pdfreader not opened with owner password itextsharp c# : Copy paste image pdf control Library platform web page .net winforms web browser PoythressVernInTheBeginningWasTheWord3-part30

31
Chapter  4: God’s Creation of Man
Human speech depends vitally on all three of these aspects. Without meaning, 
speech is empty. Without control, it does not accomplish anything, and makes 
no difference. Without presence, the speech is disconnected from the speaker, 
and again loses its point. We depend on the fact that we are made in the image 
of God.
Speaker, Expression, and Breath
We can see still another analogy between God’s speech and human speech. In 
the Trinity, the language in John 1:1 represents the Father as the speaker, the 
Son as the speech (the Word), and the Holy Spirit as the breath. 周is triad in 
speech is clearly analogous to what happens in human speech. We have a human 
speaker, his speech, and the breath or other medium that carries the speech to 
its destination. (See chart 4.1.)
Divine Speech
Human Speech
The Father speaks
speaker
The Word (the Son is the discourse) discourse
The Spirit as “breath”
travels to destination
C
hart
4.1
Coinherence in Human Communication
周e language of human beings reflects God’s Trinitarian character in another 
way, namely, in its coinherence. 周e persons of the Trinity dwell in one another. 
How is this indwelling reflected in man as the image of God?
God is unique, and so the indwelling within the Godhead is also unique. But 
the Trinitarian indwelling is also analogous to an indwelling in believers about 
which Jesus speaks: “that they [believers] may all be one, just as you, Father, are 
Image of God
Divine
omniscience
omnipotence
omnipresence
Human
meaning and 
knowledge
control
presence
imaging
F
igure
4.1
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   31
5/14/09   4:46:05 PM
Copy paste image pdf - copy, paste, cut PDF images in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Detailed tutorial for copying, pasting, and cutting image in PDF page using C# class code
how to copy pdf image to jpg; how to copy pictures from pdf file
Copy paste image pdf - VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
VB.NET Tutorial for How to Cut or Copy an Image from One Page and Paste to Another
how to paste picture on pdf; paste image in pdf preview
32
Part  1: God’s Involvement with Language 
in me, and I in you, that they also may be in us, so that the world may believe that 
you have sent me” (John 17:21). Similarly, within language we can see an ana-
logue to the unique indwelling in the Godhead. If we call the original indwelling 
within the Godhead archetypal coinherence, that is, original coinherence, then 
this human reflection of it is an ectypal coinherence, a derivative coinherence.
Within God, the archetypal coinherence among the persons of the Trinity is 
displayed in the fact that the Father as the speaker, the Son as the Word spoken, 
and the Spirit as the “breath” function together in producing God’s speech.
2
All 
three persons participate fully in the entire u瑴erance, and the speech is, as it were, 
“indwelt” by all three persons.
Now let us consider the analogue, the ectypal indwelling within human 
speech. Speech presupposes a speaker. A speech without a speaker is virtu-
ally an impossibility. Suppose that we found out that something that initially 
sounded like a speech had been generated by the sound of the waves, or by 
thunder. We might conclude that it was pure coincidence, and then we would 
say that, despite appearances, the alleged “speech” turned out to have no mean-
ing, and not to be a speech at all. Or we might decide that it was a miraculous 
speech from God, and then we would have a speaker, namely, God. Or we 
might personify the waves or the thunder, or claim that the speech came from 
a spirit within the waves or the thunder, in which case we would still have a 
personal speaker.
周us, a speech is dependent on a speaker, and can be coherently understood 
only on those terms. 周e speech must “dwell in” a speaker in order to be a speech. 
But, conversely, a speaker presupposes a speech. If we are to know what the 
speaker means, we cannot climb inside his head; we rely on his speech or on 
some alternate, speech-like mode of communication (like gestures). A speaker 
is accessible through his speech. He “dwells in” his speech.
And the speech will express the purpose of the speaker to accomplish some-
thing, to persuade or amuse or inform someone (even if, as in the exceptional 
case of soliloquy, the “someone” is actually the speaker himself). 周e speech 
goes to its destination through breath, or through some breath-like medium of 
communication. Without a medium and a transfer, there is no speech at all. 周e 
speech must “dwell in” its breath or its medium. Conversely, without the mean-
ing content, there is no speech at all. 周e breath must “dwell in” a speech and 
its meaning in order to be a speech at all. Without a speaker and his intentions, 
there is no speech at all. 周e breath must issue from a speaker, and “dwell in” the 
speaker. Each starting point points us toward the whole speech, not simply a part 
of it. But each starting point or perspective is different. As shown in the following 
2. See chapter 2.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   32
5/14/09   4:46:05 PM
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document. List<PDFImage> allImages = PDFImageHandler. ExtractImages(page); C#: Select An Image from PDF Page by Position.
copy pdf picture to powerpoint; paste image into pdf preview
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET. Support PDF VB.NET : Select An Image from PDF Page by Position. Sample for
how to copy an image from a pdf in; how to copy text from pdf image to word
33
Chapter  4: God’s Creation of Man
illustration (fig. 4.2), this is an analogue within created speakers to the mutual 
indwelling of the persons of the Trinity.
Author, Text, and Reader
With a slight shi晴 of focus, we can expand our horizon to talk about implications 
for the way we think about three foci in communication: speakers, speeches, and 
audiences. If we include wri瑴en as well as oral communication, we may include 
authors, texts, and readers.
3
In the Trinity as archetype, the Father is the speaker, the Son is the discourse, 
and the Holy Spirit is the hearer. 周e persons of the Trinity indwell one another 
in communication.
4
By analogy (see chart 4.2), there will be a kind of mutual indwelling in human 
communication. Human speakers express their intentions in speeches that ef-
fectively communicate with audiences. And the audiences, when they under-
stand, achieve a measure of coinherence with the truths and intentions and 
expressions of the speakers. An understanding audience “indwells” the ideas 
of the speaker.
Roles of Persons in the Trinity
Roles of Human Persons
Father as speaker
speaker
Son as discourse
speech
Spirit as hearer
audience
C
hart
4.2
Unlike the Godhead, finite human beings may sometimes fail in communication. 
A person in an audience misunderstands a speaker and his discourse. Or the 
speaker is inept and fails clearly to express his meaning. Or the speaker a瑴empts 
to deceive his audience, and the speech does not match what he knows. Even in 
these failures the impulse and expectation are there, among users of language, 
3. Later we will consider some differences between oral and wri瑴en communication. But 
there are clearly many similarities.
4. See chapter 2.
Coinherence
imaging
the Word
Spirit
Father
speaker
speech
breath
F
igure
4.2
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   33
5/14/09   4:46:05 PM
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
copy image from pdf to; copy pdf picture to word
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
VB.NET DLLs: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Page. Dim page As PDFPage = doc.GetPage(3) ' Select image by the point (50F, 100F).
copy images from pdf to word; how to copy image from pdf to word document
34
Part  1: God’s Involvement with Language 
to try to interpret communication. 周is hope for good communication has of 
course a perfect model in God, whose communication never fails to express his 
meaning and to accomplish his purpose:
So shall my word be that goes out from my mouth;
it shall not return to me empty,
but it shall accomplish that which I purpose,
and shall succeed in the thing for which I sent it (Isa. 55:11).
We are made in the image of God. As we grow up within the context of his 
providential control, we learn to exercise our image-bearing nature through ana-
logical imitation of God. We imitate him when we endeavor to exercise dominion 
over the world (based on Gen. 1:28–30). We also imitate him in human com-
munication, which goes from speaker to discourse to audience. Even our failures 
presuppose an underlying desire for true communication, such as we find in God. 
Even when human communication fails, speaker and audience rely on the God-
given standards for true communication in trying to assess the failure.
Even when communication succeeds, it may not succeed totally. 周e speaker 
may not succeed in expressing in an ideal way everything that he wanted to express. 
And the audience may not take in every nuance. Nevertheless, there is still a kind 
of “coinherence.” 周e audience does succeed in understanding. We understand 
enough to cooperate with one another and take the next step forward in mutual 
aid, in understanding, and in joint tasks. 周at is how God designed us and the 
language that we use. We do not need to be a god—to have exhaustive, infinite, 
and perfect understanding—in order to have genuine understanding.
Dorothy Sayers’s View of Creativity
周ese reflections based on the Bible find confirmation in what Dorothy Sayers 
has wri瑴en about artistic creation. Dorothy Sayers wrote detective stories, so 
she had firsthand experience with artistic creation. She saw that the creation of 
man in the image of God is the basis for human ability to create artistic works.
5
Artistic creation imitates the creative activity of God.
Sayers finds in the process of artistic creation an analogy to the Trinitarian 
character of God. She observes that any act of human creation has three coinher-
ent aspects, which she names “Idea,” “Energy,” and “Power.” “周e Creative Idea” is 
the idea of the creative work as a whole, even before it comes to expression. “周is 
5. Dorothy L. Sayers, 周e Mind of the Maker (New York: Harcourt, Brace, 1941). See espe-
cially, “周e Image of God,” 19–31.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   34
5/14/09   4:46:06 PM
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
VB.NET PDF - Add Image to PDF Page in VB.NET. Insert Image to PDF Page Using VB. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
how to copy and paste a pdf image; copy image from pdf reader
C# Create PDF from images Library to convert Jpeg, png images to
Best and professional C# image to PDF converter SDK for Visual Studio .NET. C#.NET Example: Convert One Image to PDF in Visual C# .NET Class.
how to copy and paste a pdf image into a word document; copy picture to pdf
35
Chapter  4: God’s Creation of Man
is the image of the Father.”
6
“周e Creative Energy” or “Activity” is the process of 
working out the idea, both mentally and on paper. Sayers describes it as “work-
ing in time from the beginning to the end, with sweat and passion. . . . this is the 
image of the Word.”
7
周ird is “the Creative Power,” “the meaning of the work and 
its response in the lively soul: . . . this is the image of the indwelling Spirit.”
8
Sayers uses her three terms to describe what happens within an author’s mind 
as he works out his ideas mentally, even if they are never put to paper. In this in-
ternal process, the “Power” is the author’s experience of receiving the work back, 
as he takes the position of an observer of his own idea and work. But Sayers also 
applies the terms to a work that goes out into the world, gets printed in a book, 
and gets read by readers. 周en the readers experience its Power. At this stage, the 
term “Power” is obviously related most closely to the audience or readership, while 
the Idea is a瑴ached to the author, and the Energy or Activity to the Discourse 
itself. 周us Sayers is advocating a variation on what we observed, namely, that 
the process of communication, from author to text to reader, has a Trinitarian 
original. Communication goes from the Father to the Word to the Spirit.
Sayers also observes that each of the three aspects—Idea, Activity, and Power—
is intelligible only in the context of the others. She affirms the coinherence or 
indwelling of each in the others.
周e Distinctiveness of God as Creator and Sovereign
We have so far emphasized the similarities between God and man in the use of 
language. But there are also differences. Man is made in the image of God, but 
he is not God. 周e Bible, unlike various forms of pantheism and panentheism, 
maintains a clear distinction between God and human beings. God is the Creator, 
while human beings are creatures. Adam is not supposed to exercise an indepen-
dent judgment concerning the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, nor he is 
the author or semi-author of the tree’s unique character and the prohibition (Gen. 
2:17). He must obey a restriction originating in God and not in him. Man is not 
semidivine but is completely subject to God’s authority. Human beings are not to 
worship sun, moon, stars, or animals, as some of the pagan nations surrounding 
Israel did. 周ey are to worship God alone.
So there will be distinctions also in human use of language in comparison with 
God’s use. God’s language, “Let there be light,” is all-powerful (omnipotent). 
Human use of language exercises control, but not exhaustive control. A human 
being shows “potence”—“power,” if you will—but not all power. He expresses 
6. Ibid., 37. 周e context of Sayers’s work is worth reading, for a fuller explanation of the 
distinctions among the three aspects.
7. Ibid.
8. Ibid., 37–38.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   35
5/14/09   4:46:06 PM
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Text: Replace Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL. Bookmark: Edit
cut and paste image from pdf; copy picture from pdf reader
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
Replace Text in PDF. Image: Insert Image to PDF. Image: Remove Image from PDF Page. Image: Copy, Paste, Cut Image in Page. Link: Edit URL.
how to copy pdf image to word document; how to copy an image from a pdf to powerpoint
36
Part  1: God’s Involvement with Language 
meaning, but not meaning of which he knows the infinite depths. He is not all-
knowing, omniscient. He is present in his speech, but is not capable in the context 
of his bodily presence and bodily limitations of sending out his speech equally 
to every place in the universe. He is present, in the body, but not everywhere 
present (omnipresent).
Harmony in Human Language Functions, Due to God
Human beings, then, are limited; they are finite. 周e limitations might appear to 
be a problem, if human beings had to make themselves self-existent, autonomous, 
and totally independent of God. How then could they guarantee that human 
language, in its meaning, control, and presence, would function reliably? For 
example, how can we know that our word for “dog” matches the character of the 
world out there, the world in which we meet dogs?
In a God-created world, a world that God pronounced “very good” (Gen. 
1:31), we know there is harmony. First of all, human beings were created to 
be in personal harmony with God. But in addition, God gave them the gi晴 
of language in complete harmony with who they were. He made the world 
of light and dry land and plants and animals in harmony with human nature. 
He gave human beings dominion over this world, and we may infer that this 
dominion, rather than being the sometimes exploitative and cruel dominion 
exercised by fallen human beings, was a dominion in harmony not only with 
the character of God and with the character of human beings, but also with 
the character of the world. And it was in harmony with the character of lan-
guage. Our word for “dog,” and our thinking about dogs, is in harmony with 
the world of dogs.
A human being’s knowledge of his own language and language use is finite. 
He cannot remember in detail how he learned the word “dog.” He does not see 
to the very bo瑴om. But he does not need to see to the very bo瑴om. 周e key to 
a solution is in his personal fellowship with God. Before the fall of man and his 
rebellion against God, there was no barrier to personal fellowship between God 
and man. Adam knew God. He heard the word of God. And the sense of God’s 
presence and God’s goodness was imprinted firmly on his mind. He relied on 
God and trusted that God was good. And so he could confidently assume that 
the language that God gave him, and the world of his environment, were suitable 
for him. He knew that his word for “dog” was designed by God as a fi瑴ing help 
for his task. He could go forward in confidence not because he was omnipotent, 
omniscient, and omnipresent, but because God as the infinite God guaranteed 
the harmony of his finite functioning in dependence on God.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   36
5/14/09   4:46:06 PM
37
Chapter  4: God’s Creation of Man
Adam’s meanings were not meanings imposed on alien material, but mean-
ings from a mind made in the image of God, and therefore a mind in tune with 
the world.
When Adam named the animals, his control did not smash the world and destroy 
what the world was “in itself.” Rather, God designed Adam’s control to be a blessing 
not only to himself but to the world: “to work it [the garden] and keep it” (Gen. 2:15). 
Adam’s control through language was not a distortion of the world but a naming that 
drew the world toward the destiny planned by God from the beginning.
周e presence of language was not something that Adam and Eve could “climb 
out of” to see the world as it really is. But they did not need to climb out of it, 
because, on the basis of the good creating activity of God, they were already in 
harmony with the world as it really is.
In short, difficulties that some of us modern human beings may feel very keenly, 
because we are alienated from God, created no substantive difficulty while human 
beings lived in fellowship with God—in harmony with God, with the world that 
God created, and with the language that God had given.
Language as Shared
A particular human language is normally not the exclusive possession of only 
one human being. Native speakers of English share English with all other native 
speakers, and to a lesser extent with those for whom English is a second language. 
Language has a communal dimension built into it.
Linguistic analysis has customarily paid a瑴ention to the community of human 
speakers. But the Bible presents an important difference. It begins not with a 
human speaker but with God as the divine speaker: “Let there be light” (Gen. 
1:3). Later on, human beings appear on the scene. But the very first recorded 
lingual communications involving a human being also involve God. God addresses 
human beings in Genesis 1:28–30 and 2:16–17.
Adam and Eve share language not only with each other but also with God. From 
the beginning, as part of God’s design for creation, language is given to human be-
ings for divine-human communication as well as human-human communication. 
Tellingly, there was divine-human communication even before human-human 
communication was possible. God communicated to Adam in Genesis 2:16–17 
before Eve was created, before Adam had any other human being with whom to 
communicate.
So human language is not merely for human beings. God spoke in the initial 
communications to Adam. He would continue to speak to Adam and Eve, and 
Adam and Eve and their descendants would continue to speak to him. 周e con-
versation would have continued in a harmonious personal relationship, over 
the years, if Adam and Eve had not sinned. Even though they did sin, God still 
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   37
5/14/09   4:46:06 PM
38
Part  1: God’s Involvement with Language 
continued to speak with them (Gen. 3:9–19). So God is part of the community 
of language users. One of the purposes of language—in fact, a central, predomi-
nant purpose—is to be a vehicle for personal communication and communion 
between God and human beings.
If, then, we believe the narrative in Genesis, we have a clear basis for confidence 
about language. Language is not only capable of expressing knowledge of God, 
but God designed it specifically for this purpose, and his design is masterful. 
Language is supremely capable of doing what God himself designed it to do. A 
word like the word for “dog” is masterfully designed to facilitate our thinking 
and communicating about dogs and their relation to the larger context that God 
designed.
Modern Approaches to Language
We may contrast this view with most modernist and postmodernist thinking 
about language.
9
In the twentieth century, structural linguistics has mostly as-
sumed 晲om the beginning, in the foundation of the discipline, that language and 
communication are purely human, that is, that God either does not exist or that 
he can be factored out of the picture. 周e same goes for the sociological study 
of human communication. Otherwise, how could these disciplines hope to be 
scientific?
But the aspiration of such disciplines to be scientific is itself loaded. To begin 
with, it may be loaded with the assumption that somehow human beings can 
be treated exactly as if they were on the same level as animals or rocks or other 
creatures over which human beings are granted dominion. It ignores the fact 
that we are made in the image of God. But even more seriously, it ignores the 
possibility that our modern conception of science, taken from the existing state 
of the natural sciences, has already been distorted by a systematic human flight 
in the direction of denying the presence of God in science.
10
周e aspiration to 
be “scientific” may already have introduced biases.
So, according to this modernist viewpoint, God is emphatically not a participant 
in lingual and social communication. But from a biblical point of view, the move 
to exclude God ignores the single most important fact about communication and 
the most weighty ontological fact about language. It has distorted the subject 
ma瑴er that we study, and so we can only anticipate a multitude of repercussions 
when it comes to the detailed analysis of the subject.
9. On modernism and postmodernism, see appendix A.
10. See Vern S. Poythress, Redeeming Science: A God-Centered Approach (Wheaton, IL: Cross-
way, 2006).
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   38
5/14/09   4:46:06 PM
39
C
H
A
P
T
E
 
5
-
God Sustaining Language
周e Lord has established his throne in the heavens,
and his kingdom rules over all.
—Psalm 103:19
N
ow let us look at God’s relation to the present day and its processes. God’s 
faithfulness guarantees that there will be a stability to the things that he 
has created. And this stability extends to human beings. We have the same bodies 
and the same memories from one day to the next—though, of course, there are 
also gradual changes. One aspect of this stability is that we are persons, and that 
we have the capacity to use and understand language.
God’s governance over our world extends even to details: “You [God] cause 
the grass to grow for the livestock and plants for man to cultivate” (Ps. 104:14). 
Scientists explore the regular pa瑴erns in God’s governance, regularities that are 
based on God’s faithfulness and consistency.
1
God controls even seemingly ran-
dom events: “周e lot is cast into the lap, but its every decision is from the Lord” 
(Prov. 16:33; see also 1 Kings 22:20, 34). God controls everything: “周e Lord 
has established his throne in the heavens, and his kingdom rules over all” (Ps. 
103:19). “Who has spoken and it came to pass, unless the Lord has commanded 
it? Is it not from the mouth of the Most High that good and bad come?” (Lam. 
3:37–38).
We can conclude, then, that God’s control extends to language as well, and to 
its details. God controls and specifies the meaning of “go” in English. He controls 
1. See Vern S. Poythress, Redeeming Science: A God-Centered Approach (Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 
2006), especially chapter 1, pp. 13–31, and chapters 13–14, pp. 177–195.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   39
5/14/09   4:46:06 PM
40
Part  1: God’s Involvement with Language 
and specifies the meaning of each word—not only in English but in Hindi, Viet-
namese, Italian, and every other language, living or dead. He also controlled the 
original spli瑴ing apart of the distinct languages of the world, as the account of 
Babel shows (Gen. 11:1–9).
God’s control over human affairs does raise a concern. How can God’s control 
be consistent with human responsibility, and with human sin?
2
周e Bible nowhere 
fully explains how, but it does show that God is in control of human affairs. In 
the first sermon in the book of Acts, Peter declares, “周is Jesus, delivered up ac-
cording to the definite plan and foreknowledge of God, you crucified and killed 
by the hands of lawless men” (Acts 2:23). 周e expression “the definite plan and 
foreknowledge of God” indicates that God brought about all the events in ac-
cordance with his plan. 周e mention of “lawless men” indicates, however, that 
human beings like Herod, Pontius Pilate, and the Jewish leaders who brought 
about the crucifixion were responsible for their unjust deeds.
God brought about salvation through Christ’s crucifixion, and his purposes 
were wholly good. 周e human beings had evil motives. Acts 4:27–28 expresses 
similar principles: “For truly in this city there were gathered together against your 
holy servant Jesus, whom you anointed, both Herod and Pontius Pilate, along 
with the Gentiles and the peoples of Israel, to do whatever your hand and your 
plan had predestined to take place.”
周ere are two levels of action here. 周eologians have classically spoken of 
“primary cause” and “secondary cause.” God as creator and ruler is the primary 
cause of the events of Christ’s crucifixion. Human beings like Pilate acted on the 
level of secondary cause. Both of the two are real and valid. But they are not on 
the same level, as though God were merely another human being, with greater 
power, who wrestled with the other human beings in order to force things to go 
his way instead of their way. No, God as creator is simply not on the level of his 
creatures. We are not able fully to conceptualize how he acts, because we are finite 
and he is infinite. We could discuss these ma瑴ers at much greater length, but we 
must leave that to other books.
3
It is enough for the present for us to understand 
that God’s control does not undermine the genuineness of human participation 
and human responsibility.
2. It has become fashionable in some religious circles nowadays not only to refashion the 
role of the Bible but to refashion the conception of God, in order for it to match various modern 
expectations and sensibilities. I believe that such refashioning is a great mistake, for reasons that 
will become clear when later on we discuss the fall of mankind and the contrast between Christian 
and non-Christian thinking about God.
3. For further discussion of God’s sovereignty and providential control, see Poythress, Redeem-
ing Science, 181–183, 193–195; John M. Frame, 周e Doctrine of God (Phillipsburg, NJ: Presbyterian 
& Reformed, 2002), 47–79; and other Reformed theological books on God.
PoythressLanguageBook.indd   40
5/14/09   4:46:06 PM
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested