1986, edited by Stanley Fischer, 15–90. 
Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press.
Bluedorn, John, Rupa Duttagupta, Jaime Guajardo, and Petia 
Topalova.2013. “Capital Flows Are Fickle: Anytime, Any-
where.” IMF Working Paper 13/183, International Monetary 
Fund, Washington.
Bohn, Henning, and Robert T. Deacon. 2000. “Ownership Risk, 
Investment, and the Use of Natural Resources.” American 
Economic Review 90 (3), 526–49.
Bräutigam, Deborah A., and Stephen Knack. 2004. “Foreign 
Aid, Institutions, and Governance in Sub-Saharan Africa.” 
Economic Development and Cultural Change 52 (2): 255–85.
Catão, Luis A. V., and Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti. 2014. “Exter-
nal Liabilities and Crises.” Journal of International Economics 
94 (1): 18–32.
Chinn, Menzie D., and Eswar S. Prasad. 2003. “Medium-
Term Determinants of Current Accounts in Industrial and 
Developing Countries: An Empirical Exploration.”  Journal of 
International Economics 59 (1): 47–76.
Collier, Paul. 2010. 周e Plundered Planet: Why We Must—and 
How We Can—Manage Nature for Global Prosperity. Oxford, 
U.K.: Oxford University Press.
Cust, James, and Torfinn Harding. 2014. “Institutions and the 
Location of Oil Exploration.” OxCarre Research Paper 127, 
Department of Economics, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of 
Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford, Oxford, U.K.
Fernald, John. 2014. “Productivity and Potential Output 
before, during, and after the Great Recession.” In NBER 
Macroeconomics Annual 2014, Vol. 29, edited by Jonathan A. 
Parker and Michael Woodford, 1–51. Chicago: University of 
Chicago Press.
Furceri, Davide, Stéphanie Guichard, and Elena Rusticelli. 2012. 
“周e Effect of Episodes of Large Capital Inflows on Domestic 
Credit.” North American Journal of Economics and Finance 23 
(3): 325–44.
Gauvin, Ludovic, and Cyril Rebillard. 2015. “Towards Recou-
pling? Assessing the Global Impact of a Chinese Hard Land-
ing through Trade and Commodity Price Channels.” Working 
Paper 562, Banque de France, Paris.
Gordon, Robert J. 2014. “周e Demise of U.S. Economic 
Growth: Restatement, Rebuttal and Reflections.” NBER Wor-
king Paper 19895, National Bureau of Economic Research, 
Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Gori, Filippo, Bin Grace Li, and Andrea Presbitero. Forthco-
ming. “Capital Inflows and Private Credit Growth.” Interna-
tional Monetary Fund, Washington.
Gruss, Bertrand. 2014. “After the Boom—Commodity Prices 
and Economic Growth in Latin America and the Caribbean.” 
IMF Working Paper 14/154, International Monetary Fund, 
Washington.
Harrison, Ann E., Inessa Love, and Margaret S. McMillan. 
2004. “Global Capital Flows and Financing Constraints.” 
Journal of Development Economics 75 (1): 269–301.
Husain, Aasim M., Rabah Arezki, Peter Breuer, Vikram Haksar, 
周omas Helbling, Paulo A. Medas, and Martin Sommer. 
2015. “Global Implications of Lower Oil Prices.” Staff Discus-
sion Note 15/15, International Monetary Fund, Washington.
Igan, Deniz, and Zhibo Tan. 2015. “Capital Inflows, Credit 
Growth, and Financial Systems.” IMF Working Paper 
15/193, International Monetary Fund, Washington.
International Monetary Fund (IMF). 2013. “Asia and Pacific 
Small States: Raising Potential Growth and Enhancing Resil-
ience to Shocks.” Washington. 
———. 2015a. 2015 External Sector Report. Washington.
———. 2015b. 2015 Spillover Report. Washington.
———. 2015c. “IMF Engagement with Countries in Postcon-
flict and Fragile Situations—Stocktaking.” IMF Policy Paper. 
Washington. 
———. 2015d. Maldives 2014 Article IV Consultation—Staff 
Report. IMF Country Report 15/68. Washington.
———. 2015e. Macroeconomic Developments and Selected Issues 
in Small Developing States. IMF Staff Report. Washington.  
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
application. In addition, texts, pictures and font formatting of source PDF file are accurately retained in converted Word document file.
how to copy an image from a pdf; preview paste image into pdf
VB Imaging - VB Code 93 Generator Tutorial
pictures on PDF documents, multi-page TIFF, Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Please create a Windows application or ASP.NET web form and copy the
copy images from pdf to word; paste image into pdf reader
CHA PTER 1
Recent Deve lo pMe nts anD pRo spec ts 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
63
Jahan, Sarwat, and Ke Wang. 2013. “A Big Question on Small 
States.” Finance & Development 50 (3): 44–47.
Lane, Philip R., and Peter McQuade.2014. “Domestic Credit 
Growth and International Capital Flows.” Scandinavian Jour-
nal of Economics 116 (1): 218–52.
Lane, Philip R., and Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti. 2007. “周e 
External Wealth of Nations Mark II: Revised and Extended 
Estimates of Foreign Assets and Liabilities, 1970–2004.” 
Journal of International Economics 73 (2): 223–50.
———.2008. “周e Drivers of Financial Globalization.” Ameri-
can Economic Review 98 (2): 327–32.
Lee, Jaewoo, Gian Maria Milesi-Ferretti, Jonathan Ostry, Ales-
sandro Prati, and Luca Antonio Ricci. 2008. Exchange Rate 
Assessments: CGER Methodologies. IMF Occasional Paper 261. 
Washington: International Monetary Fund.
McKinsey Global Institute. 2013. Reverse the Curse: Maximizing 
the Potential of Resource-Driven Economies. London.
Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development 
(OECD). 2015. 周e Future of Productivity. Preliminary ver-
sion. Paris.
Prati, Alessandro, Luca Antonio Ricci, Lone Christiansen, 
Stephen Tokarick, and 周eirry Tressel. 2011. External 
Performance in Low-Income Countries. Occasional Paper 272. 
Washington: International Monetary Fund.
Rajan, Raghuram, and Arvind Subramanian. 2008. “Aid and 
Growth: What Does the Cross-Country Evidence Really 
Show?” Review of Economics and Statistics 90 (4): 643–65.
Rausser, Gordon, and Martin Stuermer. 2014. “Collusion in 
the Copper Commodity Market: A Long-Run Perspective.” 
Unpublished, University of California at Berkeley. 
Ross, Michael L. 2001. “Does Oil Hinder Democracy?” World 
Politics 53 (3): 325–61.
———. 2012. 周e Oil Curse: How Petroleum Wealth Shapes the 
Development of Nations. Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton 
University Press.
Silva, J. M. C. Santos, and Silvana Tenreyro. 2006. “周e Log of 
Gravity.” Review of Economics and Statistics 88 (4): 641–58.
United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE). 
2011. “Remittances.” In 周e Impact of Globalization on 
National Accounts, chap. 11. New York and Geneva.
C# Imaging - C# Code 93 Generator Tutorial
pictures on PDF documents, multi-page TIFF, Microsoft Office Word, Excel and PowerPoint. Please create a Windows application or ASP.NET web form and copy the
how to copy an image from a pdf to powerpoint; how to copy an image from a pdf to word
C#: Use OCR SDK Library to Get Image and Document Text
color image recognition for scanned documents and pictures in C#. text content from whole PDF file, single PDF page and You can directly copy demos to your .NET
copy pdf picture; copy images from pdf file
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Codes to Load Images from File / Stream in .
Now you can freely copy the VB.NET sample this VB.NET imaging library with pictures of your provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to copy pictures from pdf file; copying image from pdf to word
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Code to Create Watermark on Images in .NET
and whether to burn it to the pictures to make Please feel free to copy them to your program provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
cut and paste image from pdf; how to cut pdf image
1
CHAPTER
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
65
2
CHAPTER
WHERE ARE COMMODITY EXPORTERS HEADED? 
OUTPUT GROWTH IN THE AFTERMATH OF THE COMMODIT Y BOOM 
Commodity prices have declined sharply over the past 
three years, and output growth has slowed considerably 
among those emerging market and developing econo-
mies that are net exporters of commodities. A critical 
question for policymakers in these countries is whether 
commodity windfall gains and losses influence poten-
tial output or merely trigger transient fluctuations of 
actual output around an unchanged trend for poten-
tial output. The analysis in this chapter suggests that 
both actual and potential output move together with 
the commodity terms of trade but that actual out-
put comoves twice as strongly as potential output. The 
weak commodity price outlook is estimated to subtract 
almost 1 percentage point annually from the average 
rate of economic growth in commodity exporters over 
2015–17 as compared with 2012–14. In exporters of 
energy commodities, the drag is estimated to be larger—
about 2¼ percentage points on average over the same 
period. The projected drag on the growth of potential 
output is about one-third of that for actual output.
Introduction
After rising dramatically for almost a decade, the 
prices of many commodities, especially those of energy 
and metals, have dropped sharply since2011 (Fig-
ure2.1). Many analysts have attributed the upswing 
in commodity prices to sustained strong growth in 
emerging market economies, in particular those in 
east Asia, and the downswing to softening growth in 
these economies and a greater supply of commodities.1 
Commodity prices are notoriously diffi  cult to predict, 
周  e authors of this chapter are Aqib Aslam, Samya Beidas-Strom, 
Rudolfs Bems, Oya Celasun (team leader), Sinem Kılıç Çelik, and 
Zsóka Kóczán, with support from Hao Jiang and Yun Liu and con-
tributions from the IMF Research Department’s Economic Modeling 
Division and Bertrand Gruss. José De Gregorio was the external 
consultant for the chapter.
1周 e role of global and emerging market demand in driving 
the surge in commodity prices in the fi rst decade of the 2000s is 
discussed in Erten and Ocampo 2012, Kilian 2009, and Chapter 3 
of the October 2008 World Economic Outlook. On the impact of 
slowing emerging market growth on commodity prices, see “Special 
Feature: Commodity Market Review” in Chapter 1 of the October 
but there is general agreement among analysts that 
they will likely remain low, given ample supplies and 
weak prospects for global economic growth. Com-
modity futures prices also suggest that, depending on 
2013 World Economic Outlook. Roache 2012 documents the 
increase in China’s share in global commodity imports in the 2000s.
0
50
100
150
200
250
1960
65
70
75
80
85
90
95
2000
05
10
15
1. Energy and Metals
2. Food and Raw Materials
Energy
Metals
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
1960
65
70
75
80
85
90
95
2000
05
10
15
Food
Raw materials
2015:H1
2015:H1
Figure 2.1.  World Commodity Prices, 1960–2015
(In real terms; index, 2005 = 100)
Sources: Gruss 2014; IMF, Primary Commodity Price System; U.S. Energy 
Information Administration; World Bank, Global Economic Monitor database; and 
IMF staff calculations.
Note: The real price index for a commodity group is the trade-weighted average of 
the global U.S. prices of the commodities in the group deflated by the advanced 
economy manufacturing price index and normalized to 100 in 2005. The 
commodities within each group are listed in Annex 2.1. The values for the first half 
of 2015 are the average of the price indices for the first six months of the year.
After a dramatic rise in the 2000–10 period, the prices of many commodities have 
been dropping sharply. The cycle has been especially pronounced for energy and 
metals.
C# Imaging - C# MSI Plessey Barcode Tutorial
Create high-quality MSI Plessey bar code pictures for almost Copy C#.NET code below to print an MSI a document file, like Word, Excel, PowerPoint, PDF and TIFF
copy pdf picture to word; how to copy pictures from pdf in
C# Imaging - Scan RM4SCC Barcode in C#.NET
detect & decode RM4SCC barcode from scanned documents and pictures in your Decode RM4SCC from documents (PDF, Word, Excel and PPT) and extract barcode value as
how to copy a pdf image into a word document; how to copy an image from a pdf in preview
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
66 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
the commodity, future spot prices will remain low or 
rebound only moderately over the next five years. 
周e decline in commodity prices has been accompa-
nied by stark slowdowns in economic growth among 
commodity-exporting emerging market and develop-
ing economies, most of which had experienced high 
growth during the commodity price boom (Fig-
ure2.2). Besides the decline in growth, commodity 
exporters have also seen downgrades in their medium-
term growth prospects: almost 1 percentage point has 
been shaved off the average of their five-year-ahead 
growth forecasts since 2012, while the medium-term 
growth forecasts of other emerging market and devel-
oping economies have remained broadly unchanged.
Weaker commodity prices raise key questions for 
the outlook in commodity-exporting economies. One 
that looms large is whether commodity-price-related 
fluctuations in growth are mostly cyclical or structural. 
周e flip side of this question is whether the faster 
rate of output growth during the commodity boom 
reflected a cyclical overheating as opposed to a higher 
rate of growth in potential output.2 Distinguishing 
between the cyclical and structural components of 
growth is not straightforward in any business cycle; it 
is particularly challenging during prolonged commod-
ity booms, when a persistent pickup in incomes and 
demand makes it harder to estimate the underlying 
trend in output.3
周e diagnosis of how actual and potential growth is 
influenced by commodity price fluctuations is crucial 
for the setting of macroeconomic policies in commod-
ity exporters. Price declines that lead to a mostly cycli-
cal slowdown in growth could call for expansionary 
macroeconomic policies (if policy space is available) 
to pick up the slack in aggregate demand. In contrast, 
lower growth in potential output would tend to imply 
a smaller amount of slack and, therefore, less scope 
for stimulating the economy using macroeconomic 
policies. In countries where the decline in commodity 
prices leads to a loss in fiscal revenues, weaker potential 
output growth would also require fiscal adjustments to 
ensure public debt sustainability.
周is chapter contributes to the literature on the 
macroeconomic effects of booms and downturns in 
the commodity terms of trade (the commodity price 
cycle) in net commodity exporters.4 Using a variety of 
empirical approaches, it makes a novel contribution 
2Potential output is defined in this chapter as the amount of 
output in an economy consistent with stable inflation. Actual output 
may deviate from potential output because of the slow adjustment 
of prices and wages to changes in supply and demand. In most of 
the empirical analysis, potential output is proxied by trend output—
based on an aggregate production function approach and using the 
growth rates of the capital stock as well as smoothed employment 
and total factor productivity series. Chapter 3 of the April 2015 
World Economic Outlook includes a primer on potential output 
(pp. 71–73).
3See the discussion in De Gregorio 2015. 
4A country’s “terms of trade” refers to the price of its exports in 
terms of its imports. 周e concept of “commodity terms of trade” 
as used in this chapter refers to the price of a country’s commod-
ity exports in terms of its commodity imports. It is calculated as a 
country-specific weighted average of international commodity prices, 
for which the weights used are the ratios of the net exports of the 
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
1990–
2002
2003–
11
12
13
14 15
1
1990–
2002
2003–
11
12
13
14 15
1
Forecast (t – 1)
Actual
Commodity exporters
Other emerging market and 
developing economies
Figure 2.2.  Average Growth in Commodity-Exporting 
versus Other Emerging Market and Developing Economies, 
1990–2015
(Percent)
Source: IMF staff estimates.
Note: “Commodity exporters” are emerging market and developing economies for 
which gross exports of commodities constitute at least 35 percent of total exports 
and net exports of commodities constitute at least 5 percent of exports-plus- 
imports on average, based on the available data for 1960–2014. “Other emerging 
market and developing economies” are defined as the emerging market and 
developing economies that are not included in the commodity exporters group. 
Countries are selected for each group so as to have a balanced sample from 1990 
to 2015. Outliers, defined as economies in which any annual growth rate during the 
period exceeds 30 percent (in absolute value terms), are excluded.
1
Average growth projected for 2015 in the July 2015 World Economic Outlook 
Update.
The recent drop in commodity prices has been accompanied by pronounced 
declines in real GDP growth rates, much more so in commodity-exporting countries 
than in other emerging market and developing economies.
C# Imaging - Scan ISBN Barcode in C#.NET
which can be used to track images, pictures and documents BarcodeType.ISBN); // read barcode from PDF page Barcode from PowerPoint slide, you can copy demo code
how to copy a picture from a pdf to a word document; paste image in pdf preview
VB.NET Image: Easy to Create Ellipse Annotation with VB.NET
ellipse annotation to document files, like PDF & Word ellipse annotation on documents, images & pictures using VB in Visual Studio, you can copy the following
how to copy images from pdf; cut and paste pdf images
CHA PTER 2
WHERE ARE COMM ODI TY E XPORTERS H EADE D? OU TPUT GROWTH  I N THE AFT ERMATH  O F TH E COMMO DIT Y BOO M  
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
67
by analyzing changes in the cyclical versus structural 
components of output growth in small open net 
commodity-exporting economies during the com-
modity price cycle.5 周e empirical analysis focuses 
on emerging market and developing economies that 
are net exporters of commodities, with the exception 
of case studies that examine the sectoral reallocation 
resulting from commodity booms in Australia, Canada, 
and Chile. 周e chapter also uses model-based simula-
tions to analyze the impact of the commodity price 
cycle on income, domestic demand, and output; that 
investigation draws on the IMF’s Global Economy 
Model (GEM), which has a full-fledged commodities 
sector and is hence uniquely suited to this analysis.6
Specifically, the chapter seeks to answer the follow-
ing questions about the effects of the commodity price 
cycle:
• Macroeconomic effects: How do swings in the com-
modity terms of trade affect key macroeconomic 
variables—including output, spending, employment, 
capital accumulation, and total factor productivity 
(TFP)? How different are the responses of actual 
and potential output? Do the economies of com-
modity exporters overheat during commodity 
booms?
• Policy influences: Do policy frameworks influence the 
variation in growth over the cycle?
• Sectoral effects: How do swings in the commod-
ity terms of trade affect the main sectors of the 
economy—commodity producing, manufacturing, 
relevant commodity to the country’s total commodity trade. Details 
of the calculation are provided in Annex 2.1.
5周e literature has mostly focused on the comparative longer-
term growth record of commodity exporters. Surveys can be found 
in van der Ploeg 2011 and Frankel 2012. Other major topics in 
the literature include the contribution of terms-of-trade shocks to 
macroeconomic volatility (for example, Mendoza 1995 and Schmitt-
Grohé and Uribe 2015), the comovement between the commodity 
terms of trade and real exchange rate (for example, Chen and Rogoff 
2003 and Cashin, Céspedes, and Sahay 2004), the impact of natural 
resource discoveries on activity in the nonresource sector (Corden 
and Neary 1982; van Wijnbergen 1984a, 1984b), and the relation-
ship between terms-of-trade movements and the cyclical component 
of output (Céspedes and Velasco 2012). Chapter 1 of the October 
2015 Fiscal Monitor discusses the optimal management of resource 
revenues, a topic that has also been the subject of a large literature 
(for example, IMF 2012).  
6周is chapter is a sequel to Chapter 3 of the April 2015 World 
Economic Outlook, which provides estimates of potential output 
for 16 major economies for the past two decades, and to Chapter 4 
of the April 2012 World Economic Outlook, which examines the 
growth implications of commodity price movements driven by global 
production versus global demand and the optimal fiscal management 
of commodity windfalls.
and nontradables (that is, goods and services not 
traded internationally)?
• Growth outlook: What do the empirical findings 
imply for the growth prospects of commodity-
exporting economies over the next few years?
周e main findings of the chapter are as follows:
Macroeconomic effects
• Swings in the commodity terms of trade lead to 
fluctuations in both the cyclical and structural com-
ponents of output growth, with the former tending 
to be about twice the size of the latter. In previous 
prolonged terms-of-trade booms, annual actual 
output growth tended to be 1.0 to 1.5 percent-
age points higher on average during upswings than 
in downswings, whereas potential output growth 
tended to be only 0.3 to 0.5 percentage point 
higher. These averages mask considerable diversity 
across episodes, including in regard to the underly-
ing changes in the terms of trade.
• The strong response of investment to swings in the 
commodity terms of trade is the main driver of 
changes in potential output growth over the cycle. 
In contrast, employment growth and TFP growth 
contribute little to the variations in potential output 
growth. 
Policy influences, sectoral effects, and growth outlook
• Certain country characteristics and policy frame-
works can influence how strongly output growth 
responds to the swings in the commodity terms of 
trade. Growth responds more strongly in countries 
specialized in energy commodities and metals and in 
countries with a low level of financial development. 
Less flexible exchange rates and more procyclical 
fiscal spending patterns (that is, stronger increases in 
fiscal spending when the commodity terms of trade 
are improving) also tend to exacerbate the cycle. 
• Case studies of Australia, Canada, and Chile suggest 
that investment booms in commodity exporters are 
mostly booms in the commodity sector itself. Evi-
dence of large-scale movements of labor and capital 
to nontradables activities is mixed. 
• All else equal, the weak commodity price outlook 
is projected to subtract about 1 percentage point 
annually from the average rate of economic growth 
in commodity-exporting economies over 2015–17 
as compared with 2012–14. In energy exporters the 
drag is estimated to be larger, about 2¼ percentage 
points on average.
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
68 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
周e findings of the chapter suggest that, on aver-
age, some two-thirds of the decline in output growth 
in commodity exporters during a commodity price 
downswing should be cyclical. Whether the decline 
in growth has opened up significant economic slack 
(that is, has increased the quantity of labor and capital 
that could be employed productively but is instead 
idle) and the degree to which it has done so are likely 
to vary considerably across commodity exporters. 周e 
variation depends on the cyclical position of the econ-
omy at the start of the commodity boom, the extent 
to which macroeconomic policies have smoothed 
or amplified the commodity price cycle, the extent 
to which structural reforms have bolstered potential 
growth, and other shocks to economic activity. Nev-
ertheless, a key takeaway for commodity exporters is 
that attaining growth rates as high as those experienced 
during the commodity boom will be challenging under 
the current outlook for commodity prices unless criti-
cal supply-side bottlenecks that constrain growth are 
alleviated rapidly.
周e rest of the chapter is structured as follows. 
First it discusses the macroeconomic implications of 
a terms-of-trade windfall in a commodity-exporting 
economy and presents illustrative model simulations. 
It then presents two sets of empirical tests of whether 
the evidence conforms to the model-based predic-
tions, namely, event studies and regression-based 
estimates. 周e event studies cover a large sample of 
prolonged upswings and subsequent downswings in 
the commodity terms of trade to document the key 
regularities in the data; by design, they do not control 
for contextual factors. To isolate the effects of the 
terms-of-trade movements, regression-based estimates 
of the responses of key macroeconomic variables to 
terms-of-trade shocks are also presented. In addi-
tion, case studies examine the sectoral implications 
of terms-of-trade booms. 周e chapter concludes with 
a summary of the findings and a discussion of their 
policy implications.
Commodity Terms-of-Trade Windfalls: 
A Model-Based Illustration 
How would commodity price cycles be expected 
to affect small open economies that are net export-
ers of commodities (hereafter, commodity-exporting 
economies)? 周is section first reviews the concept of 
potential output and then turns to simulations of a 
calibrated model that illustrate the response of a typical 
commodity-exporting economy to a terms-of-trade 
boom. 
Preliminaries
周e model-based analysis focuses on a commodity 
cycle in which a surge in prices—driven by stronger 
global demand—is followed by a partial, supply-driven 
correction. 周is assumption is consistent with how 
most analysts view the commodity price boom of 
the2000s. 周e correction is partial given the exhaust-
ible nature of commodities and because income levels 
in emerging markets are considered to have increased 
permanently (with higher demand for commodities), 
even if the increase in income may have been smaller 
than what had been expected.7 
Potential Output
周e following discussion of the macroeconomic 
implications of a terms-of-trade windfall distinguishes 
between temporary effects on potential output (those 
over a commodity cycle) and permanent effects 
(beyond a commodity cycle). Over a commodity 
cycle, potential output is defined as the level of output 
consistent with stable inflation—in the model, this is 
captured by the path of output under flexible prices. 
周e short-term divergence of actual output from 
potential output—resulting from the slow adjustment 
in prices—is referred to as the output gap. 周ese two 
components of output fluctuations can also be called 
the “structural” and “cyclical” components. Beyond the 
commodity cycle, potential output in a commodity-
exporting economy is driven by changes in global 
income, the implied change in the relative price of 
commodities, and any durable effects of the commod-
ity price boom on domestic productive capacity (as 
discussed next). All else equal, a permanent increase 
in the commodity terms of trade would lead to an 
increase in potential output. 
With a growth-accounting framework (which mea-
sures the contribution to growth from various factors), 
potential output can be decomposed into capital, labor, 
and the remainder unexplained by those two—TFP. 
Terms-of-trade booms can affect the path of potential 
7周e empirical analysis in the next section shows that this pattern 
of commodity cycles also characterizes the average commodity cycle 
during the past five decades, in which an initial price boom is fol-
lowed by a partial correction. 周e model captures the exhaustibility 
of commodities with land as a unique and important production 
input for commodities but not for other goods.
CHA PTER 2
WHERE ARE COMM ODI TY E XPORTERS H EADE D? OU TPUT GROWTH  I N THE AFT ERMATH  O F TH E COMMO DIT Y BOO M  
International Monetary Fund | October 2015 
69
output through each of these three components. More 
durable changes in potential growth are possible to the 
extent that productivity growth is affected. 
Capital. A commodity terms-of-trade boom that is 
expected to persist for some time will increase invest-
ment in the commodity sector and in supportive 
industries.8 A broader pickup in investment could be 
facilitated by a lower country risk premium and an eas-
ing of borrowing constraints that coincide with better 
commodity terms of trade. Higher investment rates in 
the commodity and noncommodity sectors, in turn, 
will raise the economy’s level of productive capital and 
hence raise the level (but not the permanent growth 
rate) of its potential output. 
Labor supply. Large and persistent terms-of-trade 
booms may also affect potential employment. Struc-
tural unemployment may decline following a period 
of low unemployment through positive hysteresis 
effects. Lower unemployment rates may also encour-
age entry into the labor force as well as job search, 
raising the trend participation rate. As with invest-
ment, the labor supply channels have an effect on the 
level of potential output, but not on its permanent 
growth rate. 
Total factor productivity. Terms-of-trade booms can 
raise TFP by inducing faster adoption of technology 
and higher spending on research and development. 
周e sectoral reallocation of labor and capital during a 
terms-of-trade boom could also influence economy-
wide TFP, but the sign of the effect is uncertain 
beforehand (because factors of production may be 
reallocated from high- to low-productivity sectors and 
vice versa).
Although the increases in productive capital and the 
labor force during a commodity price boom translate 
into increased potential output, this increase may not 
be sustainable. For example, investment may no longer 
be viable at lower commodity prices (once the boom 
has abated); thus the growth rate of aggregate invest-
ment may fall along with the terms of trade.
Transmission Channels for Commodity Cycles 
Upswings in the commodity terms of trade affect 
the macroeconomy through two main channels, 
income and investment.
Income. 周e commodity price boom generates an 
income windfall, as existing levels of production yield 
greater revenues. Higher income boosts domestic 
8See also the discussion in Gruss 2014. 
demand and thereby stimulates domestic production. 
Because the income windfall is generated by more 
favorable terms of trade, the response of real domes-
tic output is more subdued than that of income and 
domestic demand.9 周is was indeed the case during 
the most recent commodity boom (2000–10) (Fig-
ure2.3). Consistent with the Dutch disease effect, the 
domestic supply response to higher domestic income 
occurs disproportionately in the nontradables sector 
because demand for tradables can be met in part by a 
rise in imports.10 In the process, the prices of the rela-
tively scarce nontradable goods and services increase 
relative to the prices of tradables, and the real exchange 
rate appreciates.
Investment. In addition, commodity price booms 
heighten incentives to invest in the commodity sec-
tor and supporting industries—such as construction, 
transportation, and logistics. 周e resulting increase in 
economic activity ultimately generates spillovers to the 
rest of the economy and raises incomes further. More-
over, in the medium term, the increase in the supply of 
commodities can reverse the commodity price boom, 
contributing to the commodity cycle itself.11
周e income and investment channels are inter-
related. 周e income gain in the domestic economy 
will be higher and more broadly based if investment 
and activity in the commodity sector respond more 
strongly to the increase in the terms of trade. Likewise, 
a greater income windfall will make higher investment 
more likely.
9Kohli (2004) and Adler and Magud (2015) show that real GDP 
tends to underestimate the increase in real domestic income when 
the terms of trade improve. In addition, Adler and Magud (2015) 
provide estimates of the income windfall during commodity terms-
of-trade booms during 1970–2012.
10An extensive theoretical and empirical literature studies the 
Dutch disease effect (see Box 2.1 for an overview).
11周e strength of the supply response in the commodity sector 
depends on the sector’s maturity. 周at is, output in the sector 
will respond more to a boom the more potential there is for new 
resource discoveries and the less costly it is to ramp up production 
volumes. Anecdotal evidence from some countries in the 2000s 
boom illustrates the case of a relatively more mature sector: boosting 
or even just maintaining production required extractive companies 
to dig deeper, use more sophisticated technology, and incur higher 
costs than in the past; thus, the boom in commodity sector invest-
ment was associated with only a relatively modest rise in commodity 
output.
WORLD ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: ADJUSTING TO LOWER COMMODITY PRICES
70 
International Monetary Fund | October 2015
Model-Based Illustrations
周e effects of a commodity price cycle on a  commodity- 
exporting economy are illustrated here using GEM.12 
12GEM is a micro-founded multicountry and multisector dynamic 
general equilibrium model of the global economy. Its key features 
are a commodities sector with land as a major nonreproducible 
production factor; conventional real and nominal frictions, such 
as sticky prices and wages; adjustment costs for capital and labor; 
habit formation in consumption; a fraction of liquidity-constrained 
consumers; and a financial accelerator mechanism. For a detailed 
description of GEM, see Lalonde and Muir 2007 and Pesenti 2008.
In the simulations, the commodity boom is induced 
by a temporary pickup in growth in east Asia.13 周e 
discussion in this section focuses on model responses to 
the boom in a typical Latin American economy, as the 
region exemplifies net commodity exporters.14
周e Upswing
周e growth pickup in east Asia is calibrated so 
that the commodity price index in the commodity- 
exporting country gradually increases by20percent 
over a 10-year period (Figure 2.4).15 周e more favor-
able terms of trade boost income and consumption 
in the exporter’s economy. Meeting the surge in 
demand from domestic supply requires front-loading 
an increase in investment, which is followed by an 
increase in output. In response to higher demand, to 
capital deepening (that is, an increase in capital per 
worker), and to the resulting increase in real wages, 
the other factor of production—labor—also increases 
during the boom.
An important question that the model can help clarify 
relates to the relative contributions of cyclical and struc-
tural factors in the supply boom. In the model, increases 
in output during the commodity cycle are decomposed 
into the structural and cyclical contributing factors. 
First, under flexible prices the income windfall gives rise 
to an increase in demand and output (the structural 
component). Second, a slow adjustment in prices (in the 
presence of “sticky prices” given nominal rigidities) exacer-
bates the response of economic activity in the short term 
(the cyclical component—the deviation of actual output 
from potential output). 周e flexible- and sticky-price ver-
sions of the model are used to decompose the response in 
actual output and labor into contributions from these two 
factors (Figure 2.4, panels 2 and 4). 
13周is choice is motivated by the broad agreement among market 
analysts that fast growth in east Asia was a major force behind the 
surge in commodity prices between the late 1990s and 2008 (for a 
list of references on this topic, see note 1). 周e assumed duration of 
the pickup in east Asian growth in the model is selected to match 
this episode. 
14Latin America, one of the six regions included in the model, 
accounts for about 6¼ percent of world output. 周e region is 
parameterized as a net exporter of commodities, with the commodi-
ties sector accounting for 11 percent of output. 周e commodities 
sector in the model is further divided into oil and non-oil com-
modities of approximately equal size, with a lower price elasticity of 
demand in the oil sector. All results reported in this section refer to 
the aggregate commodities sector.
15Figure2.4 reports the responses of the model to the boom in the 
relative price of commodities (baseline scenario), presented asper-
centage deviations from the no-boom case.
0
25
50
75
100
125
150
0
25
50
75
100
125
150
Real domestic income, 2000–10
(cumulative change in percent)
Real output, 2000–10 (cumulative change in percent)
1. Domestic Income and Output Growth during the Boom
2. Domestic Demand and Output Growth during the Boom
Commodity exporters
Other EMDEs
0
25
50
75
100
125
150
0
25
50
75
100
125
150
Real domestic demand, 2000–10
(cumulative change in percent)
Real output, 2000–10 (cumulative change in percent)
Median of commodity exporters
Median of other EMDEs
Figure 2.3.  Real Income, Output, and Domestic Demand, 
2000–10
Source: IMF staff calculations.
Note: Real income is calculated by deflating nominal GDP using the domestic 
consumer price index. Countries with a decline in real GDP, income, or domestic 
demand over 2000–10 or those with greater than 150 percent growth over the 
same period are excluded. EMDEs = emerging market and developing economies.
The 2000–10 commodity price boom sharply improved the terms of trade for 
commodity exporters and induced an income windfall. Real domestic income and 
demand in the median commodity-exporting economy increased considerably 
more than real output.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested